Eighth episode of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Alejandra Aguado and Diego Bianchi from Buenos Aires, Argentina

Episode 8 from Buenos Aires now online on http://incidents.kadist.org/


In the eighth '
Incidents (of Travel)' dispatch Móvil co-founder and curator Alejandra Aguado followed the itinerary devised by the artist Diego Bianchi around Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

Their exploration took them from the self-regulated community Velatropa to the buzzing commercial area of Once, identifying human and non-human flows and interactions. This became an entry point for discussing Bianchi's interests in how, as consumers, we define a particular zeitgeist and appropriate trends that enable us to affirm our identities.

Each of the 20 photographs is augmented by one or more extra assets – a brief commentary, a sound or a caption – accessed by clicking the words overlaying the images.








'Incidents (of Travel)' explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter and an extended offline conversation between curator/s and artist/s. Online storytelling presents and documents curatorial fieldwork and a day conceived by an artist for a curator.

Conceived by Latitudes in 2012 as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City (with five dispatches presented as part of an exhibition at Casa del Lago), 'Incidents of Travel' had sequels in 2013 in Hong Kong (online dispatches published via Twitter, Instagram, and Soundcloud) and San Francisco in 2015 (daily posts as part of Kadist's Instagram take over initiative #ArtistNotInTheStudioCuratorNotAtTheOffice).

In 2016 Kadist and Latitudes partnered in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)' as part of Kadist Online Projects, publishing contributions from invited curators and artists working around the world.





Earlier conversations have taken place in Hobart (Tasmania), Yerevan (Armenia), Terengganu (Malaysia), Lisbon (Portugal), Suzhou (China), Jinja (Uganda) and Chicago (US). 

The first dispatch launched in April 2016 with an itinerary by curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – a day photographed by Nabiha Khan.





The second dispatch came from Jinja in Uganda, where curator Moses Serubiri invited photographer Mohsen Taha to explore Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972.



The third episode took place while curator Yu Ji and poet Xiao Kaiyu hiked on Dong Shan (East Mountain), 130 km west of Shanghai, on a peninsula stretching into Tai Hu lake near the city of Suzhou, China.

The fourth dispatch came from Lisbon, where Galician curator Pedro de Llano visited key locations that marked the life and work of Luisa Cunha.



The fifth episode took place in April 2016, when curator Simon Soon and artist chi too visited the Malaysian North Eastern state of Terengganu, where chi spent some time in 2013, surrounded by "men and women who work(ed) multiple jobs as a fishermen, house builders, boat builders, farmers, coconut pickers, food producers, and everything else that matters."


The sixth episode narrates a walking itinerary conducted by curator Marianna Hovhannisyan with Vardan Kilichyan, Gohar Hosyan, and Anaida Verdyan in Yerevan, the capital of Armenia, documenting the transformed, disappeared, or permanently-closed art institutions in the city centre.



The seventh episode comes from Hobart, capital of Tasmania. It is narrated by curator Camila Marambio, following an itinerary devised by artist Lucy Bleach. They spent the day "encircling the outer limits of human understanding by visiting the histories, both past, and present, of attempts to reach beyond our sensory capacities through governance, technology, and reverie", and ended the day cooking at Lucy's home sharing their mutual love for quinces.

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Latitudes' "out of office": wrap up of the 2017–2018 season

This is possibly our favourite post of the year. Not just because it means we’ll shortly be taking a deserved summer break. But also because it brings a sense of accomplishment to look back at what has happened during the last twelve months — to remember the many conversations we’ve had, the places we’ve been privileged to visit and to refresh all those ideas and plans we intended to move forward. Onwards!

September 11—October 6, 2017
: Lead Faculty of the month-long "Geologic Time" residency at The Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity in Alberta, Canada.


In this blog post, we shared some lithic impressions of the four weeks we spent leading a programme in Alberta's Rocky Mountains.

One of the epic moments of the month: hike to Stanley Glacier.
At the base of Mount Stanley, we found 505-million-year-old Burgess Shale trilobites, soft-body fossils from the Eldon formation.
Snow surprised us on our final week in Banff.
Welcome coffee with third week Guest faculty Sean Lynch.
A fun evening at High Rollers bowling alley in Banff town.

The closing event of "Geologic Time" was conceived as a two-hour infiltration into the pages, shelves, and display possibilities of The Banff Centre library. Featuring storytelling, documentation, annotation, sculpture, video, conversation and other live situations, the event presented some sediments of the ten participants’ ongoing research and geological collaborations. Pdf of the event programme.

Posters communicating some of the seminars and excursions programmed during the four weeks. Design/Photos: Latitudes.
Intervention by Semâ Bekirovic, based in Amsterdam. Bekirovic employed a number of external hard drives to act as pedestals for small stones. How many terabytes can a hunk of rock hold? What fragments of data detritus, chunks and grains of documents, broken off images, or weathered files, might be read and written, stored or retrieved? 

Intervention by Caitlin Chaisson based in Vancouver. Chaisson has been researching a former experimental farm station in Agassiz, British Columbia, and a forgotten centennial time capsule buried under a granite marker there. Caitlin also presented a cut-and-paste station on the table next to the photocopier, and a display for the tall vitrine just behind it. 

Intervention by Caroline Loewen, based in Calgary. Caroline delves deep into the story of sandstone in Alberta, a rock that gained widespread favour for building and decorative use following Calgary’s Great Fire of 1886. The black-and-brown Rundle Rock that was once quarried at the base of Banff-Centre-neighbour Mount Rundle and was used extensively in creating the Banff Springs Hotel also joins a conversation that anticipates an exhibition scheduled for next summer at Lougheed House in Calgary.
Intervention by Justy Phillips & Margaret Woodward (A Published Event) based in Hobart. Described by the Hobart-based duo as “an accumulative event of mineralogical, metaphysical and metallurgical telling”, the books that have come into the world to date have been incorporated into the library’s holdings alongside a glossary and can be found in the geology section upstairs.


An audio narration drafted by Penelope Smart was also heard on the upper floor, near the “memoirs and narrative” section. Here, an image of the exquisite marble bust by Giovanni Strazza animated Penny’s writing during the last weeks. It came to St.John’s, Newfoundland, in 1856. Ring the bell to the right of the main door of the Presentation Convent adjoining the Basilica in St.John’s and maybe one of the sisters will let you see it.

Remnants of the 2-hour event.

For the final event on October 5th, participants Becky Forsythe and Camila Sposati decided to collaborate through a performance using the library photocopier on the main floor. ‘"Receding Agate" and "Receding Rhodochrosite" was a collection of pages produced during a procedural artwork that slowly and methodically extracted copies of Agate and Rhodochrosite from Roger Caillois' "The Writing of Stones". Each page is a copy of the last, so text begins to harden into pebble-like shapes, and images begin to simplify as darker forms in an experiment of accumulation and sedimentation.’


Far Afield, the artistic-curatorial initiative led by the also participant Caitlin Chaisson, hand-bound the resulting two-part publication for Far Afield's library, a platform for "collecting and sharing publications that support experimental art practices".

      Photos by Far Afield's library.

27 October 2017: Cabaret at the Capella space, a public programme organised by the Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona in the context of their Joan Brossa exhibition. The Capella space was decorated with fragments of Antoni Hervàs "El Misterio de Caviria" scenography, presented only a year earlier at the other La Capella space as part of the 2016 BCN Producció season. The project was mentored by Latitudes. Following Hervàs’s interests in Barcelona’s dwindling cabaret scene, he invited Gilda Love and castanets master Juan de la Cruz "el Rosillo" (who sadly passed away a few months after) to interpret a moving repertoire of popular Spanish copla, against the backdrop of parts of his scenography. 



Gilda Love and castanets master Juan de la Cruz "el Rosillo". Photos by Dani Cantó/MACBA.

5 November 2017: The 1878 painting by Alfred Roll "The Old Quarryman" is exchanged with Alfred Smith's "The Grave Docks" (1884) in the Latitudes-curated exhibition "4.543 billion" at the CAPC musée. The show remains on view another two more months, until January 7, 2018.

Photo: Lysian Gauthier © Musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux.

Photo: Alice Cavender.

(Unframed) Alfred Smith's (Bordeaux, 1854–Paris, 1936) “Le Quai de la Grave” [The Grave Docks] (1884). Collection of the Musée des Beaux-Arts, Bordeaux.

15 November 2017: Study day at CAPC musée "The Return of the Earth. Ecologising Art History in the Anthropocene." With a keynote by science historian Jean-Baptiste Fressoz, and a conversation between artists Xavier Ribas and Ângela Ferreira—the latter both featured in the exhibition—the event convened by '4.543 billion'-curators Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna, saw art practice and historical research intertwining with environmental and geological narratives, and vice versa.

(Top) Left to right: Max Andrews, Xavier Ribas, Jean-Baptiste Fressoz and Ângela Ferreira during the debate. (Below) Ângela discussing her work in the exhibition. Photos (Above and below): Latitudes.

22 November 2017: Launch of Anna Moreno's "The Drowned Giant" publication at the Col·legi d'Arquitectes de Catalunya alongside architect and researcher Lluis A. Casanovas. Moreno's project is part of the BCN Producció 2017–18 programme of which Latitudes' is a jury member and mentor. 

Video of the presentation (in Catalan).

Photos (this and following): Pep Herrero / La Capella—Barcelona Producció 2017.
(Above) Photo: Anna Moreno.

Earlier that week we spent two intense mornings unpacking, hand spraying, numbering, inserting poster and booklet and re-packaging the limited edition of 300 vinyl records in the former Escola Massana, nearby La Capella. 

A short video on the project was screened on betevé tv (in Catalan, starting 04:24min).


Photos (Above and below): Latitudes.




1 December 2017: Latitudes introduces the documentary "Harald Szeemann. The Life of a Dreamer" premiered at Cinemes Girona as part of the first edition of Dart Festival 2017, the Festival of Documentary Cinema on Contemporary Art.



Photo: Latitudes.

9 December 2017: Mariana of Latitudes led the first "Parlem" [Let's talk] guided tour around the exhibition "Rosemarie Castoro. Focus at infinity", curated by Tanya Barson, MACBA's Chief Curator. (repeated on March 10 and 31st).

Photo: Latitudes.

December 2017: Transition from Storify to Wakelet to archive all the social media stories related to Latitudes' projects.
Latitudes' Wakelet profile.

20 December 2017: Max Andrews of Latitudes (and Contributing Editor of frieze magazine) looks back at 2017 from Barcelona and beyond, at some art highlights from a tumultuous 2017, including Amie Siegel, Pierre Huyghe, Lúa Coderch, Francesc Torres, Adrià Julià, Jordi Mitjà, Eulàlia Rovira & Adrian Schindler, Joan Morey, and Claudia Pagès. 

2017 from Barcelona and beyond.

23 January 2018: Opening of the exhibition "Artengo2000" by Magda Vaz and Camille Orny at the sala petita of La Capella. This is the third and final Barcelona Producció project mentored by Latitudes.


 (Above and below) View from "Artengo2000", an exhibition by Camille Orny and Magda Vaz at the Sala Petita in La Capella. Photo: Pep Herrero / La Capella.

23 January 2018: The online platform arteinformado.com publishes three artist recommendations by five Spanish-based curators. Mariana Cánepa of Latitudes selected Gerard Ortín, Martín Llavaneras and Anna Moreno.

25 January 2018: Print proofs of the forthcoming John Kørner's monograph published by Roulette Russe with texts by Oliver Basciano, Marie Nipper and Max Andrews' of Latitudes, published on the occasion of his recent mid-career retrospective "Altid Mange Problemer" at Kunsthal Charlottenborg in Copenhagen (17 June–13 August 2017).



2 February 2018: Roulette Russe publish an image of John Kørner's book hot off the press.




















9–10 February 2018: Trip to Montpellier to attend the opening of "Crash Test" at La Panacée/Centre d'art Contemporain MoCo.

16 February 2018: Max Andrews of Latitudes wrote a review of the show for frieze magazine published online and in the printed issue in April.

Installation piece by Alice Channer.
Work by Agnieszka Kurant (foreground) and Aude Pariset (background)

Detail of a vitrine piece by Bianca Bondi.
15 February 2018: Award ceremony of the 2017 Premis Ciutat de Barcelona, of which Mariana was a jury member in the Visual Arts category. Joan Morey was the awarded visual artist.

20–23 February 2018: Trip to ARCOmadrid fair, below some social media posts.





Photo: Roberto Ruiz.

Lola Lasurt presented ‘Donació’ (Donation) in the Galeria Joan Prats booth, a body of work produced for the ‘Composiciones’ commissioning series Latitudes curated for the Barcelona Gallery Weekend 2016. Lasurt was also exhibiting as part of La Casa Encendida's "Generación 2018".

22 February 2018: Max Andrews' review of Lúa Coderch's solo show "The girl with no door on her mouth" at àngels barcelona, is published online. The text is also be included in the printed issue in April. 
Review of Lúa Coderch's solo show "The girl with no door on her mouth" at àngels barcelona.

26 February 2018: After nearly two years in development, the sixth ‘Incidents (of Travel)dispatch from Yerevan, Armenia, is finally live! 

In her day-long tour Yerevan-born, San Diego-based curator and researcher Marianna Hovhannisyan extended the invitation to Vardan Kilichyan, Gohar Hosyan, and Anaida Verdyan, three students from the studio college at the National Center of Aesthetics. The purpose was to document transformed, disappeared, or permanently-closed art institutions in the city centre. The shared inquiry was based on how knowledge transmission and generational exchanges in the Armenian contemporary art field could be approached—particularly in terms of exploring the fragmented histories of its institutional work. As they were putting together the touches on this online version of the offline day, the studio-college itself closed down permanently at the end of 2017.

http://incidents.kadist.org/yerevan

2 March 2018: Book launch of John Kørner's monograph in Copenhagen. Published by Roulette Russe with texts by Oliver Basciano, Marie Nipper and Max Andrews.


 (Above and below). Courtesy Roulette Russe. Photos by Finn Wergel Dahlgren.


March 10 and 31, 2018: Second and third guided visits to Rosemarie Castoro's exhibition at MACBA led by Mariana Cánepa Luna of Latitudes.

MACBA's Instagram story announcing the talk.

March 20, 2018: Mariana Cánepa Luna of Latitudes reviews ‘Allora & Calzadilla’ at the Fundació Tàpies, Barcelona, for art-agenda."A piercing whistle punctuates the blaring of a trumpet. But in the columned central space of the Fundació Antoni Tàpies, the only visible instrument is a grand piano. For three days a week throughout the course of the exhibition, the instrument is played—and, one could say, worn—by a pianist who stands in a hole cut into its center."

Mariana Cánepa Luna of Latitudes reviews ‘Allora & Calzadilla’ at the Fundació Tàpies, Barcelona, for art-agenda.

The same day, we send the Spring newsletter to our contacts, in English and in Spanish.

12—14 April 2018: Three performances by Les Brontë, Quim Pujol and Eliana Beltrán over three consecutive evenings at La Capella, part of the BCN Producció 2017–18 programme of which Latitudes' is a jury member and mentor.


(Above and below) "Fine Cherry" performance by Les Brontë. Photos: Latitudes.
"Verde Croma" by Quim Pujol. Photos: Latitudes.
"Reading Room #3" by Eliana Beltrán. Photos: Latitudes.


1 May 2018: Max Andrews' profile on Madrid-based artist Teresa Solar Abboud goes online on frieze website.



28 April–4 May 2018: Trip to Berlin during the Gallery Weekend, and later to Cologne to visit Haegue Yang's mid-career retrospective ‘ETA 1994–2018’ at Museum Ludwig, and Ana Jotta's first solo exhibition in Germany at the Temporary Gallery. More on this blog post and on this Wakelet feed.





23–29 May 2018: Trip to London to visit +35 exhibitions, friends, and family – highlights below, full photo report here. Short day trip to Oxford's Pitt Rivers Museum (a favourite of ours), the Natural History Museum and Modern Art Oxford. 

 (Above and below) Cinthia Marcelle's "The Family in Disorder" (2018) at Museum and Modern Art Oxford.
(Above) The incredible main hall of the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford.
 (Above) The opening of Leonor Antunes's "a thousand realities from an original mark" at Marian Goodman.Polycarbonate and brass screens and rope sculptures. Each screen corresponds to the exact measurements of one of the glass panels in the Upper Lawn Pavilion in Wiltshire, built between 1959 and 1962 by the British architects Alison and Peter Smithson (1928-1993 and 1923-2003). 

 Fantastic assembly of Markus Lüperz's tent paintings at Michael Werner Gallery, which the artist painted at age 24 using distemper on canvas.
 Batia Suter's work at The Photographers' Galery. One of the nominees for the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2018, finally won by Luke Willis Thompson with his striking film "autoportrait".
   (Above) Antoni Hervàs studio at Gasworks during his 3-month residency.
   (Above) View of Trafalgar Square with Michael Rakowitz's "The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist" featuring on the Fourth Plinth commission.
(Above) Peter Gabriel discussing his during the internet interspecies symposium "The Shape of a Circle in the Mind of a Fish" curated by Lucia Pietroiusti and Filipa Ramos for the Serpentine Gallery at the London Zoo.

Things that make us very happy: when a friend travels half the world to find one of our publications (Amikejo catalogue by Mousse Publishing in 2011) in the library of TEORética in Costa Rica and shares a snapshot on Twitter. :-)

28 June 2018: The seventh ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ dispatch from Hobart, Tasmania, goes live on http://incidents.kadist.org/ On this occasion, the offline conversation took place between curator Camila Marambio and artist Lucy Bleach. We're also working on the eighth destination: Buenos Aires.
Throughout June–July 2018: Intense writing period in preparation of two forthcoming exhibitions: ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’ (Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna, opening on September 13 and, on view until October 14) and ‘COLLAPSE’, a solo exhibition by Joan Morey opening on September 19 over two floors of the Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats, with following chapters at the Centre d'Art Tecla Sala (23 November 2018–13 January 2019) and a new commission at a yet-undisclosed location (10 January 2019).


18–29 July 2018: Two days in Dublin followed by a 10-day residency in Askeaton, as part of Askeaton Contemporary Art's (ACA) thirteenth annual event "Welcome to the neighbourhood". In 2018 ACA invited artists Matt Calderwood, Jonny Lyons, Ruth Clinton and Niamh Moriarty, alongside curators Gareth Bell-Jones (Flat Time House, London) and Latitudes. More on this post.

Desmore castle undergoing restoration.
Artists and POW workers after the tour.
RUSAL Aughinish alumina plant from afar, this is the largest alumina refinery in Europe.
Group trip to Lismore Castle upper garden in County Waterford.
The gardens featured works by Franz West (above) and Rashid Johnson (below).

The Grange Stone circle.

During the residency, we learnt of the story of ‘the Pilgrim’, a merchant from Barcelona who arrived in Askeaton around 1767 and who lived out his life in the Franciscan friary, dying there in 1784. Digging further in the local library, we came across a 1984 article written by Tim Kelly in a back issue of the ABC News, Askeaton’s local publication of record. The story reveals a dramatic narrative bringing to life a cryptic inscription found in the cloister that reads “Beneath lies the Pilgrim’s body, who died January 17, 1784”. The tale involves an Italian, a Spaniard, and a morbid blood-hunt that links Barcelona with Askeaton and is read aloud by artist Carl Doran. 


Matt Calderwood's boat ready to sail on the River Deel.
Making of Jonny Lyon's "Joyride" on the River Deel.
"Welcome to the neighbourhood" Open day.


August 2018: Aaaand we’re out of office! Kinda.

Save the following dates:

13 September, 6–9pm: Opening of ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’ at Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna. 


14 September, 6pm: Performance “One motif says to the other: I can’t take my eyes off you” by Adrian Schindler and Eulàlia Rovira. Followed by the artist lecture: “A Blow by Blow Account of Stonecarving in Oxford” by Sean Lynch. Part of the exhibition ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’ at Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna.

19 September, 19h: Opening of ‘Joan Morey. COLLAPSE’, Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats.




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Seventh episode of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Camila Marambio and Lucy Bleach from Hobart, Tasmania

http://incidents.kadist.org/hobart.html

The seventh 'Incidents (of Travel)' dispatch comes from Hobart, capital of Tasmania. It is narrated by curator Camila Marambio, following an itinerary devised by artist Lucy Bleach. Lucy "shared her knowledge of volcanoes, lava, and magma leading (Camila) on a quest to relate local geochemical and geophysical conundrums to the expansive solar system." 

They spent the day "encircling the outer limits of human understanding by visiting the histories, both past, and present, of attempts to reach beyond our sensory capacities through governance, technology, and reverie", and ended the day cooking at Lucy's home sharing their mutual love for quinces.

Each of the 19 photographs is augmented by one or more extra assets – a brief commentary, soundscape or a caption – accessed by clicking the words which overlay the images
.



Originally conceived by Latitudes as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City in 2012 (with five dispatches presented as part of an exhibition at Casa del Lago) 'Incidents of Travel' had sequels in 2013 in Hong Kong (online dispatches published via twitter, Instagram, and Soundcloud) and San Francisco in 2015 (daily posts on Kadist's Instagram as part of their #ArtistNotInTheStudioCuratorNotAtTheOffice take over initiative).

The project explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter and an extended conversation between curator/s and artist/s. Online storytelling presents and documents curatorial fieldwork and an offline day conceived by an artist for a curator.
In 2016 Kadist and Latitudes partnered in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)' as part of Kadist Online Projects. This new phase is developed as an online periodical that publishes contributions from invited curators and artists working around the world.


http://incidents.kadist.org/chicago

A series of itineraries conceived by six curators, artists or researchers — previous fellows of the seminar The Place from Where We Look (Kadist Paris, June 2015) — launched in April 2016 with an itinerary by curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – a day photographed by Nabiha Khan


http://incidents.kadist.org/jinja

The second dispatch came from Jinja in Uganda, where curator Moses Serubiri invited photographer Mohsen Taha to explore Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972.


http://incidents.kadist.org/suzhou

The third episode took place while curator Yu Ji and poet Xiao Kaiyu hiked on Dong Shan (East Mountain), 130 km west of Shanghai, on a peninsula stretching into Tai Hu lake near the city of Suzhou, China
http://incidents.kadist.org/lisbon

The fourth dispatch came from Lisbon, where Galician curator Pedro de Llano visited key locations that marked the life and work of Luisa Cunha.
http://incidents.kadist.org/terengganu

The fifth episode took place in April 2016, when curator Simon Soon and artist chi too visited the Malaysian North Eastern state of Terengganu, where chi spent some time in 2013, surrounded by "men and women who work(ed) multiple jobs as a fishermen, house builders, boat builders, farmers, coconut pickers, food producers, and everything else that matters." 
http://incidents.kadist.org/terengganu

The sixth episode narrates a walking itinerary conducted by curator Marianna Hovhannisyan with Vardan Kilichyan, Gohar Hosyan, and Anaida Verdyan in Yerevan, the capital of Armenia, documenting the transformed, disappeared, or permanently-closed art institutions in the city centre.


RELATED CONTENT:




Sixth episode of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Marianna Hovhannisyan and students from the National Center of Aesthetics from Yerevan, Armenia

http://incidents.kadist.org/yerevan

The sixth 'Incidents (of Travel)' episode narrates a walking itinerary in Yerevan, the capital of Armenia, documenting the transformed, disappeared, or permanently-closed art institutions in the city center

The itinerary was conducted by curator Marianna Hovhannisyan with Vardan Kilichyan, Gohar Hosyan, and Anaida Verdyan — three art students from the National Center of Aesthetics, one of the oldest alternative art educational hubs in the city. 

The inquiry was based on how knowledge transmission and generational exchanges in the Armenian contemporary art field could be approached—particularly in terms of exploring the fragmented histories of its institutional work.

Each of the 15 photographs is augmented by one or more extra assets – a brief commentary or a caption –, accessed by clicking the words which overlay the images.



Marianna Hovhannisyan (Yerevan/San Diego) is a research-based curator, a Ph.D student in Art History, Theory, and Criticism at Visual Arts Department, Univerisity of California San Diego. 

Originally conceived by Latitudes as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City in 2012 (with five dispatches presented as part of an exhibition on Latitudes' curatorial practice at Casa del Lago) 'Incidents of Travel' had sequels in 2013 in Hong Kong (online dispatches published via twitter, instagram, and soundcloud) and San Francisco in 2015 (daily posts on Kadist's Instagram as part of their #ArtistNotInTheStudioCuratorNotAtTheOffice take over initiative).


The project explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter and an extended conversation between curator/s and artist/s. Online storytelling presents and documents curatorial fieldwork and an offline day conceived by an artist for a curator.
In 2016 Kadist and Latitudes partnered in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)' as part of Kadist Online Projects. This new phase is developed as an online periodical that publishes contributions from invited curators and artists working around the world.


http://incidents.kadist.org/chicago

A series of itineraries conceived by six curators, artists or researchers — previous fellows of the seminar The Place from Where We Look (Kadist Paris, June 2015) — launched in April 2016 with an itinerary by curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – a day photographed by Nabiha Khan


http://incidents.kadist.org/jinja

The second dispatch came from Jinja in Uganda, where curator Moses Serubiri invited photographer Mohsen Taha to explore Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972.


http://incidents.kadist.org/suzhou

The third episode took place while curator Yu Ji and poet Xiao Kaiyu hiked on Dong Shan (East Mountain), 130 km west of Shanghai, on a peninsula stretching into Tai Hu lake near the city of Suzhou, China
http://incidents.kadist.org/lisbon

The fourth dispatch came from Lisbon, where Galician curator Pedro de Llano visited key locations that marked the life and work of Luisa Cunha.
http://incidents.kadist.org/terengganu

The fifth episode took place in April 2016, when curator Simon Soon and artist chi too visited the Malaysian North Eastern state of Terengganu, where chi spent some time in 2013, surrounded by "men and women who work(ed) multiple jobs as a fishermen, house builders, boat builders, farmers, coconut pickers, food producers, and everything else that matters."  


RELATED CONTENT:






    "The Kørner problem” essay by Max Andrews in the monograph "John Kørner" published by Roulette Russe

    Exhibition poster of "Altid Mange Problemer" at Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen, Summer 2017. Photo: Latitudes.

    Last Summer, Max Andrews of Latitudes was invited to contribute an essay for the forthcoming monograph of John Kørner's work published by the Danish editorial Roulette Russe and designed by Spine Studio. The publication is out now and includes essays by Max, London-based writer Oliver Basciano, and a conversation between the artist and Marie Nipper, curator of John's recent mid-career exhibition in Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen. 

    The 280-page bilingual Danish/English monograph will be launched on March 2, 2018, at 4:30pm, in Kunsthal Charlottenborg's Apollo Kantine, though it will become available for online orders from February 26.

    (Above and following): Photos: Finn Wergel Dahlgren. Courtesy Roulotte Russe. 













    In his essay, Max tries to define what "The Kørner problem” (the title of the essay) might be:

    (...) "The apparently ‘wicked’ problems and appalling catastrophes that interpenetrate Kørner’s works are manifold. The upsurge in jihadist terrorist activity in Europe since 2015 and its fallout are unavoidable (whether vestiges of the Charlie Hebdo shootings and the Bataclan attacks in Paris, suicide bombings in Brussels and Manchester; or truck attacks in Nice, Berlin, Barcelona; rampaging attacks in London, and so on). The civil war and the rise of ISIL (ISIS, Daesh) in Syria and the exacerbating effects of climate change and mega-drought that affected the region are inescapable. The European debt and migrant crisis are here. Yet elsewhere Kørner also brings to mind what at first seem like unrelated problems: the 2011 Tōhoku tsunami and the calamity of the Fukushima nuclear power plant meltdown, human trafficking, et cetera, states of exception that seem to confirm that the problem is evermore radical, atrocious, ungrounded—more diffuse while remaining intractably real. American pop star Ariana Grande knows this as well as Kørner. Released in spring 2014, three years before the suicide bombing of her concert at Manchester Arena, her most successful single to date is titled “Problem”. We are witnessing new kinds of wicked problems and Kørner paints accordingly."


    In preparation for the catalogue essay, in July 2017 Latitudes visited Kørner's impressive "Altid Mange Problemer" mid-career exhibition at Kunsthal Charlottenborg, the largest exhibition of his works to date, gathering paintings and sculptural pieces from 2004 to the present.

    (Above and following): Photos by Latitudes.


    Max has previously written on John's work for the catalogue of his 2006 exhibition "Problems" at Victoria Miro Gallery in London.

    Latitudes' first visit to Copenhagen also involved Kørner's work, as we visited his solo show 'ARoS Bank' at the ARoS Århus Kunstmuseum, Denmark (13 June–10 September 2006), which became the subject of our first blog post over a decade ago, in September 2006 (!).

    RELATED CONTENT:
    • Latitudes' writing archive
    • Latitudes' "out of office" 2016–2017 season 1 August 2017
    • Max Andrews essay on Christopher Knowles for NoguerasBlanchard at Liste 2017 21 July 2017
    • Mariana Cánepa Luna reviews Ana Jotta’s “Abans que me n’oblidi (Before I forget)” exhibition in art-agenda 11 November 2016
    • '2006 Problems' exhibition and publication by John Kørner, Victoria Miro Gallery, London 29 November 2006
    • Copenhagen trip. 'Woman with 24 problems' by John Kørner 30 September 2006




    Mariana Cánepa Luna vocal del jurado del Premi Ciutat de Barcelona 2017 en el ámbito de las Artes Visuales


    El Ayuntamiento de Barcelona convoca anualmente los Premios Ciudad de Barcelona con el objetivo de premiar la creación, la investigación y la producción de calidad realizada en Barcelona por creadores o colectivos, instituciones y organizaciones barcelonesas. 

    El Instituto de cultura de Barcelona (ICUB), encargado de la organización de los Premios, profundiza en la dimensión ciudadana de estos galardones al reconocer el talento de otros ciudadanos -los ganadores.
    Los miembros del jurado son propuestos por el Consejo de la Cultura de Barcelona y nombrados por la Alcaldesa Ada Colau.

    Este año el jurado en la categoría de artes visuales compuesto por el director del Museu d'art contemporani de Barcelona, Ferran Barenblit Scheinin (Presidente) y formado por las vocales Violant Porcel Roqué (hasta hace poco directora de la Galería Marlborough), Martina Millà Bernard (Jefa de Exposiciones y proyectos, Fundació Joan Miró), Teresa Sesé Monclús (crítica de arte, La Vanguardia) y Mariana Cánepa Luna (co-directora de la oficina curatorial Latitudes) ha decidido por unanimidad otorgar el premio al artista Joan Morey: 

    ‘Por un año de excepcional calidad que ha resultado en el proyecto de vídeo «Cos Social [Lliçó d’anatomia]» presentado por LOOP Barcelona en el Arts Santa Mònica, en una coproducción con la Xarxa de Centres d’Arts Visuals de Catalunya, y en la performance «Tour de Force», una coproducción del CCCB y la Fundació Han Nefkens, en el marco de la exposición «1000 m2 de desig. Arquitectura i sexualitat»’. 


    Joan Morey fotografiado por Marc Medina.

    CONTENIDOS RELACIONADOS
    :

    • Antoni Hervàs's exhibition "El Misterio de Caviria" awarded the Visual Arts prize of the Premis Ciutat de Barcelona 2016 1 February 2017
    • Jurado y tutores de Barcelona Producció – Anuncio de los proyectos ganadores temporada 2017–2018 25 Mayo 2017
    • Jurado y equipo tutorial de BCN Producció 2016, La Capella, Barcelona. 2 Febrero 2016
    • Resolución Convocatoria 2012 de Artes visuales y Tutorial de la Sala d'Art Jove 7 Diciembre 2011
    • Fallo Jurado Premios Casablancas 2008, 20 Junio, 20h 16 junio 2008
    • Otros jurados – véase sección "About"




    Reviews of the exhibition "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" at the CAPC musée, Bordeaux

    As the ‘4.543 billion. The matter of matter’ exhibition concluded on January 7, 2018, at the CAPC musée in Bordeaux, we finished archiving all the social media posts visitors, the museum and ourselves have published – see our Wakelet feed below – since research phase to the exhibition itself, and below share the most relevant print and online reviews.
    Wakelet collection of the "4.543 billion" exhibition.

    December 8, 2017: Tom Jeffreys highlighted the exhibition in his "Looking Back: Paris" roundup for frieze magazine – illustrated with two works included in the show by Nicholas Mangan and Alexandra Navratil.

    "A little less academic, but no less rigorous, was ‘4,543 milliards’ (4,543 billion), curated by the Barcelona-based Latitudes (co-founded by frieze contributing editor Max Andrews) at CAPC, Bordeaux. Subtitled ‘The matter of matter’, the exhibition provided a material, geological and political response to the building’s former life as a warehouse for colonial commodities and, by extension, the complex entanglement of culture, money, politics and ecological impact. Marble from Trump Tower (Amie Siegel’s "Strata", 2017) was exhibited alongside partially-burnt documents rescued from a fire at the Bordeaux municipal archives and a 1939 mock invitation to the ‘Museum of Standard Oil’, actually MoMA’s new building, issued by the then-publications director, Frances Collins (unsurprisingly fired soon after). Combining archival materials with work by 30 artists, big ideas with specificity and nuance, this was exactly the kind of exhibition I would want to return to again and again. If the selection of the next artistic director the Venice Biennale were a democratic process, I’d be voting for Latitudes."


    November 28, 2017Frank Browning, Paris-based Contributor to the Huffington Post author, and former NPR Correspondent, reviewed the recently opened retrospective of Beatriz González and concluded his article with a short mention:

    "Meanwhile, around the corner at CAPC there’s an intriguing assembly of stones, papers, paintings, photographs and projections that unite geo-physics, sculpture, and art history, including the conversion of the building itself from a one-time commodities warehouse into its current life as a museum.

    Entitled “The Matter of Matter,” [missing "4.543 billion" years, the age of the Earth, and the first part of the exhibition title] it includes the work of 30 artists, assembled and mounted by a Spanish team, Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna. They call themselves Latitudes [wrongly published with two "T"]; they aim to excavate the world we inhabit daily, be it through the history indigo mining in Mexico and southern France (vital for fine pottery and coloring bluejeans) or oil extraction in Venezuela, gas infused sculptures or open pit diamond mining in southern Africa. All that we do, all that we eat, all that we create derives from one form of excavation or another. Simple truism as it may seem, Latitudes takes us into the intimacies of our relation with this earth and calls us to meditate on our physical and aesthetic relation to the steadily warming round rock that is our home."




    September 20, 2017: Emmanuel Labails of RCF Radio did a 9-minute interview with Pedro Jiménez Morras, Head of Press of CAPC, who discussed the premises of the exhibition and some of its works. (Listen between minute 4:39 and 13:36).

    August 19, 2017: Bea Espejo's ‘Cambio de tiempo’, on the Spanish national cultural supplement Babelia, in El País newspaper begins:

    ˝A ese pensamiento geológico del tiempo conduce la exposición 4.543 millones. La cuestión de la materia en el CAPC de Burdeos. La muestra aborda obras de arte, colecciones e historias culturales con relación a procesos ecológicos y la escala geológica del tiempo. En total, más de 35 artistas que dan valor a las discontinuidades, a las derivas y a las ausencias. La muestra almacena el tiempo como una batería almacena la energía. Y lo hace en varias capas de lectura. Una de ellas es el tiempo que lleva Latitudes, la oficina curatorial de Mariana Cánepa Luna y Max Andrews, trabajando en este proyecto, seguramente el más complejo y ambicioso, aunque esta investigación en torno a las complejas relaciones entre la ecología y el arte contemporáneo está en la base de todos sus proyectos desde 2005. Aquí no pueden ser más rotundos. Abordan la cuestión de la materia desde el lado más inmaterial, que es la memoria. Para ello, estudiaron a fondo el contexto de la ciudad bajo un programa de residencias del museo. Hablamos, pues, de un proyecto de investigación, algo que se traduce en cada pequeño gesto que recoge la muestra, y que lo expande todo. De ahí las relaciones de algunas obras con el departamento de zoología de la universidad (Ilana Halperin), el Museo de Bellas Artes (Stuart Whipps, o el préstamo de Alfred Roll), así como los muchos documentos y objetos que se incluyen de los archivos Métropole, de la Gironde y la colección geológica de la UFR Sciences de la Terre et de la Mer, de la Universidad de Burdeos.˝




    July 12, 2017: Catherine Darfay's ‘Le CAPC remonte le temps’ on the local newspaper "Sudouest", was the first feature. The article was illustrated with a with an image showing Amy Balkin's ‘Today’s CO2 Spot Price’ (2009) chartering the daily price of carbon dioxide emissions allowances in the world’s largest carbon market —a changing value documented in this blog post.


    RELATED CONTENT:
    • 4.543 billion. The Matter of Matter” exhibition
    • Archive of social networks posts related to "4.543 billion"
    • Photo gallery of the exhibition 
    • CAPC website (French, English, Spanish) http://www.capc-bordeaux.fr/programme/4543-milliards
    • Cover Story—December 2017: "Tabet's Tapline trajectory" 4 December 2017
    • Alfred Roll's 1878 "The Old Quarryman" exchanged with Alfred Smith's "The Grave Docks" (1884) in the exhibition "4.543 billion" at the CAPC musée 3 November 2017
    • Cover Story—November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth" 1 November 2017 
    • 15 November 2017, 4:30–8pm: 'The Return of the Earth. Ecologising art history in the Anthropocene' study day at the CAPC musée, Bordeaux 24 October 201
    • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
    • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
    • SAVE THE DATE: 29 June, 19h. Private view of the exhibition "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" at the CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux 30 May 2017
    • Cover Story – May 2016: Material histories – spilling the beans at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux 10 May 2016.
    • Second research trip to Bordeaux 16 July 2016




    Progress of Amy Balkin's ‘Today’s CO2 Spot Price’ (2009)

    Throughout the course of the ‘4.543 billion. The Matter of Matter’ exhibition at the CAPC musée in Bordeaux, the work by Amy Balkin (Baltimore, Maryland, 1967. Lives in San Francisco) ‘Today’s CO2 Spot Price’ (2009) charted the daily price of carbon dioxide emissions allowances in the world’s largest carbon market, the EU Emissions Trading Scheme. The numbering system was manually updated every morning to show the price in Euros of an entitlement to legally emit one metric tonne of CO2. Polluters—power plants or factories—receive or buy emissions allowances at auctions and trade them as needed to minimize costs.

    A product of the increasing dominance of the finance sector and the expansion of financial derivatives that emerged in the 1970s, the carbon market ‘fix’ has abstracted the qualitative problem of climate change mitigation into a commodity market based on a molecule treated as the singular cause. There is a trend towards emissions that can be lucratively ‘avoided’, while there has been little effect on structural fossil fuel dependence. In this perspective, global warming is a market failure that can be corrected by governing the atmosphere via an economic instrument with no real material or historical reference.

    Balkin's piece was presented alongside works by Pep Vidal, Lucas Ihlein, and Lara Almarcegui, all focusing on humans' calculations and quantification of nature and its progressive abstraction.

    —Latitudes 

    (Text from the exhibition guide)

    4.543 billion. The matter of matter’ took place between the June 29, 2017 and January 7, 2018 at the CAPC musée d'art contemporain, Bordeaux, France.



    General view of room 8. Photo: Latitudes/RK.


    Work by Lara Almarcegui (wall) and Pep Vidal (floor). Photo: Latitudes/RK.


    Prints by Lucas Ihlein (wall) and part of a tree by Pep Vidal (floor). Photo: Latitudes/RK.


    Below a sequence of all the social media posts (mostly from Instagrammers, more on this and other works on this Wakelet feed) showing the ongoing flux of its price—which has ranged from 4,84 Eur per tonne of CO2 during the installation of the piece, to 4,93 Eur on the opening day (29 June 2017), to the last picture on record showing a whopping 7,76 Eur per tonne of CO2.

    We would like to thank the Kadist in San Francisco for having given us the opportunity to, after years of corresponding over email, finally meet Amy during a residency in September 2015. Her "Incidents of Travel" day on several locations in and outside San Francisco (download the specially-commissioned itinerary here) was invaluable towards the conceptualization of this exhibition.




    During installation of the work. Photo: Latitudes for @capc 



    Taken on the opening day, 29 June 2017. Photo: Latitudes/RK. 



    Taken on 2 July 2017. Photo: Latitudes. 




    Image published in the Sudouest newspaper on 12 July 2017 showing 04,98 EUR/tC02.



    Taken on 13 July 2017 by Hélène Lucien. 


    Taken on 16 July 2017 by Adriano Pedrosa. 


    Taken on 2 August 2017 by Lena Joreis. 


    Taken on 19 August 2017 by Semi-Sans.


    Taken on 22 August 2017 by Mads Freund Brunse.


    Taken on 12 October 2017 by Tomas Mendizabal.


    Taken on 17 October 2017 by Margareth.


    Taken on 20 November 2017 by @matlegall. 


    Taken on 2 November 2017 by @Elénie. 


    Taken on 30 November 2017 by @mllelahaye 


    Taken on 1 December 2017 by @mommou.elle 


    Taken on January 7, 2018 by Alice Cavender. 


    RELATED CONTENT: 

    • 4.543 billion. The Matter of Matter” exhibition 
    • Archive of social networks posts related to "4.543 billion" 
    • Photo gallery of the exhibition 
    • CAPC website (French, English, Spanish) http://www.capc-bordeaux.fr/programme/4543-milliards
    • Cover Story—December 2017: "Tabet's Tapline trajectory" 4 December 2017
    • Alfred Roll's 1878 "The Old Quarryman" exchanged with Alfred Smith's "The Grave Docks" (1884) in the exhibition "4.543 billion" at the CAPC musée 3 November 2017
    • Cover Story—November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth" 1 November 2017
    • 15 November 2017, 4:30–8pm: 'The Return of the Earth. Ecologising art history in the Anthropocene' study day at the CAPC musée, Bordeaux 24 October 201
    • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
    • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
    • SAVE THE DATE: 29 June, 19h. Private view of the exhibition "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" at the CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux 30 May 2017 
    • Cover Story – May 2016: Material histories – spilling the beans at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux 10 May 2016
    • Second research trip to Bordeaux 16 July 2016





      Cover Story—January 2018: I'll be there for you

      Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org

      The January 2018 Monthly Cover Story "I'll be there for you" is now up on www.lttds.org – after this month it will be archived here.
       

      "Camille Orny and Magda Vaz’s exhibition for the Sala Petita of Barcelona’s La Capella will open on 23 January—it is the last of three projects that Latitudes is mentoring during the current season of the Barcelona Producció grants." Continue reading  

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities. 


      (Above and below) View from "Artengo2000", exhibition by Camille Orny and Magda Vaz at the Sala Petita in La Capella. Photo: Pep Herrero / La Capella.

      Below the text written by Latitudes, mentors of the project:

      "Bringing the format of the miniseries into the Sala Petita, Camille Orny & Magda Vaz have created a drama-documentary for six screens premised on the story of a group of five flatmates—including semi-fictionalized versions of themselves—who have struck a sponsorship deal with a corporation known as Artengo. In one reality Artengo is a sub-brand of the sporting goods retailer Decathlon dedicated to racket sports, yet in another reality, it is an arcane Russian-American multinational corporation. The series begins with a dream in which a flatmate is haunted by the Artengo-branded socks that the flatmates have agreed to wear at all times as part of the sponsorship deal that in return sees them receive occasional deliveries of unbranded food and a discount on their gas bill. Artengo2000 is a cumulative narrative: each installment is comprehensive and distinct, while each is grafted onto the body of the series, with certain elements and plot lines that link across.

      Artengo2000 hinges on possible spiritual advancements and psychic disorders caused by shared living and by being obedient brand ambassadors. We witness the transformation of a communal flat into a laboratory-like space governed by the unwritten transactions entailed in lifestyle sponsorship and company patronage. Although the drama takes us to Montjuïc, the W Barcelona hotel, and to the Arenas shopping centre, and other branded flats, the Artengo apartment itself is the core psychological location. Yet in contrast to the breezy comedic and romantic adventures of the flat-sharing television series Friends (1994–2004), the Artengo apartment fills with irrational drama, distrust, deranged dreams, and doppelgängers. The flatmates become more like guinea pigs in a pioneering space station, afloat in a void at the limits of corporate ethics, loyalties and interpersonal relations. Characters include Camille and Magda’s flatmates Manu and Laura, a washed-up professional tennis player, and a supposed Danish-Catalan man named Borja with an academic interest in the introduction to Barcelona of novel and more covert forms of whole-life sponsorship.


      Artengo2000 takes place in a familiar but twisted world in which gig economies, collaborative work and service sharing appear to have developed in even more perverse ways. A brand called Little Bits makes an appearance—a sort of mutant Deliveroo based on micro-tapas. As Orny and Vaz have suggested, their shared flat drama imagines the bizarre incompatibility of a kommunalka (kommunalki were multi-family communal apartments encouraged by Lenin as a response to the housing crisis after the Russian revolution of 1917) set in a near-future where neoliberal and Silicon-Valley logic wields even greater power. Here the so-called ‘sharing economy’ of coworking, or online platforms such as BlaBlaCar and Airbnb, is evidently not representative of an altruistic fantasy of entrepreneurship or dynamic community cohesion, but is a symptom of evermore precarious socioeconomic circumstances. Giving up some personal space is part of the experience of sharing a flat, yet it allows a lower cost of living. However, the sponsorship deal that the flatmates are signed up to exacerbates their sacrifices to extremes. The work-life balance has not been blurred, but completely collapsed, as the flatmates renounce their intimacy and subjectivity in commodifying themselves for the Artengo brand.

      Where the vast majority of television narrators strive for neutrality and self-effacement, as if viewers are supposed to ignore the fact that the story is coming through a mediator, Orny and Vaz’s storytelling, and the Artengo2000 world of homemade myth-making, is far from straightforward. It incorporates numerous doubtful narratives, both onscreen and offscreen. Film genres such as the Western, or the film noir, routinely passed through a kind of four-stage metamorphosis, media scholars have suggested.1 In the first stage, conventions were established and isolated. In the second ‘classic’ stage these conventions reached equilibrium and were mutually understood by makers and audiences; the third stage saw formal and stylistic embellishments. Finally in a ‘baroque’ stage, the embellishments were accented to the point where they themselves became the substance of the work. Yet whether television series have followed the same logic is moot, particularly in an age where gathering in the living room to watch the latest hit show at the scheduled time has long been a thing of the past, usurped by viewers binge-streaming multiple episodes. Moreover, is it not the case that Artengo2000, much like David Lynch’s surreal crime drama Twin Peaks (1990–91), was already born congenitally baroque?

      While Artengo2000 is steeped in cinematic theory and the study of genre, more plausible still is that it comes at us not only through a filter of American television, and series that have experimented with the medium of the episodic drama in often darkly-comic and self-referential ways, such as Seinfeld (1989–1998), Curb Your Enthusiasm (2000–present), and Louie (2010–15). Artengo2000 has also filtered through many diverse influences related to what critic Jordi Costa has identified as ‘post-humor’ in Spain, including YouTube channels and self-made web series from the likes of Canódromo Abandonado, Pioneros Siglo XXI, and Venga Monjas.2 Yet why does a series ‘happen’ when it does? Was the fanatical following that built around the supernatural detective series The X-Files (1993–2002), for example, in some way a Bill-Clinton-era phenomenon, a result of psychohistorical factors at work in 1990s America? And why do we now see a return of Twin Peaks (2017–) just at the same time as we see Artengo2000 emerge in Barcelona? Appropriately, asking more questions that providing answers, we offer no more closure than a typical episode of either." 

      Latitudes 

      Mentors of the project. Text written for the exhibition and available in English, Catalan and Spanish.


      1 See Thomas Schatz, ‘Hollywood Genres: Formulas, Filmmaking, and The Studio System’, McGraw-Hill, 1981.

      2 See Miguel Iríbar, ‘El posthumor, la tortilla deconstruida de la risa’, http://www.jotdown.es/2014/12/el-posthumor-la-tortilla-deconstruida-de-la-risa/



      RELATED CONTENT:
      • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
      • Cover Story – December 2017: "Tabet's Tapline trajectory", 4 December 2017
      • Cover Story – November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
      • Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
      • Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
      • Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
      • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
      • Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
      • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
      • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
      • Cover Story – March 2017: Time travel with Jordan Wolfson 1 March 2017
      • Cover Story February 2017: The Dutch Assembly, five years on 1 February 2017
      • Cover Story January 2017: How open are open calls? 4 January 2017

      -->




      2017 in 12 monthly Cover Stories

      Another year has gone by!

      Revisit some of Latitudespast–present–future–ongoing projects through our online archive of Monthly Cover Stories, a chance to focus on an artwork, article, event, film, exhibition, excursion or ongoing train of thoughts. 


      Cover Story January 2017: "How open are open calls?", 4 January 2017

      Cover Story February 2017: "The Dutch Assembly, five years on", 1 February 2017

      Cover Story – March 2017: "Time travel with Jordan Wolfson", 1 March 2017

      Cover Story – April 2017: "Banff Geologic Time", 3 April 2017

      Cover Story – May 2017: "S is for Shale or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps", 1 May 2017 

      Cover Story – June 2017: "Moth light—Absent Forms", 1 June 2017
      Cover Story – July 2017: "4.543 billion", 3 July 2017 


      Cover Story – August 2017: "Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern", 1 August 2017  


      Cover Story – September 2017: "Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis'", 1 September 2017

      Cover Story – October 2017: "Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier", 11 October 2017

      Cover Story—November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
      Cover Story—December 2017: "Tabet’s Tapline trajectory", 4 December 2017

      RELATED CONTENT:
      Latitudes' Cover Story archive,
      Latitudes' writing archive,
      Latitudes' newsletters.




      Public programme of the exhibition "4.543 billion. The Matter of Matter" at the CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux

      First public event on 30 June to the Salle des Collections de l'Unité de Formation de Biologie, Université de Bordeaux. This and following photos: Latitudes.


      On December 14 at 2pm, the mediation department of the CAPC will lead a guided visit to Ilana Halperin’s "The Rock Cycle" (2017) intervention at the Salle des Collections de l'Unité de Formation de Biologie, Université de Bordeaux. 

      The event is the third visit (earlier ones took place on October 19 and November 16) programmed in the context of her participation in the exhibition ‘4.543 billion. The matter of matter’ on view at the CAPC musée d'art contemporain de BordeauxThe next (and final one) will be taking place on January 4, three days before the exhibition closes on January 7, 2018. 

      These events are free. Booking is recommended via Léo Correa l.correa@mairie-bordeaux.fr T. (+33) 05 56 00 81 60.


      Ilana Halperin’s new project for the exhibition '4.543 billion' deals with geological intimacy and vivacity, and the uncanny fact that something as apparently inert and certain as the stone walls of the CAPC building were once marine life from a tropical ocean of the Oligocene epoch, around 32 million-years-ago. This Calcaire à Astéries (asteriated limestone) characteristic of Bordeaux takes its name from the countless tiny fossil organisms of the genus asterias (a type of sea star) that can be found in the stone alongside fossil mollusks and coral.

      Halperin addresses stone, not as dead matter or a mere resource, but as a story-laden substance that both surpasses and partners in humans’ view of the world. 'The Rock Cycle' incorporates the reading of a letter and the hosting of a number of the artist’s geological sculptures within the displays of the zoology collection of the University of Bordeaux. These ‘curios’ originated as fragments of sea-weathered brick from the Isle of Bute in western Scotland, as well as waterjet-cut sandstone, that the artist left for three months in Fontaines Pétrifiantes in Saint-Nectaire. For generations, the mineral-rich waters that percolate through the rock at this site in central France have been used to create sculptures using the same process by which stalactites form, only one hundred times faster. Objects become rapidly encrusted with new layers of stone. 


      —Latitudes 
      [Excerpt from the exhibition guide]


      Three other events have been programmed in the context of the exhibition.

      Visit with Terence Gower (participating artist) and Prof. Bruno Cahuzac. Photo: CAPC musée/Département des publics.

      8 November 2017, 5:30–7pm
      Jam Session #1—Guided tour by Terence Gower (participating artist) and Prof. Bruno Cahuzac (UFR Sciences de la Terre et de la Mer, Université de Bordeaux Montaigne).

      Guests during “The Return of the Earth: Ecologising art history in the Anthropocene” event. Photo: Latitudes.

      15 November 2017, 4:30–8pm
      The Return of the Earth: Ecologising art history in the Anthropocene”—Lecture by Jean-Baptiste Fressoz, a conversation between Xavier Ribas and Ângela Ferreira, debate convened by Latitudes. Free access. Simultaneous translation English-French.



      During Jam Session #2 event. Photo: CAPC musée/Département des publics.

      6 December 2017, 5:30–7pm
      Jam Session #2—Guided tour by Isabelle Kanor (Head association "Le Labo de Lettres” dealing with cultural issues in the Antilles and colonization), and Charlotte Bouvier and Rémi Cazamajour (Inélia, company that supplied the solar panels feeding the video installation "Ancient Lights" (2015) by Nicholas Mangan). Sign up: Stéphane Mallet, s.mallet@mairie-bordeaux.fr


      Photo: Latitudes/RK.

      The exhibition ‘4.543 billion’ is the contribution of the CAPC musée to the cultural season Paysages Bordeaux 2017. Between September 11–October 6, 2017, and within the exhibition framework, Latitudes led the month-long residency programme ‘Geologic Time’ at Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity, Alberta, Canada.

      Share:
      #4543billion
      #4543milliards
      #CAPCmusee


      RELATED CONTENT:
      • 4.543 billion. The Matter of Matter” exhibition
      • Archive of social networks posts related to "4.543 billion"
      • Photo gallery of the exhibition 
      • CAPC website (French, English, Spanish) http://www.capc-bordeaux.fr/programme/4543-milliards
      • Cover Story—December 2017: "Tabet's Tapline trajectory" 4 December 2017
      • Alfred Roll's 1878 "The Old Quarryman" exchanged with Alfred Smith's "The Grave Docks" (1884) in the exhibition "4.543 billion" at the CAPC musée 3 November 2017
      • Cover Story—November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth" 1 November 2017 
      • 15 November 2017, 4:30–8pm: 'The Return of the Earth. Ecologising art history in the Anthropocene' study day at the CAPC musée, Bordeaux 24 October 201
      • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
      • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
      • SAVE THE DATE: 29 June, 19h. Private view of the exhibition "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" at the CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux 30 May 2017
      • Cover Story – May 2016: Material histories – spilling the beans at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux 10 May 2016.
      • Second research trip to Bordeaux 16 July 2016




      Cover Story—December 2017: Tabet’s Tapline trajectory

      Monthly Cover Story on http://www.lttds.org

      The December 2017 Monthly Cover Story "Tabet’s Tapline trajectory" is now up on www.lttds.org – after this month it will be archived here.
       

      "Rayyane Tabet’sSteel Rings and the mobile Three Logos (both 2013) slice through and loom over the web of natural histories and human natures, mineral agency and political ecology that comprises the exhibition 4.543 billion. The matter of matter. Rayyane was one of the first artists to come on board what would become this Latitudes-curated exhibition at CAPC Bordeaux. And as the show approaches the end of its journey—it finishes on 7 January 2018—it seems appropriate that this month’s cover story creates a bookend of sorts. Moreover, it gives a perfect reason to mention Rayyane’s stunning exhibition Fragments that has recently opened at Hamburg Kunstverein." Continue reading  

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities. 

      RELATED CONTENT:
      • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
      • Cover Story – November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
      • Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
      • Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
      • Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
      • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
      • Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
      • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
      • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
      • Cover Story – March 2017: Time travel with Jordan Wolfson 1 March 2017
      • Cover Story February 2017: The Dutch Assembly, five years on 1 February 2017
      • Cover Story January 2017: How open are open calls? 4 January 2017




      1 Diciembre, 20:30h: Latitudes introducirá el documental italiano "Harald Szeemann. Appunti sulla vita di un sognatore" (2016)


      El 1 de diciembre 2017 a las 20:30h Latitudes introducirá el documental italiano "Harald Szeemann. Appunti sulla vita di un sognatore" (2016, 61 minutos) antes de su proyección. El documental, que se estrena en España, se aproxima a la figura del conocido comisario suizo fallecido en el 2005, que a lo largo de cinco décadas de actividad profesional organizó más de 150 exposiciones.

      La proyección es parte de la primera edición del Dart Festival 2017, el Festival de Cine Documental sobre Arte Contemporáneo que proyectará 10 documentales entre el 30 de noviembre y el 3 de diciembre en los Cinemes Girona (c/ Girona 175, 08037 Barcelona).


      Toda la programación del Dart Festival 2017 en www.dart-festival.com

      Szeemann definió y perpetuó la figura del “comisario freelance permanente”, aunque como ha comentado en varias ocasiones el también comisario Hans Ulrich Obrist, la particularidad de Szeemann es que dió continuidad al legado de Alexander Dorner, director del Museo de Hannover en los años veinte, quien definió el museo como una central eléctrica, un “museo en movimiento” en el que:
      • La exposición es un estado de transformación permanente. 
      • La exposición como algo oscilante entre el objeto y el proceso, afirmando que “la noción de proceso ha penetrado en nuestro sistema de certidumbres”.
      • La exposición de identidades múltiples.
      • La exposición como algo pionero, activo y que no se guarda nada.
      • La exposición como verdad relativa.
      • La exposición basada en una concepción dinámica de la historia del arte.
      • La exposición “elástica”: presentaciones flexibles en un edificio adaptable.
      • La exposición como puente entre los artistas y las diversas disciplinas científicas.
      El Getty Research Institute adquirió el archivo que Szeemann acumuló a lo largo de su vida en la Fabbrica Rossa, en Maggia, una pequeña localidad en su Suiza natal. El Harald Szeemann Archive and Library es una de las adquisiciones más completas jamás realizadas por el museo de Los Ángeles y lo ha convirtido en una de las fuentes más importantes para entender el arte producido a partir de 1950. 

      CONTENIDO RELACIONADO:




      22 de noviembre, 19h: Presentación de la publicació “The Drowned Giant” a cargo de Anna Moreno y Lluís A. Casanovas Blanco

      Póster del evento. Cortesía: Anna Moreno.

      22 de noviembre, 19h:
      Presentación de la publicación “The Drowned Giant” de Anna Moreno
      A cargo de la artista Anna Moreno y el arquitecto e investigador Lluís A. Casanovas

      Col·legi d’Arquitectes de Catalunya (COAC)
      Sala de actos, 1r piso
      Plaça Nova 5, 08002 Barcelona
       
      En 1970 se organizó un happening en Moratalaz (Madrid) para promocionar el proyecto de vivienda utópica La Ciudad en el Espacio, del arquitecto Ricardo Bofill. Un evento que nunca se llegó a documentar, un proyecto que nunca se llegó a construir. El pasado 7 de junio, la artista
      Anna Moreno repitió aquel happening en el mismo lugar.

      El 22 de noviembre, en la Sala de Actos del
      Col·legi d’Arquitectes de Catalunya (COAC), se presentará un LP con el registro sonoro del proceso de restitución, la única documentación existente del evento. 

      El disco contiene los testimonios de Gila Dohle, The Downton Alligators, Enrique Doza, Peter Hodgkinson, Anna Moreno, JC Ramone, Toti Soler y Ramón Del Solo, entre otros. La edición incluye un libreto con relatos de ficción escritos por los arquitectos Paula Currás & Havi Navarro, la comisaria María Montero, el experto en blues Ramón del Solo y la artista Anna Moreno.

      Lluís A. Casanovas Blanco es arquitecto y comisario afincado entre Nueva York y Barcelona. Actualmente es investigador en Princeton University (NY, EEUU). Junto con la agencia After Belonging fue uno de los comisarios en jefe de la Trienal de Arquitectura de Oslo (2016).


      Anna Moreno (Barcelona, 1984) vive y trabaja entre Barcelona y La Haya (Países Bajos). Su práctica artística se desarrolla a través de acontecimientos expandidos y exposiciones individuales, como ‘D’ahir d’abans d’ahir de l’altre abans d’ahir i més d’abans encara’ (Blueproject Foundation, Barcelona, 2016), ‘The Whole World Was Singing¸ (HIAP Project Space, Helsinki, 2016) o ‘An Awkward Game’ (1646, La Haya, 2015). Entre las exposiciones colectivas en las que ha participado cabe destacar: ‘En los cantos nos diluimos’ (Sala de Arte Joven, Madrid, 2017), ‘Distopía General’ (Reales Atarazanas, Valencia, 2017), ‘CAPITALOCEAN’ (W139, ÁmBerdam, 2016), ‘Lo que ha de venir ya ha llegado’ (CAAC, Sevilla; MUSAC, León, y Koldo Mitxelena, Sebastián, todas en 2015) y ‘Generaciones’ (La Casa Encendida, Madrid, 2014). Su obra se ha incluido en el marco de simposios como ‘Visual Activism’¸ (SFMOMA, San Francisco, 2014) o ‘United We Organize’ (Stroom Den Haag, La Haya, 2013). Ha participado en residencias como ‘Artistas en residencia’ (CA2M y La Casa Encendida, MóBoles y Madrid, 2017), Seoul Art Space Geumcheon (Seúl, 2012) o Atelierhaus Salzamt (Linz, 2011), entre otros. Es profesora de investigación artística en la Royal Academy of Art de La Haya, donde es miembro fundador de Helicopter, una iniciativa dirigida por artistas enfocada a la experimentación y al intercambio de conocimientos. 

      Fotos: Laura San Segundo. Cortesía: Anna Moreno.

      Publicación producida con el apoyo de Barcelona Producció 2017, La Capella / Institut de Cultura de Barcelona. 

      Proyecto tutorizado por Latitudes.

      CONTENIDO RELACIONADO:

      • Cover Story—August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern (web archive);
      • Tutores: Barcelona Producció, La Capella, Barcelona, julio 2017–junio 2018 (web);
      • Web de La Capella;
      • Jurado y tutores de Barcelona Producció – Anuncio de los proyectos ganadores temporada 2017–2018 (25 Mayo 2017).

      -->




      Alfred Roll's 1878 "The Old Quarryman" exchanged with Alfred Smith's "The Grave Docks" (1884) in the exhibition "4.543 billion" at the CAPC musée

      “Le Vieux Carrier” [The Old Quarryman] (1878) by Alfred Roll (Paris, 1846–1919). Collection of the Musée des Beaux-Arts, Bordeaux.
      Following the conclusion of its four-month loan period, we wave goodbye to “Le Vieux Carrier” [The Old Quarryman] (1878) portrait by Alfred Roll (Paris, 1846–1919) on November 6, 2017. Roll's portrait has been on display since June 29 as part of the exhibition "4.543 billion" at the CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux. In its place we welcome Alfred Smith's (Bordeaux, 1854–Paris, 1936) “Le Quai de la Grave” [The Grave Docks] (1884).

      Alfred Smith's (Bordeaux, 1854–Paris, 1936) “Le Quai de la Grave” [The Grave Docks] (1884). Collection of the Musée des Beaux-Arts, Bordeaux.

      We are very grateful to the Musée des Beaux-Arts de Bordeaux for agreeing to these wonderful loans. In turn, and in companion to three artworks from 2012–3 exhibited at the CAPC, Birmingham-based artist Stuart Whipps is presenting a new off-site work entitled "Thin Section: Scottish Shale" (2017) in the galleries of the Musée des Beaux-Arts.


      (Above and below) Views of Stuart Whipps' "Thin Section: Scottish Shale" (2017) at the Musée des Beaux-Arts, Bordeaux. Photo: Latitudes.
      Photo: Latitudes.
      (Left, floor) Stuart Whipps' "Thin Section: Scottish Shale" (2017) and (right, above) “Le Quai de la Grave” [The Grave Docks] (1884) by Alfred Smith (Bordeaux, 1854–Paris, 1936), painting that will be exchanged on November 6, 2017, with Alfred Roll's “Le Vieux Carrier” [The Old Quarryman] (1878). Photo: Latitudes.

      A 0.5mm thick sliver of Scottish Shale rock (a gas-harbouring rock similar to schist) cut from a sample with a diamond saw is treated as if it were a photographic slide by being displayed on a Reflecta AFM 2000 slide projector, a model that has an in-built display monitor. The luminous minerals contained within the shale rock—quartz, calcite, dolomite, feldspars, mica, pyrite...—appear in 1:1 scale.


      (Above and below) Views of the exhibition room at the CAPC musée that includes Alfred Roll's portrait. The room includes works by Maria Thereza Alves, Ângela Ferreira, Antoine J. Aalders and Stuart Whipps. Photo: Latitudes/RK. 

      Photo: Latitudes/RK.

      Photo: Latitudes.

      Between 1878 and 1894, Alfred Roll (Paris, 1846–1919) painted a series of Realist works depicting the world of industry, and more pointedly, comprising statements of solidarity with the harsh circumstances of the worker at a time of great social unrest. Representing an elderly quarryman in his smock, “Le Vieux Carrier” [The Old Quarryman] (1878) began this sequence when it was first exhibited at the Paris Salon in 1879. It is one of the few Roll portraits whose subject remains anonymous, yet the man depicted was undoubtedly a genuine labourer rather than a model—the artist was later known to welcome miners and their families to sit for portraits in his studio. Is it not known where the man would have been working. Yet given Roll’s later depiction of stonemasons on a quayside in Suresnes, near Paris, (“Le Travail, chantier de Suresnes (Seine)”, 1885), one might speculate that “Le Vieux Carrier” represents both the large-scale infrastructural projects taking place around the capital at the time, as well as the increasing reorganization of the French workforce in the extractive industries through retiring older workers and cutting wages. 

      Roll would go on to spend several months living and working in the coal mines of Charleroi, Belgium, and Anzin, in the Nord-Pas-de-Calais region of northern France, and he presented the celebrated painting “Grève des mineurs” [Miners’ strike] at the 1880 Salon. Roll seems to have painted from the perspective that exhaustion unfolds through human labour systems as much as through the depletion of raw materials.

      (Unframed) Alfred Smith's (Bordeaux, 1854–Paris, 1936) “Le Quai de la Grave” [The Grave Docks] (1884). Collection of the Musée des Beaux-Arts, Bordeaux.
         
      “Le Quai de la Grave” [The Grave Docks] (1884) is one of a number of Bordeaux cityscapes by the painter Alfred Smith (Bordeaux, 1854–Paris, 1936) in which the effects of the weather and the time of the day are treated with great fidelity. A mason appears to be sizing-up a large limestone block that has been brought downriver by boat. Other workers take a rest in the shade of the water tank and the sentry box during what appears to be a scorching hot summer afternoon in Bordeaux. The seasonal movement of migrant stonemasons from central France, especially the Creuse département, was an established and widespread feature of the construction industry by the late eighteenth century. Migrants had travelled by foot for centuries, but with the introduction of railways to central France in the 1850s, this began to change. Paris was the main magnet, but many young men also departed every March to look for work in Lyon, Bordeaux, and other cities. 

      Until at least the beginning of the twentieth century, construction in France was defined by the cutting, dressing, and placing of stone and the industry would have encompassed a wide range of specialist and physically demanding jobs—from quarrymen to masons, roofers, and pavers. By the time of Smith’s depiction, much of the precision of stone cutting would have been done at the quarry site itself. Finishing, polishing and decoration would have been carried out on site. Building work had started to organize trade unions in the early 1880s and a national building trades’ federation was founded in Bordeaux in 1892.

      Share:
      #4543billion

      #4543milliards
      @LTTDS 
      @CAPCmusee 
      #CAPCmusee

      ‘4.543 billion’ is the contribution of the CAPC musée to the cultural season Paysages Bordeaux 2017

      RELATED CONTENT:
      • Archive of social networks related to "4.543 billion"
      • Photo gallery of the exhibition 
      • CAPC website (French, English, Spanish) http://www.capc-bordeaux.fr/programme/4543-milliards
      • 15 November 2017, 4:30–8pm: 'The Return of the Earth. Ecologising art history in the Anthropocene' study day at the CAPC musée, Bordeaux 24 October 2017
      • Cover Story—November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth" 1 November 2017
      • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
      • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
      • SAVE THE DATE: 29 June, 19h. Private view of the exhibition "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" at the CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux 30 May 2017
      • Cover Story – May 2016: Material histories – spilling the beans at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux 10 May 2016.
      • Second research trip to Bordeaux 16 July 2016




      Cover Story—November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth"

      Monthly Cover Story on http://www.lttds.org/blog/


      The November 2017 Monthly Cover Story "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth" is now up on www.lttds.org – after this month it will be archived here

      "On 15 November the study day The Return of the Earth: Ecologising art history in the Anthropocene takes place at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain Bordeaux in conjunction with the Latitudes-curated exhibition 4.543 billion. The matter of matter. With a keynote by science historian Jean-Baptiste Fressoz, and a conversation between artists Xavier Ribas and Ângela Ferreira—the latter both featured in the exhibition—the event will intertwine discussions of art practice and historical research, with environmental and geological narratives, and vice versa." Continue reading
       
      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities


      RELATED CONTENT:
      • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
      • 15 November 2017, 4:30–8pm: 'The Return of the Earth. Ecologising art history in the Anthropocene' study day at the CAPC musée, Bordeaux 24 October 2017
      • Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
      • Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
      • Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
      • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
      • Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
      • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
      • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
      • Cover Story – March 2017: Time travel with Jordan Wolfson 1 March 2017
      • Cover Story February 2017: The Dutch Assembly, five years on 1 February 2017
      • Cover Story January 2017: How open are open calls? 4 January 2017




      15 November 2017, 4:30–8pm: 'The Return of the Earth. Ecologising art history in the Anthropocene' study day at the CAPC musée, Bordeaux

      Xavier Ribas, detail of diptych num 7 'Caliche Fields' (2010), 22 Pigment prints on Harman Baryta paper 33 x 50 cm. Courtesy the artist and ProjecteSD, Barcelona.

      'The Return of the Earth. Ecologising art history in the Anthropocene'
      Study day
      Wednesday, 15 November 2017  
      4:30—8:00pm
      Auditorium
      CAPC musée d’art contemporain Bordeaux 
      7, rue Ferrère, 33000 Bordeaux, France 


      PROGRAMME

      4:30—5:30 pm

      Keynote by science historian Jean-Baptiste Fressoz (Paris) 
      5:30—5:45 pm
      Break
      5:45—6:45
      pm
      Conversation between artists Xavier Ribas (London) and Ângela Ferreira (Lisbon)
      6:45—7:45
      pm
      Roundtable discussion moderated by Latitudes (Barcelona)


      Free event. Simultaneous translation French/English. 

      Conference programmed in the context of the exhibition '4.543 billion. The matter of matter', CAPC musée d’art contemporain Bordeaux, 29 June 2017–7 January 2018. Curated by Latitudes.



      The work of many of the artists in the exhibition '4.543 billion. The matter of matter' explores the shared history of human activities and Earth systems. Yet this comes with a critical and political inflexion of the universalizing notion of the Anthropocene, the proposed geological ‘epoch of humanity’ that would cast all of the mankind as being responsible for the alarming damage caused by modernizing and capitalizing nature.

      With a keynote by science historian Jean-Baptiste Fressoz, and a conversation between artists
      Xavier Ribas and Ângela Ferreira—the latter both featured in the exhibition—this event hosted by Latitudes ('4.543 billion' curators Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna), sees art practice and historical research intertwining with environmental and geological narratives, and vice versa. Both Ribas and Ferreira make art that resists the generalising story of the Anthropocene that Fressoz unmasks in his book 'The Shock of the Anthropocene. The Earth, History and Us' (co-authored with Christophe Bonneuil, Verso Books, 2016). Echoing the meticulous historical approach of Fressoz, both Ribas’s and Ferreira’s projects in the exhibition deal with case studies with a very specific place and politics. Addressing mineral agency and colonial extraction, the artists will discuss their approaches to work that has sprung from diamonds in South Africa (Ferreira) to nitrate in Chile (Ribas).

      As Fressoz & Bonneuil have written, the Anthropocene “signals the return of the Earth into a world that Western industrial modernity, on the whole, represented to itself as above earthly foundation … Environmental history, natural anthropology, environmental law and ethics, human ecology, environmental sociology, political ecology, green political theory, ecological economics, etc., are among the new disciplines that have recently begun to renew the human and social sciences, in a dialogue with the sciences of nature.” The dialogue during the event will seek to discover what might happen when artists, curators, exhibitions and museums come into the mix of such emerging practices. What is at stake when artists venture beyond the conventional separation of humanities from sciences, and into environmental art history, cultural ecology, decolonial activism, and so on?


      Entrance to the exhibition at the CAPC. Photo: Latitudes/RK.

      GUESTS

      Jean-Baptiste Fressoz, formerly a lecturer at Imperial College, London, is a historian of science, technology and environment. He is based at the Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Paris, the largest governmental research organisation in France and the largest fundamental science agency in Europe. He is the author, with Christophe Bonneuil, of 'The Shock of the Anthropocene' (Verso, 2016). “This bold, brilliantly argued history of the Anthropocene epoch is a corrective to cosy thinking about humanity’s grave disruptions to Earth systems. Christophe Bonneuil and Jean-Baptiste Fressoz draw on climate science, economics and technological history to reveal how, starting in eighteenth-century France, imperial narratives that saw people and planet as a ‘totality to be governed’ laid the conceptual basis for the crisis. They call for a ‘new environmental humanities’, and a shift away from market-based approaches that feed the beast.” – Barbara Kiser, Nature.

      Ângela Ferreira’s works in the exhibition form part of a series titled “Stone Free” (2012) in reference to the 1966 hit song performed by Jimi Hendrix (1942–70). “Stone Free” creates correspondences between two voids below the ground, two ‘negative monuments’ as the artist has termed them: Chislehurst Caves, in southeast London, and Cullinan Diamond Mine in Gauteng Province, South Africa. 


      Chislehurst Caves is a man-made network of underground tunnels mainly worked in the late 1700s yet dating back to as early as 1250. The tunnels were excavated in order to mine chalk and flint. Following their use as an air-raid shelter during the second world war, the tunnels were transformed into a venue for rock concerts in the 1960s and 1970s. The Jimi Hendrix Experience played there in 1966 and again the following year, bringing Hendrix’s unique countercultural synthesis of social realism and psychedelic spiritualism based on African and indigenous-American imagery into the literal underground.

      Cullinan Diamond Mine (known as Premier Mine from its establishment in 1902 until 2003) is famed for being the source of the largest gem-quality rough diamond ever discovered, in 1905. Most of the gems cut-and-polished from this stone were used to adorn the Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom. The recent history of the diamond industry is inextricable from that of settler colonialism in southern Africa and a commodity cartel established by the De Beers corporation founded in 1888 by British imperialist Cecil Rhodes (1853–1902), two years before he became Prime Minister of the Cape Colony. De Beers owned all of the major mines in South Africa, as well as controlling global distribution until it began a recent sell-off of its less productive mines to the Petra Diamonds group, including divesting itself of Cullinan in 2008. 


      Ferreira was born in Maputo, Mozambique, in 1958, and lives in Lisbon, where she teaches Fine Art at the Lisbon University.
      http://angelaferreira.info

      “A History of Detonations” (2014) is a glimpse at an extensive body of work by Xavier Ribas devoted to exploring the legacy of the mining of sodium nitrate in northern Chile, which boomed from the 1870s until the early-twentieth century when it was discovered how to make the compound synthetically. Comprised of photographs taken by the artist during research visits, alongside vintage postcards and press prints bought on the internet, Ribas’s poster sequence takes us from Chile to London to the surface of Mars. The mining and trade of Chilean sodium nitrate was led by a class of British ‘gentleman capitalists’—aristocrats, bankers and merchants. The extraction of the resource not only industrialized the arid Atacama Desert at one end of the commodity chain, and enriched country estates at the other, but through its use as a chemical fertilizer and a component of explosives, it would radically alter a whole series of seemingly disparate geographies, bodies and institutions.

      Ribas was born in Barcelona, 1960, and lives in London.  He is a lecturer at the University of Brighton and associate lecturer at the Universitat Politècnica de València. http://www.xavierribas.com/

      Latitudes is a Barcelona-based curatorial office initiated in 2005 by Max Andrews (1975, Bath, United Kingdom) and Mariana Cánepa Luna (1977, Montevideo, Uruguay). They are the curators of the CAPC exhibition ‘4.543 billion. The matter of matter’, and led the related month-long residency programme ‘Geologic Time’ that took place in September 2017 at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity. During 2009 Latitudes developed ‘Portscapes’, a series of ten public commissions in the Port of Rotterdam, the Netherlands (2009); in 2010–11 it was a partner organisation in the exhibition ‘The Last Newspaper’ (New Museum, New York) and in 2011 was the guest curator of the project space of the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Castilla y León (MUSAC) in León, Spain. More recent curatorial projects include the solo exhibition ‘José Antonio Hernández-Díez. I will fear no evil’, Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA), Barcelona (2016); ‘Compositions’, site-specific commissions for two editions of the Barcelona Gallery Weekend (2015 & 2016); and editing the online curatorial reportage initiative ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ developed in partnership with Kadist (initiated in 2016).  
      www.LTTDS.org

      Share:
      #4543billion

      #4543milliards
      @LTTDS 
      @CAPCmusee 
      #CAPCmusee

      ‘4.543 billion’ is the contribution of the CAPC musée to the cultural season Paysages Bordeaux 2017

      Views of the exhibition at the CAPC musée. Photos: Latitudes / RK.

      RELATED CONTENT:
      • CAPC website (French, English, Spanish) http://www.capc-bordeaux.fr/programme/4543-milliards
      • Sediments of the Geologic Time 4-week residency at the Banff Centre for Arts & Creativity 10 October 2017
      • SAVE THE DATE: 29 June, 19h. Private view of the exhibition "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" at the CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux 30 May 2017
      • Cover Story – May 2017: "S is for Shale or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps" May 2017
      • Cover Story – May 2016: Material histories – spilling the beans at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux 10 May 2016.
      • Second research trip to Bordeaux 16 July 2016




      Cover Story—October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier

      October 2017 Monthly Cover Story on http://www.lttds.org


      The October 2017 Monthly Cover Story "Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier" is now up on www.lttds.org – after this month it will be archived here

      "We are looking for glimpses of life as it was over half a billion years ago. In sight of the snout of the Stanley Glacier in Kootenay National Park, lie deposits of Burgess Shale, a rock famous for its exceptional preservation of hitherto unknown, and frankly bizarre, soft-bodied marine creatures." Continue reading  

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities. 

      RELATED CONTENT:




      Sediments of the Geologic Time 4-week residency at the Banff Centre for Arts & Creativity




      September 11, 2017:
      Banff is a town located within Banff National Park in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, Alberta. Elevation: 1,383 m. We'll be spending four weeks at The Banff Centre, at the foot of Sleeping Buffalo Mountain (Tunnel Mountain) overlooking the Bow Valley. 


      The programme conceived by Latitudes (Lead Faculty), and with the participation of Irish artist Sean Lynch as Guest Faculty, asked how a geologic lens might affect artistic and curatorial practice.

      Participants: Justy Phillips & Margaret Woodward (A Published Event) based in Hobart; Semâ Bekirovic, based in Amsterdam; Caitlin Chaisson based in Vancouver; Becky Forsythe, based in Reykjavik; Chloe Hodge, based in London; Shane Krepakevich, based in Toronto; Caroline Loewen, based in Calgary; Penelope Smart, based in St. John's, Newfoundland; and Camila Sposati, based in São Paulo.



      Views of the Banff Centre campus from the Vistas dining centre, the trees slowly starting to turn yellow.


       

      Group photo of 'Geologic Time' 10 participants and Lead Faculty – participant Penelope Smart and Guest Faculty artist Sean Lynch are camera shy.


       

      The door to Latitudes' Studio 317 in Glyde Hall.



      Stunning views towards the Banff Springs Hotel and Sulphur Mountain from the GH 317 studio.



      'Geologic Time' dedicated section in the library.



      Campus tour with local legend Jim Olver, Customer Service at Banff Centre for Arts & Creativity, "passionate about river canoeing, geology, ski-touring & curling!"



      September 16, 2017: Hike up to Tunnel Mountain, with panoramic views of the town, the Bow and Spray River valleys, and the Banff Springs Hotel site. The Stoney people (indigenous people of Western Canada) had long called the mountain "Sleeping Buffalo", as it resembles a sleeping buffalo when viewed from the north and east. The name Tunnel Mountain was given in 1882 when a proposed route for the Canadian Pacific Railway was to be blasted through. An alternate route costing much less money was put around the mountain, but the name Tunnel Mountain remained.



      September 17, 2017: (Above and below) Hoodoos Trail descends to the river and follows it east and north under the cliff face of Tunnel Mountain. We were interrupted by a herd of elk (wapiti) so decided to turn around.





      September 19, 2017: Lecture by the legendary Rocky Mountains expert Ben Gadd, 71 (pictured above), one of Canada’s better-known naturalists, geologists, and mountain writers.



      Some of the rock specimens brought by Ben Gadd to his lecture – including some very fetching custom cushions sewn by his wife.



      Ben Gadd during his Q&A with Geologic Time participants.



      Gadd holding a 170-95 million-year-old coast mountains granite.



      September 20, 2017: Morning visit to the archive of the Whyte Museum in Banff, a museum that collects, preserves, and exhibits all kinds of materials related to the cultural heritage of the Canadian Rocky Mountains.



      September 20, 2017: Afternoon visit to Bankhead and Lake Minnewanka ("Water of the Spirits" in Nakoda).

      Bankhead is an abandoned coal mining town in Banff National Park. The mine began in 1903 and ceased operations in 1922 when it was generally understood that mining had not been profitable. In 1926, many of the town's buildings were moved to Banff and Canmore. Bankhead was located at the foot of Cascade Mountain, which contains high-grade anthracite coal deposits. The Bankhead coal mine was operated by the Pacific Coal Company, a subsidiary of the Canadian Pacific Railway, which needed the coal to fuel its steam engines.





      Air powered (fireless) locomotive on display at Bankhead, Alberta.



      (Above) Rhubarb grows out of jet-black anthracite: high-grade coal formed 100 million years ago. At its peak in 1911, the Bankhead mine that once stood on this site at the base of Cascade Mountain employed 480 men. Its tunnels produced half a million tonnes of coal that year, destined for the furnaces of the Canadian Pacific Railway. Miners came mostly from Poland, Italy, Britain, and Russia, while a group of 90 Chinese men were brought to Canada to sort rock from coal for minimal wages. Unwelcome in the town, they set up on the far side of the slag heaps, where they made a shanty town from scrap wood. They also created a kitchen garden, where they cultivated, among other plants, the hardy rhubarb that still thrives today.

      Apart from it being forbidden to remove plants from what has been a part of Banff National Park since its designation in 1930, the whole site is contaminated with dioxins from waste oil. So no crumble today.



      'Wave Sound' (2017) piece by Anishinaabe artist Rebecca Belmore commissioned by @landmarksreperes2017



      Rocky Mountains beauty by Lake Minnewanka.



      A Jeff Wall-esque shot of the group by Lake Minnewanka.



      September 21, 2017: (Above and below) Geology tour around campus with Jim Olver (Director of Customer Service, Banff Centre) "reading" the campus, its formations and fossils. Olver has worked at the Banff Centre for 35 years.





      (A
      bove) A well rounded composite rock and (below) finding rocks around campus.


      September 23, 2017: (below and following six) Stunning Bow Lake hike with independent curator and BICI resident, Heidi Rabben.













      September 24, 2017: (Below) Visual Arts + Digital department excursion to Lake Louise, named 'Lake of the Little Fishes' by the Stoney Nakota First Nations people.

      Lake Louise's impressive emerald colour of the water is due to the silt-like rock flour continually being carried into the lake by melt-water from the surrounding glaciers. The tiny and uniform particles become suspended in the water, refracting blue and green wavelengths of light.









      September 25, 2017: (Below) Monday weekly meeting and afternoon group seminar led by Caroline Loewen, Shane Krepakevich and Semâ Bekirovic around Don McKay's essay “Ediacaran & Anthropocene: poetry as a reader of deep time” inducing imaginative speculation through geopoetry. Guest Faculty
      Sean Lynch arrives from Ireland.





      September 26, 2017: (Below) Afternoon lecture by "Geologic Time" Guest Faculty Sean Lynch on the value of conversations, Bardic traditions, stone-carvers James and John O'Shea, and fried chicken.





      September 27, 2017: (Below) 1:1 sessions with Sean Lynch and a bit of time to dig into the library and read the beautifully written book "The Writing of Stones" by Roger Caillois (1970) with an introduction by Marguerite Yourcenar: "Those fusions, pressures, ruptures, imprints of matter in matter have left traces inside and out which sometimes almost exactly resemble writing and which actually do transcribe events from millions of years ago."





      September 28, 2017: Evening seminar in the Banff Upper Hot Springs, elevated at 1,585 meters it's the highest hot water bathing in Canada.



      September 29, 2017: (Below) "Geologic Time" hike to the Stanley Glacier in the Kootenay National Park in British Columbia, led by guides Rona Schneberger and Jane Whitney. At the base of Mount Stanley, we turned over some rocks and found 505-million-year-old Burgess Shale trilobites, soft-body fossils from the Eldon formation.





















      September 30, 2017: Second screening night led by Sean Lynch.

       
      October 2, 2017: (Below) Final week of the programme. Last Monday weekly meeting, this time under the snow. Third and final afternoon workshop led by 'Geologic timers' Becky Forsythe, Caitlin Chaisson and Chloe Hodge around Hito Steyerl's text "In Free Fall: A Thought Experiment on vertical perspective" (e-flux journal #24, April 2011).






      October 3 and 4, 2017: Final 1:1 conversations with participants, and open studios by the Independent artists.
       
      October 5, 2017, 5—7pm: (photos below) The Open event of
      Geologic Time in the library, followed by a visit to Illuminations, "a participative artwork experience by Sarah Fuller, Moment Factory and Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity".

      The closing event of Geologic Time was conceived as a two-hour infiltration into the pages, shelves, and display possibilities of The Banff Centre library. Featuring storytelling, documentation, annotation, sculpture, video, conversation and other live situations, the event presented some sediments of the ten participants’ ongoing research and lithic collaborations. Pdf of the event programme here.


      Caitlin Chaisson has been researching a former experimental farm station in Agassiz, British Columbia, and a forgotten centennial time capsule buried under a granite marker there. Caitlin also presented a cut-and-paste station on the table next to the photocopier, and a display for the tall vitrine just behind it. If you plan on attending the Agassiz Fall Fair and Corn Festival around September 14, 2018, Caitlin will be there, lending an extra hand in the rocky relay that is the shape of time. Pickles may be involved. 

      Meanwhile read her reflections on her "Geologic Time" experience.


      Also on the main floor, Chloe Hodge made an arrangement of book spreads and purloined texts on a large desk on the side of the library that faces Sulphur Mountain. From 1956–1981 the latter peak was the site of a high altitude geophysical laboratory, a Cosmic Ray Station. Chloe’s presentation filters the macro-perspective enabled by this buoyant micro-history through into a speculative research-workshop around freefall, the loss of perspective, and groundlessness. 



      Becky Forsythe has been making plans for a future exhibition inspired by the artist and naturalist known as Petra, who spent decades collecting stones and minerals from the mountains in Stöðvarfjörður, Iceland. Camila Sposati has been reflecting on the various “extractions” of a residency and exhibition that took place in the Amazon in 2004, gradually turning them into a script for a play. Becky and Camila are collaborating for this event on a procedural work using the library photocopier on the main floor (Receding Agate and Rhodochrosite). On the upper floor, they present two further collaborations via the media of “chairs and view” – Looking at the mountains and The mountain at my back – that recontextualize the interior space with respect to vistas of Mt Bourgeau, the Massive Range, Pilot Mountain, and so on.


      Chloe is also one of eight 'Geologic Time' narrators whose readings can be heard through speakers on the main floor. What we are hearing are excerpts from Lost Rocks (2017–21), a growing library of short fiction books commissioned by Justy Phillips & Margaret Woodward (A Published Event). Described by the Hobart-based duo as “an accumulative event of mineralogical, metaphysical and metallurgical telling”, the books that have come into the world to date have been incorporated into the library’s holdings alongside a glossary and can be found in the geology section upstairs.



      Caroline Loewen has put together documentation at the top of the stairs, along the narrow “bar”. Caroline delves deep into the story of sandstone in Alberta, a rock that gained widespread favour for building and decorative use following Calgary’s Great Fire of 1886. The black-and-brown Rundle Rock that was once quarried at the base of Banff-Centre-neighbour Mount Rundle and was used extensively in creating the Banff Springs Hotel also joins a conversation that anticipates an exhibition scheduled for next summer at Lougheed House in Calgary. (The same Lougheed dynasty lends its name to the Jeanne and Peter Lougheed Building (JPL), the Banff Centre’s media headquarters.) 



      For these two hours in the library Semâ Bekirovic employed a number of external hard drives to act as pedestals for small stones. How many terabytes can a hunk of rock hold? What fragments of data detritus, chunks and grains of documents, broken off images, or weathered files, might be read and written, stored or retrieved? We might ponder this as we stand by the “bar” looking towards Sulphur Mountain. 


      An audio narration drafted by Penelope Smart was also heard on the upper floor via a Bluetooth speaker in the stacks, near “memoirs and narrative”. Here, an image of the exquisite marble bust by Giovanni Strazza animated Penny’s writing during the last weeks. It came to St.John’s, Newfoundland, in 1856. Ring the bell to the right of the main door of the Presentation Convent adjoining the Basilica in St.John’s and maybe one of the sisters will let you see it.



      Shane Krepakevich has been prototyping an exhibition display system, or running a 1:1 scale artist-run research institute, in his studio overlooking Mike MacDonald’s butterfly garden. Shane has been thinking about design impulses, transparency, support structures, and the refraction of light through glass, sometimes during the hours he has spent sanding and polishing a series of bronze paperweights, or prospecting the library for textual gems. For the library presentation, Shane made 8.5"×11" arrangements of found sentences, printed them, and then squirrelled them away inside selected library books, alongside images he has photocopied for his display system project.



      A number of commemorative posters by Latitudes are presented in the meeting room upstairs. These mark some of the excursions and talks that have formed a part of the last weeks through the motif of the human hand as a geologic scale device. 



      Finally, if we ever need reminding about the mystery and power of geological formations, 'Picnic at Hanging Rock', the 1975 Australian film directed by Peter Weir, was screened on a monitor on the upper floor.

      Special thanks to Mark Black, Brandy Dahrouge, Peta Rake, and Angela Schenstead. 

      October 6, 2017: Exit interviews, pack up, and departures.

      'Geologic Time' participants: Justy Phillips & Margaret Woodward (A Published Event), based in Hobart; Semâ Bekirovic, based in Amsterdam; Caitlin Chaisson based in Vancouver; Becky Forsythe, based in Reykjavik; Chloe Hodge, based in London; Shane Krepakevich, based in Toronto; Caroline Loewen, based in Calgary; Penelope Smart, based in St. John’s, Newfoundland; and Camila Sposati, based in Sao Paulo.

      'Geologic Time' was a residency programme of the Banff International Curatorial Institute (BICI), organised by the Banff Centre for Art and Creativity in Alberta, Canada. The 2017 residency took place between September 11–October 6 within the framework of the group exhibition 4.543 billion. The matter of matter curated by Latitudes at CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux, France, on view until January 7, 2018.


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      “Thinking with” geology at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity


      Greetings from the Banff Centre in the Canadian Rockies!

      For the next four weeks, Latitudes will be Lead Faculty of the residency programme "Geologic Time" organised by the Banff International Curatorial Institute (BICI) at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity

      Curators, artists and writers Justy Phillips & Margaret Woodward (A Published Event) based in Hobart; Sema Bekirovic, based in Amsterdam; Caitlin Chaisson based in Vancouver; Becky Forsythe, based in Reykjavik; Chloe Hodge, based in London; Shane Krepakevich, based in Toronto; Caroline Loewen, based in Calgary; Penelope Smart, based in St. John's, Newfoundland; and Camila Sposati, based in Sao Paulo, are here for a month to discuss geological formations and timescales, while speculating about a more expansive and longer-term view of art, exhibitions, and their institutions. 

      Through fieldwork, seminars, and independent study, 'Geologic Time' we will be thinking with geology as a potential way to consider non-conventional, deep-time perspectives on curating, exhibition making, programming, and fieldwork within contemporary art.

      Programme on Banff's website.

      On September 12, 4 pm, Latitudes will give a lecture presenting their practice at the Jeanne & Peter Lougheed Building 204. Everyone is welcome!

      "Geologic Time" is a thematic residency programme of the Banff International Curatorial Institute (BICI), Visual + Digital Arts organised by the Banff Centre for Art and Creativity in Alberta, Canada. Within the framework of the residency, Latitudes curated the group exhibition "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux, France, on view until January 7, 2018.  


      Entrance to one of the two wings of the exhibition "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux, France, on view until January 7, 2018. Photo: Latitudes / RK.

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      Cover Story—September 2017: Dark disruption: David Mutiloa’s "Synthesis"

      Photo: Roberto Ruiz. Cortesía: David Mutiloa.


      The September 2017 Monthly Cover Story "Dark disruption: David Mutiloa’s "Synthesis" is now up on www.lttds.org – after this month it will be archived here.

      "Human worker-performers move sluggishly around a modular platform in a permanently gloomy La Capella; they are employed to apparently do nothing much at all, embodying an uncanny kind of work–life balance. It’s the gig economy, stupid. David Mutiloa’s melancholy Barcelona exhibition Synthesis shadows how changes in the modern office workplace have heeded novel notions of management and business efficiency, abiding by a labour market that progressively favours flexibility and adaptability." Continue reading 

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities. 

       Photo: Pep Herrero / La Capella/ Barcelona Producció 2017.

      Below the text written by Latitudes, mentors of the project:

      "In the modern office workplace, spatial design and brand communication have evolved in step with novel notions of management, business efficiency and a labour market that progressively favours flexibility and adaptability. The typical Western office worker – their physiology as well as their psychology – has also been overhauled. Twentieth-century time-and-motion studies first standardised and rationalised the salaried worker’s time and space. And today the twenty-first-century worker is increasingly a co-working independent contractor who navigates an entirely dissolved working-week structure, continuous competitive ‘disruption’ and the so-called ‘gig economy’. 

      Using sculpture, video projections and human presence, David Mutiloa’s exhibition Synthesis proposes that this condition has led to the appearance of pharmacologically managed depression, “an illness of responsibility”. It has also induced a terrible form of boredom – the spectre of both the boundless outsourcing of undesirable labour to the developing world, and automation leading to a world without work. Synthesis shadows these ideas through two video projections, live action by human worker-performers and the display of a series of sculptures made from steel, silicon, resin, computer components, pharmaceutical drugs and other materials. These sculptures derive from human anatomy and iconic industrial design forms conceived for the office environment from the 1960s to the 1990s. These decades saw a transition from the typewriter to the personal computer, and from rooms with regimented rows of desks to spaces with customisable cubicles, ‘neighbourhoods’ and flexible work ‘nests’. Arranged on and around a modular platform like industrial still lifes, the sculptural elements are sometimes juxtaposed with office-systems brochures. They often represent variations based on an individual element that Mutiloa has abstracted, augmented or made into its inverse form through moulding and casting – furniture, desk accessories and structural systems, for example, that were designed with both high style and ergonomics in mind. Prominent among the sculptural forms are those based on the classic Pop-era Valentine typewriter, first produced in 1969 for the Italian brand Olivetti. Large metal forms are derived from wall connectors from the revolutionary Action Office systems, introduced by the Herman Miller company in the 1960s. Modular ‘workstations’ for the ‘human performer’ were comprised of angled and movable fabric-wrapped walls, which an office worker could supposedly arrange to create his or her own ideal work space. Other sculptures adopt the form of articulated arms with support for screens or are taken from the Aeron chair, also produced by Herman Miller. 


       Photo: Pep Herrero / La Capella/ Barcelona Producció 2017.

      The latter, a seat with exaggerated lumbar support, become so popular with Web startup companies in the late 1990s that it was nicknamed the ‘Dot-Com Throne’. Other forms recall the frame of the 543 Broadway chair, and a metal grid evokes the Shopping Cart desk; both of the earlier pieces were designed by Gaetano Pesce in the 1990s for the notoriously open-plan, multicoloured offices of the advertising agency TBWA/Chiat/Day New York. A large suspended video projection will present a series of highly composed shots of the installation itself, and will be filmed and edited during the exhibition and later inserted into the composition as if following a just-in-time production methodology. The second video projection of Synthesis also gives the whole exhibition space its uncanny soundtrack – a relentless, evolving, aural collage that seems to evoke the hum of a post-industrial factory floor, or the placeless drone of the knowledge economy. The screen shows a virtual camera moving over and around a spatial environment that Mutiloa derived from the 1970s office system produced by Olivetti, from which the exhibition also takes its title. Continuously generated from a 3D digital model, the visualisation comprises a looped animation that is screened throughout the exhibition. Human work-performers move listlessly around the exhibition; they are employed by Mutiloa’s exhibition, yet are apparently doing nothing at all. In a widely cited study published in 2013, experts predicted that almost half of the jobs in the US were at risk of being automated in the next two decades.  Driverless technology, cheap computers, deep learning and big data are leading to increasingly sophisticated tasks being done by ever-smarter machines across a whole range of sectors – from translation to logistics, but especially in office and administrative work. A pessimist would argue that wherever office work can be broken down into a series of routine tasks, no job is safe. If new technologies are not yet replacing workers, they may
      nevertheless be putting them under increased surveillance in order to monitor their activity and productivity minute by minute.  


      As automation rises, does the value of the tasks that can be done only by humans therefore increase? What is at stake when affective faculties such as creativity – the supposed domain of the artist – are more than ever part of a productive and evaluative logic? Does the notion that one must project one’s own personal brand through the splintered attention spans of social media point to a future marked by a total synthesis of individual fulfilment, freelancers’ anxiety and corporate competitiveness for all?
       

      — Latitudes
       

      [1] http://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/downloads/academic/The_Future_of_Employment.
       

      Photo: Pep Herrero / La Capella/ Barcelona Producció 2017. 

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      Latitudes' "out of office" 2016–2017 season

       Downtime for physical and mental "reparations" begins. 
      Photos: Latitudes (except where noted otherwise).

      It's the end of the 2016–17 season, at last. Following a Latitudes' tradition we mark the summer downtime with an "out of office" post (see the 2008-9, 2009-10, 2010-11, 2011-12, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2015–16 ones) with a series of "behind the scenes" and "making of" moments from the year gone by. Here are some glimpses of the past season, from September 2016 to July 2017.

      We'll be back in September 2017, when we'll be leading a residency programme at Banff Centre in the Canadian Rockies!

       
      15 September
      2016: The 2016–17 season started with glitter and sparkle as Antoni Hervàs' "The Mystery of Caviria" exhibition opened in La Capella. The eight chapters of his complex scenario revolved around the legend of Jason and the Argonauts’ expedition in search of the Golden Fleece. The spectacular scenography took as its point of origin the section of the tale in which the expedition led by Jason stops for a few months in Lemnos, the island of fire, in the northern part of the Aegean Sea. Taking this fragment, Hervàs explored the transformist and genre-bending possibilities of drawing, a medium that enabled him to unite two mythologies: the Cabeirian rites of Classical Greece and figures from Barcelona’s dwindling cabaret scene. Photos of the exhibition here.

      Toni's exhibition was the focus of the September and November Cover Story series on our home page, archived here.



      Photos above: Latitudes and Toni Hervàs.

      18 September 2016: More sparkle awaited on the former site of the Copacabana club and nearby frontón court. The former is currently a parking lot used by the Department of Culture of the Catalan Government. The lone castanets master Juan de la Cruz el Rosillo interpreted a moving repertoire of popular Spanish coplas. For the second part of the event, the audience walked a few meters up Las Ramblas towards the frontón, where Gerard López, Senior Spanish Champion in male rhythmic gymnastics, interpreted newly-commissioned choreography with specially-produced music by Norman Bambi, while wearing a Hervàs-designed garment (exhibited as part of his exhibition).


      20 September 2016: Just as we are catching our breath from the memorable exhibition opening and the first event related to Toni's exhibition, street banners popped up around the city announcing the second Barcelona Gallery Weekend.


      26–28 September 2016: Installation of "Composiciones" projects, five site-specific commissions for the second iteration of the Barcelona Gallery Weekend. Three days of intense preparations! Curated by Latitudes for the second time (see 2015 edition), the project further explored Barcelona as a rich fabric of the historic and the contemporary, the unfamiliar and the conspicuous.

       Above and below: Lola Lasurt at the Biblioteca Pública Arús. 
      (Above) Lúa and Mariana admiring the serendipitous finding of "El Espejo equivocado" painting at the Club Billar Barcelona. An almost spooky, yet incredibly fitting find. 

      (Above) With Rafel Bianchi and Gina Giménez unpacking Gina's works and spreading them around the former textile factory Can Trinxet, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat. 

      Silkscreened outfits for the runners finally ready to be worn throughout the weekend. Photos: Robert Llimós.

      Runners pass by Galeria dels Àngels. Photo: Gabriela Moragas.
       Testing the resistance of a pair of Levi's jeans in preparation for Wilfredo Prieto "Pantalones Rotos" at the Mounted Unit of the Barcelona City Police.


      29 September–2 October 2016: Opening and guided visits around the five "Composiciones" interventions by Lúa Coderch (at the Club Billar Barcelona); Regina Giménez (at the former textile factory Can Trinxet, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat); Lola Lasurt (at the Biblioteca Pública Arús); Robert Llimós (connecting all the participating galleries) and Wilfredo Prieto (at the Mounted Unit of the Barcelona City Police) in unique sites across the neighbourhoods of the city. Their projects offered moments of intermission, intimacy and bewilderment throughout the weekend, highlighting some lesser-known aspects of the city’s cultural heritage and municipal life.

      Storify archive of social networks posts. Photographs here.

      Guided tour by Lúa Coderch in her intervention at the Club Billar Barcelona.

      Guided tour by Gina Giménez to ARCOwalks group in Can Trinxet. 

       Speaking for the radio at the Mounted Unit of the Barcelona City Police.

       
       TV presenter Josep Paris modeled Robert Llimós' 1972 updated runners design during the weekly cultural TV programme Àrtic. Photo: Àrtic.

       Double spread on "Composiciones" in the cultural supplement "Tendències" by national newspaper El Mundo. Photo: Vanessa Graell.

      26 October 2016: Launch of Rasmus Nilausen book "Soups & Symptoms" at Múltiplos, which includes an essay by Max Andrews. For the event, Rasmus and Max served up a carrot soup (potage crécy) and requested questions from friends, family and collaborators which would be accepted as long as they fitted onto Jacob's Cream cracker.

      The catalogue was produced thanks to the funding from Premi Art Nou 2015, Art Barcelona, Associació de Galeries d’Art Contemporani in collaboration with the Institut de Cultura de Barcelona, García Galeria (Madrid) and Estrany de la Mota (Barcelona). It can be purchased in La Central.

      Max and Rasmus prepare the carrots for a large pot of Potage Crécy, questions are written on a Jacob's Cream crackers (that will later accompany the soup) and book launch at Múltiplos.


      3 November 2016: Runway show at La Capella with some costumes from the 1980s and 90s designed by actor and impresario Victor Guerrero. Part of the activities programmed on the occasion of the exhibition.

      Photos: Latitudes.

      8 November 2016: Mariana Cánepa Luna's review on Ana Jotta's exhibition published on art-agenda, focused on "her ongoing series 'Notas de rodapé' [Footnotes] [which] provide a key to understanding the semantic complexity of her work. It comprises a selection of the eclectic bits and pieces which Jotta has gathered for decades and that coexist in her studio alongside works that she has fabricated." Continue reading


      23-24 November 2016: Latitudes participated in a two-day summit "You are such a curator!" organised by the Curatorial Programme of De Appel, Amsterdam. With contributions by Mira Asriningtyas, Lucrezia Calabro Visconti, Renata Cervetto, Mateo Chacon-Pino, Galerie (Adriano Wilfert Jensen and Simon Asencio), Natasha Hoare, Kati Ilves, Prem Krishnamurthy, Inga Lace, Latitudes (Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna), Ariane Loze, Shona Mei Findlay, Fadwa Naamna, Kim Nguyen, Emma Ines Panza, Aneta Rostkowska and Kuba Woynarowski, Chris Sharp, Niels Van Tomme, Huib Haye van der Werf, and others. We took the opportunity to extend our stay on the occasion of the Amsterdam Art Weekend 2016, which included the opening of Jordan Wolfson's at the Stedelijk and the Open Studios at the Rijksakademie.


      Latitudes' presention "Following the Holy Greyhound" reflected "on the disinterment of a sculpture from 1991 – part of an exhibition by the Venezuelan artist José Antonio Hernández-Díez curated by Latitudes at MACBA, Barcelona, earlier this year – and their approach to a group exhibition in preparation for CAPC Musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux in Summer 2017. Full report here.

        Photos: Carina Erdmann/De Appel.

      November-December 2016: Two of Latitudes' projects ("Composiciones" commissions for the Barcelona Gallery Weekend and "El misterio de Caviria" by Antoni Hervàs) are shortlisted for the best exhibition of the year by the TV culture programme Tria33. The audience casts their votes online until January. Antoni Hervàs won with 40% of the audience votes. "Composiciones" ends in the third position with 17% of the votes.



      January 2017: Issue of frieze magazines includes Max Andrews' "Salon Selectives" text in the Opinion section, discussing "How open are open calls?":

      "While competition organizers typically trumpet the volume and cosmopolitanism of applications received an ebullient endorsement, others may rue the sheer amount of collectively wasted effort made by the also-rans. (In Spain, Bilbao-based studio Taller de Casquería estimated that the hours involved in the 1,715 submissions received for the Guggenheim Helsinki open call for designs represented over €18 million worth of speculative work.) In Gary Hustwit’s 2011 documentary film, Urbanized, Rem Koolhaas stated that such competitions were a ‘complete drain of intelligence’, inviting mass creative thinking with the guarantee that the vast majority of it will be discarded. This addiction in the field of architecture appears to be gaining traction in contemporary art as a means not only of generating exhibitions but of programming institutions."

      The text was the January Cover Story on our website.


      25 January 2017: Presentation of Antoni Hervàs' La Capella publication at the Antic Teatre in the background of one of his scenographic drawings dedicated to Gilda Love (this was the second time this had been displayed in this space, following the recording in May last year of Gilda performing, a video later included in the exhibition). The evening was followed by the "Desplume" monthly cabaret show.




      16 February 2017: A moving evening seeing Toni Hervàs receive the Premi Ciutat de Barcelona for visual arts exhibition of the year at the Sala de Consell de Cent in the Barcelona City Hall. The jury recognised "the artist's research in linking Greek mythology with the Barcelona cabaret scene from the 1960s–80s and for the recuperation of its vitality."

      Toni receiving the award from Barcelona mayor Ada Colau and during his speech. Photos: Latitudes.

      1 March 2017: Launch of the fourth 'Incidents (of Travel)' episode, in which Galician curator Pedro de Llano met Lisboeta artist Luisa Cunha in Lisbon. Their offline day took place in early December and went through key locations in the artist's life – from Ar.Co, the School of Visual Arts in Almada where she enrolled at age thirty-seven, to the Largo da Academia de Belas Artes in Chiado, where she conceived a public project that never materialised.
      Above: captures from the project website.

      2 March 2017: Opening of Joana Hurtado Matheu's "Nostalgic Dissidence" exhibition mentored by Latitudes as part of the Barcelona Producció 2016 season. Repairs and conservation work in the Baroque cupola had delayed the opening by three months, so we were all pleased the day finally arrived. 

        Working on the exhibition layout.

      Francesco Arena's "Mare della tranquillità" (2013) is activated by a performer. "An old wooden table, taken from the family dining room, has been cut into four pieces to form the corners of a much bigger new table. Enlarged with inserts of metal, its size evokes the table on which, on May 7, 1945, the signing of the German surrender ended World War II in Europe. The work is the support for a participative action which consists of walking back and forth on the five-metre table a total of 155 km, the length of the Berlin Wall. Every day during the two months of the exhibition someone will get up on the table and, wearing shoes that have never touched the ground and holding a tally counter, walk from one end to the other 596 times." (exhibition wall label by the curator)

      Photos: Pep Herrero/La Capella and Marc Llibre Roig.

      22–24 March 2017: Third trip to Bordeaux. Packed with meetings. Three months to go to the opening of "4.543 billion" exhibition. In two weeks deadline to submit the texts for the gallery guide. 

       Running through each work through our sketch up exhibition rendering with the curatorial, collections, registrar, press and installation teams.

      23 March 2017: Meanwhile in Barcelona, Toni Hervàs wins yet another award – for the best exhibition of the year, and given by the Catalan Association of Art Critics. 

      Hervàs during the award ceremony. Photo: ACCA.

      April 2017: A bit of a website refresh – these things are so darn tedious yet they feel so good when they are done and dusted!


      26 April 2017: Fifth 'Incidents (of Travel)' episode online narrating the encounter between curator Simon Soon and artist Chi Too. Their offline day took place in April 2016, when they visited the Malaysian state of Terengganu, where chi spent some time in 2013, surrounded by "men and women who work(ed) multiple jobs as a fishermen, house builders, boat builders, farmers, coconut pickers, food producers, and everything else that matters."

      'Incidents (of Travel)' is a chartered day-long itinerary as an alternative to the standard studio-visit, inviting an extended conversation between a curator and an artist. Previous destinations have included Chicago, US; Jinja, Uganda; Suzhou, China; and Lisbon, Portugal. Produced by Kadist; photographs and video by Awang Ketut; site built by The Present Group.



      Above: captures from the project website.

      3 May 2017: Conversation with Korean-born, Berlin-based artist Haegue Yang at the Fundació Tàpies, Barcelona. The evening discussion analysed Yang's practice from the perspective of historical development and cyclic fluctuations, asked, as phrased by sociologist and economist Giovanni Arrighi – what is accumulative, what is cyclical, what is new? 

      Photos: Fundació Han Nefkens.

      May 2017: After three intense weeks of jury process, eighteen selected projects of Barcelona Producció 2017 grant scheme are announced. We begin the year-long mentoring process of three projects out of the seventeen selected projects this year as part of the Barcelona Producció 2017 production grants. David Mutiloa's SYNTHESIS (18 July–25 September 2017) is first to occupy La Capella's 15th-century exhibition space. The other two projects mentored by Latitudes are a publication by Anna Moreno and an exhibition "Artengo2000" at the small exhibition space by Camille Orny and Magda Vaz.

       Jury searching for a solid wifi spot to watch video documentation sent by an applicant.

      12 June 2017, in Basel: Max Andrews of Latitudes contributed the essay "C-H-R-I-S-T-O-P-H-E-R-K-N-O-W-L-E-S. SO LISTEN UP" about the spoken-word works, "typings", poetry and paintings of Christopher Knowles. The publication is made to accompany his solo presentation in the stand of NoguerasBlanchard gallery at Liste art fair in Basel. The exquisite short-run publication is designed and printed by Barcelona-based independent publishers and Riso printers Do The Print. Read on.

       Photos: Latitudes

      Photo via @gal_NB


      12 June, in Barcelona: Following the announcement of the awardees of the 2017–18 season of Barcelona Producció production grants, we visit David Mutiloa's temporary studio in Hangar. Mutiloa is the first artist to open the season and his exhibition "SYNTHESIS" will take place in the central nave of La Capella from July 18. 

      "Using sculpture, video projections and human presence, David Mutiloa’s exhibition Synthesis proposes that this condition has led to the appearance of pharmacologically managed depression, “an illness of responsibility”. It has also induced a terrible form of boredom – the spectre of both the boundless outsourcing of undesirable labour to the developing world and automation leading to a world without work. – Text from the gallery guide, written by Latitudes (pdf here). 

      Here is a short video documenting the exhibition.

       Photos: Latitudes

       
      19 June–2 July: We're off to Bordeaux for the installation and opening of "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" exhibition in ten days. After two years of preparation, it's a truly exciting moment to see it all coming together.  

      —> Press release here
      —> Ongoing archive of social media posts here.

      Lucy Skaer's 26 coal and resin sculptures after Brancusi's 26 different editions of "Bird in Space".

      Deciding the layout of Félix Arnaudin's incredible suite of photographs kindly lent by the Musée d'Aquitaine Bordeaux.

      Photovoltaic panels charging the batteries that power Nicholas Mangan's double video projection "Ancient Lights" (2015). 

       Anne Garde's photos documenting Richard Serra's "Threats of Hell" (1990) production from Dillinger Hütter (Germany) to its exhibition at the CAPC nave, to its current location at a private collector home on the banks of the Garonne, where it changed its name to a happier "Hopes of Paradise".
       Part of the CAPC installation team having a coffee break enjoying Stéphane's awesome chocolate cake.
       Rayyane Tabet's mobile pieces arriving from Hamburg at the CAPC.
      Registrar thick checklist file.
       François measuring Lara Almarcegui's works before placing them on the wall.

       Construction of the warehouse and jetty. Statements of works by engineer and architect Claude Deschamps.
       Christophe moving the 600kg rock by Hubert Duprat to the entrance.
       Pascal lighting the exhibition.

      Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller stretching their new work "Untitled (Blue)" (2017), for a work focused on indigo and colonial trade. 

      Christina Hemauer and Terence Gower listening to Pep Vidal explaining his sculpture work "19-metre tree cut in 7 equal volumes" (2015). 

       One of the many guided visits for press, staff, friends of the museum during the opening days. Photo: Latitudes/RK.

      11–14 July 2017: Installation of "SYNTHESIS" in La Capella. David Mutiloa's solo exhibition is the first of the 2017–18 season of Barcelona Producció. Opening on July 18, on view until September 25.

      "In the modern office workplace, spatial design and brand communication have evolved in step with novel notions of management, business efficiency and a labour market that progressively favours flexibility and adaptability. The typical Western office worker – their physiology as well as their psychology – has also been overhauled. Twentieth-century time-and-motion studies first standardised and rationalised the salaried worker’s time and space. And today the twenty-first-century worker is increasingly a co-working independent contractor who navigates an entirely dissolved working-week structure, continuous competitive ‘disruption’ and the so-called ‘gig economy’." – Text by Latitudes from the exhibition sheet.

      Scheme to help assemble the platform.

       Artist at work.



      24–26 July 2017: Trip to Copenhagen to visit the impressive solo exhibition by John Kørner, "Altid Mange Problemer" at Kunsthal Charlottenborg, curated by Marie Nipper—the largest exhibition of his works to date. Max Andrews of Latitudes has been invited to contribute an essay for his forthcoming monograph published by Roulette Russe which is due to come out in November 2017. Max has previously written on John's work for his 2006 exhibition "Problems" at Victoria Miro Gallery in London. Our first visit to Copenhagen to see John's work was precisely the subject of our first blog post in September 2006!

      Everything in Copenhagen seemed to have turned yellow – we knew John's love for the colour (first image below), but also Mark Leckey's exhibition at the x-room of the Statens Museum fur Kunst, seemed to have been inspired by "the Nyboder yellow" hue – the historic row house district of former Naval barracks in Copenhagen. 


      Mark Leckey's exhibition ‘He Thrusts his fists against the posts but still insists he sees the ghosts’ recreated the ramps underneath the M53 motorway bridge in Ellesmere Port. 

      Example of the "Nyboder yellow" hue – the historic row house district of former Naval barracks in Copenhagen. 

      27 July 2017: Visit Ricardo Bofill's Walden7 and his nearby studio Taller de Arquitectura with Anna Moreno. Moreno was awarded a grant of Barcelona Producció 2017 to produce the publication "The Drowned Giant", a project focusing on a performance–happening staged by Bofill in 1970 to promote his unrealised architectural project La Ciudad en el Espacio in Moratalaz (Madrid). The publication will be launched in late November 2017 and is mentored by Latitudes. As part of Moreno's ongoing research on Bofill's practice, she has been living in Walden7 for the past month in order to carry research for a forthcoming commission for the Spring 2018 exhibition "Beehave" at the Fundació Miró. 


       (Above) Taller de arquitectura studio. (Below) Walden7 in Sant Just Desvern (Barcelona).



      At the time of writing, we are frantically preparing for what will be an intense September. On September 10 we'll travel to Banff, where Latitudes will be Lead Faculty of the month-long residency programme "Geologic Time" at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity which will bring together 10 curators/artists/writers from around the world to discuss geological formations and timescales, while speculating about a more expansive and longer-term view of art, exhibitions, and their institutions. We will be “thinking with” geology (beyond the depiction of the landscape) as a potential way to consider non-conventional, deep-time perspectives on curating, exhibition making, programming, and fieldwork within contemporary art. 

       Julius Schoppe (1795–1868), “Illustration of giant stone near the Rauenschen Mountains near Fürstenwalde”, c. 1827. Public domain – Wikimedia Commons.

      RELATED CONTENT:




      Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern


      The August 2017 Monthly Cover Story "Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern" is now up on www.lttds.org after this month it will be archived here

      "Anna Moreno is waving from the roof of Walden 7, the vertiginous sixteen-storey apartment complex designed by architect Ricardo Bofill in 1975. Hola Anna, què fas!? Looming out of the greenery far below is another extraordinary building that we visited earlier in the day. La Fábrica is a former cement works whose silos and cavernous “cathedral” are home to Bofill’s Taller de Arquitectura. It is 29°C and the humidity is at 62% in Sant Just Desvern, west of Barcelona. Two rooftop swimming pools provide a refreshing respite. We don’t complain." Continue reading 

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities. 

      RELATED CONTENT:




      Max Andrews essay on Christopher Knowles for NoguerasBlanchard at Liste 2017

       
      Max Andrews of Latitudes contributed the essay "C-H-R-I-S-T-O-P-H-E-R-K-N-O-W-L-E-S. SO LISTEN UP" about the spoken-word works, "typings", poetry and paintings by Christopher Knowles. The publication was made to accompany his recent solo presentation in the stand of NoguerasBlanchard gallery at Liste art fair in Basel. 

      Max reviewed Knowles’ exhibition at Gavin Brown's enterprise for frieze magazine back in October 2004, and his work "Untitled (Alert Paintings)" (2004) depicting the Department of Homeland Security’s Threat Advisory System, was the linchpin of the Latitudes-curated 2007 exhibition "Extraordinary Rendition" at NoguerasBlanchard.  

      The exquisite short-run publication (500 copies) was designed and printed by Barcelona-based independent publishers and Riso printers Do The Print.


      All photos: Latitudes.

      Christopher Knowles was born in New York City, USA, in 1959. Lives and works in New York. He has taken part in several exhibitions, among which: 'In a Word', Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia, USA, curated by Anthony Elms and Hilton Als (2015); 'Secret Codes', Galeria Luisa Strina, São Paulo (2014); 'The Sundance Kid is Beautiful', The Louvre Museum, Paris, France, 2013; 'Merci Mercy', 980 Madison Avenue, New York (2013); 'Ecstatic Alphabets/Heaps of Language', MoMA, New York (2012); 'En el primer cercle', Fundació Antoni Tàpies, Barcelona (2011); 'Poor. Old. Tired. Horse', Institute of Contemporary Arts, London (2009); 'Visions of the Frontier', curated by Robert Wilson, Institut Valencia d’Art Modern (2009); 'Glossolalia: Languages of Drawing', Museum of Modern Art, New York (2008); 'Get Lost: Artists Map Downtown New York', New Museum Project, New York (2007); 'Learn to Read', Tate Modern, London (2007); 'Extraordinary Rendition', NoguerasBlanchard, Barcelona (2007).

      Knowles' is represented by NoguerasBlanchard, Barcelona / Madrid; Gavin Brown's enterprise, New York / Rome; and Office Baroque in Brussels.


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      Cover Story – July 2017: "4.543 billion"


      The July 2017 Monthly Cover Story "4.543 billion" is now up on www.lttds.org after July it will be archived here

      "4.543 billion. The matter of matter recently opened at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux, and features the work of more than thirty artists. Curated by Latitudes, the exhibition looks at histories of art as fragments in geological time. The portentous mood of this gallery hinges on combustion and history violently formed through the fundamental reordering of the relations between humans and the rest of nature." Continue reading

      Social media archive related to the exhibition.
      Photo gallery of the exhibition.

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities. 

      RELATED CONTENT:




      "Geologic Time" thematic residency programme at the Banff Centre for Art and Creativity in Alberta, Canada

      Julius von Schoppe (1795–1868), Illustration of giant stone near the Rauenschen Mountains near Furstenwalde, 1827, Lithograph, von Tempeltey.

      Between September 11 and October 6, 2017, ten artists, researchers, writers and curators from around the world will ponder geological formations and stratigraphy, minerals, and resource extraction to speculate about a more expansive, slower and longer-term view of art, exhibitions, and institutions. The spectacular Rocky Mountains will not only be the backdrop, but the active participants.

      Through
      fieldwork, seminars, and independent study, 'Geologic Time' participants will be “thinking with” geology (beyond the depiction of landscape) as a potential way to consider non-conventional, deep-time perspectives on curating, exhibition making, programming, and fieldwork within contemporary art. 

      Lead faculty: Latitudes  
      Guest Faculty: Sean Lynch

      "Geologic Time" is a thematic residency programme of the Banff International Curatorial Institute, Visual + Digital Arts organised by the Banff Centre for Art and Creativity in Alberta, Canada. Within the framework of the residency Latitudes curated the group exhibition "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux, France, on view until January 7, 2018.   


      View of the Banff Centre campus. Photo: Latitudes.

      RELATED CONTENT:

      • "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" in pictures.
      • Guest Faculty of the Thematic Residency 'Blueprint for Happiness' at The Banff Centre, Canada, 27 July–8 August 2015 16 July 2015
      • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
      • Cover Story December 2016: Ten years ago – Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook 5 December 2016 
      • Cover Story – May 2016: Material histories – spilling the beans at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux 10 May 2016.
      • Second research trip to Bordeaux 16 July 2016 




      Cover Story – June 2017: "Moth light—Absent Forms"


      The June 2017 Monthly Cover Story ""Moth light—Absent Forms"" is now up on www.lttds.org after June it will be archived here

      "The Latitudes-curated Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes & des Arts et Techniques dans la Vie Moderne opened at Meessen De Clercq, Brussels, in February 2011. More a series of five interlinked solo presentations than a conventional thematic group exhibition, it featured the work of Kasper Akhøj, Martí Anson, Maria Loboda, Charlotte Moth and Sarah Ortmeyer." Continue reading

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities. 

      RELATED CONTENT:




      SAVE THE DATE: 29 June, 19h. Private view of the exhibition "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" at the CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux


      Xavier Ribas, Chilean Nitrate publicity postcard, c. 1920 from "A History of Detonations", 2013. Courtesy the artist and ProjecteSD, Barcelona; and Lucas Ihlein, "Under Ground", 2010. Courtesy of the artist.


      SAVE THE DATE

      Exhibition ‘4.543 billion. The matter of matter’, CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux, June 29, 2017–January 7, 2018.  

      Opening: June 29, 2017 (6 pm)

      With: A.J. Aalders, Lara Almarcegui, Maria Thereza Alves, Félix Arnaudin, Amy Balkin, Alessandro Balteo-Yazbeck in collaboration with Media Farzin, Bernd Becher and Hilla Becher, Étienne Denisse, Hubert Duprat, Giulio Ferrario, Ângela Ferreira, Anne Garde, Ambroise-Louis Garneray, Terence Gower, Rodney Graham, Ilana Halperin (also at the Université de Bordeaux’s zoology department), Marianne Heier, Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, Lucas Ihlein and Louise Kate Anderson, Jannis Kounellis, Martín Llavaneras, Erlea Maneros Zabala, Nicholas Mangan, Fiona Marron, Alexandra Navratil, Xavier Ribas, Alfred Roll, Amie Siegel, Lucy Skaer, Alfred Smith, Rayyane Tabet, Pierre Théron, Pep Vidal, Alexander Whalley Light, Stuart Whipps (also at the Musée des Beaux-Arts) as well as documents and objects lent by the archives of the CAPC, the Archives Bordeaux Métropole, the Archives départementales de la Gironde, and the geology collection of the UFR Sciences de la Terre et de la Mer, Université de Bordeaux.

      Curated by Latitudes

      With contributions from more than 30 artists, “4.543 billion. The matter of matter” is a major exhibition that addresses works of art, collections and cultural histories in relation to ecological processes and a geological scale of time. It presents a continuum of materials and temporal landscapes – films, works on paper, photographs, sculptures, documents, and other meaningful things – and springs from the CAPC building’s former life as a warehouse for colonial commodities whose limestone walls were once deep in the ground and whose wooden beams were once part of a forest.


      A central proposal of the exhibition is that works of art are part of geophysical history as much as art history. 4.543 billion attempts to take into account both a micro-local and a planetary perspective, and to rethink some of the histories of art as fragments of broader narratives about the Earth and how our place in it has been represented. What is at stake when art and museums take on greater temporal and material awareness? How might they move beyond a spatial framework of “think globally, act locally”, to “think historically, act geologically”? 

      Collections are accumulations of real physical matter in time as well as of ideas, decisions, fashions, knowledge, and use. Likewise minerals and organic matter might be regarded as both cultural evidence and archival storage media. This exhibition takes a situated view of the past that resists an undifferentiated narrative in which modernity in general is at fault for global ecological disarray, or humanity in an invariably abstract sense must take responsibility.


      Accordingly, the artists included instead often address the specific roles and purposeful effects of individuals, practices, states or corporations in an account of how mineral agents and organic processes have intertwined with and underpinned culture. Marianne Heier’s contribution, for example, documents a project addressing the decisive roll North Sea oil has played in shaping art and culture in Norway. Rayyane Tabet’s works deal sculpturally with the legacy of the Trans-Arabian Pipe Line, a joint venture by three American oil companies that came together in 1946 to construct an pipeline from Saudi Arabia to the Mediterranean. Incorporating a fragment of Breccia Pernice marble from the lobby of Trump Tower, Dynasty (2017) by Amie Siegel weaves Italian geology into the political turmoil of the present. 

      Several of the more documentary projects on display (including those by Alessandro Balteo Yazbeck and Terence Gower) trace the relationships between Modern art, the museum, and wealth created through extractive industry, combining approaches framed by Earth sciences with colonial history, sociology and political reportage. Yet other works take a more atmospheric, filmic, sculptural or graphic approach to extraction, economy, energy and global exchange, whether orbiting around sunlight, forests, synthetic materials derived from fossil fuels (a subject addressed by Alexandra Navratil), or the services and substances entailed in buildings that display art (as seen through the work of Lucas Ihlein and Lara Almarcegui).
      In addition to two new projects in development for the occasion (by Christina Hemauer & Roman Keller and Ilana Halperin), the exhibition will include many works kindly lent by the artists and international galleries, as well as those from the CAPC collection and its archives. Loans from Bordeaux institutions include those from the Archives Bordeaux Métropole, the Archives départementales de la Gironde, the Musée des Beaux-Arts, the Musée d’Aquitaine and the geology collection of the UFR Sciences de la Terre et de la Mer, Université de Bordeaux.


      Located at opposite ends of the galleries will be two imposing works that bookend the exhibition conceptually as well as physically. Originally made for CAPC in 1985, Jannis Kounellis’s nine-metre-long Sans titre is a slab of steel draped with coffee sacks that spits flames. On the other side, Ancient Lights (2015) is a two-screen video installation by Nicholas Mangan that is powered by an off-grid solar system with panels on the roof of the CAPC building. With sections filmed at the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona, and a salt-storage solar plant near Seville, Mangan’s looped videos speculates on the ideology and politics of energy. 


      Several works by Ângela Ferreira also link diverse histories: those of the Cullinan Diamond Mine in South Africa, the source of one of the largest gems ever found, and the Chislehurst Caves in South East London, a crucible of counter-culture in the 1960s. In terms of an exploration of the underground – in this case with a sociological dimension – one could also mention All surface expectations disappear with depth (2010) a three-screen video work by Fiona Marron that juxtaposes text from a 1954 field report on working conditions in an American gypsum mine with footage from present-day excavation in Ireland.


      Share:
      #4543billion 

      @LTTDS 
      @CAPCmusee 
      @paysagesbx17

      ‘4.543 billion’ is the contribution of the CAPC musée to the cultural season Paysages Bordeaux 2017. Within the exhibition framework, Latitudes will lead the month-long residency programme ‘Geologic Time’ at Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity, Alberta, Canada, in September–October 2017.


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      Jurado y tutores de Barcelona Producció – Anuncio de los proyectos ganadores temporada 2017–2018

      Fotos de Pep Herrero para Barcelona Producció/La Capella.

      Después de una intensísima semana de lectura de las 230 solicitudes recibidas, otra semana de debate entre los miembros del jurado y una tercera semana entrevistando a los 31 candidatos pre-seleccionados, el jurado de la temporada 2017–2018 de Barcelona Producció formado por David Armengol, Alexandra Laudo, Mónica Bello, Joan Caselles, Mireia Sallarès y Latitudes junto a Oriol Gual, director de La Capella (con voz, sin voto), ha decidido seleccionar los siguientes 17 proyectos para su producción y presentación a lo largo de la temporada:

      Sala Grande – Exposición individual

      • "Synthesis" de David Mutiloa
      • "Talk trouble" de Claudia Pagès
      • "El Gafe i la Revolució" de Dani Montlleó
      Sala pequeña – Exposición individual
      • "Remover con una vara de madera" de Matteo Guidi
      • "ARTENGO2000" de Camille Orny y Magda Vaz
      • "SSSSSSSilex" de Paco Chanivet
      Sala Gran – Comisariado
      • "A break can be what we are aiming for" de Irina Mutt
      Sala pequeña – Comisariado
      (Modalidad desierta)

      Proyectos deslocalizados

      • "Són els microorganismes els que tindran l’última paraula" de la Associació Cultural Nyamnyam
      • "En frontera" de Marco Noris
      Investigación
      • "El Peso de mis Vecinas - La Poesía y el Cante como Dispositivos Estratégicos" de Christina Schultz
      • "El mal alumne. Pedagogia crítica per a intel·ligències artificials" de Taller Estampa
      Publicación
      • "The Drowned Giant" de Anna Moreno
      Acción en vivo
      • "Chroma" de Quim Pujol
      • "The Reading Room #3 presenta: Aparatos del habla – Materialismo histórico" de Eliana Beltrán
      • "Fine Cherry" de Victoria Macarte
      Entornos digitales
      • "Eixams" de Alex Muñoz
      • "Notes on a novel (that I am not going to write), or the swimming pool, or the hair, the herb and the bread or the tomato plant" de Irene Solà
      Latitudes tutorizará los proyectos de David Mutiloa (Sala Grande, 18 julio– 25 septiembre 2017), Anna Moreno (Proyecto de publicación, noviembre 2017) y Magda Vaz y Camille Orny (Sala pequeña, 23 enero–1 abril 2018).

      La undécima convocatoria introduce varias novedades: se han doblado el número de categorías pasando de nueve a dieciocho y se suman tres nuevos tutores (las comisarias Alexandra Laudo y Mónica Bello, y el artista Joan Casellas). La otra novedad es que el "Espai Cub" desaparece para transformarse en una sala más amplia con paredes blancas de 4×8m situado a la entrada de La Capella ("sala pequeña").

      Las nuevas líneas que se han introducido se destinan a la producción de un proyecto curatorial para la sala pequeña para formatos reducidos o de archivo (1 proyecto), edición de una publicación (1 proyecto), proyectos en entornos digitales (2 proyectos), proyectos en vivo (3 proyectos), y se ha recuperado la añorada beca de investigación (2 proyectos).

      El calendario preliminar de exhibición será en siguiente:

      18 de julio–25 de septiembre 2017
      Sala Gran (individual 1) + Sala Petita (individual 1)

      11 de octubre–7 de enero 2017
      Sala Gran (individual 2) + Sala Petita (individual 2)

      23 de enero 2017–1 de abril 2018
      Sala Gran (individual 3) + Sala Petita (individual 3)

      27 de abril–24 de junio 2018
      Sala Gran (comisariado) + Sala Petita (comisariado)

      Los proyectos deslocalizados, de edición, de acción en vivo, digitales y de investigación se producirán y presentarán a lo largo de la temporada.



      Barcelona producció es una convocatoria anual dirigida a la comunidad artística de Barcelona y su área de influencia. Es una iniciativa del Institut de Cultura de Barcelona (ICUB) del Ajuntament de Barcelona.

      CONTENIDO RELACIONADO:





      Cover Story – May 2017: "S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps"

       

      The May 2017 Monthly Cover Story "S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps" is now up on www.lttds.org after May it will be archived here.  

      "Today, as for millennia, the mighty River Zambezi is crashing over a series of precipitous basalt gorges—a place the Makololo people described as Mosi-oa-Tunya. The smoke that thunders. Since the 1870s, a Scottish stream has been plunging over a diminutive replica, seen in this month’s video Cover Story, located in the gardens of a mansion that is now a country house hotel (by all accounts with an enviable breakfast) in the village of Polbeth, less than an hour’s drive from Edinburgh." Continue reading

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities. 

      RELATED CONTENT:
      • Archive of Cover Stories
      • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
      • Cover Story – March 2017: Time travel with Jordan Wolfson 1 March 2017
      • Cover Story February 2017: The Dutch Assembly, five years on 1 February 2017
      • Cover Story January 2017: How open are open calls? 4 January 2017
      • Cover Story December 2016: Ten years ago – Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook 5 December 2016
      • Cover Story November 2016: Plucking Gilda, synesthetic Toni and dazzling Víctor 2 November 2016
      • Cover Story October 2016: "A Funny thing Happened on the Way to the Gallery, 13 October 2016
      • Cover Story September 2016: "El misterio de Caviria" by Antoni Hervàs 1 Septiembre 2016
      • Last chance to read the August 2016 Monthly Cover Story "Fermínlandia" 31 August 2016




      Fifth episode of 'Incidents (of Travel)' – Dispatch by Simon Soon and chi too from Terengganu, Malaysia


      The fifth 'Incidents (of Travel)' episode narrates an encounter between curator Simon Soon and artist chi too. Their offline day took place in April 2016, when they visited the Malaysian North Eastern state of Terengganu, where chi spent some time in 2013, surrounded by "men and women who work(ed) multiple jobs as a fishermen, house builders, boat builders, farmers, coconut pickers, food producers, and everything else that matters."


      Each of the 16 photographs and videos is augmented by one or more extra assets (a brief commentary, a caption or a soundscape), accessed by clicking the words which overlay the images. 


      Originally conceived by Latitudes as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City in 2012 (with five dispatches presented as part of an exhibition on Latitudes' curatorial practice at Casa del Lago) 'Incidents of Travel' had sequels in 2013 in Hong Kong (online dispatches published via twitter, instagram, and soundcloud) and San Francisco in 2015 (daily posts on Kadist' instagram as part of their #ArtistNotInTheStudioCuratorNotAtTheOffice take over initiative).


      The project explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter and an extended conversation between curator/s and artist/s. Online storytelling presents and documents curatorial fieldwork and an offline day conceived by an artist for a curator.

      Since April 2016 Kadist and Latitudes partnered in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)' as part of Kadist Online Projects. This new phase is developed as an online periodical that publishes regular contributions from invited curators and artists working around the world.
      The series inaugurated in April 2016 with an itinerary from curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – their tour was photographed by Nabiha Khan. The second dispatch came from Jinja in Uganda, where curator Moses Serubiri invited photographer Mohsen Taha to explore Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972. The third episode took place while curator Yu Ji and poet Xiao Kaiyu hiked on Dong Shan (East Mountain), 130 km west of Shanghai, on a peninsula stretching into Tai Hu lake near the city of Suzhou, China. The fourth dispatch came from Lisbon, where Galician curator Pedro de Llano visited key locations that marked the life and work of Luisa Cunha.

      Forthcoming: Marianna Hovhannisyan (Yerevan).
        

      RELATED CONTENT





      Flow Series #11: Conversación entre Haegue Yang y Latitudes, 3 mayo 2017, 19:30h



      Conversación entre Haegue Yang y Latitudes
      Miércoles 3 de mayo, 19:30h. 
      Actividad gratuita. Aforo limitado. 
      Reservas: activitats@ftapies.com 
      c/ Aragó 255, 08007 Barcelona
       
      El undécimo encuentro de la Flow series, reunirá a Latitudes y la artista surcoreana afincada entre Berlin y Seoul Haegue Yang. Durante su conversación hablarán sobre cuatro de sus obras más recientes, entre las cuales destacan "An Opaque Wind" (Sharjah Biennial 12, 2015) y "An Opaque Wind Park in Six Folds" (Fundação de Serralves, Porto, 2016), a partir de una perspectiva en términos de patrones de desarrollo histórico y de las fluctuaciones cíclicas, planteadas por el economista y sociólogo italiano Giovanni Arrighi, quien cuestionaba ¿qué es acumulativo, qué es cíclico y qué es nuevo?

      Flow series es un programa de encuentros impulsado por la Fundación Han Nefkens y la Fundació Antoni Tàpies cuyo objetivo es reunir diferentes agentes del mundo del arte procedentes de continentes y contextos diversos. Los encuentros en torno a un artista y sus producciones en curso son el objeto de una conversación seguida de un aperitivo. 

       
       
      Vista de la instalación, "An Opaque Wind Park in Six Folds", Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art, Porto, Portugal, 2016. Fotos: Latitudes.



      Haegue Yang (1971 Seúl, Corea del Sur) participó en documenta 13 en Kassel en el 2012 y en el 2009 representó a Corea del Sur en la Biennale di Venezia. Ha partipado en numerosas exposiciones, entre las que destacan: Hamburger Kunsthalle, Hamburgo, 2017; Fundaçao Serralves, Porto, 2016; Centre Pompidou, Paris, 2016; Ullens Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing, 2015; el Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art, Seúl, 2015; la Bergen Kunsthall, Bergen, 2013; Aubette 1928 y el Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art en Estrasburgo, 2013; Haus der Kunst en Munich, 2012; Kunsthaus Bregenz, 2011; Modern Art Oxford, 2011; el Aspen Art Museum, 2011; y el Walker Art Center en Minneapolis, 2009.

       
      Instalación 'Accommodating the Epic Dispersion – On Non-cathartic Volume of Dispersion' (2012) de Haegue Yang, comisariada por Julienne Lorz en Haus der Kunst, Munich. Foto: Latitudes.

      Latitudes ha colaborado con Yang en varias ocasiones a lo largo de la última década. En el 2007 encargó una entrevista entre el comisario Doryun Chong y Yang para el número 14 de la revista UOVO (leer un extracto en el blog del Walker Art Center). En el 2009 Latitudes presentó su pieza ‘Holiday for Tomorrow’ (2007) en el marco de la exposición colectiva ‘Sequelism Part 3: Possible, Probable, or Preferable Futures’ en Arnolfini, Bristol.

      Más adelante, en el 2010, Yang colaboró con una fotocopia de su rostro para la cubierta de ‘The Star Ledger’, el cuarto fascículo que formó el catálogo de la exposición ‘The Last Newspaper’ (New Museum, Nueva York), editado por Latitudes durante el transcurso de dicha exposición.

      Recientemente, con motivo de la conmemoración del 10º aniversario de Latitudes, le encargó un diseño para una edición limitada de tote bags (¡agotada!). El diseño se basó en ‘Eclectic Totemic’ – el papel pintado creado en colaboración con los diseñadores OK-RM (Oliver Knight y Rory McGrath) para su exposición individual en el Museo de Arte Moderno y Contemporáneo de Estrasburgo en el 2013. 


      Fotografiando el tote bag realizado por Haegue Yang realizado en colaboración con OK-RM, que conmemora el 10º aniversario de Latitudes. Foto: Latitudes.


      Además, Max Andrews de Latitudes ha escrito sobre su trabajo para el catálogo de la Carnegie International 2008 en Pittsburgh, así como la publicación que acompañó su exposición individual ‘Desigualdad simétrica’ en la Sala Rekalde en el 2008–9. En el 2012 escribió sobre su obra 'Tectonic Texture' emplazada en la Cantera de Andrabide, como parte de la serie de intervenciones ‘Sentido y Sensibilidad’ en Urdaibai.


       
      'Tectonic Texture' (2012) de Haegue Yang en la Cantera de Andrabide, como parte de la serie de intervenciones ‘Sentido y Sensibilidad’ en Urdaibai. Foto: Latitudes.

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      Cover Story – April 2017: "Banff Geologic Time"

      The April 2017 Monthly Cover Story "Banff Geologic Time" is now up on www.lttds.org after April it will be archived here.  

      "Johann Wolfgang von Goethe spent a great deal of time worrying about stones. Not least, he was troubled by a giant 700-tonne granite rock that lay near the otherwise flat land near Berlin. What on earth was this alien to the region’s geology doing there? Goethe’s realisation that the strange mineral object must have been displaced by glaciers helped instigate the theory of ice ages and deep time. Stone provokes us to recalibrate our concept of the past and our place in the world. Rock is radical." Continue reading by clicking the grey bar underneath the image.

      We remind artists, researchers, cultural writers and curators interested in slower and longer-term view of art, exhibitions, and their institutions (as well as rocks of course!) that the call for the Banff thematic residency programme "Geologic Time" (September 11–October 6, 2017) led by Latitudes and artists Sean Lynch as Guest Faculty, is open until May 24 (11:59pm MST).




      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities, and are archived here.

      Related content:




      Exposición y actividades programadas durante la exposición "La disidencia nostálgica" comisariada por Joana Hurtado Matheu en La Capella

      (Arriba y abajo) Vista de la instalación con obra de Richard McGuire. 
      Todas las fotografías: Pep Herrero/La Capella–BCN Producció 2016.


      "La disidencia nostálgica"
      3 marzo–30 abril 2017
      Comisariada por Joana Hurtado Matheu

      Con la participación de Francesco Arena, The Atlas Group / Walid Raad, Lúa Coderch, Roger Guaus, Marine Hugonnier, Odó Hurtado, Ange Leccia, Richard McGuire, Deimantas Narkevičius, Aimar Pérez Galí, Suzanne Perrottet, Julien Prévieux, Anri Sala, Adrian Schindler y Danh Vō.

      En una sociedad obsesionada por la memoria –por el archivo, el monumento y el testimonio–, la nostalgia se ha convertido en un fenómeno público, un síntoma, incluso, de la cultura contemporánea.

      No obstante, existen muchos tipos de nostalgia. La más omnipresente en la actualidad es una nostalgia regresiva y comercial, adoptada por las políticas conservadoras para establecer símbolos en honor a un pasado que se pretende heroico e inmutable, o convertida por la industria cultural en un objeto de consumo sin consciencia histórica. Pero existe otra nostalgia, una que va en sentido opuesto, que es disruptiva porque no conmemora ni banaliza el pasado, una nostalgia que aprovecha la perspectiva para reflexionar sobre la historia y, a través de este desfase físico y temporal, reconoce la interdependencia entre lo individual y lo colectivo, y puede recuperar así el vínculo entre la memoria y la utopía.

      Hoy, contra la nostalgia absolutista o mercantilizada, contra el revival nacional y el souvenir neutral, se abre paso una nostalgia disidente, que explora las ambivalencias de experimentar distintos tiempos y espacios al mismo tiempo. Esta nostalgia que encontramos en la literatura y el cine modernos, de William Faulkner a Samuel Beckett, de Jean-Luc Godard a Chris Marker, también es motivo de creación en el arte contemporáneo. 


        Vista de la exposición "La disidencia nostálgica".

      "La disidencia nostálgica" propone un recorrido por la obra de artistas que trabajan con el pasado como un espacio de resistencia y posibilidad creativa. Por un lado, reivindican una distancia crítica para visibilizar el peso del poder político en la interpretación de la historia, y por el otro, reconocen el poder afectivo como un saber personal y colectivo, que puede ser vivido, transmitido o soñado. 

      Esta aproximación a la disidencia nostálgica se sitúa en un contexto más amplio, complejo y conflictivo: el de la lectura de la historia y la representación de la memoria. Es un tema de actualidad fuera de la exposición, ya que últimamente, en un intento por detectar faltas y reconstruir anhelos, hemos visto cómo el pasado vuelve –ya sea el 1714 o la Constitución española– a la hora de pensar futuros alternativos. ¿Pero en nombre de quién, cómo y para qué miramos atrás? 

      – Joana Hurtado Matheu


      Proyecto ganador de la convocatoria BCN Producció'16 en la categoría de comisariado. Tutorizado por Latitudes.

      Joana Hurtado Matheu es escritora, comisaria e investigadora independiente, especializada en las relaciones entre prácticas artísticas, fotografía y cine. Coordina el programa de artes visuales de Can Felipa del Ayuntamiento de Barcelona y ha comisariado proyectos expositivos y cinematográficos como Heretgies (LOOP, 2016-2017), Catedrals a la capella (capella de Sant Roc, Valls, 2011-2013), Pop Up. Veure és afegir (CaixaForum, 2011), Efecte cinema (Can Felipa, 2009) o Cinergies (CCCB, 2008-2009). Profesora invitada en varias universidades y actual vicepresidenta de la Associació Catalana de Crítics d’Art, ha colaborado en el suplemento “Cultura/s” de La Vanguardia durante más de diez años, así como en varias revistas de arte y cine, catálogos y libros colectivos.

      Con el apoyo de: Goethe Institut, Galeria Nogueras Blanchard, Filmoteca de Cataluña, CA2M y Fundación ARCO, Zumzeig, Boyberry, Hangar, Cafè Schilling.


      Con la colaboración de: Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo, Galerie Chantal Crousel, Galeria Fortes D’Aloia & Gabriel, Galeria NoguerasBlanchard, Galerie Martel.


      Agradecimientos: Elisabet Albareda, Latitudes, Juan Diego Valera, Èlia Llach, Eva Sòria, Alex Nogueras, Oriol Fontdevila, Aleix Plademunt, Eulàlia Rovira, Gemma Alberich, Manuel Segade. Y a mi familia –la que conozco, la que imagino y la que sueño–.



       ACTIVIDADES PROGRAMADAS:

      Francesco Arena, Mare della tranquillità, 2013. Metal, madera, 500 x 178 x 75 cm y acción. Foto: Martin Argyroglo / Cortesia Galleria Raffaella Cortese, Milano, y NoguerasBlanchard, Barcelona/Madrid.

      Superficie con linea, de Francesco Arena.
      Cada día en horario de apertura de la sala.
      Inscripciones individuales o por grupos de dos o tres personas en el punto de información de la sala y en: lacapella@bcn.cat
        
      Una vieja mesa de madera sacada del comedor familiar, ha sido cortada en cuatro partes para hacer las esquinas de una nueva mesa mucho más grande. Ampliada con piezas de metal, sus medidas evocan la mesa donde, el 7 de mayo de 1945, se firmó la rendición alemana que pondría fin a la Segunda Guerra Mundial. La obra se acompaña de una acción –en esta ocasión, abierta a la participación– que consiste en caminar sobre la mesa un total de 155 km, la longitud del muro de Berlín. Con unos zapatos que no han pisado nunca el suelo y un contador en la mano, cada día, durante los dos meses que dura la exposición, alguien recorrerá la mesa de punta a punta 596 veces. Las decisiones que se toman alrededor de una mesa afectan el futuro a pequeña y gran escalera.

      Aimar Pérez Galí, The Touching Community / Greenberg_1992, 2017. Acción. Cortesia del artista. 


      Aimar Pérez Galí, The Touching Community / Correspondencia, 2017. Impresiones y tinta sobre papel y linóleo. Cortesia del artista. 

       The Touching Community / Greenberg_1992, de Aimar Pérez Galí 
      Texto: Jon Greenberg. 
      Acción: Óscar Dasí y Aimar Pérez Galí. 
      Sonido: Tirso Orive
      Sábado 25 de marzo, 12h en Boyberry (c/ Calàbria, 96)
      Duración: 60 minutos 
      Mayores de 18 años.
      Plazas limitadas. Inscripción gratuita hasta competar aforo.
      Reservas: lacapella@bcn.cat 
      En colaboración con Boyberry. 

      Aimar Pérez Galí investiga sobre el impacto que tuvo la epidemia del sida en el contexto de la danza española y latinoamericana. The Touching Community es un trabajo íntimo y afectivo que a través de un diálogo con los fantasmas da visibilidad a una época y una comunidad. La acción que acompaña la instalación en sala, se apropia del Contact Improvisation, práctica de danza en la cual el movimiento se improvisa a partir del contacto físico entre dos cuerpos y que contrasta con las políticas de inmunidad que aparecieron con el VIH. Un trabajo sobre la memoria, silenciada o transmitida, y sobre el tacto y el contacto como herramienta de supervivencia. 



      Instalación de Lúa Coderch, "Nit en blanc abans", 2017. Vídeo digital, 4:3, monocanal, color, sonido, 11' 17". Cortesia de la artista y Galeria Àngels, Barcelona. 


      Un viatge d’anada i tornada [Un viaje de ida y vuelta], de Lúa Coderch
      Sábado 1 de abril, 10h en Moll de les Drassanes

      Duración: 1h
      Plazas limitadas. Inscripciones en: lacapella@bcn.cat
      *Esta actividad puede resultar afectada por causas meteorológicas. 


      La artista barcelonesa ha reciclado los muebles de casa para hacer una tarima, plegable y portátil, como una maleta, que acoge el vídeo de un relato escrito durante una noche en blanco. Los recuerdos son la base de nuestros sueños, cuando dormimos o cuando esperamos despiertos uno mañana que no llega. Sobre las distracciones y las distancias ganadas durante este “tiempo perdido” trata también la actividad que nos propone: un viaje de ida y retorno. Nieta de abuelos nacionales durante la Guerra Civil Española, su obra más nostálgicamente contestataria, donde aprende a cantar las canciones del bando republicano, sonará cada noche a la calle Hospital.

       Adrian Schindler, "3400 g - 1,100 °C", 2017. Instalación y vídeo. Cortesía del artista.

      Der Rüstungsfluss / El riu armadura, de Adrian Schindler
      Sábado 29 de abril, 18h en La Capella (c/ Hospital 56)
      Plazas limitadas. Inscripciones en:
      lacapella@bcn.cat
      En colaboración con el Goethe Institut.

      A través de la proyección de documentos históricos y fotografías personales, Adrian Schindler narra la historia y el papel estratégico de un puente sobre el Rin, construido cerca del pueblo de donde proviene su familia materna. Un puente que une la historia europea y la familiar en base de sombras y fragmentos, que nos traen desde las fronteras del imperio romano hasta los años de ocupación de los aliados, pasando por las guerras religiosas francesas y el Tercer Reich.

      Vista de la exposición – performance de Francesco Arena. Foto: Pep Herrero/La Capella–BCN Producció 2016.

      Ciclo de cine:

      En la Filmoteca de Catalunya
      Jean-Marie Straub y Danièle Huillet, "En rachâchant". 7 min, 1982.
      Eric Baudelaire, "The Anabasis of May and Fusako Shigenobu, Masao Adachi and 27 Years Without Images". 66 min, 2011.
      4 de abril, 21h.

      Deimantas Narkevičius, "The Role of a Lifetime". 16 min, 2003.
      Patricio Guzmán, "Nostalgia de la luz". 90 min, 2010.
      5 de abril, 21h.

      Sandra Ruesga, "Haciendo Memoria. Entre el dictador y yo". 10 min, 2005.
      Michel Haneke, Caché. 118 min, 2006.
      6 de abril, 21h.

      En el Zumzeig Cinema
      30 de marzo y 13, 20 y 27 de abril.

      Consultar cartelera.

      Vista de la exposición – fotografía de Marine Hugonnier "Towards Tomorrow (International Date Line, Alaska)", 2001 

      Vista de la exposición – obra de Roger Guaus. Foto: Pep Herrero/La Capella–BCN Producció 2016.

      Visitas comentadas:

      Visitas comentadas a cargo de la comisaria
      Joana Hurtado Matheu
      14 de marzo y 25 de abril, a las 18 h.

      Visitas por la disidencia nostálgica de la exposición y de La Capella a cargo de Núria Miret y Judith López.
      Cada sábado, a las 18 h.


        RELACIONADO:




      Fourth episode of 'Incidents (of Travel)' – Dispatch by Pedro de Llano and Luisa Cunha from Lisbon, Portugal


      The fourth 'Incidents (of Travel)' episode comes from Lisbon, Portugal, where Galician curator Pedro de Llano met Lisboeta artist Luisa Cunha. Their offline day took place in early December and went through key locations in the artist's life – from Ar.Co, the School of Visual Arts in Almada where she enrolled at age thirty seven, to the Largo da Academia de Belas Artes in Chiado, where she conceived a public project that never materialised. 

      Each of the 23 photographs in the sequence is augmented by one or more extra assets (a brief commentary, a caption or a soundscape), and is accessed by clicking the words which overlay the images. 


      Originally conceived by Latitudes as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City in 2012 (with five dispatches presented as part of an exhibition on Latitudes' curatorial practice at Casa del Lago) 'Incidents of Travel' had sequels in 2013 in Hong Kong (online dispatches published via twitter, instagram, and soundcloud) and San Francisco in 2015 (daily posts on Kadist' instagram as part of their #ArtistNotInTheStudioCuratorNotAtTheOffice initiative). 

      The project explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter and an extended conversation between curator/s and artist/s. Online storytelling presents and documents curatorial fieldwork and an offline day conceived by an artist for a curator.

      Since April 2016 Kadist and Latitudes partnered in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)' as part of Kadist Online Projects. This new phase is developed as an online periodical that publishes regular contributions from invited curators and artists working around the world. 

      The series inaugurated with an itinerary from curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – their tour was photographed by Nabiha Khan. The second dispatch came from Jinja in Uganda, where curator Moses Serubiri invited photographer Mohsen Taha to explore Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972. The third episode took place while curator Yu Ji and poet Xiao Kaiyu hiked on Dong Shan (East Mountain), 130 km west of Shanghai, on a peninsula stretching into Tai Hu lake near the city of Suzhou, China.
      Forthcoming contributions: Simon Soon (Kuala Lumpur / Sydney); Natalia Zuluaga (Pereira / Miami) and Marianna Hovhannisyan (Yerevan), all fellows who participated in the seminar ‘The Place From Where We Look’ at Kadist Paris in June 2015.  

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      Cover Story – March 2017: Time travel with Jordan Wolfson


      The March 2017 Monthly Cover Story "Time travel with Jordan Wolfson" is now up on www.lttds.org after March it will be archived here.  

      "The film that lends its image to this month’s cover story – Jordan Wolfson’s Landscape for Fire, 2007 – was featured in the Latitudes-curated film programme A Stake in the Mud, A Hole in the Reel. Land Art’s Expanded Field 1968–2008, which premiered in April 2008 at the Museo Tamayo, Mexico City, before touring several venues in Spain, Switzerland, the Netherlands and the U.K. 

      Landscape for Fire responded to a 1972 film of the same name by Anthony McCall in which the British artist, best known for his “solid light” works, attempted to integrate performance, installation, sculpture and images in movement. Thirty-five years on, Jordan had re-staged this work of the past as though it were a ritual, the repetition of which invoked the almost mystical aura that often surrounds the art of the late 1960s and early 1970s." Continue reading by clicking the grey bar underneath the image

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities, and are archived here.


      Related content:




      Cover Story – February 2017: The Dutch Assembly, five years on


      The February 2017 Monthly Cover Story "The Dutch Assembly, five years on" is now up on www.lttds.org after February it will be archived here.  

      "Five years ago this month ‘The Dutch Assembly’ took place. In 2012, the Netherlands was the guest country of ARCOmadrid and with the collaboration of the Mondriaan Fonds and the Embassy of the Netherlands in Spain, Latitudes convened this representation of Dutch art organisations. (...) ‘The Dutch Assembly’ transpired in the teeth of a storm surrounding the slashing of the Dutch cultural budget by a State Secretary of Culture (Halbe Zijlstra) who openly flaunted his disdain for the arts. (...) How have the participating organisations faired in the last five years?" Continue reading...

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and highlight past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions or field trips related to our activities, and are archived here.


      Related content:




      25 de enero 2017, 19h: Presentación de la publicación "El misterio de caviria" de Antoni Hervàs en el Antic Teatre

      Fotos: Latitudes.

      El miércoles 25 de enero a las 19h se presentará la publicación resultante de la exposición "El misterio de caviria" de Antoni Hervàs coincidiendo con el espectáculo cabaretesco "El desplume!" evento mensual que organiza Eduardo Gión en el Antic Teatre (Carrer Verdaguer i Callis 12, 08003),
      conducido por Víctor Guerrero y concebido como un homenaje a Pierrot y a la escena cabaretesca barcelonesa.   

      El libro se presentará a las 19h precediendo al espectáculo que empieza a las 21h (y cuya entrada cuesta 10 Euroscompra online o en taquilla). Durante la presentación Hervàs y Latitudes tutores del proyecto – reflexionarán sobre la ejecución del proyecto, la transformación del color, la condición mutante del dibujo, la red de afectos, de acciones y escenarios que ha activado "El misterio de caviria”. 

       Instalación en La Capella. Foto: Pep Herrero /La Capella BCN Producció'16.

      Detalle de los ojos de Gilda Love. Foto: Pep Herrero /La Capella BCN Producció'16.

      La publicación [en catalán, castellano e inglés] incluye una entrevista entre Antoni Hervàs y Latitudesartista y tutores del proyecto respectivamente – con grandes saltos en la historia así como fotografías documentando la exposición. La edición corre a cargo del Ajuntament de Barcelona y The Flames y se puede comprar por 5 Euros.

      Después del evento se podrá adquirir la publicación en la librería Múltiplos o a través de la web de Folch studio, diseñadores de la publicación y de la imagen gráfica del ciclo BCN Producció'16.

      Aquí podéis ver un vídeo de la exposición (7'54'', catalán con subtítulos en castellano. Here with English subtitles) realizado por Hugo Barbosa.

      Actuación de Juan de la Cruz “el Rosillo” (aka El Castañuelas) en lo que fue en el antiguo local de espectáculos Copacabana (en la actualidad el aparcamiento del departamento de cultura de Barcelona). Foto: @brillobox.

      Actuación de Gerard López en el Frontón Colón, 18 de Septiembre 2016. Foto: Latitudes.
       Desfile de trajes de Víctor Guerrero en La Capella. Foto: Latitudes

      BCN producció es una convocatoria anual dirigida a la comunidad artística de Barcelona y su área de influencia con el fin de apoyar la producción y presentación de tres exposiciones individuales en la Sala Gran de La Capella, tres en el Espai Cub, un proyecto de comisariado y dos proyectos deslocalizados. BCN producció es una iniciativa del Institut de Cultura de Barcelona (ICUB) del Ajuntament de Barcelona. 

      Latitudes es parte del equipo tutorial de BCN Producció'16 junto al comisario David Armengol y la artista Mireia Sallarès. A lo largo del 2016 Latitudes ha tutorizado los proyectos de Pau Magrané/PLOM (Espai Cub, 27 abril–12 junio 2016) y Antoni Hervàs (Sala Gran, 16 septiembre–13 noviembre 2016), y la exposición de la comisaria Joana Hurtado Matheu (Sala Gran, 2 marzo–30 abril 2017) a lo largo de la conceptualización, formalización y producción de sus respectivos proyectos. 

      CONTENIDO RELACIONADO:





      Cover Story – January 2017: How open are open calls?


      The January 2017 Monthly Cover Story is now up on www.lttds.org after January it will be archived here.  

      "The first issue of frieze of 2017 includes “Salon Selectives”, an article by Latitudes’s Max Andrews that, with a wink to sassy 1980s hair care, asks “how open are open calls?”. The text is accompanied by this astonishing drawing from the collection of The Metropolitan Museum of Art by Felicien Myrbach-Rheinfeld entitled Candidates for Admission to the Paris Salon (c.1900)." Continue reading...

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions or field trips related to our activities.  

      Related content: