Cover Story–September 2018: Harald Szeemann’s travel sculpture

Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org


The September 2018 Monthly Cover Story "Harald Szeemann's travel sculpture" is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org

"Summer vacations have a habit of turning into busman’s holidays in Latitudes' agenda. Undoubtedly the Swiss curator phenomenon Harald Szeemann (1933–2005) also often sensed or engineered, that trips for pleasure and travel for research and work would inevitably dovetail. Museum of Obsessions, a fascinating but flawed exhibition dedicated to his life and work has just closed at Kunsthalle Bern (it will tour to Kunsthalle Düsseldorf, Castello di Rivoli, and the Swiss Institute, New York)."

—> Continue reading
—> After September it will be archived here.

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.



RELATED CONTENT:


  • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
  • 1 Diciembre, 20:30h: Latitudes introducirá el documental italiano "Harald Szeemann. Appunti sulla vita di un sognatore" (2016) 27 noviembre 2017
  • Cover Story–August 2018: Askeaton Joyride 2 August 2018
  • Cover Story–July 2018: No Burgers for Sale 2 July 2018
  • Cover Story—June 2018: Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group 4 June 2018
  • Cover Story – May 2018: "Shadowing Roman Ondák" 7 May 2018 
  • Cover Story – April 2018: "Cover Story—April 2018: Dates, 700 BC to the present: Michael Rakowitz" 3 April 2018
  • Cover Story – March 2018: "Armenia's ghost galleries" 6 March 2018
  • Cover Story – February 2018: Paradise, promises and perplexities 5 February 2018
  • Cover Story – January 2018: I'll be there for you, 2 January 2018




Cover Story–August 2018: Askeaton Joyride

Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org

The August 2018 Monthly Cover Story "Askeaton Joyride" is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org


"Strange and wonderful things happen in Askeaton—especially during each summer for the last thirteen years. Initiated by artists Michele Horrigan and Sean Lynch in 2006, the residency programme Welcome to the Neighbourhood hosts artists and curators in the midst of this small town community in County Limerick, Ireland, under the umbrella of Askeaton Contemporary Arts."

—> Continue reading
—> After August 2018 it will be archived here.

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.



RELATED CONTENT:


  • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
  • Cover Story – July 2018: "No Burgers for Sale" 2 July 2018
  • Cover Story—June 2018: Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group 4 June 2018
  • Cover Story – May 2018: "Shadowing Roman Ondák" 7 May 2018 
  • Cover Story – April 2018: "Cover Story—April 2018: Dates, 700 BC to the present: Michael Rakowitz" 3 April 2018
  • Cover Story – March 2018: "Armenia's ghost galleries" 6 March 2018
  • Cover Story – February 2018: Paradise, promises and perplexities 5 February 2018
  • Cover Story – January 2018: I'll be there for you, 2 January 2018
  • Cover Story – December 2017: "Tabet's Tapline trajectory", 4 December 2017
  • Cover Story – November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
  • Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
  • Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
  • Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
  • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
  • Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
  • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
  • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
  • Cover Story – March 2017: Time travel with Jordan Wolfson 1 March 2017




Cover Story–July 2018: No Burgers for Sale

Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org


The July 2018 Monthly Cover Story "No Burgers for Sale" is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org


"In 1983, a Burger King opened on New York’s Governors Island, then a U.S. Coast Guard base. It was the first franchise to serve beer. After scoffing a Whopper combo, officers and enlisted men could enjoy a round of golf, play bingo, go to the movies, or throw balls at the adjacent bowling alley. In 1999, this Burger King featured in issue 615 of ‘The Amazing Spider-man’. After almost two centuries operating as a federal or military facility, the Island was vacated in 1996, and the Burger King shut up shop. The remnants were photographed in 2003 by Andrew Moore and Lisa Kereszi."

No burgers were on sale though, just wooden pretzels!

—> Continue reading

—> Project photo documentation
—> After July 2018 it will be archived here.

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.



RELATED CONTENT:


  • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
  • Cover Story—June 2018: Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group 4 June 2018
  • Cover Story – May 2018: "Shadowing Roman Ondák" 7 May 2018 
  • Cover Story – April 2018: "Cover Story—April 2018: Dates, 700 BC to the present: Michael Rakowitz" 3 April 2018
  • Cover Story – March 2018: "Armenia's ghost galleries" 6 March 2018
  • Cover Story – February 2018: Paradise, promises and perplexities 5 February 2018
  • Cover Story – January 2018: I'll be there for you, 2 January 2018
  • Cover Story – December 2017: "Tabet's Tapline trajectory", 4 December 2017
  • Cover Story – November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
  • Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
  • Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
  • Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
  • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
  • Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
  • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
  • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
  • Cover Story – March 2017: Time travel with Jordan Wolfson 1 March 2017




Cover Story—June 2018: Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group

Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org

The June 2018 Monthly Cover Story "Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group" is now up on Latitudes' homepage.

"Sporadically convened by Latitudes, the Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group is a forum for informal dialogue about megatrends and the future of contemporary art institutions.

In order to be conducive to freedom of interaction, this by-invitation, closed-door meetings have been held under the Chatham House Rule. The list of attendees is not circulated beyond those participating in the meeting, and no documentation is made."


—> Continue reading
—> After June it will be archived here.

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.


RELATED CONTENT:
  • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
  • Cover Story – May 2018: "Shadowing Roman Ondák" 7 May 2018 
  • Cover Story – April 2018: "Cover Story—April 2018: Dates, 700 BC to the present: Michael Rakowitz" 3 April 2018
  • Cover Story – March 2018: "Armenia's ghost galleries" 6 March 2018
  • Cover Story – February 2018: Paradise, promises and perplexities 5 February 2018
  • Cover Story – January 2018: I'll be there for you, 2 January 2018
  • Cover Story – December 2017: "Tabet's Tapline trajectory", 4 December 2017
  • Cover Story – November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
  • Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
  • Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
  • Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
  • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
  • Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
  • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017




Cover Story–May 2018: "Shadowing Roman Ondák"

Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org

The May 2018 Monthly Cover Story "Shadowing Roman Ondák" is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org

This month we revisit Roman Ondák’s exhibition ‘Some Thing’ at The Common Guild, Glasgow, in 2013, during which Latitudes was invited to give a talk. Roman’s show comprised a series of composite works in display cases. Early still-life paintings and pencil drawings from his student days in Slovakia in the 1980s were coupled with the actual objects depicted – a chair, a length of rope, a helmet, a vase (a detail of "Shadow, 1981/2013" is the work above), and so on, which were placed in a deadpan way on top of them.

—> Continue reading
—> After May it will be archived here.

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.



RELATED CONTENT:






Cover Story—April 2018: Dates, 700 BC to the present: Michael Rakowitz

Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org


The April 2018 monthly Cover Story "Dates, 700 BC to the present: Michael Rakowitz" is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org

"As Michael Rakowitz’s fourth plinth commission is unveiled in London’s Trafalgar Square, this month’s cover story image revisits Return (2004-ongoing) a related project by the artist that also speaks about the turbulent history of Iraq. And dates. In London, Michael has deployed thousands of date syrup cans to make a 1:1 scale recreation of Lamassu, the fantastic winged bull that graced the gates of the city of Nineveh from 700 BC until it was destroyed by Isis in 2015."

—> Continue reading
—> After April it will be archived here.

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.

RELATED CONTENT:

  • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
  • Cover Story – March 2018: "Armenia's ghost galleries" 6 March 2018
  • Cover Story – February 2018: Paradise, promises and perplexities 5 February 2018
  • Cover Story – January 2018: I'll be there for you, 2 January 2018
  • Cover Story – December 2017: "Tabet's Tapline trajectory", 4 December 2017
  • Cover Story – November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
  • Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
  • Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
  • Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
  • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
  • Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
  • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
  • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017





    Cover Story – March 2018: Armenia's ghost galleries

    Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org 

    The March 2018 Monthly Cover Story ‘Armenia's ghost galleries’ is now up on www.lttds.org – after this month it will be archived here.

    Incidents (of Travel)’ – Latitudes collaboration with Kadist – returns with a dispatch from Yerevan, Armenia. The itinerary leads us on something of a ghost tour. Photographs and reportage unearth the fragmented memories of galleries and art spaces that no longer exist. This haunted dispatch is the fruit of two-years of meticulous shared inquiry by Armenian curator Marianna Hovhannisyan (currently based in San Diego) with Vardan Kilichyan, Gohar Hosyan, and Anaida Verdyan, alumni of the former Studio College of the National Center of Aesthetics in Yerevan. 


    —> Continue reading

    Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.


    RELATED CONTENT:
    • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
    • Cover Story – February 2018: Paradise, promises and perplexities 5 February 2018
    • Cover Story – January 2018: I'll be there for you, 2 January 2018
    • Cover Story – December 2017: "Tabet's Tapline trajectory", 4 December 2017
    • Cover Story – November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
    • Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
    • Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
    • Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
    • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
    • Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
    • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
    • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
    • Cover Story – March 2017: Time travel with Jordan Wolfson 1 March 2017




    Cover Story—February 2018: Paradise, Promises and Perplexities


    Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org 

    The February 2018 Monthly Cover Story "Paradise, Promises and Perplexities" is now up on www.lttds.org – after this month it will be archived here.

    "This month marks ten years since the opening of Greenwashing, curated by Latitudes and Ilaria Bonacossa. Subtitled Environment: Perils, Promises and Perplexities, this exhibition at the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin, addressed the melding of corporate agendas and individual ethics in the wake of the exhaustion of traditional environmentalism." Continue reading

    Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.

    RELATED CONTENT:


    Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
    Cover Story – January 2018: I'll be there for you, 2 January 2018
    Cover Story – December 2017: "Tabet's Tapline trajectory", 4 December 2017
    Cover Story – November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
    Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
    Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
    Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
    Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
    Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
    Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
    Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
    Cover Story – March 2017: Time travel with Jordan Wolfson 1 March 2017
    Cover Story — February 2017: The Dutch Assembly, five years on 1 February 2017
    Cover Story – January 2017: How open are open calls? 4 January 2017





      Reviews of the exhibition "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" at the CAPC musée, Bordeaux

      As the ‘4.543 billion. The matter of matter’ exhibition concluded on January 7, 2018, at the CAPC musée in Bordeaux, we finished archiving all the social media posts visitors, the museum and ourselves have published – see our Wakelet feed below – since research phase to the exhibition itself, and below share the most relevant print and online reviews.
      Wakelet collection of the "4.543 billion" exhibition.

      December 8, 2017: Tom Jeffreys highlighted the exhibition in his "Looking Back: Paris" roundup for frieze magazine – illustrated with two works included in the show by Nicholas Mangan and Alexandra Navratil.

      "A little less academic, but no less rigorous, was ‘4,543 milliards’ (4,543 billion), curated by the Barcelona-based Latitudes (co-founded by frieze contributing editor Max Andrews) at CAPC, Bordeaux. Subtitled ‘The matter of matter’, the exhibition provided a material, geological and political response to the building’s former life as a warehouse for colonial commodities and, by extension, the complex entanglement of culture, money, politics and ecological impact. Marble from Trump Tower (Amie Siegel’s "Strata", 2017) was exhibited alongside partially-burnt documents rescued from a fire at the Bordeaux municipal archives and a 1939 mock invitation to the ‘Museum of Standard Oil’, actually MoMA’s new building, issued by the then-publications director, Frances Collins (unsurprisingly fired soon after). Combining archival materials with work by 30 artists, big ideas with specificity and nuance, this was exactly the kind of exhibition I would want to return to again and again. If the selection of the next artistic director the Venice Biennale were a democratic process, I’d be voting for Latitudes."


      November 28, 2017Frank Browning, Paris-based Contributor to the Huffington Post author, and former NPR Correspondent, reviewed the recently opened retrospective of Beatriz González and concluded his article with a short mention:

      "Meanwhile, around the corner at CAPC there’s an intriguing assembly of stones, papers, paintings, photographs and projections that unite geo-physics, sculpture, and art history, including the conversion of the building itself from a one-time commodities warehouse into its current life as a museum.

      Entitled “The Matter of Matter,” [missing "4.543 billion" years, the age of the Earth, and the first part of the exhibition title] it includes the work of 30 artists, assembled and mounted by a Spanish team, Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna. They call themselves Latitudes [wrongly published with two "T"]; they aim to excavate the world we inhabit daily, be it through the history indigo mining in Mexico and southern France (vital for fine pottery and coloring bluejeans) or oil extraction in Venezuela, gas infused sculptures or open pit diamond mining in southern Africa. All that we do, all that we eat, all that we create derives from one form of excavation or another. Simple truism as it may seem, Latitudes takes us into the intimacies of our relation with this earth and calls us to meditate on our physical and aesthetic relation to the steadily warming round rock that is our home."




      September 20, 2017: Emmanuel Labails of RCF Radio did a 9-minute interview with Pedro Jiménez Morras, Head of Press of CAPC, who discussed the premises of the exhibition and some of its works. (Listen between minute 4:39 and 13:36).

      August 19, 2017: Bea Espejo's ‘Cambio de tiempo’, on the Spanish national cultural supplement Babelia, in El País newspaper begins:

      ˝A ese pensamiento geológico del tiempo conduce la exposición 4.543 millones. La cuestión de la materia en el CAPC de Burdeos. La muestra aborda obras de arte, colecciones e historias culturales con relación a procesos ecológicos y la escala geológica del tiempo. En total, más de 35 artistas que dan valor a las discontinuidades, a las derivas y a las ausencias. La muestra almacena el tiempo como una batería almacena la energía. Y lo hace en varias capas de lectura. Una de ellas es el tiempo que lleva Latitudes, la oficina curatorial de Mariana Cánepa Luna y Max Andrews, trabajando en este proyecto, seguramente el más complejo y ambicioso, aunque esta investigación en torno a las complejas relaciones entre la ecología y el arte contemporáneo está en la base de todos sus proyectos desde 2005. Aquí no pueden ser más rotundos. Abordan la cuestión de la materia desde el lado más inmaterial, que es la memoria. Para ello, estudiaron a fondo el contexto de la ciudad bajo un programa de residencias del museo. Hablamos, pues, de un proyecto de investigación, algo que se traduce en cada pequeño gesto que recoge la muestra, y que lo expande todo. De ahí las relaciones de algunas obras con el departamento de zoología de la universidad (Ilana Halperin), el Museo de Bellas Artes (Stuart Whipps, o el préstamo de Alfred Roll), así como los muchos documentos y objetos que se incluyen de los archivos Métropole, de la Gironde y la colección geológica de la UFR Sciences de la Terre et de la Mer, de la Universidad de Burdeos.˝




      July 12, 2017: Catherine Darfay's ‘Le CAPC remonte le temps’ on the local newspaper "Sudouest", was the first feature. The article was illustrated with a with an image showing Amy Balkin's ‘Today’s CO2 Spot Price’ (2009) chartering the daily price of carbon dioxide emissions allowances in the world’s largest carbon market —a changing value documented in this blog post.


      RELATED CONTENT:
      • 4.543 billion. The Matter of Matter” exhibition
      • Archive of social networks posts related to "4.543 billion"
      • Photo gallery of the exhibition 
      • CAPC website (French, English, Spanish) http://www.capc-bordeaux.fr/programme/4543-milliards
      • Cover Story—December 2017: "Tabet's Tapline trajectory" 4 December 2017
      • Alfred Roll's 1878 "The Old Quarryman" exchanged with Alfred Smith's "The Grave Docks" (1884) in the exhibition "4.543 billion" at the CAPC musée 3 November 2017
      • Cover Story—November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth" 1 November 2017 
      • 15 November 2017, 4:30–8pm: 'The Return of the Earth. Ecologising art history in the Anthropocene' study day at the CAPC musée, Bordeaux 24 October 201
      • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
      • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
      • SAVE THE DATE: 29 June, 19h. Private view of the exhibition "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" at the CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux 30 May 2017
      • Cover Story – May 2016: Material histories – spilling the beans at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux 10 May 2016.
      • Second research trip to Bordeaux 16 July 2016




      Cover Story—January 2018: I'll be there for you

      Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org

      The January 2018 Monthly Cover Story "I'll be there for you" is now up on www.lttds.org – after this month it will be archived here.
       

      "Camille Orny and Magda Vaz’s exhibition for the Sala Petita of Barcelona’s La Capella will open on 23 January—it is the last of three projects that Latitudes is mentoring during the current season of the Barcelona Producció grants." Continue reading  

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities. 


      (Above and below) View from "Artengo2000", exhibition by Camille Orny and Magda Vaz at the Sala Petita in La Capella. Photo: Pep Herrero / La Capella.

      Below the text written by Latitudes, mentors of the project:

      "Bringing the format of the miniseries into the Sala Petita, Camille Orny & Magda Vaz have created a drama-documentary for six screens premised on the story of a group of five flatmates—including semi-fictionalized versions of themselves—who have struck a sponsorship deal with a corporation known as Artengo. In one reality Artengo is a sub-brand of the sporting goods retailer Decathlon dedicated to racket sports, yet in another reality, it is an arcane Russian-American multinational corporation. The series begins with a dream in which a flatmate is haunted by the Artengo-branded socks that the flatmates have agreed to wear at all times as part of the sponsorship deal that in return sees them receive occasional deliveries of unbranded food and a discount on their gas bill. Artengo2000 is a cumulative narrative: each installment is comprehensive and distinct, while each is grafted onto the body of the series, with certain elements and plot lines that link across.

      Artengo2000 hinges on possible spiritual advancements and psychic disorders caused by shared living and by being obedient brand ambassadors. We witness the transformation of a communal flat into a laboratory-like space governed by the unwritten transactions entailed in lifestyle sponsorship and company patronage. Although the drama takes us to Montjuïc, the W Barcelona hotel, and to the Arenas shopping centre, and other branded flats, the Artengo apartment itself is the core psychological location. Yet in contrast to the breezy comedic and romantic adventures of the flat-sharing television series Friends (1994–2004), the Artengo apartment fills with irrational drama, distrust, deranged dreams, and doppelgängers. The flatmates become more like guinea pigs in a pioneering space station, afloat in a void at the limits of corporate ethics, loyalties and interpersonal relations. Characters include Camille and Magda’s flatmates Manu and Laura, a washed-up professional tennis player, and a supposed Danish-Catalan man named Borja with an academic interest in the introduction to Barcelona of novel and more covert forms of whole-life sponsorship.


      Artengo2000 takes place in a familiar but twisted world in which gig economies, collaborative work and service sharing appear to have developed in even more perverse ways. A brand called Little Bits makes an appearance—a sort of mutant Deliveroo based on micro-tapas. As Orny and Vaz have suggested, their shared flat drama imagines the bizarre incompatibility of a kommunalka (kommunalki were multi-family communal apartments encouraged by Lenin as a response to the housing crisis after the Russian revolution of 1917) set in a near-future where neoliberal and Silicon-Valley logic wields even greater power. Here the so-called ‘sharing economy’ of coworking, or online platforms such as BlaBlaCar and Airbnb, is evidently not representative of an altruistic fantasy of entrepreneurship or dynamic community cohesion, but is a symptom of evermore precarious socioeconomic circumstances. Giving up some personal space is part of the experience of sharing a flat, yet it allows a lower cost of living. However, the sponsorship deal that the flatmates are signed up to exacerbates their sacrifices to extremes. The work-life balance has not been blurred, but completely collapsed, as the flatmates renounce their intimacy and subjectivity in commodifying themselves for the Artengo brand.

      Where the vast majority of television narrators strive for neutrality and self-effacement, as if viewers are supposed to ignore the fact that the story is coming through a mediator, Orny and Vaz’s storytelling, and the Artengo2000 world of homemade myth-making, is far from straightforward. It incorporates numerous doubtful narratives, both onscreen and offscreen. Film genres such as the Western, or the film noir, routinely passed through a kind of four-stage metamorphosis, media scholars have suggested.1 In the first stage, conventions were established and isolated. In the second ‘classic’ stage these conventions reached equilibrium and were mutually understood by makers and audiences; the third stage saw formal and stylistic embellishments. Finally in a ‘baroque’ stage, the embellishments were accented to the point where they themselves became the substance of the work. Yet whether television series have followed the same logic is moot, particularly in an age where gathering in the living room to watch the latest hit show at the scheduled time has long been a thing of the past, usurped by viewers binge-streaming multiple episodes. Moreover, is it not the case that Artengo2000, much like David Lynch’s surreal crime drama Twin Peaks (1990–91), was already born congenitally baroque?

      While Artengo2000 is steeped in cinematic theory and the study of genre, more plausible still is that it comes at us not only through a filter of American television, and series that have experimented with the medium of the episodic drama in often darkly-comic and self-referential ways, such as Seinfeld (1989–1998), Curb Your Enthusiasm (2000–present), and Louie (2010–15). Artengo2000 has also filtered through many diverse influences related to what critic Jordi Costa has identified as ‘post-humor’ in Spain, including YouTube channels and self-made web series from the likes of Canódromo Abandonado, Pioneros Siglo XXI, and Venga Monjas.2 Yet why does a series ‘happen’ when it does? Was the fanatical following that built around the supernatural detective series The X-Files (1993–2002), for example, in some way a Bill-Clinton-era phenomenon, a result of psychohistorical factors at work in 1990s America? And why do we now see a return of Twin Peaks (2017–) just at the same time as we see Artengo2000 emerge in Barcelona? Appropriately, asking more questions that providing answers, we offer no more closure than a typical episode of either." 

      Latitudes 

      Mentors of the project. Text written for the exhibition and available in English, Catalan and Spanish.


      1 See Thomas Schatz, ‘Hollywood Genres: Formulas, Filmmaking, and The Studio System’, McGraw-Hill, 1981.

      2 See Miguel Iríbar, ‘El posthumor, la tortilla deconstruida de la risa’, http://www.jotdown.es/2014/12/el-posthumor-la-tortilla-deconstruida-de-la-risa/



      RELATED CONTENT:
      • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
      • Cover Story – December 2017: "Tabet's Tapline trajectory", 4 December 2017
      • Cover Story – November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
      • Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
      • Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
      • Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
      • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
      • Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
      • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
      • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
      • Cover Story – March 2017: Time travel with Jordan Wolfson 1 March 2017
      • Cover Story February 2017: The Dutch Assembly, five years on 1 February 2017
      • Cover Story January 2017: How open are open calls? 4 January 2017

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      2017 in 12 monthly Cover Stories

      Another year has gone by!

      Revisit some of Latitudespast–present–future–ongoing projects through our online archive of Monthly Cover Stories, a chance to focus on an artwork, article, event, film, exhibition, excursion or ongoing train of thoughts. 


      Cover Story January 2017: "How open are open calls?", 4 January 2017

      Cover Story February 2017: "The Dutch Assembly, five years on", 1 February 2017

      Cover Story – March 2017: "Time travel with Jordan Wolfson", 1 March 2017

      Cover Story – April 2017: "Banff Geologic Time", 3 April 2017

      Cover Story – May 2017: "S is for Shale or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps", 1 May 2017 

      Cover Story – June 2017: "Moth light—Absent Forms", 1 June 2017
      Cover Story – July 2017: "4.543 billion", 3 July 2017 


      Cover Story – August 2017: "Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern", 1 August 2017  


      Cover Story – September 2017: "Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis'", 1 September 2017

      Cover Story – October 2017: "Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier", 11 October 2017

      Cover Story—November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
      Cover Story—December 2017: "Tabet’s Tapline trajectory", 4 December 2017

      RELATED CONTENT:
      Latitudes' Cover Story archive,
      Latitudes' writing archive,
      Latitudes' newsletters.




      Cover Story—December 2017: Tabet’s Tapline trajectory

      Monthly Cover Story on http://www.lttds.org

      The December 2017 Monthly Cover Story "Tabet’s Tapline trajectory" is now up on www.lttds.org – after this month it will be archived here.
       

      "Rayyane Tabet’sSteel Rings and the mobile Three Logos (both 2013) slice through and loom over the web of natural histories and human natures, mineral agency and political ecology that comprises the exhibition 4.543 billion. The matter of matter. Rayyane was one of the first artists to come on board what would become this Latitudes-curated exhibition at CAPC Bordeaux. And as the show approaches the end of its journey—it finishes on 7 January 2018—it seems appropriate that this month’s cover story creates a bookend of sorts. Moreover, it gives a perfect reason to mention Rayyane’s stunning exhibition Fragments that has recently opened at Hamburg Kunstverein." Continue reading  

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities. 

      RELATED CONTENT:
      • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
      • Cover Story – November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
      • Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
      • Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
      • Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
      • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
      • Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
      • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
      • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
      • Cover Story – March 2017: Time travel with Jordan Wolfson 1 March 2017
      • Cover Story February 2017: The Dutch Assembly, five years on 1 February 2017
      • Cover Story January 2017: How open are open calls? 4 January 2017




      Cover Story—November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth"

      Monthly Cover Story on http://www.lttds.org/blog/


      The November 2017 Monthly Cover Story "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth" is now up on www.lttds.org – after this month it will be archived here

      "On 15 November the study day The Return of the Earth: Ecologising art history in the Anthropocene takes place at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain Bordeaux in conjunction with the Latitudes-curated exhibition 4.543 billion. The matter of matter. With a keynote by science historian Jean-Baptiste Fressoz, and a conversation between artists Xavier Ribas and Ângela Ferreira—the latter both featured in the exhibition—the event will intertwine discussions of art practice and historical research, with environmental and geological narratives, and vice versa." Continue reading
       
      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities


      RELATED CONTENT:
      • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
      • 15 November 2017, 4:30–8pm: 'The Return of the Earth. Ecologising art history in the Anthropocene' study day at the CAPC musée, Bordeaux 24 October 2017
      • Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
      • Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
      • Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
      • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
      • Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
      • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
      • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
      • Cover Story – March 2017: Time travel with Jordan Wolfson 1 March 2017
      • Cover Story February 2017: The Dutch Assembly, five years on 1 February 2017
      • Cover Story January 2017: How open are open calls? 4 January 2017




      Cover Story—October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier

      October 2017 Monthly Cover Story on http://www.lttds.org


      The October 2017 Monthly Cover Story "Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier" is now up on www.lttds.org – after this month it will be archived here

      "We are looking for glimpses of life as it was over half a billion years ago. In sight of the snout of the Stanley Glacier in Kootenay National Park, lie deposits of Burgess Shale, a rock famous for its exceptional preservation of hitherto unknown, and frankly bizarre, soft-bodied marine creatures." Continue reading  

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities. 

      RELATED CONTENT:




      Cover Story—September 2017: Dark disruption: David Mutiloa’s "Synthesis"

      Photo: Roberto Ruiz. Cortesía: David Mutiloa.


      The September 2017 Monthly Cover Story "Dark disruption: David Mutiloa’s "Synthesis" is now up on www.lttds.org – after this month it will be archived here.

      "Human worker-performers move sluggishly around a modular platform in a permanently gloomy La Capella; they are employed to apparently do nothing much at all, embodying an uncanny kind of work–life balance. It’s the gig economy, stupid. David Mutiloa’s melancholy Barcelona exhibition Synthesis shadows how changes in the modern office workplace have heeded novel notions of management and business efficiency, abiding by a labour market that progressively favours flexibility and adaptability." Continue reading 

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities. 

       Photo: Pep Herrero / La Capella/ Barcelona Producció 2017.

      Below the text written by Latitudes, mentors of the project:

      "In the modern office workplace, spatial design and brand communication have evolved in step with novel notions of management, business efficiency and a labour market that progressively favours flexibility and adaptability. The typical Western office worker – their physiology as well as their psychology – has also been overhauled. Twentieth-century time-and-motion studies first standardised and rationalised the salaried worker’s time and space. And today the twenty-first-century worker is increasingly a co-working independent contractor who navigates an entirely dissolved working-week structure, continuous competitive ‘disruption’ and the so-called ‘gig economy’. 

      Using sculpture, video projections and human presence, David Mutiloa’s exhibition Synthesis proposes that this condition has led to the appearance of pharmacologically managed depression, “an illness of responsibility”. It has also induced a terrible form of boredom – the spectre of both the boundless outsourcing of undesirable labour to the developing world, and automation leading to a world without work. Synthesis shadows these ideas through two video projections, live action by human worker-performers and the display of a series of sculptures made from steel, silicon, resin, computer components, pharmaceutical drugs and other materials. These sculptures derive from human anatomy and iconic industrial design forms conceived for the office environment from the 1960s to the 1990s. These decades saw a transition from the typewriter to the personal computer, and from rooms with regimented rows of desks to spaces with customisable cubicles, ‘neighbourhoods’ and flexible work ‘nests’. Arranged on and around a modular platform like industrial still lifes, the sculptural elements are sometimes juxtaposed with office-systems brochures. They often represent variations based on an individual element that Mutiloa has abstracted, augmented or made into its inverse form through moulding and casting – furniture, desk accessories and structural systems, for example, that were designed with both high style and ergonomics in mind. Prominent among the sculptural forms are those based on the classic Pop-era Valentine typewriter, first produced in 1969 for the Italian brand Olivetti. Large metal forms are derived from wall connectors from the revolutionary Action Office systems, introduced by the Herman Miller company in the 1960s. Modular ‘workstations’ for the ‘human performer’ were comprised of angled and movable fabric-wrapped walls, which an office worker could supposedly arrange to create his or her own ideal work space. Other sculptures adopt the form of articulated arms with support for screens or are taken from the Aeron chair, also produced by Herman Miller. 


       Photo: Pep Herrero / La Capella/ Barcelona Producció 2017.

      The latter, a seat with exaggerated lumbar support, become so popular with Web startup companies in the late 1990s that it was nicknamed the ‘Dot-Com Throne’. Other forms recall the frame of the 543 Broadway chair, and a metal grid evokes the Shopping Cart desk; both of the earlier pieces were designed by Gaetano Pesce in the 1990s for the notoriously open-plan, multicoloured offices of the advertising agency TBWA/Chiat/Day New York. A large suspended video projection will present a series of highly composed shots of the installation itself, and will be filmed and edited during the exhibition and later inserted into the composition as if following a just-in-time production methodology. The second video projection of Synthesis also gives the whole exhibition space its uncanny soundtrack – a relentless, evolving, aural collage that seems to evoke the hum of a post-industrial factory floor, or the placeless drone of the knowledge economy. The screen shows a virtual camera moving over and around a spatial environment that Mutiloa derived from the 1970s office system produced by Olivetti, from which the exhibition also takes its title. Continuously generated from a 3D digital model, the visualisation comprises a looped animation that is screened throughout the exhibition. Human work-performers move listlessly around the exhibition; they are employed by Mutiloa’s exhibition, yet are apparently doing nothing at all. In a widely cited study published in 2013, experts predicted that almost half of the jobs in the US were at risk of being automated in the next two decades.  Driverless technology, cheap computers, deep learning and big data are leading to increasingly sophisticated tasks being done by ever-smarter machines across a whole range of sectors – from translation to logistics, but especially in office and administrative work. A pessimist would argue that wherever office work can be broken down into a series of routine tasks, no job is safe. If new technologies are not yet replacing workers, they may
      nevertheless be putting them under increased surveillance in order to monitor their activity and productivity minute by minute.  


      As automation rises, does the value of the tasks that can be done only by humans therefore increase? What is at stake when affective faculties such as creativity – the supposed domain of the artist – are more than ever part of a productive and evaluative logic? Does the notion that one must project one’s own personal brand through the splintered attention spans of social media point to a future marked by a total synthesis of individual fulfilment, freelancers’ anxiety and corporate competitiveness for all?
       

      — Latitudes
       

      [1] http://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/downloads/academic/The_Future_of_Employment.
       

      Photo: Pep Herrero / La Capella/ Barcelona Producció 2017. 

       RELATED CONTENT:




      Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern


      The August 2017 Monthly Cover Story "Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern" is now up on www.lttds.org after this month it will be archived here

      "Anna Moreno is waving from the roof of Walden 7, the vertiginous sixteen-storey apartment complex designed by architect Ricardo Bofill in 1975. Hola Anna, què fas!? Looming out of the greenery far below is another extraordinary building that we visited earlier in the day. La Fábrica is a former cement works whose silos and cavernous “cathedral” are home to Bofill’s Taller de Arquitectura. It is 29°C and the humidity is at 62% in Sant Just Desvern, west of Barcelona. Two rooftop swimming pools provide a refreshing respite. We don’t complain." Continue reading 

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities. 

      RELATED CONTENT:




      Cover Story – July 2017: "4.543 billion"


      The July 2017 Monthly Cover Story "4.543 billion" is now up on www.lttds.org after July it will be archived here

      "4.543 billion. The matter of matter recently opened at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux, and features the work of more than thirty artists. Curated by Latitudes, the exhibition looks at histories of art as fragments in geological time. The portentous mood of this gallery hinges on combustion and history violently formed through the fundamental reordering of the relations between humans and the rest of nature." Continue reading

      Social media archive related to the exhibition.
      Photo gallery of the exhibition.

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities. 

      RELATED CONTENT:




      Cover Story – June 2017: "Moth light—Absent Forms"


      The June 2017 Monthly Cover Story ""Moth light—Absent Forms"" is now up on www.lttds.org after June it will be archived here

      "The Latitudes-curated Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes & des Arts et Techniques dans la Vie Moderne opened at Meessen De Clercq, Brussels, in February 2011. More a series of five interlinked solo presentations than a conventional thematic group exhibition, it featured the work of Kasper Akhøj, Martí Anson, Maria Loboda, Charlotte Moth and Sarah Ortmeyer." Continue reading

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities. 

      RELATED CONTENT:




      Cover Story – May 2017: "S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps"

       

      The May 2017 Monthly Cover Story "S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps" is now up on www.lttds.org after May it will be archived here.  

      "Today, as for millennia, the mighty River Zambezi is crashing over a series of precipitous basalt gorges—a place the Makololo people described as Mosi-oa-Tunya. The smoke that thunders. Since the 1870s, a Scottish stream has been plunging over a diminutive replica, seen in this month’s video Cover Story, located in the gardens of a mansion that is now a country house hotel (by all accounts with an enviable breakfast) in the village of Polbeth, less than an hour’s drive from Edinburgh." Continue reading

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities. 

      RELATED CONTENT:
      • Archive of Cover Stories
      • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
      • Cover Story – March 2017: Time travel with Jordan Wolfson 1 March 2017
      • Cover Story February 2017: The Dutch Assembly, five years on 1 February 2017
      • Cover Story January 2017: How open are open calls? 4 January 2017
      • Cover Story December 2016: Ten years ago – Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook 5 December 2016
      • Cover Story November 2016: Plucking Gilda, synesthetic Toni and dazzling Víctor 2 November 2016
      • Cover Story October 2016: "A Funny thing Happened on the Way to the Gallery, 13 October 2016
      • Cover Story September 2016: "El misterio de Caviria" by Antoni Hervàs 1 Septiembre 2016
      • Last chance to read the August 2016 Monthly Cover Story "Fermínlandia" 31 August 2016




      Cover Story – April 2017: "Banff Geologic Time"

      The April 2017 Monthly Cover Story "Banff Geologic Time" is now up on www.lttds.org after April it will be archived here.  

      "Johann Wolfgang von Goethe spent a great deal of time worrying about stones. Not least, he was troubled by a giant 700-tonne granite rock that lay near the otherwise flat land near Berlin. What on earth was this alien to the region’s geology doing there? Goethe’s realisation that the strange mineral object must have been displaced by glaciers helped instigate the theory of ice ages and deep time. Stone provokes us to recalibrate our concept of the past and our place in the world. Rock is radical." Continue reading by clicking the grey bar underneath the image.

      We remind artists, researchers, cultural writers and curators interested in slower and longer-term view of art, exhibitions, and their institutions (as well as rocks of course!) that the call for the Banff thematic residency programme "Geologic Time" (September 11–October 6, 2017) led by Latitudes and artists Sean Lynch as Guest Faculty, is open until May 24 (11:59pm MST).




      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities, and are archived here.

      Related content:




      Cover Story – March 2017: Time travel with Jordan Wolfson


      The March 2017 Monthly Cover Story "Time travel with Jordan Wolfson" is now up on www.lttds.org after March it will be archived here.  

      "The film that lends its image to this month’s cover story – Jordan Wolfson’s Landscape for Fire, 2007 – was featured in the Latitudes-curated film programme A Stake in the Mud, A Hole in the Reel. Land Art’s Expanded Field 1968–2008, which premiered in April 2008 at the Museo Tamayo, Mexico City, before touring several venues in Spain, Switzerland, the Netherlands and the U.K. 

      Landscape for Fire responded to a 1972 film of the same name by Anthony McCall in which the British artist, best known for his “solid light” works, attempted to integrate performance, installation, sculpture and images in movement. Thirty-five years on, Jordan had re-staged this work of the past as though it were a ritual, the repetition of which invoked the almost mystical aura that often surrounds the art of the late 1960s and early 1970s." Continue reading by clicking the grey bar underneath the image

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities, and are archived here.


      Related content:




      Cover Story – February 2017: The Dutch Assembly, five years on


      The February 2017 Monthly Cover Story "The Dutch Assembly, five years on" is now up on www.lttds.org after February it will be archived here.  

      "Five years ago this month ‘The Dutch Assembly’ took place. In 2012, the Netherlands was the guest country of ARCOmadrid and with the collaboration of the Mondriaan Fonds and the Embassy of the Netherlands in Spain, Latitudes convened this representation of Dutch art organisations. (...) ‘The Dutch Assembly’ transpired in the teeth of a storm surrounding the slashing of the Dutch cultural budget by a State Secretary of Culture (Halbe Zijlstra) who openly flaunted his disdain for the arts. (...) How have the participating organisations faired in the last five years?" Continue reading...

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and highlight past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions or field trips related to our activities, and are archived here.


      Related content:




      Cover Story – January 2017: How open are open calls?


      The January 2017 Monthly Cover Story is now up on www.lttds.org after January it will be archived here.  

      "The first issue of frieze of 2017 includes “Salon Selectives”, an article by Latitudes’s Max Andrews that, with a wink to sassy 1980s hair care, asks “how open are open calls?”. The text is accompanied by this astonishing drawing from the collection of The Metropolitan Museum of Art by Felicien Myrbach-Rheinfeld entitled Candidates for Admission to the Paris Salon (c.1900)." Continue reading...

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions or field trips related to our activities.  

      Related content:




      Cover Story – December 2016: Ten years ago – Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook


      The December Monthly Cover Story is now up on www.lttds.org after this month it will be archived here

      "The publication Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook is ten years old. Commissioned by the Arts & Ecology programme of The Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures & Commerce (RSA), in partnership with Arts Council England, this book was one of Latitudes’s first projects. Through the inspirational contributions of people as varied as Lucy Lippard, Stephanie Smith, Amy Balkin, or the late Wangari Maathai – to mention just a few – the compendium charted the twin legacies of Land Art and the environmental movement while proposing how the critical acuity of art might remain relevant in the face of the dramatic ecological consequences of human activity. The research and reflection involved set Latitudes on a course that led to several further projects engaging with ecology, explicitly or otherwise." Continue reading...

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, exhibitions and field trips related to our activities.  

      Related content:




      Actividades programadas durante la exposición "El misterio de caviria" de Antoni Hervàs en La Capella


      Hasta el próximo domingo 13 de noviembre tenéis oportunidad de visitar la exposición individual "El Misterio de Caviria" de Antoni Hervàs en La Capella

      En paralelo a la exposicón, se han organizado una serie de actividades que han activado la exposición, la primera de las cuales tuvo lugar el 18 de septiembre en el antiguo local de fiestas Copacabana (actual aparcamiento del Department de Cultura de la Generalitat en La Rambla) cuando Juan de la Cruz el Rosillo, interpretó un emocionante repertorio de canciones acompañado por sus ya famosas castañuelas de cerámica.

      Fotos: Latitudes.

      A continuación el público se desplazó unos metros hasta el Frontón Colón donde Gerard López, el campeón de España masculino senior de gimnasia rítmica, reali una coreografía llevando un maillot diseñado para la ocasión por Hervàs – actualmente expuesto en La Capella. El Copacabana fue el primer local de espectáculos de travestismo en la ciudad condal tras la Guerra Civil. Uno de sus números más populares era cuando la travesti Margarita (ahora encarnada en el premiado gimnasta), disfrazada con un traje de volantes hechos con papel de periódico, invitaba a los espectadores a que le prendieran fuego provocando su danza frenética. López interpretó una sinuosa versión de la danza de los siete velos compuesta por Norman Bambi  para esta ocasión, en la que los movimientos gráciles y seductores del atleta, encubren la poderosa y agresiva disciplina que requiere la gimnasia rítmica permitiéndole reavivar las cenizas del extinto local.


      Fotos: Latitudes.


      El 27 de octubre, en una velada organizada en colaboración con el cineasta Eduardo Gión (director de "Lentejuelas de sangre" (2012) y del espectáculo mensual "El Desplume!" en el Antic Teatre), se proyectaron en La Capella cinco cortos inéditos en Super-8 realizados por el legendario Pierrot (el actor, dibujante, escritor y showman Antonio Gracia (1942-2011)) pionero del fantaterror y del cine experimental barcelonés.


      Cartel de @octavioterol.

       El programa incluyó:

      + Miss Drácula (22' 36'')
      ¿Se siente enjaulado? ¿Embriagado todavía por un amor desdichado? ¿Preferiría desaparecer? Muera tal y como ha deseado toda su puñetera vida. Miss Drácula le complacerá. Vaya a verla cuando quiera, ella le está esperando en su castillo.

      + Lecciones de sexualidad (17')
      Pasen y vean: sexo-terror, un delicioso paseo en el cual recrearse y dar rienda suelta a tabúes y perversiones inconfesables.

      + La muñeca (27' 30'')
      La sangre de los muertos es semilla de nuevos súbditos de Satán. Un viaje hacia el epicentro del Mal en el que no se conformaron con llamar a sus puertas, sino que arrojaron pedruscos para cerciorarse de que se enteraría.

      + Poseídos (10')
      Cuando una está harta de ver levitar a sus hijos y de dejarse la piel al limpiar esa viscosa y supurante espuma verde con la que lo dejan todo perdido, no queda más remedio que tomar asiento y pintarse las uñas mientras se espera la llegada del crucifijo.

      + El diario de Er (6' 50'')
      Eredio danza menguante entre las páginas de su diario, en que yace escrito con sangre el apasionado relato de un amor no correspondido.
       


      Víctor Guerrero.

      Finalmente el 3 de noviembre, tuvo un lugar un recorrido antológico por la trajectoria de Víctor Guerrero, showman y diseñador de vestuario, a través del desfile de sus trajes más memorables realizados en los años 70 y hasta la actualidad. El recorrido transformó la instalación de "El misterio de caviria" en un psicodélico desfile feliniano de la mano de los modelos Gabriel, Bruno, Manuel, Yago, Juan David, Víctor y Manel (¡gracias a cada uno de ellos por su complicidad!).


       (Arriba y abajo) Entre bambalinas: Víctor Guerrero presenta a los modelos los trajes y complementos de su colección personal. Todas las fotos: Latitudes

       Bruno durante la prueba de vestuario y ensayo. 
        Manuel durante la prueba de vestuario y ensayo. 
       
        Yago durante su prueba de vestuario. 

        Gabriel durante su prueba de vestuario. 

        Manuel durante su prueba de vestuario. 

       Momentos antes de empezar la actuación.

      Empieza el espectáculo con la capa.

       Bruno y Manuel con trajes rojos y abanicos con plumas dan entrada al resto de modelos.

       Yago en frac blanco y Juan David con el traje "quick change" utilizado para realizar un truco de magia.
       Los ocho modelos al final del desfile.

      Avanzamos que en Enero se presentará la publicación que recoge documentación de la exposición así como una entrevista entre Antoni Hervàs y Latitudes, tutores del proyecto, sobre el proceso de trabajo, las escenografías y personajes que han compuesto "El misterio de Caviria":
       

      "El misterio de Caviria"
      Colofón 

      "El misterio de Caviria" es un proyecto expositivo de Antoni Hervàs enmarcado dentro de la 10ª edición de la convocatoria abierta BCN Producció'16 que se presenta durante la temporada 2016 en La Capella.

      Tutoría del proyecto: Latitudes 
      Diseño de espacio: Goig (Miquel Mariné y Pol Esteve)
      Cesión de espacio taller: Fàbrica de Creació Fabra i Coats
      Patrocinio de andamiaje: Cal Cego

      Capítulo 1: La Loba
      Casco: Luís Robles (“Lluis Quinrob“)
      Canción: “La Loba” de Marifé de Triana
      Intérprete: Pilar Carrión
      Localizaciones vídeo: etHALL / Bar O'Barquiño
      Música: NormanBambi
      Cinematografía: Eduardo Gión

      Capítulo 2: La sala de las columnas
      Ve: Violeta la Burra
      Música: Norman Bambi

      Capítulo 3: La Peste
      Intérprete: Gilda Love
      Localización: Antic Teatre
      Cinematografía: Eduardo Gión
      Vestuario: Victor Guerrero
      Cesión de espacio: El Desplume

      Capítulo 4: Ritual purificador del fuego
      Nadadores: WoMen Synchro
      Coreografía: Iris Brunsó
      Intérprete: José Jaén
      Música: Versión de “Tengo miedo”, Norman Bambi
      Cinematografía: Ainara Elgoibar. Tractora
      Performance realizada a la Fundación Joan Miró (2015) durante el acontecimiento performativo “Mercurio Splash” comisariado por David Bestué y Antoni Hervàs.
      Fotografía: Pere Pratdesaba/Fundació Joan Miró, Barcelona.

      Capítulo 5: La lucha
      Taller “De cintura en arriba” con el equipo de lucha de La Mina, parte del programa de actividades públicas gestionadas por Consol Llupià para Xarxa Zande.
      Localización: Artes Santa Mònica
      Documentación fotográfica: Jose Begega y Consol Llupià

      Capítulo 6: El trofeo de la lucha
      Confección del maillot: Elastic Rubí
      Pedrería: Yolanda Strass
      Música: Norman Bambi

      Acto I: el Copacabana
      Cesión de espacio: Departament de Cultura de la Generalitat de Catalunya
      Intérprete: Juan de Cruz el Rosillo

      Acto II: el Frontón Colón
      Gimnasta: Gerard López, Club gimnàstic Mediterrania
      Cesión practicable de gimnasia rítmica: Consell de l'Esport Escolar de Barcelona
      Música: Norman Bambi
      Cinematografía: Ainara Elgoibar. Tractora
      Sonidista: Mariana Cánepa Luna
      Material técnico: HANGAR – BAFF

      Capítulo 7: La ridiculització de la masculinidad
      Documentación: Casal Lambda, Barcelona

      Capítulo 8: La invocación de los dioses del underground
      Material documental cesión de Eduardo Gión:
      1. Un desplume diferente. Espectáculo del Barcelona de noche.
      2. Cortometrajes de Pierrot: “Miss Drácula” (1976), “Poseidos” (1973),“Vampiros” (1972), “La muñeca”(1972), “Miss drácula 2 y el imperio de la Leche” (1976).


      Juan de la Cruz "el Rosillo". Foto: @brillobox

      Antoni Hervàs agradece al jurado de BCNProducció'16, a todo el equipo de BCNProducció y al fabuloso equipo de montaje liderado por Alberto Calvete.

      A Ico Mateo.

      A toda la expedición argonauta: Luc, Ainara, Pol, Miquel, Eduardo, Max, Mariana, Lluis, Gerard López, Juan de Cruz, los guerreros de la mina, a los WoMen synchro (Antonio, Iris, Gio, Tammi, Luis, Clara, Claudia y Pau); José Jaén, Victor Guerrero, Pilar Carrión, Violeta la Burra y Gilda Love.

      A la capitana de la furgo-Argo: Beatriz Fuentes.

      Así como a los fantásticos
      amigos: Ariadna Parreu, Pau Magrané, Anna Moreno, Fito Conesa, Marc Navarro, David Bestué, Martina Millà, Montse Badia, Lucía C. Pino, Enric Farrés, Araceli Moreno, Claudia Labrador, Ángela Palacios, Evripidis Sabatis, Jordi GG, Corte Moderno, Carlos Valverde, Alicia Rosselló, Manolo Carrión, Marc Vives, Aimar Pérez Galí, Dutor-Mont de Pallol, Sergio Ibañez, Consol Llupià, Jose Begega, Usue Arrieta, Guido, Sara Hervàs & Maria, y a la Katherings: Pilar Cortés.

      A Pierrot y a todos aquellos, quienes desde Fregoli, han iluminado los escenarios de la ciudad hasta apagarse.



      Contenidos relacionados:




      Cover Story – November 2016: Plucking Gilda, synesthetic Toni and dazzling Víctor


      A new Monthly Cover Story is now on www.lttds.org (after October it will be archived here). "Plucking Gilda, synesthetic Toni and dazzling Víctor" focuses on Antoni Hervàs' exhibition "El Misterio de Caviria" which can be visited at La Capella until November, 13th.   

      “During [my first visit to] El desplume, Víctor Guerrero introduced Gilda (Victor also designs the dazzling attire that she wears): “The legend is here!” Soon, a brilliant and powerful whirlwind appeared, stopping time and winning the audience over from the first moment that she stepped on stage. When Gilda reveals her real age in one of her characteristic monologues, the audience is always left dumbfounded – she seems immortal. I realised that I was establishing some synesthetic relations by which I attributed colours to her stories. I started to imagine a scenario in my head: her large eyes open wide as she perceives a steaming stench cast by Draculina...”

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage to highlight past, present or forthcoming projects, research, exhibitions or field trips related to our activities. 


      Related content:
      • Archive of Cover Stories
      • Cover Story, October 2016: "A Funny thing Happened on the Way to the Gallery, 13 October 2016
      • Cover Story, September 2016: "El misterio de Caviria" by Antoni Hervàs 1 Septiembre 2016
      • Last chance to read the August 2016 Monthly Cover Story "Fermínlandia" 31 August 2016
      • Cover Story, July 2016: Through the grapevine – Rasmus Nilausen’s Soups & Symptoms 3 July 2016
      • Last days! Cover Story and exhibition of José Antonio Hernández-Díez: techno-pop, death and resurrection (20 June 2016)
      • Cover Story, May 2016: Material histories – spilling the beans at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux (10 May 2016)
      • Cover Story, March 2016: José Antonio Hernández-Díez: The sacred heart of the matter (3 March 2016
      • Cover Story, February 2016: Sarah Ortmeyer, Towering allusions (9 Febrero 2016)




      October Cover Story: "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Gallery"


      A new Monthly Cover Story is now on www.lttds.org (after October it will be archived here). "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Gallery" reflects on the recent reenactment of the 1972 performance by Robert Llimós, restaged during the four days of the recent Barcelona Gallery Weekend. "Los Corredores" was one of the five context-sensitive interventions curated by Latitudes for the second edition of the event.
       
      (...) "During the past few days the Compositions of the Barcelona Gallery Weekend could be found in a subterranean billiards club, an abandoned textiles factory, a masonic-anarchist library, and the stables of the city police. The contribution of Robert Llimós was constantly dashing between these singular venues and the twenty-three participating galleries. Los Corredores (The Runners) was a remake of an action that was originally created in the summer of 1972 as part of the legendary avant-garde art festival known as Los Encuentros de Pamplona (The Pamplona Meetings). Llimós is best known for a long trajectory as a painter and sculptor that began in the sixties within the Nueva Figuración movement, and continues today with his depictions of extraterrestrials, yet this is one of a handful of his striking performative works." Continue reading...  

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage to highlight past, present or forthcoming projects, research, exhibitions or field trips related to our activities. 


      Related content:
      • Archive of Cover Stories
      • September Cover Story: "El misterio de Caviria" by Antoni Hervàs 1 Septiembre 2016
      • Last chance to read the August 2016 Monthly Cover Story "Fermínlandia" 31 August 2016
      • Cover Story, July 2016: Through the grapevine – Rasmus Nilausen’s Soups & Symptoms 3 July 2016
      • Last days! Cover Story and exhibition of José Antonio Hernández-Díez: techno-pop, death and resurrection (20 June 2016)
      • Cover Story, May 2016: Material histories – spilling the beans at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux (10 May 2016)
      • Cover Story, March 2016: José Antonio Hernández-Díez: The sacred heart of the matter (3 March 2016
      • Cover Story, February 2016: Sarah Ortmeyer, Towering allusions (9 Febrero 2016)




      September Cover Story: "El misterio de Caviria" by Antoni Hervàs


      You can now read our September 2016 Monthly Cover Story "El misterio de Caviria" on www.lttds.org (after September 2016 it will be archived here), a preview of his forthcoming solo exhibition "El misterio de Caviria" at La Capella, part of the BCNProducció'16 production grants. Hervàs' project is one of the three exhibitions Latitudes mentors this year.

      (...) "Antoni Hervàs draws back the curtains on his exhibition El Misterio de Caviria at the Sala Gran of La Capella, Barcelona, on 15 September. As part the tutorial team of BCNProducció'16 alongside David Armengol and Mireia Sallarès, Latitudes has been working with Toni since February on the development of what can only be described as an epic production. Continue reading...

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage to highlight past, present or forthcoming projects, research, exhibitions or field trips related to our activities. 


      Related content:
      • Archive of Cover Stories
      • Last chance to read the August 2016 Monthly Cover Story "Fermínlandia" 31 August 2016
      • Cover Story, July 2016: Through the grapevine – Rasmus Nilausen’s Soups & Symptoms 3 July 2016
      • Last days! Cover Story and exhibition of José Antonio Hernández-Díez: techno-pop, death and resurrection (20 June 2016)
      • Cover Story, May 2016: Material histories – spilling the beans at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux (10 May 2016)
      • Cover Story, March 2016: José Antonio Hernández-Díez: The sacred heart of the matter (3 March 2016
      • Cover Story, February 2016: Sarah Ortmeyer, Towering allusions (9 Febrero 2016)




      Last chance to read the August 2016 Monthly Cover Story "Fermínlandia"


      Last chance to read the August 2016 Monthly Cover Story "Fermínlandia" on www.lttds.org (after August 2016 it will be archived here)

      "
      Five years ago, in August 2011, Fermín Jiménez Landa initiated the surrender, conquest and defence of a small nameless island using the power of music. With the help of local fishermen he had taken a portable generator, two tripod-mounted loudspeakers, and an mp3 player out into the Aegean Sea and planted the equipment on this uninhabited Greek island. Its new national anthem played again and again until the batteries ran out. You can just make out the two loudspeakers sitting atop the grassy rock in this photograph by Fermín." Continue reading...

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage to highlight past, present or forthcoming projects, research, exhibitions or field trips related to our activities. 


      Related content:
      • Archive of Cover Stories.
      • Cover Story, July 2016: Through the grapevine – Rasmus Nilausen’s Soups & Symptoms 3 July 2016
      • Last days! Cover Story and exhibition of José Antonio Hernández-Díez: techno-pop, death and resurrection (20 June 2016)
      • Cover Story, May 2016: Material histories – spilling the beans at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux (10 May 2016)
      • Cover Story, March 2016: José Antonio Hernández-Díez: The sacred heart of the matter (3 March 2016
      • Cover Story, February 2016: Sarah Ortmeyer, Towering allusions (9 Febrero 2016)




      Cover Story: July 2016 – Through the grapevine – Rasmus Nilausen’s Soups & Symptoms


      New Monthly Cover Story "Through the grapevine – Rasmus Nilausen’s Soups & Symptoms" is now on www.lttds.org (after July 2016 it will be archived here)

      "Rasmus Nilausen’s "The Cluster" III (2014) sits tight in a cupboard in what was once the house of a priest. This painting formed just one part of the exhibition that, together with Pere Llobera, Nilausen made for the Latitudes-devised Composiciones last October (the programme of artists’ interventions returns later this year). "Vera Icon" took over the rooms of the abandoned house in the gardens of La Central bookstore, itself a former city-centre church, and tweeting Mayoress Ada Colau was one of the many curious visitors over the weekend." continue reading...

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage to highlight past, present or forthcoming projects, research, exhibitions or field trips related to our activities. 
      "Highly recommended the #BarcelonaGAlleryWeekend @ArtBarcelona_AS". Twitter by Ada Colau, Barcelona Mayor during her visit to Rasmus Nilausen (photographed on the left and upper right corner) and Pere Llobera exhibition at the house of a former priest, La Central Bookstore. Slideshow starts here.

      Related content:
      • Archive of Cover Stories.
      • Last days! Cover Story and exhibition of José Antonio Hernández-Díez: techno-pop, death and resurrection (20 June 2016)
      • Cover Story, May 2016: Material histories – spilling the beans at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux (10 May 2016)
      • Cover Story, March 2016: José Antonio Hernández-Díez: The sacred heart of the matter (3 March 2016
      • Cover Story, February 2016: Sarah Ortmeyer, Towering allusions (9 Febrero 2016)




      Last days! Cover Story and exhibition of José Antonio Hernández-Díez: techno-pop, death and resurrection

      Monthly cover story on www.lttds.org

      José Antonio Hernández-Díez’s exhibition No temeré mal alguno (I will fear no evil) – curated by Latitudes – continues at the Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA) until 26 June. Reconstructed for the exhibition, the extraordinary Sagrado Corazón Activo was first shown in September 1991 in a group show titled El Espíritu de los Tiempos (The Spirit of the Times) in Caracas, Venezuela. It belongs to a body of work that José termed a ‘New Christian Iconography’ in which the application of communications and medical technology interlace with systems of paranormal belief, most prominently Christian theology.


      Published as part of MACBA’s Portable Notebook series, Latitudes’s essay about José’s exhibition explains that “this visceral work deals with a key point of difference in theologies related with transubstantiation and ‘real presence’ – the notion that Jesus Christ is actually somehow present in a fleshy way in the bread and wine of the Eucharist versus being a symbolic or a metaphorical presence. Sagrado Corazón Activo seems to inhabit the peculiarly disjointed temporality that is proper to hauntology – a techno-medical vision of a science-gone-mad future within an ancient symbolic past.”   

      Photo: Inés Balcells for ABC El Mundo.

      No temeré mal alguno (I will fear no evil) focusses on José’s first experimental works with videography in the late 1980s and early 1990s and such early iconic vitrine-based works, alongside a new project made for the occasion. The presence of ghosts and bodily organs in this phase of Hernández-Díez’s out-of-joint art – videographic spectres, disembodied voices, preserved creatures, hearts and skin – is only enhanced by the necromantic aspect of the fact that several of his works were remade, as if brought back to life, for the exhibition.

      #HernándezDíez
        
      Related content:




      Cover Story, May 2016: Material histories – spilling the beans at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux


      A cover story is published monthly on www.lttds.org

      "In pondering a museum’s memories you seldom think of coffee beans. Yet at CAPC Contemporary Art Museum Bordeaux, burnished nuggets of the past in the form of the seeds of Coffea arabica occasionally materialise, as if out of nowhere. One day one might appear atop a pile of papers on an office desk; weeks later, another bean might show up in the middle of one of the exhibition galleries. A look on top of a shelf in the library might harvest several. During Latitudes’ recent residency at CAPC, François Poisay from the exhibition team showed us the stash he has been squirrelling away in his desk for years." 

      Continue reading on www.lttds.org (after May 2016, it will be archived here

      Related content:  




      Cover Story, February 2016: Sarah Ortmeyer, Towering allusions



      The February 2016 Cover Story is dedicated to Sarah Ortmeyer's piece VITRINE MAURICE (2011) presented as part of the group show Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes & des Arts et Techniques dans la Vie Moderne at Meessen De Clercq, Brussels.

       
      Related Content:




      January 2016 Monthly Cover Story: Kasper Akhøj's Eileen Gray’s E.1027


      NEW YEAR / 
      NEW MONTH / 
      NEW MONTHLY COVER STORY /

      The January "Cover Story" features a black-and-white photo by Danish artist Kasper Akhøj taken from the living room of Eileen Gray's E.1027, the seaside villa built at Roquebrune-Cap-Martin, France, in the late 1920s. The image is part of the series 'Welcome (TO THE TEKNIVAL)' that Kasper has been working on since 2008 examining the process of restoration and the convoluted history of this icon of modern architecture. On January 16, Kasper will open a solo show at Ellen de Bruijne PROJECTS, Amsterdam. A publication designed by Copenhagen-based designer Anni's will include an essay by Latitudes’s Max Andrews.

      We first got to know Kasper in 2007 in the United Arab Emirates. Kasper was there installing 'Autoxylopyrocycloboros' (2006) for Simon Starling as part of Sharjah Biennial 8, while we were there curating the biennial’s symposium. Four years later, in 2011, we were delighted to include Kasper’s work in the Latitudes’ group show Exposition International des Art Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes & des Arts et Techniques dans la Vie Moderne (International Exhibition of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts & Art and Technology in Modern Life) at Meessen De Clercq, Brussels, in 2011. Here he presented a slideshow which centred on the ‘Abstracta’ display system, originally designed by the Danish architect and designer Poul Cadovious in the 1960s. 

      Happy 2016! 



      RELATED CONTENT: 





      More from OMONOIA – Athens Biennale 2015–2017 on our December Cover Story

      International Summit Synapse 1 at New Rex of the National Theatre of Greece. 'Session II: Rethinking Institutions': (from left to right) Leo Panitch, Maria Hlavajova, Adam Szymczyk, Amalia Zepou (moderator), Hilary Wainwright, Emily Pethick, Latitudes (Max Andrews & Mariana Cánepa Luna) © Eva Galatsanou.

      The above picture by Eva Galatsanou was taken during 'Session II: Rethinking Institutions' one of the Summit panels that launched OMONOIA, the Athens Biennale 2015–2017. Latitudes participated in this panel on November 18, as one of the speakers. The current Cover Story on our home page features this event at the National Theatre of Greece, New Rex.  

      Below some more photos of that day and the working group meetings that took place at the former Bageion Hotel (18 Omonoia Square) on November 19, 2015.

       Omonoia Square. On the left the Bargeion Hotel (with the orange banner), HQ of the Athens Biennial 2015–2017.
       
      Omonoia Square from the first floor of the Bageion Hotel.

       Artistic Director Massimiliano Mollona, and Athens Biennale directors Xenia Kalpaktsoglou (left) and Poka-Yio (right) welcome guests to the second day of the Summit "Synapse 1: Introducing a laboratory for production post". 

       After the welcoming words, guests joined closed-door working groups sessions around the building on 'Cooperativism', 'Commons & Urban Welfare', 'Alternative Currencies' and 'Solidarity Networks'.

       10am–1pm: Latitudes joined the 'Commons & Urban Welfare' working group which had representatives of Avtonomi Akadimia (GR), Omada Metavasis / Transition (GR), Omikron Project (GR), Sarantaporo (GR), Votanikos Kipos Squat (GR), Athens Wireless Metropolitan Network (TBC) (GR), Green Park (TBC) (GR), Luigi Coppola (Parco Commune dei Frutti Minori, IT), Sylvia de Fanti (Teatro Valle, IT) and Federica Giardini.

      2–5pm: During the Open Assembly, artist, activist and Berlin-based curator Margarita Tsomou feeds back to the audience what was discussed during the 'Solidarity Networks' working group which had representatives from Refugees Welcome (GR), Solidarity4all (GR), HYLE[Ύλη]matter (GR), Notara Squat (TBC) (GR), The Other Human (TBC) (GR), Metropolitan Community Clinic at Helliniko (GR), European Village (GR), Ivor Stodolsky (Perpetuum Mobile) (NO).

      Potent voices like that of Tsomou raised questions about a proposed 'open' biennale format and the possible (in)adequacy of visual arts to host activism. "I do my activism in the street" – she exclaimed. (Tsomou has recently interviewed Adam Szymczyk (artistic director of documenta 14) for DIE ZEIT – download here.)

       Other speakers were more direct in their pragmatism and asked the forum "What do we have? Do we have a hammer? Do we have chairs?" to which Mollona and Poka-Yio responded the biennial has the Bageion Hotel building and in-kind sponsorship for production, everything else has to be decided and invented collectively for the next two years. 

       End of the Open Assembly at the Bageion Hotel.

       Stairs of the Bageion Hotel.


      RELATED CONTENT:





      Latitudes' "out of office" 2014–2015 season

      It's that end-of-the-season time of the year again. It has become a tradition for Latitudes (see the 2008-9, 2009-10, 2010-11, 2011-12, 2012–13, 2013–14 posts) to mark the summer break, not by presenting a written memo of activities or a financial statement, but with a 'behind the scenes' post filled with photos revisiting moments from the year gone by. So here are some glimpses from September 2014 to August 2015.

      Slowing down is rather relative this Summer, as at the end of July we embarked on a two-week trip to The Banff Centre in Canada to be Guest Faculty of one of its thematic residencies, 'Blueprint for Happiness' led by British artists Heather & Ivan Morison. At the end of August, we will be in residency at Kadist Art Foundation in San Francisco for another two weeks. 

      Milestones during the first part of 2015 were two-fold: after months of technical tweaking and editorial wrangling, we launched our newly designed website in February and secondly, this Spring Latitudes celebrated its 10th anniversary.

      Have a great holiday, más en septiembre! 

      7 October 2014: Latitudes hosted the second year students of the MA Curating Contemporary Art at the Royal College of Art, London, and took the opportunity of presenting and reflecting on our collaborations with three Catalan artists – Martí Anson, Ignasi Aballí and Francesc Ruiz
       Francesc Ruiz presenting his work to the RCA students.

      Trip reporting: We reported from the field including at Madrid's Apertura in September, London's Frieze week in October, David Jablonowski's "Hype Cycle" at Fons Welters during Amsterdam's Art Weekend in November, and from Bordeaux in January, to Bari in May.

      Writing: This year Max Andrews has joined Frieze as Contributing Editor – where he has been writing since 2004. His writing has been more visible in recent months as Frieze have published reviews on Maria Thereza Alves at CAAC in Sevilla, the group show "What cannot be used is forgotten" at CAPC Bordeaux, a profile of Nicholas Mangan and a review of the Spanish and Latin American Pavilions at the Venice Biennale. Mariana Cánepa Luna also published an interview with Mangan in Mousse Magazine last February.

      New website: Our homemade website finally saw the light of day in February. As explained in this post, the website features new elements such as the 'Cover Story' (more on that in the next paragraph), sliding photo galleries, a tidied-up sidebar with a calendar of events, tags to filter projects by 'year' or 'exhibition', etc.

      'Cover Story': More writing has emerged through the new monthly section "Cover Story" on our home page (check out the archive of this section):

      March 2015: Focused on a single artwork: Wilfredo Prieto's ‘Grasa, jabón y plátano’ (2006); 

      April 2015: Revisited a peculiar site: the Connaught Road West flyover, in Hong Kong;


      April 2015 Cover Story.

      May 2015: Honoured two artistazos: Lawrence Weiner and Sergi Aguilar and a whisky-enhanced chat on the Barcelona shore in October 2008; 


      June 2015: Visited Ignasi Aballí at his Raval studio.

      Summer 2015: Orbited around Australian artist Nicholas Mangan, an artist with whom Latitudes just did an in conversation in the context of his solo exhibition "Ancient Lights" at Chisenhale, London and whose work has been the focus in Max Andrews' Frieze text as well as in Mariana Cánepa Luna's interview in the February-March issue of Mousse Magazine


       Summer 2015 Cover Story (plus the archive here).

      26 February, ARCOmadrid: On jury duty visiting the galleries participating in the #Opening section of the art fair, in order to select its best stand. The award was given to Barcelona-based gallery etHALL which presented works by Martin Vitaliti and Sergio Prego.

       

      Spring, celebration time! Later in May we celebrated our 10th anniversary (well, officially it was in April!) launching a series of limited editions in the form of tote bags by four artists that have a special place in our hearts and with whom we have collaborated with in the past: Lawrence Weiner (New York, 1942), Haegue Yang (Seoul, 1971), Ignasi Aballí (Barcelona, 1958) and Mariana Castillo Deball (Mexico City, 1975). Below is a glimpse from the making of the tote bags at Print Workers Barcelona, and here's where you can place your order.
       Photolith design for the tote bag by Haegue Yang – realised in collaboration with OK-RM. 
       Silkscreen process of Lawrence Weiner's design. Photo: Print Workers.
       Silkscreening Ignasi Aballí's tote. Photo: Print Workers.
       Silkscreening Mariana Castillo Deball tote. Photo: Print Workers.
       Silkscreening the credit for each bag in the inside pocket. Photo: Print Workers.
      Homemade photo studio documenting the totes. Results of the photo shoot here.

      9–13 May 2015: After an intense week of Biennale overdose in Venice, we traveled to Bari to join Vessel and MADA's 2015 International Curatorial Retreat as two of its tutors. The week was far from being a retreat, it was more like an "intensive" – though it certainly was a "treat". Highly interesting debates and conversations on-and-off the scheduled activities of lectures and break-out sessions emerged in places such as a cave or in the nearby town Monopoli – no direct link to the property trading board game. Here a report from fellow tutor Dr. Alexandra Ross
        
       Visiting the market. Photo: Piero Percoco.
      Market stall selling tomatoes of all kinds and origins.
       Chef Boris Portnoy doing some dinner prep at Doppelgaenger gallery/home.
       Due to a fire in Rome's airport, our flight was cancelled and we had to rearrange our travel, spending another day in Bari. We therefore visited (we were in fact their only visitors) the Palazzo dell'Acquedotto Pugliese di Bari, decorated by roman designer Duilio Cambellotti
      A food detour to purchase delightful spicy rucola in the Mercato ex Manifattura Bari, in the Quartiere Libertà.


      3–5 June 2015: Max Andrews participated in the annual 'Invest Conference 2015' organised by Stroom den Haag, in The Hague, consisting of "an incentive for the artistic development of recently graduated artists who have received the PRO Invest subsidy in the year before. A group of ten international curators is asked to visit these artists in their studios and meet with the art scene of The Hague." 
        Above (visiting Machteld Rullens) and following photographs by Myung Feyen. Courtesy Stroom den Haag.

      7 July 2015: For our last public event of the year we joined Melbourne artist Nicholas Mangan for an in conversation in the context of his solo show 'Ancient Lights' that opened a few days earlier at Chisenhale Gallery in London. Mint and Lime Films video documented the talk – watch it from Chisenhale's website / Vimeo.

      Vinyl listing the exhibition events.
       (Above) Photos by Manuela Barczewski.


      27 July–7 August 2015: Guest Faculty of the Thematic Residency 'Blueprint for Happiness' at The Banff Centre, Canada. We joined the group in the middle two weeks of the six week programme led by British artists Heather and Ivan Morison

      View of The Banff Centre from our bedroom in Lloyd Hall.
      Banff TV announcing Latitudes' talk on 28 July, 4pm. 

       Blueprint for Happiness' participants.
       Views from Latitudes' studio in the Jeanne & Peter Lougheed Building.
       Studio visit with "Blueprint for Happiness" participant Vanessa Kwan.
       Studio visit with "Blueprint for Happiness" participant Robert Cram.
      Inevitable photo of a deer walking around Banff.
      Stunning evening sunset over the Bow River after a storm with a double rainbow.

      While in Banff, Latitudes led three seminars bringing forward a series of case studies as well as focussing on a number of artists whose practice has dealt with public space in different geographical contexts. We also undertook studio visits with each of the 11 resident artists, and participated in a field trip to Calgary to visit the HQ of art construction company Heavy Industries and the Esker Foundation Contemporary Art Gallery


       (School) Field trip to Calgary to visit Heavy Industries fabricators and the Esker Foundation. 
       Even though the school bus seats were no longer in scale to our adult bodies, interesting chats happened over the 2 hours of each trajectory.

      On Sunday 2 August, Latitudes hosted a closed-door evening film programme screening works by Spanish artist Emilio Moreno, Irish artist Sean Lynch and Australian artist Nicholas Mangan. The three films share a focus on public sculptures, monuments or buildings that have been displaced from their original context. 

       Flicking through some of the 4,000 artist books at Banff library.

      Most of this past months' activity has been invested in preparing for 2015–16 projects: Firstly, 'Compositions' a series of five artistic interventions by six artists active in the Barcelona art scene: David Bestué (Barcelona, 1980. Lives in Barcelona); Dora García (Valladolid, 1965. Lives in Barcelona), Jordi Mitjà (Figueres, 1970. Lives between Lladó and Banyoles); Rasmus Nilausen (Copenhagen, 1980. Lives in Barcelona) & Pere Llobera (Barcelona, 1970. Lives in Barcelona) and Daniel Steegmann Mangrané (Barcelona, 1977. Lives in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), which will take place in the context of the first Barcelona Gallery Weekend (1–4 October 2015). 

      Façade of Cosme Toda in L'Hospitalet municipality (Barcelona) part of a 1920s factory complex where David Bestué will present his intervention in the context of the first Barcelona Gallery Weekend, 1–4 October 2015.
      Site visit to the Umbracle with Daniel Steegmann Mangrané.


      Secondly, we've been working on the forthcoming solo exhibition of Venezuelan-born, Barcelona-based artist José Antonio Hernández-Díez which will be on view at La Capella MACBA from March 2016. Onwards!


      Digging through documentation in MACBA library in preparation for José Antonio Hernández-Díez exhibition.

      RELATED CONTENT:

      Latitudes 'Out of office' 2013–14, 31 July 2014;
      Latitudes' "out of office" photo album, 2012–2013 season, 31 July 2013;
      Latitudes' "out of office" photo album 2011–2012, 31 July 2012;
      Latitudes 'out of office' photo album 2010–11 season, 1 August 2011;
      Latitudes 'out of office' photo album 2009–10 season, 30 July 2010;
      Latitudes' "out of office" photo album 2008-9, 30 July 2009.


      This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
      All photos:
      Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
      This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




      Archive Cover Story (June): Ignasi Aballí sees nothing and something

        June 2015 Cover Story dedicated to Barcelona-based artist Ignasi Aballí, creator of one of Latitudes' commemorative tote bags.

      Related Content:


      Cover Story #3: Here's to horseshoes: Lawrence Weiner and Sergi Aguilar 1 June 2015


      Cover Story #2: Beneath the Connaught Road West flyover, Hong Kong, 19 January 2013 4 May 2015

      Cover Story #1: Wilfredo Prieto's work "Grease, Soap, Banana" 2 April 2015


      Latitudes hosts the MA Curating Contemporary Art students of the Royal College of Art in Barcelona 7 October 2014

      Ignasi Aballí at ARTIUM and Latitudes' text on 2009 project in Beijing and a 2010 interview 20 May 2012

      Where to find the publications edited by Latitudes? 22 April 2012

      'THE LAST STAR-LEDGER' AVAILABLE NOW! #4 issue of the 10 Latitudes-edited newspapers for 'The Last Newspaper' exhibition, New Museum 27 October 2010


      Ignasi Aballí's exhibition catalogue 'Nothing, or Something' now available 26 October 2009

      Slideshows of two projects: 'Provenances' at Umberto di Marino and 'Nothing, or Something' at SUITCASE Art Projects Beijing 25 May 2009



      This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes

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      All photos:
      Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
      Work is licensed under a
      Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




      Archive Cover Story (May): Here’s to horseshoes: Lawrence Weiner and Sergi Aguilar


      May 2015 Cover Story dedicated to Lawrence Weiner and Sergi Aguilar.


      Related Content:

      Cover Story #2: Beneath the Connaught Road West flyover, Hong Kong, 19 January 2013 (4 May 2015)

      Cover Story #1: Wilfredo Prieto's work "Grease, Soap, Banana" (2 April 2015)

      Latitudes participates in the "Readers Circle: 100 Notes–100 Thoughts" programme organised by the Maybe Education and Public Programs of dOCUMENTA (13) (31 August 2012)

      dOCUMENTA (13) artists and Latitudes (24 August 2012)

      Lawrence Weiner, 'Under the Sun', Espai d'Art Contemporani de Castelló (25 October 2009)

      Latitudes' "out of office" photo album 2008-9 (30 July 2009)

      SAVE THE DATE: 8 October, Lawrence Weiner, Fundació Suñol, Barcelona (29 August 2008)

      'UN PAÑO DE ALGODÓN ...' de Lawrence Weiner (22 September 2008)




      This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
      All photos:
      Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
      Work is licensed under a
      Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




      Archive of Cover Story (April): "Beneath the Connaught Road West flyover, Hong Kong, 19 January 2013"

      This past March we launched our re-designed website, which includes improved features as well as new sections such as "cover story" on our home page: a monthly focus on an artwork, artist, book, site or trip we've experienced in our recent past, accompanied by a short text.  

      Our April Cover Story titled "Beneath the Connaught Road West flyover, Hong Kong, 19 January 2013" looked back at the first 'Incidents of Travel' tour led by artist Nadim Abbas, part of our month residency at Spring Workshop. 

      We recommend reading the text while listening to this field recording we made on the very same spot!


      Related content:

      Cover Story #1: Wilfredo Prieto's work "Grease, Soap, Banana" (2 April 2015)
      New re-designed website now online! (25 February 2015) 
      Witte de With and Spring Workshop's 'Moderation(s)' publication 'End Note(s)' is out! (5 March 2015).
      Nadim Abbas' "Incidents of Travel: Hong Kong" public tour (19 January 2013)
      Archive of social media posts related to "Incidents of Travel" tours and photo-documentation.
      Interview between Christina Li and Latitudes on 'Incidents of Travel' for Witte de With's 'Witness to Moderation(s)' blog (7 May 2013)

      13 field recordings from 'Incidents of Travel: Hong Kong'


      This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
      All photos:
      Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
      Work is licensed under a
      Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




      Archive of our first Cover Story (March): Wilfredo Prieto, ‘Grasa, jabón y plátano’ (2006)


      As recently announced in this channel, we have re-designed our website. This has meant improving a few tech and editing things and introducing new sections such"cover story": a monthly focus on an artwork, artist, book, site or trip we've experienced in our recent past, accompanied by a short text. 

      Our first cover story centers on Wilfredo Prieto's work "Grease, Soap, Banana" presented in 2007 in the group show "Extraordinary Rendition". Above you find the full picture, below details. Enjoy!
       


      This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
      All photos:
      Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
      Work is licensed under a
      Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




      Latitudes' re-designed website now online!


      Our website is finally up and running! Take a look at www.lttds.org

      After months of re-editing, digging floppy disks and analogue archives, we're proud (and relieved!) to launch our newly designed website, same address as always: http://www.lttds.org




      We have improved several things. Our home page now features a "cover story", a monthly focus on an artwork, artist, book, site or trip we've experienced in our recent past, accompanied by a short text. Our first cover story centers on Wilfredo Prieto's work "Grease, Soap, Banana" presented in 2007 in the group show "Extraordinary Rendition".
        
      Below this section we highlight three recent projects which are refreshed with each visit.

      Yes! Each page is more tablet and mobile-friendly, yet has an even wider format for your desktop.


      Each of our project pages includes a sliding photo gallery complementing our flickr sets, and has clearer access to our social media networks – such as our twitter or facebook.

      At the end of each project's text, we've added "Related Content": an expandable section linking to our blog posts.
      The sidebar includes details of the locations, publication (if applicable) and project supporters; a calendar of events and biography of the artist (for solo shows).

      Our project page now includes tags enabling you to dynamically filter our projects by 'year', 'exhibition', 'research', 'public realm', 'with publication', etc.
      From here you can also check our Index, our Publications or download the pdf 'Projects Dossier' detailing a selection of our projects.

      We have revised the 'About' page and placed an accordion listing our "Lectures", "Teaching", "Awards & Affiliations", "Juries", "Residencies", "Bibliography/Press" and "Research and Field Trips".

      And last, but certainly not least, we continue to report from our blog on the development of our projects as well as on our field trips, news, shows, or books worth discussing.





      This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
      All photos:
      Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
      Work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




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