Mariana Cánepa Luna reviews Frieze week 2018 for art-agenda.com

Advertising in Pimlico. Above and below photos by Latitudes.

London Roundup
Various locations, London
October 12, 2018


Just as Frieze Art Fair opened last Wednesday, Prime Minister Theresa May gave her keynote speech—and dared to dance again—at the Conservative Party Conference in Birmingham. She announced that freedom of movement would be terminated “once and for all” by limiting access to “highly skilled workers” (in short, migrants earning over 30,000 British pounds per year). Countless art professionals earn much less (including entry-level curatorial staff at Tate, and yours truly), as well as doubtless many of the myriad gallery and museum folks involved in the city-wide jamboree of Frieze week. How do we imagine London’s contemporary art ecology post-Brexit, a scene that has grown exponentially since Tate Modern’s opening in 2000 and the first Frieze Art Fair in 2003? The question of how the 2019 edition of the fair is going to be affected was the elephant in the tent. Most people I asked shrugged: negotiations are still ongoing, consequences are yet to be seen. “It’ll be fiiiiine,” a London museum director told me. “Maybe we’ll visit a smaller fair, like the first editions—remember those days?” opined a British gallerist friend working in New York. Although one could put this upbeat denial down to the cliché of dark British humor and the spirit of “muddling through,” I nevertheless left worried that something more troubling lay behind it.

If Frieze might have triggered the relocation of many contemporary art galleries from the East to the West of the city, two recent institutional openings are enforcing a southern axis. The new Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art in New Cross, housed in a listed Victorian bathhouse refurbished by 2015 Turner Prize winners Assemble, kicked off with a sparkling survey show of Mika Rottenberg’s absurdist film installations offering grotesque parodies of current labor conditions. The second home of the South London Gallery at Peckham Road Fire Station, elegantly renovated by 6a architects, opened with “Knock Knock,” a group show about the uses of humor—from political satire to visual puns—in contemporary art. The addition of these spaces will surely benefit Gasworks, a short bus ride away in nearby Vauxhall, whose truly international program of residencies and exhibitions over the last two decades has been a vital antidote to the dangers of isolationism in the British art scene.


—> Continue reading here.

Text originally published in art-agenda.com on October 12, 2018.



Lucy Dodd at Sprüth Magers, London.

Façade of the new Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art in New Cross.
Detail of Mika Rottenberg's show at Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art in New Cross.
Part of Tania Bruguera’s 2018 Hyundai Commission at Tate Modern. 
Visitor's comments on the Turner Prize 2018 board.
Installation from Atelier E.B's show at the Serpentine Sackler Galleries, London.
Detail from Cayetano Ferrer's solo exhibition “Demaster” at Southard Reid, London.
Martine Syms at Sadie Coles HQ, London. 
Judith Kopf's "Flock of Sheep" (2017) at the South London Gallery.
Cornelia Parker Transitional "Object" (PsychoBarn) at the Royal Academy.
 Johanna Unzueta at Proyectos Ultravioleta, Focus section, Frieze Art Fair.
 (Above + below) Sam Lewitt, "Core (the "Work")", BMW Open Work commission, Frieze Art Fair.
 Ian Law at RODEO, Frieze Art Fair.
(Above and below) Oscar Humphries' "Sèvres and Japonism" at Frieze Masters, London. 

(Above and below) Chris Burden at Gagosian, London.  

Lawrence Abu Hamdan at Chisenhale, London.
Daniel Silver at Frith Street Gallery, London.
Kemang Wa Lahulere at Marian Goodman Gallery, London.
 Alicja Kwade's work in the "Space Shifters" exhibition, Hayward Gallery, London.
 (Above and below) Elmgreen and Dragset, "This is how we bite our tongue", Whitechapel, London.
Amy Sillman at Camden Art Center, London.

RELATED CONTENT: 




Cover Story–May 2018: "Shadowing Roman Ondák"

Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org

The May 2018 Monthly Cover Story "Shadowing Roman Ondák" is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org

This month we revisit Roman Ondák’s exhibition ‘Some Thing’ at The Common Guild, Glasgow, in 2013, during which Latitudes was invited to give a talk. Roman’s show comprised a series of composite works in display cases. Early still-life paintings and pencil drawings from his student days in Slovakia in the 1980s were coupled with the actual objects depicted – a chair, a length of rope, a helmet, a vase (a detail of "Shadow, 1981/2013" is the work above), and so on, which were placed in a deadpan way on top of them.

—> Continue reading
—> After May it will be archived here.

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.



RELATED CONTENT:






Max Andrews reviews Lúa Coderch; "Crash Test. The Molecular Turn" and Julia Spínola for frieze

Review ‘The Molecular Turn’: While Social Media Flourishes Ecological Systems are Collapsing. At La Panacée, Montpellier, Nicolas Bourriaud’s manifesto for a new movement and attempt to demarcate an artistic peer group." on frieze magazine.

Max Andrews, co-founder of Latitudes and contributing editor to frieze, has recently reviewed the group exhibition ‘Crash Test. The Molecular Turn’ (at La Panacée, Montpellier, until May 6, 2018) as well as Lúa Coderch's solo exhibition ‘The girl with no door on her mouth’ (àngels barcelona, on view until April 13, 2018) for friezeBoth texts are available online and are included in print in the April issue.

—> Video of Lúa Coderch presenting her work (Spanish with English subtitles).

Review "The Girl with No Door on Her Mouth: Lúa Coderch's Acts of Making Noise. The artist explores the politics of the female voice that speaks out or is shut up, at àngels barcelona, Spain." on frieze magazine.

A review on Julia Spínola's solo show "Lubricán" at the Centro de Arte 2 de Mayo (Móstoles, Madrid), has also just been published online and will also be included in the forthcoming May 2018 issue.

—> Video of Julia Spínola presenting the show (in Spanish).

Review "Julia Spínola: Twilight. At Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo, Móstoles, a crepuscular glow lends acute poignancy to simple forms and materials" on frieze magazine.


RELATED CONTENT:
  • Writing archive on Latitudes' website (since 2005);
  • "The Kørner problem” essay by Max Andrews in the monograph "John Kørner" published by Roulette Russe, 19 February 2018
  • Max Andrews essay on Christopher Knowles for NoguerasBlanchard at Liste 2017, 21 July 2017
  • Cover Story – January 2017: How open are open calls?, 4 January 2017
  • Cover Story – December 2016: Ten years ago – Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook, 5 December 2016
  • January 2016 Monthly Cover Story: Kasper Akhøj's Eileen Gray’s E.1027, 4 January 2016
  • Symposium participation, "The Shock of Victory", Glasgow, 25 September 2015
  • Review of the exhibition "What cannot be used is forgotten" in the May issue of frieze magazine, 29 April 2015
  • Review of Maria Thereza Alves' exhibition at CAAC Sevilla published in frieze magazine 9 March 2015




"The Kørner problem” essay by Max Andrews in the monograph "John Kørner" published by Roulette Russe

Exhibition poster of "Altid Mange Problemer" at Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen, Summer 2017. Photo: Latitudes.

Last Summer, Max Andrews of Latitudes was invited to contribute an essay for the forthcoming monograph of John Kørner's work published by the Danish editorial Roulette Russe and designed by Spine Studio. The publication is out now and includes essays by Max, London-based writer Oliver Basciano, and a conversation between the artist and Marie Nipper, curator of John's recent mid-career exhibition in Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen. 

The 280-page bilingual Danish/English monograph will be launched on March 2, 2018, at 4:30pm, in Kunsthal Charlottenborg's Apollo Kantine, though it will become available for online orders from February 26.

(Above and following): Photos: Finn Wergel Dahlgren. Courtesy Roulotte Russe. 













In his essay, Max tries to define what "The Kørner problem” (the title of the essay) might be:

(...) "The apparently ‘wicked’ problems and appalling catastrophes that interpenetrate Kørner’s works are manifold. The upsurge in jihadist terrorist activity in Europe since 2015 and its fallout are unavoidable (whether vestiges of the Charlie Hebdo shootings and the Bataclan attacks in Paris, suicide bombings in Brussels and Manchester; or truck attacks in Nice, Berlin, Barcelona; rampaging attacks in London, and so on). The civil war and the rise of ISIL (ISIS, Daesh) in Syria and the exacerbating effects of climate change and mega-drought that affected the region are inescapable. The European debt and migrant crisis are here. Yet elsewhere Kørner also brings to mind what at first seem like unrelated problems: the 2011 Tōhoku tsunami and the calamity of the Fukushima nuclear power plant meltdown, human trafficking, et cetera, states of exception that seem to confirm that the problem is evermore radical, atrocious, ungrounded—more diffuse while remaining intractably real. American pop star Ariana Grande knows this as well as Kørner. Released in spring 2014, three years before the suicide bombing of her concert at Manchester Arena, her most successful single to date is titled “Problem”. We are witnessing new kinds of wicked problems and Kørner paints accordingly."


In preparation for the catalogue essay, in July 2017 Latitudes visited Kørner's impressive "Altid Mange Problemer" mid-career exhibition at Kunsthal Charlottenborg, the largest exhibition of his works to date, gathering paintings and sculptural pieces from 2004 to the present.

(Above and following): Photos by Latitudes.


Max has previously written on John's work for the catalogue of his 2006 exhibition "Problems" at Victoria Miro Gallery in London.

Latitudes' first visit to Copenhagen also involved Kørner's work, as we visited his solo show 'ARoS Bank' at the ARoS Århus Kunstmuseum, Denmark (13 June–10 September 2006), which became the subject of our first blog post over a decade ago, in September 2006 (!).

RELATED CONTENT:
  • Latitudes' writing archive
  • Latitudes' "out of office" 2016–2017 season 1 August 2017
  • Max Andrews essay on Christopher Knowles for NoguerasBlanchard at Liste 2017 21 July 2017
  • Mariana Cánepa Luna reviews Ana Jotta’s “Abans que me n’oblidi (Before I forget)” exhibition in art-agenda 11 November 2016
  • '2006 Problems' exhibition and publication by John Kørner, Victoria Miro Gallery, London 29 November 2006
  • Copenhagen trip. 'Woman with 24 problems' by John Kørner 30 September 2006




Max Andrews essay on Christopher Knowles for NoguerasBlanchard at Liste 2017

 
Max Andrews of Latitudes contributed the essay "C-H-R-I-S-T-O-P-H-E-R-K-N-O-W-L-E-S. SO LISTEN UP" about the spoken-word works, "typings", poetry and paintings by Christopher Knowles. The publication was made to accompany his recent solo presentation in the stand of NoguerasBlanchard gallery at Liste art fair in Basel. 

Max reviewed Knowles’ exhibition at Gavin Brown's enterprise for frieze magazine back in October 2004, and his work "Untitled (Alert Paintings)" (2004) depicting the Department of Homeland Security’s Threat Advisory System, was the linchpin of the Latitudes-curated 2007 exhibition "Extraordinary Rendition" at NoguerasBlanchard.  

The exquisite short-run publication (500 copies) was designed and printed by Barcelona-based independent publishers and Riso printers Do The Print.


All photos: Latitudes.

Christopher Knowles was born in New York City, USA, in 1959. Lives and works in New York. He has taken part in several exhibitions, among which: 'In a Word', Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia, USA, curated by Anthony Elms and Hilton Als (2015); 'Secret Codes', Galeria Luisa Strina, São Paulo (2014); 'The Sundance Kid is Beautiful', The Louvre Museum, Paris, France, 2013; 'Merci Mercy', 980 Madison Avenue, New York (2013); 'Ecstatic Alphabets/Heaps of Language', MoMA, New York (2012); 'En el primer cercle', Fundació Antoni Tàpies, Barcelona (2011); 'Poor. Old. Tired. Horse', Institute of Contemporary Arts, London (2009); 'Visions of the Frontier', curated by Robert Wilson, Institut Valencia d’Art Modern (2009); 'Glossolalia: Languages of Drawing', Museum of Modern Art, New York (2008); 'Get Lost: Artists Map Downtown New York', New Museum Project, New York (2007); 'Learn to Read', Tate Modern, London (2007); 'Extraordinary Rendition', NoguerasBlanchard, Barcelona (2007).

Knowles' is represented by NoguerasBlanchard, Barcelona / Madrid; Gavin Brown's enterprise, New York / Rome; and Office Baroque in Brussels.


RELATED CONTENT:





Mariana Cánepa Luna reviews Ana Jotta’s “Abans que me n’oblidi (Before I forget)” exhibition in art-agenda

Installation view of the exhibition "Ana Jotta: Abans que me n'oblidi (Antes de que me olvide / Before I Forget)", 2016, ProjecteSD, Barcelona. Photo: ©Roberto Ruiz 

Ana Jotta’s “Abans que me n’oblidi (Before I forget)
PROJECTESD, Barcelona
September 30–November 26, 2016
 

by Mariana Cánepa Luna

"While it has been widely exhibited in her native Portugal, Ana Jotta’s work hasn’t been presented in depth to the Barcelona public since the early 1990s.(1) So this mini-survey of her production from 1980 to the present, framed as part of the Barcelona Gallery Weekend, is overdue. “Abans que me n’oblidi (Before I forget)” begins (or ends) at the intermediary patio space that one crosses before entering the main exhibition space at ProjecteSD. Part of a curved wall is covered with irregular patches of light gray and pale pink paint, as if emulating swatch tests for a redecoration. This playful gesture sets the tone for the exhibition inside, a somber and subtle palette of delicate intonations and provisional arrangements."  


Continue reading...
 

Originally published in art-agenda.com on November 8, 2016.

Ana Jotta, "Cloud", 2013. Painted steel, 90 x 200 x 4 cm. Photo: ©Roberto Ruiz.

Installation view of the exhibition "Ana Jotta: Abans que me n'oblidi (Antes de que me olvide / Before I Forget)", 2016, ProjecteSD, Barcelona. Photo: ©Roberto Ruiz.


Ana Jotta, "Footnote #1", 2016. Mixed media. Variable dimensions. Photo: ©Roberto Ruiz.



Ana Jotta, "Un Printemps 2008", 2008, Acrylic and felt pen on screen, 160 x 129 x 16 cm. Photo: ©Roberto Ruiz.


Installation view of the exhibition "Ana Jotta: Abans que me n'oblidi (Antes de que me olvide / Before I Forget)", 2016, ProjecteSD, Barcelona. Photo: ©Roberto Ruiz.


Ana Jotta, "Que Sais-Je?", 2011. Marker pen on tape roll, 2,5 x 14,3 diam. cm. Photo: ©Roberto Ruiz.



 Detail of several "Footnote" pieces. Photo: Latitudes.

 Detail of several "Footnote" pieces. Photo: Latitudes.

Ana Jotta, "Sem título", 2016. Paint on wall. Variable dimensions. Photo: Latitudes.

RELATED CONTENT:





Tutors of the 2015 International Curatorial Retreat, 9–13 May, Bari (Italy)

Introduction to the four-day workshop by Tara McDowell, director of the Curatorial Practice Ph.D. Program at MADA (Monash School of Art Design and Architecture), Melbourne.

Organised by Vessel in collaboration with the Curatorial Practice Ph.D. Program at MADA (Monash School of Art Design and Architecture) in Melbourne – which a year ago co-hosted our Melbourne residency as part of Gertrude Contemporary's Visiting Curatorial Program – the retreat brings together participants and tutors in an intense mobile four-day format. 

The 2015 International Curatorial Retreat (9–13 May) focused on issues which have gained urgency within contemporary curatorial practice under the conditions of globalization, in particular, the process of writing when related to the ‘epistemologies of the South’ – a term adopted from Portuguese sociologist Boaventura de Sousa Santos. 

As one of the team of tutors of the retreat, Latitudes presented two of its recent editorial projects (The Last Newspaper and Incidents of Travel in Mexico and Hong Kong), and led an afternoon workshop that operated in the realm of "art-fiction", of desirable or dystopian prototypes, speculative objects and art world services, as well as imminent and real (to use the startup term) disruptions. A kind of near-future think tank and foresight group, the workshop imagined curatorial-editorial prototypes and use-case scenarios.

Tirdad Zolghadr during his workshop.
 Alexandra Ross presented http://www.continuous-curatorial-conversations.org/, a "compilation of supplementary histories which appropriately emphasizes the oral nature of curatorial practice".
Photo: Piero Percoco

Participants (via the open call): Rachel Dedman (1989, London, lives and works in Beirut; Curator-in-Residence, 98weeks, Beirut); Maya Mikelstone (1982, Latvia, lives and works in Paris/Latvia, independent curator); Jesse van Oosten (1986, Rotterdam, lives and works in Rotterdam, Associate Curator, TENT Rotterdam); Heidi Rabben (1982, Laguna Beach, California, lives and works in San Francisco; Assistant Director, Kadist Art Foundation, San Francisco); Maayan Sheleff (1976, Tel-Aviv, lives and works in Tel-Aviv, independent curator); Eszter Szakács (1983, Mór, Hungary, lives and works in Budapest; curator and researcher at tranzit.hu, Budapest); Christel Vesters (1972, Oldebroek, The Netherlands, lives and works in Amsterdam; PhD candidate, School of Humanities, Royal College of Art in London). 

Participants from the Curatorial Practice Ph.D. at MADA, Melbourne: Léuli Eshraghi, Sarah Ann Farrar, Rosemary Forde, Melanie Oliver, Joel Stern and Holly Williams. 

Tutors: Tara McDowell (Associate Professor and Director of Curatorial Practice at MADA); Dr. Alexandra Ross (Postdoctoral fellow, Centre for Curating the Archive at Michaelis Art School, University of Cape Town); Tirdad Zolghadr (Curator and writer currently affiliated with Al Quds Bard College and the International Academy of Art, Ramallah); Fucking Good Art (travelling artists’ magazine or editorial project for research in-and-through art); Vít Havránek (theoretician and organizer based in Prague, co-founder of Tranzitdisplay and Latitudes (independent Barcelona-based curatorial office). 

Light display at the Piazza del Ferrarese during the Feste di San Nicola.

View from the Doppelgaenger Gallery in the old town area, space that hosted the seminars.

 Part of the group visited Monopoli for a workshop led by Rob and Nienke of Fucking Good Art.

 Monopoli seafront.

 Walking through the old city centre of Bari on the way to lunch.

 Food shopping at the Mercato ex Manifattura Bari (former tobacco factory) in the Quartiere Libertà.

 Dinner cooked by the International Curatorial Retreat 'chef-in-residence' Boris Portnoy.
 Photo: Piero Percoco
(Above and below) 'Notes and Quotes' session led by Rob and Nienke of Fucking Good Art, a 'de-briefing'  session that wrapped up the discussions by exchanging notes and quotes drawn from the previous few days.
Final remarks and feedback session. Photo: Piero Percoco.
 
RELATED CONTENT:

This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org
Work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




Latitudes reviews MACBA's 'Universal Archive', Frieze #121, March 2009


The forthcoming issue of Frieze magazine (Issue 121, March 2009) includes a review by Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna on MACBA's exhibition 'Universal Archive' (23 October 2008–6 January 2009). 

Below a short extract:

"Of the blockbuster cultural initiatives that have been inspired and hosted by the Catalan capital in 2008, no two could be further apart than Woody Allen’s dismaying Vicky Cristina Barcelona (2008) and the MACBA exhibition ‘Universal Archive: The Condition of the Document and the Modern Photographic Utopia’, a hugely ambitious genealogy of the documentary form of photography (co-produced and touring to the Museu Colecção Berardo-Arte Moderna e Contemporãnea, Lisbon). While Allen’s facile vision of Barcelona and the ‘flamboyant artist’ character of his male lead (played by Javier Bardem) demonstrated the ‘Olé!’ version of the city’s self-branding, ‘Universal Archive’ was difficult to digest by comparison. The exhibition, which comprised some 2,000 photographs, presented a tough and awkward depiction of the grittier sides of the city and uncompromisingly explored the often-unglamorous role of the artist–documentarian within it. 



The exhibition’s wonderfully unwieldy scale and its dizzying categorization refused benign consumption. Both its strength and its weakness lay in the fact that it was really three projects under one roof, covering a time span from 1850 to the present day. Even three visits did not truly do the show justice, but its exhausting extent nevertheless perfectly complemented the archival strategies it presented, as if its densely-installed two floors – encompassing legions of framed prints and closely-packed vitrines and several digital slideshows – were inspired by a labyrinthine Borgesian tale. For many visitors, the stamina required to experience it could have been off-putting. There are only so many images of shift workers, tract housing, farmland or grain silos that one can absorb. Yet, attempting to embrace such immense amounts of data – whether Timothy H. O’Sullivan’s territorial surveys of the USA in the 1860s and ’70s, August Sander’s collective portrait of the German people in the late 1920s, or the Mass-Observation movement in Britain from 1937 until the early 1950s – provided the exhilarating, if relentless, basis for the whole project."

...Continue reading on Frieze online.

[Image above: Cover of Frieze's issue 121; Image below: Pere Català Pic, 'Fotomuntatge sobre el Barri Gòtic per a la societat d'Atracció de Forasters de Barcelona', 1935. Arxiu Històric de la Ciutat de Barcelona – Arxiu Fotogràfic.]




Older Posts / Entradas antiguas