Latitudes' redesigned portfolio – projects since 2005


After weeks and long hours facing the screen and mining hard disks, we've uploaded Latitudes' redesigned portfolio, at last! Go to download page and choose format:

For desktop/laptop/tablet view (83pp, 30.9 MB)
For mobile (164pp, 15.8 MB)
For print (164pp, 155.3 MB)


The pdf gathers a selection of projects produced since 2005 and includes a refreshed version of our biographies – which have also been updated on our website.

We have also included short individual biographies available for download as pdf – see below highlighted in yellow.

PDF designed and edited by Latitudes.

RELATED CONTENT:




Cover Story–July 2018: No Burgers for Sale

Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org


The July 2018 Monthly Cover Story "No Burgers for Sale" is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org


"In 1983, a Burger King opened on New York’s Governors Island, then a U.S. Coast Guard base. It was the first franchise to serve beer. After scoffing a Whopper combo, officers and enlisted men could enjoy a round of golf, play bingo, go to the movies, or throw balls at the adjacent bowling alley. In 1999, this Burger King featured in issue 615 of ‘The Amazing Spider-man’. After almost two centuries operating as a federal or military facility, the Island was vacated in 1996, and the Burger King shut up shop. The remnants were photographed in 2003 by Andrew Moore and Lisa Kereszi."

No burgers were on sale though, just wooden pretzels!

—> Continue reading

—> Project photo documentation
—> After July 2018 it will be archived here.

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.



RELATED CONTENT:


  • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
  • Cover Story—June 2018: Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group 4 June 2018
  • Cover Story – May 2018: "Shadowing Roman Ondák" 7 May 2018 
  • Cover Story – April 2018: "Cover Story—April 2018: Dates, 700 BC to the present: Michael Rakowitz" 3 April 2018
  • Cover Story – March 2018: "Armenia's ghost galleries" 6 March 2018
  • Cover Story – February 2018: Paradise, promises and perplexities 5 February 2018
  • Cover Story – January 2018: I'll be there for you, 2 January 2018
  • Cover Story – December 2017: "Tabet's Tapline trajectory", 4 December 2017
  • Cover Story – November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
  • Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
  • Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
  • Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
  • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
  • Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
  • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
  • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
  • Cover Story – March 2017: Time travel with Jordan Wolfson 1 March 2017




Two 'Portscapes' films presented in 'Scenographies', an exhibition at SMBA in Amsterdam

Still from Marjolijn Dijkman's "Surviving New Land" (2009). 
Courtesy of the artist and SKOR | Foundation for Art in Public Space.
 
Two of the films produced for 'Portscapes', the year-long programme of public art projects in the Port of Rotterdam curated by Latitudes back in 2009, are currently screened as part of the exhibion 'Scenographies'. The show, curated by Clare Butcher for SMBA Amsterdam, is "a dynamic exhibition programme based around the archive of SKOR | Foundation for Art in Public Space." On view until 16 November 2013, artists and artists' collectives will approach the legacy of SKOR, the former institution that realized more than a thousand projects in public space in the Netherlands over the past three decades.

The selected films are those by Dutch artists Jan Dibbets ("6 Hours Tide Object with Correction of Perspective", watch the making of part 1 and part 2), and Marjolijn Dijkman's "Surviving New Land" (watch a low res view here), and are screened between 3-16 October as part of the larger film programme "Constructed Sceneries" curated by High&Low Bureau (Yael Messer and Gilad Reich).

On Saturday 3 October at 8pm, High&Low Bureau will talk about their practice in relation to the subjects in the film programme. They will be joint by 'Scenographies' curator, Clare Butcher.

+ info:
Photos of Jan Dibbets' film here
Photos of Marjolijn Dijkman film here.
Info on the exhibition 'Scenographies', here (as a pdf)
Portscapes website.

 Production of '6 Hours of Tide Object with Correction of Perspective' (2009) by Jan Dibbets. Photo: Paloma Polo / SKOR.

This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter
All photos: Latitudes (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)




Ignasi Aballí at ARTIUM and Latitudes' text on 2009 project in Beijing and a 2010 interview

Ignasi Aballí "This is not the end". Courtesy of the artist.

On the occasion of Ignasi Aballí (Barcelona, 1958) exhibition 'This is not the end' at ARTIUM, Vitoria-Gasteiz (curated by François Piron, on view until 2 September 2011), we wanted to share two projects in which Latitudes collaborated with the Catalan artist.

Firstly, the interview 'Rank & File' between the artist and Latitudes for which we discussed his ongoing 'List' series. The text was originally published in 'The Last Star Ledger' (Issue #4 of 'The Last Newspaper' catalogue, New Museum, New York, 2010).


Read here: https://issuu.com/latitudes/docs/4_the_last_star-ledger/2



ARTIUM's 'This is not the end' includes the work "Tomar medidas" (Taking Measures, 2009), in which nine instruments are displayed measuring things we cannot see: dust particles, time, electrical fields, noise, temperature, intensity of light, radiation, etc. The first version of "Tomar medidas" was produced for 'Nothing, or Something' (22 May–22 July 2009), an exhibition curated by Latitudes for Suitcase Art Projects, the project space of the Today Art Museum, located on three floors of the Yintai retail centre in Beijing – see images of the exhibition. 

Following is the essay included in the small publication 'Nothing, or Something' produced alongside the exhibition – see images of the publication.




Detail of the publication "Nothing, or Something" published by Today Art Museum and edited by Latitudes.

'Ignasi Aballí: Nothing, Or Something'

The morning before Ignasi Aballí’s ‘Nothing, Or Something’ opened, we couldn’t help but overhear an American businesswoman having a breakfast meeting at our hotel. “We’re working very much with intangibles”, she declared – and, we had to concur, so were we. Aballí’s works for Suitcase Art Projects address immateriality, residues and traces. He prompts us to consider things that we cannot perceive directly or are too ordinary to be properly noticed. What is perhaps philosophy’s central and most enduring question – ‘Why is there something rather than nothing?’ – is simultaneously approached as a precise existential experiment and as if with the shrug of a silent comedian.

Despite drawing on the formal language of modernism’s impulse towards reduction and the ‘white cube’ of the museum as much as commonplace materials and unremarkable elements of daily existence, ‘Nothing, or Something’ has nevertheless been created for a situation that is neither fully ‘art’ (though presented under the auspices of the Today Art Museum), nor ‘life’, nor public space – but for a shopping centre. Walter Benjamin’s vast The Arcades Project (1927–1940) located the bustling arcades of nineteenth-century Paris – early versions of the contemporary mall – as heralding a decisive shift to the speed and commodification of things which signaled the emergence of the modern age. Following Benjamin’s concerns, Aballí’s project is preoccupied by the parameters of display while being experienced through a collision and confusion with its surroundings. The windows in which it takes place are located throughout three floors of the Beijing Yintai Centre, a recently opened retail destination hosting high-end fashion, jewelry and watch manufacturers in the heart of Beijing's Central Business District, in one of the tallest buildings in the city. In the context of an excess of brand visibility, signage and luxury product presentation strategies, the eight conceptually interlinked works which comprise ‘Nothing, or Something’ seek a counterpoint and temporarily make room for a different kind of looking, a slower revelation and, to borrow from Marcel Duchamp – to whom we will return – a ‘delay in glass’. The constraints and techniques of making something visible, and the very expectation of having something to see, become the projects’ points of articulation. 

Please excuse our appearance, for example, wryly offers the visitor an explanation for the apparent lack of anything in the display case beyond the out-of-place presence of pages from the Spanish newspaper El País (which has often been used by Aballí as the basis for his art) which are laid on the floor as if anticipating some messy activity. Summoning an in-between temporality of perpetual waiting, the vinyl text on the window requests pardon for an apparent hiatus in the rhythm of seasonal trends. Aballí’s work from 2005 entitled Próxima aparición / Próximamente / Coming Soon – a one hour film showing the text of its title – similarly places the audience in a irrational situation of viewing where the main event is declaredly taking place at another time. Coming Soon is also the title of the vacated shop scenario of ‘Nothing, Or Something’. Only traces are left on the premises. An inventory of products on sale are detailed in half-removed words on the glass. Torn posters hang from the side walls; dirty marks have been left by shelves at the back; the dusty outline of objects in a forgotten display case. Each is a remainders of what purports to have been a unit dedicated to photographic equipment. The awkwardly appended ‘coming soon’ vinyl text on the window creates some confusion, however, as to what has left and what has yet to appear. Dust has regularly featured as a material in Aballí’s work, bringing to mind not only Dust Breeding (1920) – Man Ray’s celebrated photograph of Marcel Duchamp’s The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass) (1915–23) partially covered in a thick dusty layer – but less specifically a concern with entropy and the threshold of perception, where something is only readily perceivable through gradual accumulation or through its removal. Dust is “a very complex material ... a terminal, annoying, residual material that we don’t want” as the artist has described – particularly when it comes to photography.1 As he addressed in his recent exhibition ‘Without activity’, so many of the gestures and routines of (especially pre-digital) photography are concerned with cleaning, brushing and wiping-away.2 The depositing of dust also becomes an analogue for the exposure of light on photographic paper and in essence the inevitable passage of time.

Dust is, unsurprisingly, present in the atmosphere of Beijing. In the work Beijing Air, Aballí takes the small volume of the city’s air present in a window display as the subject of what seems to be an encyclopedic annotated diagram cataloguing its actual and speculative, or feared, components. Text fixed to the glass and indicating lines describe the common gases present in air as well as a host of industrial pollutants, various airborne viruses and environmental particulate matter such as pollen. Many artists have commemorated the notion of blankness or explored the radically empty and each different reasons – the void can represent the wiping away of content and yet the preparation for something new. Aballí echoes this legacy – alongside Duchamp once more, whose Paris Air (1919) consists of a small vial of air from the French capital – yet his pseudo-scientific indications that nothingness is in fact not so easily achievable, at least for an earth-bound artist, brings humorous bathos to one of the central myths of the avant-garde.

Taking measures similarly adopts the language of objective inquiry with an absurd twist. Eight identical plinths occupy a vitrine and present scientific instruments which detect and measure invisible forces for the duration of the project – a stopwatch counts time, a digital barometer records the atmosphere pressure, a compass shows the magnetic orientation, a thermometer-hydrometer measures temperature and humidity, while a lux meter detects light. A sound meter measures in decibels alongside an instrument for sensing radiation. It is no surprise that an anemometer reveals that it is not windy in the vitrine. Contrary to immediate, decorative, or pictorial appeals to vision, Aballí proposes an ongoing sensitization to perceptions that escape direct representation. Yet evidently, we are still looking at something and instead our aesthetic attention is displaced onto the design and the presentational mode of these instruments.

The vitrine opposite this, Scenic Viewpoints, presents the visitor with an arrangement of what appears to be blank white sheets of paper taped to the inside of the glass. As with several of the other works, in this shopping centre context it could well seem like an unfortunate-looking temporary situation. Something being changed, remedied, covered over and hopefully overlooked: nothing to see here! Yet the attentive are rewarded with an altogether different vision – looking through the gaps in the white ‘tiles’ through to the reflection in the mirrored back surface of the narrow space, one can piece together an exuberant compilation of sights. Each sheet is an enlarged colour postcard depicting views, events and landmarks from the artist’s home of Barcelona, a city whose popularity as a tourist destination lies in no small part to its presentation as a readily consumable and legible visual ‘brand’. Blankly monochromatic on the outside, Scenic Viewpoints refuses such a generalised overview. Its ecstatic orchestration of wide vistas and saturated spectacles is only visible to a peeping, prying viewer who then can only see a small part at one time, while linking “the abundance of images around us with the scarcity of meaning we can attach to them”, as Bartomeu Marí has described of another of Aballí’s works Revelations (2005).3 

The vitrines titled Illuminating and White Cube are sited facing each other. Illuminating consists only of the application of light. Very bright light. The installation of professional film lights which shine out from the vitrine creates a level of luminescence that is evidently excessive. With a seeming lack of anything in particular to illuminate, one is reflected in the mirrored vitrine in the looped process of beholding oneself beholding the work. A counterpoint to the tastefully spotlighted products in the neighbouring shops, the wastefully ‘incorrect’ situation highlights a stark condition of energetic consumption while literally highlighting its context. White Cube provides the backdrop to this intense reflexivity. It cancels the transparency of its vitrine through the application of whitewash on the glass, a technique commonly adopted by empty premises after going out of business. (Not coincidentally, some of the pages of the newspapers of Please excuse our appearance carry stories related to the recession, which are illustrated by closed-up shops.) As with Aballí’s Big Mistake (1998-2005) and other works using Tipp-Ex correction fluid (used to cover errors on writing or typing paper), the artist creates a quotidian monochrome, through a melancholic painting-like blanking-out activity that nevertheless is never properly a painting. If White Cube refers to a spectre of painting, Vitrines for a Vitrine seems to orientate around some missing sculpture or precious object. Yet as if the artist has been perpetually unconvinced by the plausibility of displaying something, no thing is on show – rather it is the condition of display which is demonstrated in a mise en abyme, itself within the regime of visibility of the shopping centre. Three clear acrylic display cases like those used in museums or in chic stores occupy the glass vitrine. Each contains one small photograph of different empty vitrines which the artist has encountered in various cities.

Nothing, or Something’ undoubtedly triggers perplexing situations for the shopping public, and the workers of the centre who were more-or-less familiar with the art project’s presence or witnesses to its installation. For many the works may well go completely unnoticed. Are we seeing what we are supposed to be seeing? Where is the work? When is the work? Yet it is not the intention of Aballí’s project to be disingenuous or confrontational. On the contrary, it operates through orchestrating and modifying simple possibilities for observation, deduction and reflection. Something or nothing is happening, is not happening, is not happening any more, or is yet to happen. Enhanced by memory and hindsight the project allows a disarmingly humble visual retirement – the kind of complexity that emerges through ceasing or waiting. How and why are things added and subtracted from the world, or from sight? What is worth looking at, having or keeping, and what is to be doubted or erased? What does it mean to be more aware of the things we cannot see? Perhaps we are all working with intangibles?

Latitudes (Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna)
 
1 Ignasi Aballí, 0-24 h., Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona, 2005, p.25
2 Sem Actividade / Without Activity, Museu de Portimão, 2008
3 Ignasi Aballí, 0-24 h., Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona, 2005, p.11

Text originally published in 'Nothing, or Something', the publication accompanying the exhibition that took place in the Suitcase Art Projects, Beijing, China, 22 May–22 July 2009. 



This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




Photographic documentation of 'Portscapes' projects on flickr and youtube

You can see photographic documentation of 'Portscapes', the ten newly produced commissions that were produced and presented throughout 2009 alongside the Port of Rotterdam, The Netherlands, in the photo collection in flickr.

From there you can select individual albums for each artist project (Lara Almarcegui, Bik van der Pol, Jan Dibbets, Marjolijn Dijkman, Fucking Good Art, Ilana Halperin, Christina Hemauer & Roman Keller, Paulien Oltheten, Jorge Satorre and Hans Schabus), see installation shots of the exhibition at the Museum Boijmans (opened until 25 April) as well as the multi-part publication and a few images of Latitudes' site visits to the port area in May and July 2008.

You can also watch the 'behind the scenes' videos produced of each project on Latitudes YouTube Channel.




Inside 'Portscapes' publication box (green=standard and white=limited edition)


Designed by Rotterdam-based design studio Ben Laloua/Didier Pascal, the multi-part publication box includes a miscellany of contributions by the artists, a cahier with texts on the projects (it can be downloaded from here), the prologue publication presented with the launch of the project in February 2009 and a DVD with 'behind the scenes' footage with interviews with 'Portscapes' artists Lara Almarcegui, Bik van der Pol, Jan Dibbets, Marjolijn Dijkman, Fucking Good Art, Ilana Halperin, Christina Hemauer & Roman Keller, Paulien Oltheten, Jorge Satorre and Hans Schabus.



DVD with 'behind the scenes' footage and interviews with 'Portscapes' artists – these can also be seen online on Latitudes' YouTube Channel.

The limited edition contains the film '6 Hours Tide Object with Correction of Perspective' (2009) produced by Jan Dibbets for 'Portscapes'.


The publications can be purchased at the Museum Boijmans’s shop, or can be ordered from SKOR by emailing [email protected] or calling +31(0)20 672 25 25. The standard edition costs €12.50 and the limited edition €50.

Publisher: Port of Rotterdam Authority and SKOR (Foundation Art and Public Space, Amsterdam)
Publication date: 5 February 2010
Graphic design Portscapes: Ben Laloua/Didier Pascal with Marius Hofstede, Rotterdam.
Design various artists contributions: Edauw Design, Koudekerk aan den Rijn
Format: 33x27cm, box (green for the standard edition, white for the limited-edition)
Weight: c.900g
Print run: 800 copies of which 100 are limited editions
Project texts: Latitudes and Theo Tegelaers
'Portscapes' was an accumulative series of newly commissioned projects taking place throughout 2009 alongside the construction of Rotterdam's [51°55' N 4°29' E] Maasvlakte 2 – the extension to Europe's largest seaport and industrial area by 20%. + info




'Portscapes' exhibition, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, 30 January–25 April 2010. Reception: 5 February, 8pm

Lara Almarcegui 'A Guide to the Wastelands of the Port of Rotterdam' (2009). Photo: Latitudes


Bik van der Pol, still of the film 'Facts on the Ground' (2009–10). Photo: Bik van der Pol

Jan Dibbets, Production stills while filming '6 Hours Tide Object With Correction of Perspective' (2009). Photos: Latitudes, Paloma Polo/SKOR and Freek van Aarkel.
Marjolijn Dijkman, 'Here be dragons' (2009), image presented on a billboard. The second part of her project, the film 'Surviving New Island' (2009–10) will be premiered during the exhibition.


Fucking Good Art / Rob Hamelijnck & Nienke Terpsma 'Portscapes_ON AIR / Station Maasvlakte' (2009). 


Ilana Halperin, 'A Brief History of Mobile Landmass' (2009–10), audioguide. Photo: Chantal Karnaat.
Paulien Oltheten, Great if two pairs of legs are synchronized for a moment, (2009). Photo: Ben Wind.


Christina Hemauer & Roman Keller, 'The Postpetrolistic Internationale' (2009–10). Photo: Paloma Polo / SKOR.


Jorge Satorre in collaboration with Jorge Aviña, 'The Erratic. Measuring Compensation' (2010). Courtesy of the artist.



Hans Schabus, 'Europahaven, Rotterdam, 17 juni 2009' (2009) (c) the artist

'Portscapes'
Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
30 January–25 April 2010. Reception: Friday 5 February, 8pm.
Free entrance

Project website: www.portscapes.nl
Projects chronology: http://www.dipity.com/latitudes/PORTSCAPES

 
Works by Lara Almarcegui (Spain/Netherlands), Bik van der Pol (Netherlands), Jan Dibbets (Netherlands), Marjolijn Dijkman (Netherlands), Fucking Good Art (Netherlands), Ilana Halperin (US/Scotland), Christina Hemauer & Roman Keller (Switzerland), Paulien Oltheten (Netherlands), Jorge Satorre (Mexico), Hans Schabus (Austria), as well as work by the website collaborators Maria Barnas (poetry) and Markus Miessen (interviews).

'Portscapes' will present the results of works commissioned by the Port of Rotterdam realised throughout 2009 by 10 (inter)national artists on the occasion of the beginning of the construction of Maasvlakte 2 – the 2,000-hectare land supplementation project to extend Rotterdam's port, Europe's largest seaport and industrial area. 'Portscapes' has encompassed new projects of various scales under the leitmotif itineraries and destinationsartist-led tours, film screenings, billboards and the production of film and photographic works, audio-guides, radio broadcast and field guides. + info...

The films by Rotterdam-based artists Bik van der Pol and Marjolijn Dijkman, 'Facts on the Ground' (2009–10) and 'Surviving New Land' (2009–10) respectively, will be presented for the first time coinciding with the exhibition.

Overtreders W, the designers of the exhibition, have created semi-transparent display structures for the museum’s Richard Serra Hall, using industrial materials based on the format of cargo containers.

A catalogue (€12,50) and a special-edition catalogue (€50) designed by Ben Laloua/Didier Pascal is co-published by SKOR and the Port of Rotterdam Authority on the occasion of the exhibition. The special-edition includes filmed interviews with the artists as well as the DVD of '6 Hours Tide Object with Correction of Perspective' (2009), the film produced by Jan Dibbets for 'Portscapes'. Publication available at the Museum Boijmans's shop or can be ordered via SKOR by writing to [email protected] or calling +31(0)20 672 25 25


Portscapes was commissioned by the Port of Rotterdam Authority with advice and support from SKOR (Foundation for Art and Public Space, Amsterdam) and was curated by Latitudes, Barcelona.

Serra Hall, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen
Museumpark 20 | 3015 CX Rotterdam, Netherlands
Opening hours: Tue–Sun 11–17h
Free entrance to the exhibition
Press enquiries: Nienke van Beers, Tel: +31(0)20- 672 25 25, [email protected]




Ignasi Aballí's exhibition catalogue 'Nothing, or Something' now available



Ignasi Aballí's exhibition catalogue 'Nothing, or Something' is finally out and available via Múltiplos, Barcelona.

The catalogue follows his recent exhibition at the project space run by Beijing's Today Art Museum placed at the Yintai Center, which took place between 22 May and 22 July this year. The exhibition catalogue includes an essay by exhibition curators Latitudes as well as installation images of the project which spreads throughout eight window displays on three floors. Aballí's project responded to the retail context of the commercial centre as well as an artistic history of absence, nothingness and invisibility.

To see images of the exhibition, see here.
Description of the exhibition, read here.

'Nothing, or Something'
Softcover, 88 pages, colour
Essay by Latitudes
English/Chinese publication
Published by the Today Art Museum.

All images: Latitudes | www.lttds.org




Lawrence Weiner, 'Under the Sun', Espai d'Art Contemporani de Castelló

All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org

A year after 'THE CREST OF A WAVE' exhibition at Fundació Suñol in Barcelona, Lawrence Weiner has just opened a new exhibition in Spain, this time at the Espai d'Art Contemporani de Castelló. 'Under the Sun' includes an exhibition in EACC (on view until 28 March 2010) as well as a public piece in a city centre park which will open in a second phase, in early February 2010. Below Weiner's text from the exhibition invitation:

THE MARKING OF A SPACE WITHIN A PUBLIC PARK THAT IS DEPENDENT UPON MEANING NOT MEANS
THE PLACING OF A CLUSTER OF STRUCTURES THAT AFFORD A PLACE DEMARKED AT THAT MOMENT
BY THE RESULT OF A FLICK OF A WRIST
A FORM THAT CAN FLY A KITE OR KILL A BULL WITH GRACE
THAT SETS ASIDE A PLACE FOR THE MOMENT THAT IS YOURS
BEING ONLY ONE METER HIGH THEY AFFORD NOT PROTECTION BUT A DEMARCATION OF SOVEREIGN
TERRITORY WHEN OCCUPIED
TWISTED & TURNED UNDER THE SUN

Update February 2010:


Completing the first part of his 'Under the Sun' exhibition for Castelló, the artist recently inaugurated a permanent public work at 'El Pinar', Castellón. As written in the press release the project brings to mind 'the bullfighting but also the lightness and the elegance of a wave that takes shape in the space as its own territory.' 


More images here.


Images courtesy of EACC. Photos: Ángel Sánchez.




Presentación de la web www.plataformacuratorial.es durante las segundas jornadas de 'Producir, Exponer, Interpretar...', Matadero Madrid

Presentada durante las segundas jornadas de 'PRODUCIR, EXPONER, INTERPRETAR. Estrategias y conflictos en la práctica curatorial', Matadero, Madrid, 25-27 Septiembre) la web www.plataformacuratorial.es recoge resumenes de las presentaciones de la primera parte de estas jornadas que tuvo lugar en MUSAC (Mayo 2009), textos, links de interés, comentarios en formato twitter sobre las segundas jornadas, fotografías, etc. También existe una página en facebook.

Abajo imágenes de las jornadas.

[Fotos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org]




Notas presentación de Latitudes expuestas durante las "Jornadas internacionales de debate para El Canòdrom, el nuevo Centro de Arte en Barcelona", 6–7 Julio 2009

In reference to "Artists should be at the centre of the centre, at every step and in all aspects." Nordic and Danish Pavilion Press Conference seating set up, Venice Biennale 2009. Photo: Latitudes | www.lttds.org


Notas de la presentación de Latitudes (en español e inglés)

'Jornadas internacionales de debate para un nuevo Centro de Arte en Barcelona' (6–7 Julio 2009)
. Mesa: 'El Canòdrom, un nuevo equipamiento en Barcelona visto por artistas, críticos y comisarios'.


(Español)

– Anunciar lo antes posible la convocatoria pública para el puesto de dirección. Definir un programa artístico de relevancia local e internacional para el nuevo centro, un centro con personalidad jurídica propia, autónomo e independiente de cambios políticos;

– Elección de un equipo de trabajo (desde técnicos o becarios hasta encargados de producción, seleccionados por sus cualidades profesionales a través de convocatorias públicas y entrevistas personales). Definir conjuntamente un programa artístico, campaña de inauguración, programa de actividades post-inauguración y el uso de los espacios del Canòdrom junto con los arquitectos encargados de la remodelación;

– Conceptualizar una nueva identidad gráfica que respete la fuerte presencia arquitectónica y la historia del edificio – ej. mantener la tipografía, carteles galgos, etc.;

– Programación previa a la inauguración – el Canòdrom debe existir desde ya. Iniciar una presencia mediática local, nacional e internacional. Organizar visitas del edificio para prensa, galeristas, coleccionistas, gente del barrio, etc. pre-inauguración. Dar a conocer el nuevo centro desde dentro y su programación. Fomentar la transparencia. Crear una nueva audiencia para el Canòdrom, una comunidad – por ej. programación previa a apertura edificio: Bòlit, Girona o el MUSAC en León.

– Programar dentro y fuera del edificio – pensar de modo expansivo e innovador y no limitar la creatividad al espacio de físico del edificio. No olvidar el poder de la web;

– El Canòdrom debe ser un espacio de producción y co-producción (es primordial colaborar con otros centros), experimentación y discusión. Saber tomar riesgos, ser creativo con las posibilidades que ofrece a nivel local e internacional;

– Estimular y nutrir relaciones otros centros de producción local e internacional. Formar parte de un contexto artístico y crear y reforzar la escena cultural;

– Establecer una comisión de expertos / comité asesor independiente (‘Advisory Board’) para dar solidez al programa y estabilidad e independencia a la dirección. El comité ayuda a establecer y a consolidar relaciones con otros centros de igual o similar perfil;

– Crear un equipamiento donde la escena artística se vea representada, donde se cree complicidad con los agentes locales y donde los recursos y facilidades disponibles sean de calidad, con garantías profesionales. Potenciar la profesionalización del sector.

(English)

– Barcelona should be a city that can support its artists within an international context and the new art centre should publicly perform a leading role in this respect. It needs to create a space of dialogue and encounter between Catalan, Spanish and international artists and focus on the active development of practice as well as new audiences.

– In a move symptomatic of and responding to a certain lack of stimulus and critical discussion in the city, the artists Marc Vives, Rubén Grilo, Alex Reynolds created 'Vena (por la)', an incisive and ongoing series of artist and curator talks which take place in the La Central bookshop. Artists are taking the matters into their own hands and starting their own initiatives seemingly because institutions are not providing enough throughput of public talks, or at least not at the most valued level.

– Canòdrom should be an opportunity to link up different constituencies and audiences (from collectors, art students, to graphic designers, galleries, art writers, art historians...)

– One art centre cannot fully substitute for the shortcomings of the Spanish art academy system – what would be the most valuable long-term parallel goal would be to invest in an international post-graduate studio programme on the model of the Stadelschule in Frankfurt or the Rijksakademie in Amsterdam. Canòdrom should nevertheless have a strong element of professional development and advocacy, critical exchange and debate as part of its programme not as a bolted on education bonus – it needs to be more than an exhibition space.

– Canòdrom should stimulate, support and create professional artists and curators and lead by example. In the same way, the one cannot assume the abstract presence of an audience but need to actively produce different audiences, a new institution needs to take a lead in the actual formation and conditions of stimulus for the work of artists in society. Artists should be at the centre of the centre, at every step and in all aspects.

Latitudes, July 2009.


CONTENIDOS RELACIONADOS:

  • Gone with the wind: on the 'art crunch' and the Centre d'Art de Barcelona, the saga continues... 16 December 2008
  • Jornadas entorno al Canòdrom, el futuro Centro de Arte en Barcelona, 6–7 Julio 2009 (3 julio 2009)




Jornadas entorno al Canòdrom, el futuro Centro de Arte en Barcelona, 6–7 Julio 2009


Los próximos 6 y 7 de julio tendrá lugar en el Auditorio del MACBA (Plaça Joan Coromines, s/n) las 'Jornadas Internacionales de Debate para un Nuevo Centro de Arte en Barcelona' - programa a continuación.

Latitudes participará en la mesa redonda 'El Canòdrom, un nuevo equipamiento en Barcelona visto por artistas, críticos y comisarios' que tendrá lugar el Lunes 6 Julio, 18–20h, seguido por un debate de 20–21h –
véanse notas de nuestra presentación.


Entrada gratuita – Plazas limitadas – Inscripción previa (hasta el 4 Julio) a [email protected] o llamando al 676 135 250

Organiza: Consell Nacional de la Cultura i de les Arts, Departament de Cultura i Mitjans de Comunicació, Ajuntament de Barcelona, Consell de la Cultura de Barcelona.



Programa CANÒDROM’09. Jornadas internacionales de debate para un nuevo Centro de Arte en Barcelona


Desde la proliferación de centros de arte en Europa a principios de los años 80 hasta la actualidad, el concepto de centro de arte se ha modificado y ha evolucionado, siguiendo patrones distintos adaptados a cada contexto y a la evolución de la tecnología y de la comunicación, así como a la convivencia con la industria cultural, al carácter multidisciplinar del arte, a las nuevas prácticas curatoriales, al ejercicio de la mediación social y a la labor educativa y de formación en el marco de una sociedad global.

Con el fin de dar impulso al nuevo proyecto del futuro Centro de Arte Contemporáneo de Barcelona, con sede en el edificio del Canòdrom de la Meridiana de Barcelona, se organizan unas jornadas internacionales de debate y discusión que cuentan con la participación de los directores de varios centros de arte europeos ejemplos de diversos de los modelos existentes. Asimismo se hace un llamamiento al sector de las artes visuales —artistas, críticos, comisarios, galeristas, estudiantes de arte, gestores culturales y demás agentes y emprendedores artísticos— para que formen parte de este debate.

Lunes, 6 de julio
Mañana 10.00 h – 10.30 h
Apertura de las jornadas a cargo de Pilar Parcerisas, Vicepresidenta Primera del Consejo Nacional de la Cultura y de las Artes, y Daniel Giralt-Miracle, miembro del Comité Ejecutivo del Consejo de la Cultura de Barcelona.

10.30 h – 12.00 h
El Canòdrom, un edificio para el arte contemporáneo Xavier Monteys y Josep M. de Lecea, arquitectos. Autores de la restauración y remodelación del Canòdrom

12.00 h – 12.30 h Pausa

12.30 h - 14.00 h
Los centros de arte en Europa, hoy. Especificidad y límites frente a los museos.
Dirk Snauwaert, Director del Centro de Arte Contemporáneo Wiels, Bruselas
Nicolaus Schafhausen, Director de Witte de With, Rotterdam
Modera: Roberta Bosco, periodista de arte de El País, Barcelona

14.00 h - 14.30 h Debate

16.00 h - 17.30 h
El modelo inglés y su relación con los consejos de las artes. La tradición de la Cornerhouse.
Dave Moutrey, Director de la Cornerhouse, Manchester

17.30 h - 18.00 h Pausa

18.00 h - 20.00 h
El Canòdrom, un nuevo equipamiento en Barcelona visto por artistas, críticos y comisarios.
Carles Guerra, Director de La Virreina. Centro de la imagen, Barcelona
Amanda Cuesta, crítica de arte y curadora de exposiciones
Jorge Luis Marzo, miembro del grupo de debate Centro de Arte Barcelona
Latitudes (Max Andrews y Mariana Cánepa), curadores independientes
Joan Fontcuberta, artista y Presidente de la Asociación de Artistas Visuales de Cataluña (AAVC)
Daniel García Andújar, artista y presidente de la Asociación de Artistas Visuales de Cataluña (AAVC)
Modera: Mercè Alsina, crítica de arte y curadora de exposiciones, Secretaria de la Asociación Catalana de Críticos de Arte (ACCA)

20.00 h – 21.00 h Debate


Martes, 7 de julio
10.00 h - 11.30 h
El flujo del arte contemporáneo en los centros de arte: producción, presentación, difusión
Bartomeu Marí, ex Director de Witte de With y actualmente Director del Macba, Barcelona

11.30 h - 12.00 h Pausa

12.00 - 14.00 h
En red. El Canòdrom desde el territorio.
Oriol Gual, Director del espacio La Capella, Barcelona
David Santaeulària, Director del espacio Zero 1, Olot
Glòria Picazo, Directora del Centro de Arte La Panera, Lleida.
Rosa Pera, Directora de Bòlit, Centro de Arte, Girona
Anna Capella, Directora del Museo del Ampurdán, Figueres
Jordi Abelló, Coordinador de los espacios de arte del Ayuntamiento de Tarragona
Víctor Sunyol, Presidente de H. Asociación para las Artes Contemporáneas, Vic
Clara Garí, Directora de la Nau Côclea, Camallera
Modera: Oriol Picas, Subdirector General de Equipamientos del Departamento de Cultura y Medios de Comunicación de la Generalidad de Cataluña.

14.00 h - 14.30 h Debate 16.00 h - 17.30 h
Los retos de futuro de los centros de arte
Susanne Pfeffer, Curadora del KW Instituto de Arte Contemporáneo, Berlín
Kestutis Kuizinas, Director del Centro de Arte Contemporáneo (CCA), Vilnius, Lituania
Francis McKee, Director del Centro de Arte Contemporáneo, Glasgow
Laurence Rassel, Directora de proyectos de la Fundación Antoni Tàpies, Barcelona
Modera: Rosario Fontova, periodista de arte independiente, Barcelona

17.30 h - 18.00 h Pausa

18.00 h - 20.00 h
Espacios de producción y creación con relación al Canòdrom
Víctor Lobo, co-director de Experimentem amb l’art, Barcelona
Pep Dardanyà, director de Can Xalant, Mataró
Tere Badia, investigadora y coordinadora de Xarxaprod
Pedro Soler, director de Hangar, Barcelona
Sergi Díaz, coordinador de Fabra i Coats, Barcelona
Modera: Ramon Parramon, director de Idensitat y jefe de estudios de posgrado de Elisava

Cierre de las jornadas a cargo de Lluís Noguera, Secretario General del Departamento de Cultura y Medios de Comunicación de la Generalidad de Cataluña, y Jordi Martí, Delegado de Cultura del Ayuntamiento de Barcelona.



CONTENIDO RELACIONADO:

Notas presentación de Latitudes expuestas durante las "Jornadas internacionales de debate para El Canòdrom, el nuevo Centro de Arte en Barcelona", 6–7 Julio 2009 (10 julio 2009)





Latitudes reviews MACBA's 'Universal Archive', Frieze #121, March 2009


The forthcoming issue of Frieze magazine (Issue 121, March 2009) includes a review by Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna on MACBA's exhibition 'Universal Archive' (23 October 2008–6 January 2009). 

Below a short extract:

"Of the blockbuster cultural initiatives that have been inspired and hosted by the Catalan capital in 2008, no two could be further apart than Woody Allen’s dismaying Vicky Cristina Barcelona (2008) and the MACBA exhibition ‘Universal Archive: The Condition of the Document and the Modern Photographic Utopia’, a hugely ambitious genealogy of the documentary form of photography (co-produced and touring to the Museu Colecção Berardo-Arte Moderna e Contemporãnea, Lisbon). While Allen’s facile vision of Barcelona and the ‘flamboyant artist’ character of his male lead (played by Javier Bardem) demonstrated the ‘Olé!’ version of the city’s self-branding, ‘Universal Archive’ was difficult to digest by comparison. The exhibition, which comprised some 2,000 photographs, presented a tough and awkward depiction of the grittier sides of the city and uncompromisingly explored the often-unglamorous role of the artist–documentarian within it. 



The exhibition’s wonderfully unwieldy scale and its dizzying categorization refused benign consumption. Both its strength and its weakness lay in the fact that it was really three projects under one roof, covering a time span from 1850 to the present day. Even three visits did not truly do the show justice, but its exhausting extent nevertheless perfectly complemented the archival strategies it presented, as if its densely-installed two floors – encompassing legions of framed prints and closely-packed vitrines and several digital slideshows – were inspired by a labyrinthine Borgesian tale. For many visitors, the stamina required to experience it could have been off-putting. There are only so many images of shift workers, tract housing, farmland or grain silos that one can absorb. Yet, attempting to embrace such immense amounts of data – whether Timothy H. O’Sullivan’s territorial surveys of the USA in the 1860s and ’70s, August Sander’s collective portrait of the German people in the late 1920s, or the Mass-Observation movement in Britain from 1937 until the early 1950s – provided the exhilarating, if relentless, basis for the whole project."

...Continue reading on Frieze online.

[Image above: Cover of Frieze's issue 121; Image below: Pere Català Pic, 'Fotomuntatge sobre el Barri Gòtic per a la societat d'Atracció de Forasters de Barcelona', 1935. Arxiu Històric de la Ciutat de Barcelona – Arxiu Fotogràfic.]




Beginning of 'Portscapes': Jan Dibbets' 1969–2009 "12 Hours Tide Object with Correction of Perspective"

Production stills of Jan Dibbets '12 Hours Tide Object with Correction of Perspective', produced by Gerry Schum for the series 'Land Art' in 1969. Courtesy Jan Dibbets.

'Portscapes' is an accumulative series of artists’ projects that will take place throughout 2009 alongside the construction of ‘Maasvlakte 2’, a 2,000 hectare area of reclaimed land that will extend the Port of Rotterdam, Europe's largest seaport and industrial area. Projects of variable scales will be experienced through itineraries and destinations, comprising artist-designed tours, performances, interventions, screenings and mobile seminars, for example.

'Portscapes' will be launched during Art Rotterdam (5–8 February 2009). A prologue publication designed by Ben Laloua / Didier Pascal will be available at Portscapes' booth with contributions by Jorge Satorre, Paulien Oltheten, Maria Barnas and Erick Wesselo amongst others. Images of the publication:


'Portscapes' prologue publication designed by Ben Laloua / Didier Pascal

Events during Art Rotterdam week include:


* Thursday 5 February: tour for press and invited guests around the port and presentations by Portscapes artists Marjolijn Dijkman and Ilana Halperin as well as Theo Tegelaers from SKOR and Latitudes.

* Sunday 8 February (weather permitting) : the inaugural project will take place with the filming of an event-sculpture by the Dutch Conceptual artist Jan Dibbets. First realised in February 1969 as part of Gerry Schum's seminal 'Land Art' series of films screened on German TV, the 2009 realisation of '12 Hours Tide Object with Correction of Perspective' will be filmed forty years later to the month on the beach of the Maasvlakte.


 The artists currently developing proposals are: Lara Almarcegui, Bik van der Pol, Jan Dibbets, Marjolijn Dijkman, Fucking Good Art, Cyprien Gaillard, Ilana Halperin, Roman Keller & Christina Hemauer, Paulien Oltheten, Michael Rakowitz, Jorge Satorre, Hans Schabus and Jun Yang.

More info: www.portscapes.nl (UK/NL) and Latitudes' web.

'Portscapes' is commissioned by the Port of Rotterdam Authority advised by SKOR (Foundation for Art and Public Space, Amsterdam) and is curated by Latitudes.
   

Art Rotterdam (5–8 February) takes place at the Cruise Terminal in Wilheminakade 699, 3072 AP Rotterdam (MAP). Opening hours: Thursday 5 & Friday 6: 13–18h; Saturday 7 & Sunday 8: 11–19h.




Redesigned website home page


We have recently redesigned the home page of our web with some photo galleries and quick links to our projects. We have also introduced an index – a useful tool to navigate our current, previous and future projects through an ongoing list of collaborators (artists, curators, institutions, writers, etc).

News and updates on www.lttds.org/blog




Jordi Mitjà at Bòlit, Centre d'Art Contemporani in Girona

"From Excess. Recipes for an architecture of accumulative thought" is the title of Jordi Mitjà's contribution to the group show In construction. Recipes from Scarcity, Ubiquity and Excess, the inaugural show – in two temporary spaces – of BÒLIT, the soon-to-open Centre d'Art Contemporani in Girona, Spain, directed by Rosa Pera.


Mitjà's project comprises the installation Espai Diògenes (see images above; last two from Santiago Cirugeda's Niu project); the documentary cycle Diogenes Cinema and Anatomia Diògenes, a beautiful publication published by Crani (www.crani.org) that compiles photographic material accumulated in the Empordà region between 1988 and 2008.

Mitjà's Espai Diògenes continues the investigative spirit of previous projects such as the film Concèntric. Poble petit, infern gegant (presented in 2006–7 at Espai Zero1, Olot) drawing on found documents, films from amateur film-makers, articles, books, notes, photographs, etc., that he has been gathering from abandoned sites, rubbish, or simply given by friends or family throughout the past years. Mitjà is as persuaded by these materials as he is curious to dissect the history and stories behind each found object. Espai Diògenes presents an esquisite selection of works (collages, slide projections, objects including slide projectors, photographs, films...) in a nest-like space, "a defence structure, a protection from the outside world, an infinite skin" (1) - "nests" recalling the claustrophobic spaces created by those that suffer from Diogenes syndrome.
Capella de Sant Nicolau
Plaça de Santa Llúcia s/n
17007 Girona
Exhibition dates: 10 October 2008 - 11 January 2009

(1) 'Runa', by Jordi Mitjà. In "Anatomia Diògenes. Obres inèdites acumulades entre 1988-2008. Ed. Crani, October 2008.




Manifesta 8, 2010, in Murcia?

 

Hot on the heels of Manifesta 7 which took place throughout the Trentino-South Tyrol region of northern Italy this summer and autumn, the applications for host city for the 8th edition of this European Biennial of Contemporary Art - Manifesta 8 would take place in 2010 - closed a little more than a month ago. According to the Polish newspaper Gazeta, the contenders in what increasingly feels like an Olympics-style bid, are ... Gdansk, Poland; Riga, Latvia and Murcia in Spain. The same paper reports that the Polish bid was someway short of the 3.3 million Euro price tag.

In contrast, the southern Spanish city of Murcia, doubtless keen to shake off its image of golf resorts and vegetable growing, is seemingly very flush with money for contemporary art. Rather improbably, the city already has something of a track record for bringing home major projects and attracting some big names. And as many in the arts seem to be cutting budgets in credit crunch times -- not least the State-funder SEACEX who recently announced a 22% cut in its provision for Spanish artists abroad -- Murcia seems to be spending and investing in contemporary art more than ever.

Earlier this year the city staged Estratos, (see posts from 03.02.08 and 28.05.08) a twenty-artist project curated by Nicolas Bourriaud, the first 'PAC' (Proyecto de Arte Contemporáneo) a biennial-like format alongside residencies and exchanges supported by the Region of Murcia. Anish Kapoor's 'Islamic Mirror' curated by Rosa Martinez, continues at the Santa Clara Convent until January 2009 (organised by Culture and Tourism Department of the Region), and in May the SOS 4.8 Festival, with curators including Rirkrit Tiravanija was also funded by the Region. With the debacle of Manifesta 6 and the dispersed and difficult to navigate recent edition, what is clearly going to be a well-financed bid from an ambitious Murcia (with the 2nd 'PAC' already in place for 2010, and doubtless supported again by the communications skills of Urroz Proyectos), will surely take a lot of beating. And rumours are already beginning to circulate that a decision has already been made. We'll find out shortly before Christmas.

––

UPDATE:

The Region of Murcia's selected "en diálogo con África del Norte" as the host of Manifesta 8. There will be a presentation on the 11 February, at 14h at their Stand de la Región de Murcia in ARCO, Madrid. See e-flux announcement (11/02/09)

[Image: http://flights.jet2.com/Murcia/weather.htm]




Turin Triennale (T2) & Artissima 15


50 Moons of Saturn: 2nd Turin Triennial (6 November 2008–1 February 2009)



Coinciding with this year Artissima 15 Art Fair, the second Turin Triennial (6 November 2008–1 February 2009) titled '50 Lune di Saturno' (50 Moons of Saturn) opened last week presenting the works of 50 artists, spread throughout 3 venues: Castello di Rivoli Museo d’Arte Contemporanea, the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo and the Palazzina della Società della Promotrice delle Belle Arti (no website).

Daniel Birnbaum's correct Triennale also presents two 'solo shows' by Paul Chan (three rooms at the Sandretto) and Olafur Eliasson (at Rivoli). Here 'solo shows' means presenting more works by each or simply giving them more room (having said that Eliasson's work is a one-room installation) not necessarily making clear divisions between these 'solo shows' and the rest of the artists in the Triennale.

T2 participating artists:

Meris Angioletti, Rosa Barba, Jennifer Bornstein, Zoulikha Bouabdellah, Ulla von Brandenburg, Matthew Brannon, Gerard Byrne, Bonnie Camplin / Paulina Olowska, Valerio Carrubba, Antonio Cataldo & Mariagiovanna Nuzzi, Paul Chan, Kerstin Cmelka, Keren Cytter, Simon Dybbroe Möller, Olafur Eliasson, Lara Favaretto, Spencer Finch, Ceal Floyer, Anna Galtarossa, Andrea Geyer, Loris Gréaud, Wade Guyton, Haegue Yang, Annika von Hausswolff, Ragnar Kjartansson, Joachim Koester, Koo Jeong-A, Sandra Kranich, Robert Kusmirowski, Rivane Neuenschwander, Diego Perrone, Alessandro Piangiamore, Giuseppe Pietroniro, Giulia Piscitelli, Peyman Rahimi, Pietro Roccasalva, Tomás Saraceno, Wilhelm Sasnal, Benjamin Saurer, Alberto Tadiello, Pascale Marthine Tayou, Wolfgang Tillmans, Gert and Uwe Tobias, Luca Trevisani, Tatiana Trouvé, Ian Tweedy, Donald Urquhart, Guido van der Werve, Jordan Wolfson and Akram Zaatari.

Castello di Rivoli Museo d’Arte Contemporanea
Piazza Mafalda di Savoia, Rivoli
Open: from Tuesday to Thursday from 10 am to 5 pm, from Friday to Sunday from 10 am to 9 pm

Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo
Via Modane 16, Torino
Open: from Tuesday to Sunday 12 to 8 pm; Thursday from 12 to 11 pm;

Palazzina della Società della Promotrice delle Belle Arti
Via Diego Balsamo Crivelli 11, Torino
Open: from Tuesday to Sunday 10 am to 7 pm

Artissima 15 programme was packed with numerous events Wednesday to Sunday, including:

PRESENT FUTURE
(17 projects by artists emerging on the national and international scene selected by Cecilia Alemani, art critic and independent curator, New York; Michael Ned Holte, independent curator and art critic, Los Angeles; Thibaut Verhoeven, curator SMAK, Gent; Aurélie Voltz, independent curator, Berlin); CONSTELLATIONS (11 installations, sculptures, and large-format works) selected by Stéphanie Moisdon, co-curator, 2007 Lyon Biennale and Manifesta 4, and Susanne Pfeffer, curator, Kunst-Werke, Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin); The VIDEO LOUNGE (curated by ourselves, included films and videos by 40+ artists and over 6 hours of screening of materials submitted by the participating galleries – More info); the ITALIAN WAVE (a contest launched to present the work of Italian artists under-35 Italian); l'ECOLE DE STEPHANIE (curated by Stéphanie Moisdon, l'école is a small temporary school that offered lessons, lectures, debates, performances, and screenings); ARTISSIMA CINEMA (a festival of animated shorts and artists films from Indonesia and China); ARTISSIMA VOLUME (devoted to contemporary music); ARTISSIMA COMICS (an exhibition of a promising young talent of Italian comics, Michelangelo Setola); ARTISSIMA DESIGN (an exhibition of Paolo Mussat Sartor, the photographer and narrator of Art Povera) plus the CONTEMPORARY ARTS NIGHT on Saturday 8th, where galleries and art spaces premiered shows or performances until the wee hours...


T2 artists and venues in the user-unfriendly website www.torinotriennale.it
Artissima 15: www.artissima.it




Site visit to Maasvlakte 2, the Port of Rotterdam expansion


Last week Latitudes visited the port and industrial zone of Rotterdam (seen in the images). On the west of the existing port, construction is undergoing to build Maasvlakte 2, a new port area arising from the sea in front of the Maas estuary, which will be constructed between 2008 and 2013. The reclaimed land will add 20% of port area and triple the container capacity. Following such land reclamation or polder mega-projects such as the Flevopolder, Ijburg and Neeltje Jans, the second Maasvlakte will be the latest chapter of the Netherlands’ ongoing relationship between the sea and the land.

As stated in the Maasvlakte website: "The land reclamation will measure around 2,000 hectares in total. Half of this will consist of infrastructure, such as sea defences, fairways, railways, roads and port basins. The other 1,000 hectares will provide the space for industrial sites."

The Maasvlakte 2 project organisation of the Rotterdam Port Authority wants to involve artists in this 5 year development stage, and for that they have involved SKOR. The Port Authority and SKOR invited Latitudes to visit the area and to generate ideas for the forthcoming 5 year period, from planning to realisation of what will be one of the biggest trade zones in the world.

All images: Latitudes | www.lttds.org




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