Latitudes' "out of office": wrap up of the 2018–2019 season

Seen in Malasaña, Madrid. Photo: @marianacanepaluna

This is our tenth ‘Out of Office’ post, a tradition which started with this 2008-9 post in pre-Facebook, pre-Twitter, pre-Instagram days. We’ve come a long way, but remain faithful to the idea of sharing behind-the-scenes moments. Below we share a selection of the art we’ve seen, the trips we had a chance to take, the conversations we began, the meals we shared, and (oh, we particularly love these) installation scenes. Subverting the institutional convention of the year-end report, our ‘out of office’ mixes official and unofficial photos, screengrabs and we-fies, even! Revision, reflection, remembrance, re-ignition. Create or die!

September 1, 2018: New season, new month, and new cover story on the Harald Szeemann exhibition in Bern (cover story archive here).
September 5, 2018: Launch of a new dispatch of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ from Buenos Aires, Argentina. In this eighth episode, Móvil co-founder and curator Alejandra Aguado followed the itinerary devised by the artist Diego Bianchi around the self-regulated community Velatropa, the buzzing commercial area of Once, identifying human and non-human flows and interactions. This became an entry point for discussing Bianchi’s interests in how, as consumers, we define a particular zeitgeist and appropriate trends that enable us to affirm our identities.

Each of the 20 photographs is augmented by one or more extra assets – a brief commentary, a sound or a caption – accessed by clicking the words overlaying the images. 

‘Incidents (of Travel)’ is an ongoing editorial project edited by Latitudes and produced by KADIST. Earlier offline conversations have taken place in Chicago (USA), Jinja (Uganda), Suzhou (China), Lisbon (Portugal), Terengganu (Malaysia) and Yerevan (Armenia).


September 11–15, 2018: Installation and opening of the exhibition ‘Cream Cheese and Pretty Ribbons!’ at Martin Janda Gallery, Vienna.

Installation process of ‘Cream Cheese and Pretty Ribbons!’. Photo: Martin Janda Gallery.

Exhibition file with correspondence, floor plan, artist's CVs, checklist, price list, technicians notes, etc. Above and following photos: Latitudes.

Mariana installing David Bestué’s ‘Trencadissa’ (2013).

(Left) Eulàlia Rovira and Adrian Schindler’s ‘Els peus fixats al terra delatant cap impaciència’ [THE FEET FIXED TO THE GROUND BETRAY NO IMPATIENCE] (2016) and (right) photograph series by Sean Lynch, part of the installation ‘A BLOW BY BLOW ACCOUNT OF STONE CARVING IN OXFORD’, (2013-14).
With Sean, Eulàlia and Adrian. Unanimously decided Adrian’s arm was the longest and therefore would perform better as a ‘we-fie’ stick. 


September 14, 2018: The day after the opening Eulàlia and Adrian presented “One motif says to another ‘I can't take my eyes off you’” a new performance produced for the occasion at the gallery (focus of the October Cover Story), and Sean Lynch performed the lecture ‘A Blow by Blow Account of Stonecarving in Oxford’, parrots and owls! More photos.
October 2018 cover story. Archived here.

September 2—18, 2018: Intermittent installation of Joan Morey’s exhibition ‘COLLAPSE’ at the Centre d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona — Fabra i Coats.


Deciding among the two options for the façade banners. Italics or not?

Last-minute proofreading of exhibition captions and panels.
Planning the next steps during the installation with technician guru Alberto Calvete.
A heads up to visitors.
Listing the contents in each vitrine.
Wall labels, exhibition guide, essay and remote controls.

September 19, 2018: Opening of Morey’s exhibition ‘COLLAPSE’, Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona – Fabra i Coats. 


 Opening photos: Eva Carasol. 

September 27, 2018: First reenactment of Joan Morey’s performance ‘POSTMORTEM. Pour en finir avec le jugement de Dieu’ [POSTMORTEM. To have done with the judgment of God] (2006–2007) interpreted by Sònia Gómez, in the context of the exhibition ‘Desiring machine, Working machine’ at the Contemporary Art Centre of Barcelona – Fabra i Coats.

‘POSTMORTEM. Pour en finir avec le jugement de Dieu’ [POSTMORTEM. To have done with the judgment of God] (2006–2007) published in frieze magazine Instagram.

September 28–October 7, 2018: Research trips to London  during Frieze art week (blog post here, art-agenda round-up here) and Liverpool for the Liverpool biennial (photo report here). 


While in London we met with Valentina Ravaglia, Assistant Curator, to donate Lawrence Weiner's limited edition tote bag, designed in 2015 to commemorate Latitudes’ 10th anniversary. Shortly after, the tote was included in Tate's ‘ARTIST ROOMS: Lawrence Weiner’ exhibition, on view from November 2, 2018, at The McManus Museum and Galleries in Dundee, Scotland, until February 17, 2019.

(Above and below) View of ‘Lawrence Weiner. ARTIST ROOMS’, National Galleries of Scotland and Tate. ©Lawrence Weiner. 

October 11, 2018: Second reenactment of Joan Morey’s performance within the exhibition ‘Desiring machine, Working machine’ at the Contemporary Art Centre of Barcelona – Fabra i Coats. ‘LLETANÍA APÒRIMA’ [APORIC LITANY] (2009) was interpreted by Jordi Vall-lamora.

Joan Morey. LLETANIA APÒRIMA (2009). Performance reenactment within the frame of the exhibition ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring MKachine, Working Machine’ (2018–2019). Photo: Noemi Jariod. Courtesy the artist.

October 12, 2018: art-agenda.com publishes Mariana Cánepa Luna’s Frieze Roundup review. Read it here.


October 12–14, 2018: Train to Arlès to visit the exhibition ‘Picture Industry: A Provisional History of the Technical Image’ at LUMA Arlès (Max Andrews’s review was published in December).

Frank Gehry’s building under construction. 
 A large exhibition devoted to Gilbert & George works. 
Saturday morning reception at LUMA.
Before the morning reception, a quick walkthrough Arlès busy Saturday market. 

October 19, 2018: (Secret) Site-visit to La Modelo prison with Joan Morey (artist) and Esther Doblas (Executive production) to check the spaces, discuss script possibilities (plan A, B, C, D...), identify mobility issues, etc. At this point in time, nobody knew the location of the event which was only disclosed the very same evening of the performance.

Salvador Puig Antich, the last political activist executed by Franco’s dictatorial regime, was jailed in this wing, in the cell 443. He was garroted in March 1974 in a room where parcels were delivered to the prison.
 Advanced tangle wiring techniques.
 Central space. Morey makes notes on his map of all the access, exits, gallery numbering, etc.
 Exit to the largest prison yard.
 Cisterns placed outside the cells in cages to avoid prisoners hiding anything in them.

 Joan taking further notes nearby the room where prisoners were given methadone.

Joan, Esther and Mariana discuss options in the Panopticon-inspired central space (this cabin is not the original structure).

October 25, 2018: Fifth reenactment of Joan Morey’s performance within the exhibition ‘Desiring machine, Working machine’ at the Contemporary Art Centre of Barcelona – Fabra i Coats. ‘GRITOS Y SUSURROS. Conflicte dramàtic cinquè (amb l’obra d’art)’ [CRIES & WHISPERS. Fifth Dramatic Conflict (with the Work of Art)] (2009) was interpreted by Carme Callol and Tatin Revenga.

Carme Callol and Tatin Revenga rehearsal. Photo: Joan Morey.

Joan Morey, ‘GRITOS Y SUSURROS. Conflicte dramatic cinquè (ambos l’obra d’art)’ [CRIES & WHISPERS. Fifth Dramatic Conflict (with the Work of Art)], 2009. Interpreted by Carme Callol and Tatin Revenga. Performance reenactment within the frame of the exhibition ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring Machine, Working Machine’ (2018–2019). Photo: Noemi Jariod. Courtesy the artist.

October 26–27, 2018: Attending the opening of ‘Te toca a tí’ in Espai d'art contemporani de Castelló (EACC). Mariana’s review of the exhibition would be published on
 January 7, 2019, in art-agenda


Teresa Lanceta’s work, exhibition view of ‘Te toca a tí’ in Espai d’art contemporani de Castelló (EACC). 

November 1, 2018: Morey’s first performance of the series is this months’ focus on Latitudes’s home page. 
November 13, 2018: frieze.com publishes the review of Pere Llobera show at Bombon Projects and SIS galería by Max Andrews. Read the review here. Also included in the January-February 2019, issue #200, page 242.

November 15, 2018: Fourth reenactment of Joan Morey’s performance within the exhibition ‘Desiring machine, Working machine’ at the Contemporary Art Centre of Barcelona – Fabra i Coats. ‘BAREBACK. Fenomenología de la comunión’ [BAREBACK. Phenomenology of Communion], (2010) was interpreted by Manuel Segade.

Preparation of Manuel Segade’s outfit before the reenactment of the performance ‘BAREBACK. Fenomenología de la comunión’ [BAREBACK. Phenomenology of Communion], (2010) by Joan Morey. Photo: Noemi Jariod. Courtesy the artist.

Portrait of Manuel Segade at the end of his performance ‘BAREBACK. Fenomenología de la comunión’ [BAREBACK. Phenomenology of Communion], (2010) on Max Andrews’s Instagram.

November 18–22 Vienna Art Week; November 22-25 Amsterdam Art Weekend: This blog post documents the exhibitions and studios visited during our trip to Vienna, hosted by the Vienna Art Week. As part of the programme, Latitudes participated in a panel discussion on ‘Some Current Positions of Curating’ at das weisse haus.


(Above and below) Photos by eSeL.


November 22, 19:30h: Unfortunately due to our earlier engagement to attend the Vienna Art Week and a sudden change of dates, we were unable to attend the opening of Joan Morey’s ‘COS SOCIAL’ at Centre d’Art Tecla Sala, the second chapter of ‘COLLAPSE’. Below some install shots when the works arrived from Lleida’s La Panera.


Morey striking a pose on the façade of Tecla Sala. Photos: Latitudes.

November 22-25, 2018: Amsterdam Art Week. Visited De Appel, Rijksakademie OPEN Studios, Andriesse, Oude Kerk, RongWrong, Stedelijk museum, Ellen de Bruijne, Fons Welters, tegenboschvanvreden, andriesse eyck, a.o. Photo report here (with photos from the Vienna Art Week, too).November 29, 2018: Fifth reenactment of Joan Morey’s performance within the exhibition ‘Desiring machine, Working machine’ at the Contemporary Art Centre of Barcelona – Fabra i Coats. ‘IL LINGUAGGIO DEL CORPO. Prólogo’ [IL LINGUAGGIO DEL CORPO. Prologue] (2015–2016) was interpreted by Catalina Carrasco and Gaspar Morey.

The final shot of ‘IL LINGUAGGIO DEL CORPO’ published on Max Andrews' Instagram (later deleted by Instagram due "not following their community guidelines on nudity").

December 1, 2018: Following on our recent trip to Vienna’s Kunsthistorisches Museum to see their historic Brueghel exhibition, we decided to dedicate December’s cover story to another of their current shows: ‘Spitzmaus Mummy in a Coffin and Other Treasures’ conceived by filmmaker Wes Anderson and his partner Juman Malouf. 
December 2018 cover story on www.lttds.org

December 2–4, 2018: Short research trip to Madrid to visit exhibitions: group show ‘Querer parecer noche’ at the Centro de Arte 2 de Mayo in Móstoles; Lúa Coderch’s ‘La vida de O.’ at CentroCentro; comprehensive solo shows by Luigi Ghirri, Luis Camnitzer, Dorothea Tanning, and Dierk Schmidt at Museo Reina Sofia; Lina Bo Bardi at Fundación March; works by Portuguese artists Alexandre Estrela and João Maria Gusmão + Pedro Paiva at La Casa Encendida; and a few solo exhibitions in commercial galleries such as David Goldblatt at Elba Benítez; Alejandro Cesarco in Parra & Romero; Eva Fàbregas at garcía galería; Enric Farrés Duran at NoguerasBlanchard and Daniel Jacoby at Maisterravalbuena. We also had time to squeeze in a visit to the Museo Geominero, a place we’ve long wanted to visit and never managed to find time for. And it didn’t disappoint. Highly recommended to everyone not only into minerals and stones but also nerds (as we are) on exhibition display and cabinets.

Lúa Coderch’s ‘La vida de O.’ at CentroCentro.
Alejandro Cesarco at ParraRomero, Madrid.

Above and below: Museo Geominero, Madrid.


Group exhibition ‘Querer parecer noche’ at the Centro de Arte 2 de Mayo (CA2M) in Móstoles.


Dierk Schmidt at Museo Reina Sofia’s Palacio Velázquez.

December 13, 2018: Sixth and final reenactment of Joan Morey’s performance within the exhibition ‘Desiring machine, Working machine’ at the Contemporary Art Centre of Barcelona – Fabra i Coats. ‘TOUR DE FORCE. El cos utòpic’ [TOUR DE FORCE. The Utopian Body] (2017) was interpreted by Eduard Escoffet.


Backstage makeup and application of fake tattoos – in the hurry the ‘Memento Mori’ tattoo on one on Escoffet’s arm was upside down. No big deal. 


December 20, 2018: frieze.com publishes Max’s review on the exhibition ‘Picture Industry: A Provisional History of the Technical Image’, a survey exhibition at LUMA Arlès captures the history of mechanically-reproduced imagery from the 19th century to the present. Read the review here.
January 7, 2019: art-agenda.com publishes Mariana’s review of the group exhibition ‘Te toca a tí [It's your turn]’ at Espai d'art contemporani de Castelló (EACC). Read the review here.
The review is also the focus of our January’s Monthly Cover Story on Latitudes home page (archived here).
January 8–10, 2019: Set up for the performance ‘Schizophrenic Machine’ by Joan Morey, the closing event of the three-part project ‘COLLAPSE’. Both exhibitions at the Centre d’art contemporani de Barcelona – Fabra i Coats and Centre d’art Tecla Sala close on January 13, 2019. 



January 10, 2019, at 7pm: Performance ‘COLLAPSE. Schizophrenic Machine’ by Joan Morey. Performance structured in a prologue and five acts inside Barcelona’s La Model prison. A group of people was driven by coach to the location from each of the two art centres that hosted the first two parts of ‘COLLAPSE’. The performance was integrated into the architecture and the memory of the building, creating an imposing immersive experience. Public restricted by capacity to 113 spectators. Attendance had to be requested in advance and was subject to prior selection and the acceptance of specific rules and a strict dress code. More here.

‘COLLAPSE. Schizophrenic Machine’ by Joan Morey.© 2019. All documentation photographs by Noemi Jariod. Courtesy of the artist.

January 14, 2019: frieze.com publishes’s' fan letter on ‘Frank Zappa’s Genre-Defying ‘Civilization Phaze III’’. Published in Issue 200, January - February 2019. Read the text here.
February 1, 2019: New cover story focusing on Morey’s closing performance ‘COLLAPSE. Schizophrenic Machine’ at La Model prison in Barcelona.
February 8, 2019: Launch of a new ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ dispatch from Reykjavík (and cover story on Latitudes’s home page between March-April 2019). In this new itinerary, Canadian curator Becky Forsythe and Icelandic artist Þorgerður Ólafsdóttir navigate Reykjavík’s surroundings considering Þorgerður’s “current interest in Icelandic Spar (a form of transparent calcite), its double refraction and light-polarizing properties. In a race with daylight, they travel between sites, collecting moments and considering the ways in which geologic time surfaces in the context of human time.”

Each of the 27 photographs is augmented by one or more extra assets – a brief commentary, a sound or a caption – accessed by clicking the words overlaying the images.


‘Incidents (of Travel)’ is an editorial project that began in Spring 2016. It’s edited by Latitudes and produced by KADIST as part of their online projects. Earlier offline conversations have taken place in Chicago (USA), Jinja (Uganda), Suzhou (China), Lisbon (Portugal), Terengganu (Malaysia), Yerevan (Armenia) and Buenos Aires (Argentina).





February 20, 2019: After a few weeks facing the screen and months mining hard disks, we finally upload Latitudes’ redesigned portfolio, available to download for desktop/laptop/tablet view (83pp, 30.9 MB), for mobile (164pp,15.8 MB) or for print (164pp, 155.3 MB).




February 26–March 1, 2019: Three intensive days navigating ARCOmadrid events. We enjoyed Reina Sofía’s exhibitions dedicated to Chicago-based artist H. C. Westermann (later reviewed by Mariana for L’Officiel Art International) and Mapa Teatro’s site-specific installation as part of the Fisuras programme; David Bestué’s solo show at García Galería; Catalina Lozano’s exhibition ‘Winning by Losing’ at CentroCentro; Charlotte Moth’s subtle play with three works from CA2M’s collection in Móstoles, and Armando Andrade Tudela also at CA2M.



Above and below: David Bestué solo show at García Galería, Madrid.

(Above and below): Following on from Joao Laia’s earlier exhibition ‘Transmissions from the Etherspace’ in the same institution, his latest exhibition ‘Drowning in a sea of data’ —despite the ubiquity of the topic of the incessant presence of technology and algorithms in our daily lives — included great works such as Clemens von Wedemeyer’s film and Tomasz Kowalski’s small canvases


Downstairs the highlights of this year’s Generación 2019 were Susanna Inglada and Lucía P. Moreno.

 Catalina Lozano’s group exhibition ‘Winning by Losing’ at CentroCentro. Above: work by Patricia Esquivias. Below: Work by Asier Mendizábal and (next images) Jorge Satorre and Xavier Salaberría.
(Above and below) Bravo to Charlotte Moth’s subtle play with three pieces in CA2M’s collection in dialogue with some of her work. A highlight was the two-part theatre backdrop painted by Leonor Fini in the 1950s and commissioned by Antonio el Bailarín for the 1956 International Festival of Granada.


March 13, 2019: Max’s review on ‘Domènec. Y la tierra será el paraíso’ exhibition at adn galería, Barcelona, published on frieze.com (also included in frieze, issue 202, April 2019).
23 March–16 April 2019: Montevideo (family trip) and Buenos Aires (work trip). Read a fully documented report of our week in Buenos Aires here.

Max Andrews and Lara Marmor conversation ‘First Things First: Making Exhibitions for a General Audience’ covered the contradictions for curatorial and artistic strategies addressing larger audiences. Photo: Art Basel.



In ‘Beyond the Museum: New Institutional Frames for Art’ Mariana Cánepa Luna and Solana Molina Viamonte discussed some of the current transformations institutions undergo, as well as identifying forthcoming challenges. Photo: Art Basel.




April 2019: Two articles were published this month. Latitudes wrote a 14-page feature on Joan Morey for THE SEEN—Chicago’s International Online Journal of Contemporary and Modern Art, and Mariana wrote a review of H. C. Westermann’s retrospective ‘Goin’ Home’ (Volver a casa) exhibition at the Museo Reina Sofía in Madrid, published in L’Officiel Art International’s issue #29. More on our writing archive.


The first page of the 14-page feature on Joan Morey’s performative practice published on THE SEEN—Chicago’s International Online Journal of Contemporary and Modern Art.

Views of the H. C. Westermann's retrospective "Volver a casa" exhibition at the Museo Reina Sofía in Madrid. Photo: Latitudes.

Additionally, a third text appeared this month: the essay ‘Thinking like a drainage basin’ for the exhibition catalogue ‘Lara Almarcegui. Béton’ published by Silvana Editoriale, accompanying her solo exhibition at CAIRN centre d’art in Digne-les-Bains in southern France.


In 2011 Latitudes-edited the monograph ‘Lara Almarcegui. Projects 1995–2010’ published by Archive Books.


(Two above) IVAM’s new sculpture park under construction.



(Two above) Views from their current permanent collection display ‘TIEMPOS CONVULSOS. Historias y microhistorias en la colección del IVAM’.

(Above and below) Views from the exhibition ‘Ice and Earth: The Shimmering Abstractions’ by Anna-Eva Bergman at Bombas Gens, Valencia. Read here.


May 2–4, 2019: Trip to Valencia to research for an article on the Valencia art scene in the framework of IVAM’s 30th anniversary (to be published in October 2019 in frieze magazine).

May 6-31, 2019: Intense jury duty selecting Barcelona Producció awardees of the 2019-2020 season. Three long weeks reading 259 applications, debating with the rest of the jury, and interviewing 32 shortlisted candidates in order to award 15 production grants, an initiative of La Capella



On June 3, winners are announced. Latitudes will tutor three of the fifteen awarded projects: ‘Joc d'infants’ [Children’s game] by Lola Lasurt (solo exhibition, June-October 2020, dates TBC), the offsite project ‘La Balena del Prat al Prat’ [The El Prat Whale to El Prat] by Consol Llupià, and the research ‘Nombrar, poseer. Crítica de la práctica taxonómica’ [To name, to own. Critique of taxonomic practice] by Agustín Ortiz Herrera.
May 29, 2019: Frieze published Max’s review ‘Ice and Earth: The Shimmering Abstractions’ on Anna-Eva Bergman’s retrospective of the terrestrial geographies at Bombas Gens, Valencia.

Exhibition catalogue ‘Lara Almarcegui. Béton published by Silvana Editoriale.

June 4, 2019: We received copies of the publication ‘Lara Almarcegui. Beton’ (Silvana Editoriale, April 2019), which includes Latitudes' essay ‘Thinking like a drainage basin’. 


One of the cleverest interventions: (Theresa) ‘May you live in interesting times’, Venice Biennale 2019.

June 10–14, 2019: Visiting the Venice Biennale. Highlights: Jannis Kounellis at the Fondazione Prada; in the biennale enjoyed works by Khalil Joseph, Ed Atkins, Gabriel Rico, Hito Steyerl, Otobong Nkanga, Haris Epaminonda, Ulrike Müller, Michael Armitage, Gauri Gill (a highlight of Documenta14), Cyprien Gaillard, Jimmie Durham and Lara Favaretto, et. al. The group show at Punta della Dogana (always impeccably installed) had great pieces by Hicham Berrada, Charbel Joseph H. Boutros, Stéphane Saade, and Ari Benjamin; Christopher Kulendran Thomas at V-A-C; mixed feelings about Luc Tuymans at Palazzo Grassi; visited the empty Lithuanian (performances were only on Saturdays, Wednesdays has now been added to the schedule). In the Giardini, we enjoyed the presentations in France, Brazil, Belgium and Switzerland, and elsewhere Ghana, Cyprus, Wales, France, Madagascar, Dineo Seshee Bopape's work in the South African, the maze-like Italy and Hong Kong. Future Generations is always good to visit, though we'd be grateful if they could provide a leaflet or sheet with information on the exhibited works and artists. We enjoyed the presentations by Toyin Ojih Odutola, Jakob Kudsk Steensen, Daniel Turner and Gala Porras-Kim and had time to swing by Victoria Miro which presented great paintings by Njideka Akunyili Crosby. Others photographed below.


Detail from Cathy Wilkes’s work at the British Pavilion, Venice Biennale 2019.

Ingela Ihman’s work at the Nordic Pavilion, Venice Biennale 2019.

 Sergio Prego’s sculptures at the back of the Spanish Pavilion, Venice Biennale 2019.

Yu Ji sculptures in the Central Pavilion, Giardini, Venice Biennale 2019

Jimmie Durham’s ‘Black Serpentine’ in the Central Pavilion, Giardini, Venice Biennale 2019.

Lara Favaretto's ‘Thinking Head’ in the Central Pavilion, Giardini, Venice Biennale 2019.

Haris Epaminonda in the Arsenale, Venice Biennale 2019.

Joël Andrianomearisoa at the Madagascar Pavilion, CorderieVenice Biennale 2019.

Lynette Yiadom-Boakye’s paintings at the Ghana Pavilion, Corderie, Venice Biennale 2019.

 Irish pavilion with work by Eva Rothschild, Corderie, Venice Biennale 2019.

Welsh Pavilion presented work by Sean EdwardsVenice Biennale 2019.

July 1, 2019: New cover story rewinding 10 years to Francesc Ruiz's (visionary?) participation in the group show ‘Sequelism, part 3: Possible, Probable and Preferable Futures’ in Arnolfini, Bristol.
July 11, 2019: Conversation with Lara Almarcegui at the Institut Valencià d’Art Modern (IVAM) in the context of her new exhibition ‘Lara Almarcegui. Agras volcano. Mining rights

Photo © Institut Valencià d'Art Modern (IVAM).

July 16, 2019: Website update with a new page on our forthcoming participation in PUBLICS’s ‘Today Is Our Tomorrow’ art festival taking place in early September in Helsinki. Running parallel during the same week (9–15 September), Frame Contemporary Art Finland is organising ‘Gathering for Rehearsing Hospitalities’, a six-day gathering in which artists, curators, researchers and other critical minds ‘are invited to rehearse and debate hospitality towards diverse ways of knowing and challenging of dominant knowledges’.
July 19, 2019: As a board member of the Fundació Privada AAVC governing HANGAR since 2015, Mariana attends the last HANGAR board meeting before the Summer break. This is a longer than usual session as 2018 accounts have to be approved. Enjoying the blue sky and bright colours before entering spreadsheet world.



Nearby building to HANGAR on c. Marroc / Espronceda.


July 22, 2019: We learn Joan Morey is one of the eight beneficiaries of the 27th edition of the Botín Foundation’s International Visual Arts Grants. Yey! 

July 26-28, 2019: Trip to Madrid to catch a few exhibitions before they finished and the August exodus. Henrik Olesen, David Wojnarowicz, Miriam Cahn, Sara Ramo and Rogelio López Cuenca at the Museo Reina Sofía; Inéditos 2019 at La Casa Encendida; Eva Fàbregas and Aimée Zito Lema at CentroCentro; the recently inaugurated Paloma Polo at CA2M in Móstoles; Joël Andrianomearisoa (at Galería Sabrina Amrani) and Darío Villalba at Sala Alcalá 31, two shows ending this weekend.


 Joël Andrianomearisoa at Galería Sabrina Amrani.

 Above and below: Darío Villalba at Sala Alcalá 31

 Eva Fàbregas ‘Gut feeling’ at CentroCentro.

  Paloma Polo, ‘A Fleeting Moment of Dissidence Becomes Fossilised and Lifeless After The Moment Has Passed’ 2014, at CA2M in Móstoles.

 Henrik Olesen, ‘SOME GAY-LESBIAN ARTISTS AND/OR ARTISTS RELEVANT TO HOMO-SOCIAL CULTURE BORN BETWEEN C. 1300–1870’ (2007) at Museo Reina Sofía.

David Wojnarowicz's photograph ‘What Is This Little Guy’s Job in the World’ (1990) at the Museo Reina Sofía


The 2019–2020 season will kick off on 9–15 September. We'll be in Helsinki participating in two events. Firstly the art festival ‘Today Is Our Tomorrow’, a three-day event (12, 13 and 14 September) initiated by PUBLICS presenting a collaboratively curated program of temporary public art commissions, live performance, music, dance, theatre, literature and symposia, local and international organisations. Latitudes’ has invited Mercedes Azpilicueta to present the performance ‘Yegua-yeta-yuta’ (2015) at Club Kaiku, an underground music venue renowned for hosting an innovative lineup of DJs. 


Skype conversation with the artist Mercedes Azpilicueta and Paul O'Neill from PUBLICS.

And secondly, we'll be part of Frame Contemporary Art Finland's ‘Gathering for Rehearsing Hospitalities’, a week composed of a series of talks, performative dialogues, interventions and screenings developed in collaboration with a number of local partners.

A few days later, we'll be participating in the 2019 EXPO CHICAGO/Red Bull Arts Global Curatorial Initiative visiting a range of institutions and artists in Chicago (17–21 September) and Detroit (21–23 September).





Latitudes' redesigned portfolio – projects since 2005


After weeks and long hours facing the screen and mining hard disks, we've uploaded Latitudes' redesigned portfolio, at last! Go to download page and choose format:

For desktop/laptop/tablet view (83pp, 30.9 MB)
For mobile (164pp, 15.8 MB)
For print (164pp, 155.3 MB)


The pdf gathers a selection of projects produced since 2005 and includes a refreshed version of our biographies – which have also been updated on our website.

We have also included short individual biographies available for download as pdf – see below highlighted in yellow.

PDF designed and edited by Latitudes.

RELATED CONTENT:




Cover Story–February 2019: Schizophrenic Machine

Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org

The February 2019 Monthly Cover Story “Schizophrenic machine” is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org


Schizophrenic machine, the concluding performance of the Latitudes-curated Joan Morey project COLLAPSE, took place on the freezing evening of 10 January. One hundred and thirteen pre-vetted audience members, each complying with a rigid all-black dress code, were driven by coach to the previously undisclosed location: the former La Model prison in Barcelona’s Eixample neighbourhood. More strictures were barked by a balaclava-clad doorman upon arrival: silence! single file! No mobile phones, no bathrooms, no chance to leave. The reverberation of a door slamming. More than two hours in the darkness and cold.

—> Continue reading
—> After December it will be archived here.


Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.


RELATED CONTENT:

  • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
  • Photo documentation of COLLAPSE.
  • Cover Story—January 2019: “Seesaw” (7 January 2019)
  • Cover Story—December 2018: "Treasures! exhibitionism! showmanship!" 1 December 2018
  • Cover Story—November 2018: "Joan Morey—postmortem judgement reenactment" 1 November 2018
  • Cover Story–October 2018: "I can’t take my eyes off you: Eulàlia Rovira and Adrian Schindler" 1 October 2018
  • Cover Story–September 2018: Harald Szeemann’s travel sculpture, 10 September 2018
  • Cover Story–August 2018: Askeaton Joyride, 2 August 2018
  • Cover Story–July 2018: No Burgers for Sale 2 July 2018
  • Save the date: 13 September, 6–9pm. Latitudes-curated exhibition ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’, Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna, 21 June 2018
  • Cover Story—June 2018: Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group, 4 June 2018
  • Cover Story – May 2018: Shadowing Roman Ondák, 7 May 2018 




‘COLLAPSE. Schizophrenic Machine’ site-specific performance by Joan Morey at the former prison La Model, Barcelona, 10 January 2019



‘Schizophrenic Machine’ site-specific performance by Joan Morey at the former Panopticon-inspired prison La Model, Barcelona, 10 January 2019. © All photographs by Noemí Jariod. Courtesy of the artist.




















Schizophrenic Machine’ was the closure to the three-part project ‘COLLAPSE’ by Joan Morey. This new site-specific performance took place on January 10, 2019, in the former prison La Modelo, a location that was kept in secret up until the 113 guests were driven in coaches from either Centre d'art Contemporani - Fabra i Coats, or the Centre d'art Tecla Sala

The audience previously registered to attend the closed-door performance and agreed to comply with the strict dress code. The performance script integrated the 1904 chilling architecture of the prison through voice and technological devices such as drones, surveillance cameras, strobe lighting, an architecture scanning laser. Each one activated and deactivated the building's memories making ‘Schizophrenic Machine’ be Morey's first performance with no human actors as protagonists. ‘Schizophrenic Machine’ continued Morey's long-standing exploration of power structures and control of the body.



Schizophrenic machine’ took the physical and discursive past of La Model as a scenario for performance where bodies were not acting and the protagonist was the architecture itself. The Panopticon-inspired prison was inaugurated on June 9, 1904, and was conceived as a model for the Spanish penitentiary system: an example of the reintegration of criminals into society through discipline, isolation and religious morality. La Model was one of the main sites of political repression and social control in the city. Followers of all political persuasion passed through its cells, aside from common criminals, yet during the long totalitarian dictatorship of General Franco (1939–1975), it was especially notorious as a site for the repression of political dissidents. La Model closed on June 8, 2017, 113 years after its inauguration


‘Schizophrenic machine’ took over the unoccupied building and created a phantasmagoric presence that activated and deactivated its own memory. Conceived as an all-encompassing experience the event took on a singular awareness of the building and the site. The sequential dramatisation of its radial spaces articulated a dystopian representational device. A cast of technological interpreters —voices, sound, lights, cameras, drones and other devices— took the place of performing bodies. Moreover, the panopticon architecture itself seemed to address spectators through a female voice that spoke on the principles of control, power and the paradigm of a surveillance society. La Model became a schizophrenic machine, an imperious disciplinary mechanism for the 21st century. 

Produced by the Contemporary Art Center of Barcelona - Fabra i Coats as the third and final part of the ‘COLLAPSE’ project.





























Share: #JoanMoreyColapso

RELATED CONTENT:

  • Wakelet archive of social media content
  • Selección de reseñas, videos y entrevistas (31 Diciembre 2018)
  • Inscripción para asistir a la performance ‘Máquina esquizofrénica’ de Joan Morey (11 Diciembre 2018)
  • December 13, 2018, 7pm: Performance reenactment of "TOUR DE FORCE. El cos utòpic" (2017) by Joan Morey 10 December 2018
  • December 13, 2018, 7 pm: Performance reenactment of "TOUR DE FORCE. El cos utòpic" (2017) by Joan Morey (10 December 2018)
  • "Joan Morey presenta "Col·lapse. Cos social", programa Taquilla Inversa, L'Hdigital Mitjans de Comunicació de L'Hospitalet, 29 Novembre 2018
  • Pía Cordero, "COL·LAPSE, o l’avenir il·limitat de l’obscenitat", www.nuvol.com, 6 Desembre 2018
  • November 29, 2018, 5–8pm: Performance reenactment of "IL LINGUAGGIO DEL CORPO. Pròleg" (2015-16) by Joan Morey 26 November 2018
  • November 15, 2018, 7 pm: Performance reenactment of "BAREBACK. Fenomenología de la comunión" (2010) by Joan Morey 12 November 2018
  • October 25, 7pm: Performance reenactment of "GRITOS Y SUSURROS" (2009) by Joan Morey 22 October 2018
  • October 11, 2018, 7pm: Performance reenactment of ‘LLETANIA APÒRIMA’ [APORIC LITANY] (2009) by Joan Morey 8 October 2018
  • Performance programme in the context of Joan Morey's exhibition ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring Machine, Working Machine’ 24 September 2018
  • Maria Palau, "Contra l'abús de poder", El Punt Avui, p. 32, 23 Setembre 2018 (Catalan)
  • Full performance programme
  • NOTA DE PRENSA: ‘Joan Morey. COLAPSO’, diversos espacios, Barcelona, 20 septiembre 2018–13 enero 2019, 19 September 2018
  • Save the date: 19 September at 7pm, opening of the solo show by Joan Morey ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring machine, working machine’, Centre d'Art Contemporani Barcelona - Fabra i Coats, 3 September 2018




Selección de reseñas, videos y entrevistas sobre el proyecto COLAPSO de Joan Morey


Natàlia Farré, ‘Sumisión y frío en la Modelo’, El Periódico, 15 de enero 2019.
Maria Palau, ‘Angoixats a la Model’, El Punt Avui, 13 de enero 2019, pág 23.

Conxita Oliver, ‘El món performatiu de Joan Morey, a revisió’, eltemps.cat, 13 desembre 2018 (Catalán).


Pía Cordero, "COL·LAPSE, o l’avenir il·limitat de l’obscenitat", núvol.com, 6 desembre 2018 (Catalán).



María Muñoz, ‘Sobre el poder, la performance y el deseo’, Metal magazine, 4 diciembre 2018 (Castellano).




"Joan Morey presenta "Col·lapse. Cos social", programa Taquilla Inversa, L'H digital Mitjans de Comunicació de L'Hospitalet, 29 novembre 2018 (4'57'', Catalán).


Entrevista ‘Joan Morey, artista i performer mallorquí’ con Tania Adam, programa ‘Terrícoles’, canal betevé, 13 novembre 2018 (27', Catalán).
Vanessa Graell, ‘Anatomía de la ‘performance’’, El Mundo, 27 septiembre 2018 (Castellano).
Maria Palau, ‘Contra l'abús de poder’, El Punt Avui, 23 setiembre 2018 (Catalán).
Núria Juanico, ‘L’entrada a l’univers sinistre de Joan Morey’, Ara.cat, 25 setiembre 2018 (Catalán).


CONTENIDO RELACIONADO:
  • Proceso de inscripción para asistir a la performance ‘Máquina esquizofrénica’ de Joan Morey 11 Diciembre 2018
  • December 13, 2018, 7 pm: Performance reenactment of "TOUR DE FORCE. El cos utòpic" (2017) by Joan Morey 10 December 2018
  • November 29, 2018, 5–8pm: Performance reenactment of "IL LINGUAGGIO DEL CORPO. Pròleg" (2015-16) by Joan Morey 26 November 2018
  • November 15, 2018, 7 pm: Performance reenactment of "BAREBACK. Fenomenología de la comunión" (2010) by Joan Morey 12 November 2018
  • October 25, 7pm: Performance reenactment of "GRITOS Y SUSURROS" (2009) by Joan Morey 22 October 2018
  • October 11, 2018, 7pm: Performance reenactment of ‘LLETANIA APÒRIMA’ [APORIC LITANY] (2009) by Joan Morey 8 October 2018
  • Wakelet archive of social media content




Mariana Cánepa Luna reviews ‘Te toca a tí! [It's Your Turn!]’ for art-agenda



‘Te toca a tí’ [It's Your Turn]
Espai d'art contemporani de Castelló, Castelló de la Plana
October 26, 2018—February 17, 2019


"Two pairs of hands play a game of cat’s cradle, forming a star from a loop of string; viewers may imagine one person pulling the string while the other interprets their instructions. This photograph, which appears on the cover of the booklet accompanying the group exhibition “Te toca a tí” [It’s your turn] at the Espai d’art contemporani de Castelló (EACC), epitomizes the exhibition’s conceptual framework. Curated by Laura Vallés Vílchez and including works by ten artists, the show asks whether a gallery can become a site of negotiation, and if so, in what ways it can be re-signified."

—> Continue reading here.

Text originally published in art-agenda on January 7, 2019.



Teresa Lanceta, selection of tapestries and sewn fabrics, 2003-2018. Variable dimensions. Courtesy of the artist and Galería Espacio Mínimo. Photo by Ester Pegueroles.


Luca Frei, ‘Simone Forti's See-Saw’, 2015. Variable dimensions. Performance with plywood see-saw. Courtesy of the artist and The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Committee on Media and Performance Funds, 2018. Photo by Luca Frei.


Céline Condorelli, ‘Models for a Qualitative Society’, 2016. Variable dimensions. Painted blackwood acacia, steel. 84 x 119 cm, Inkjet prints. Courtesy of the artist. Photo by Ester Pegueroles.

RELATED CONTENT:






    Max Andrews reviews in frieze: ‘A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’ (LUMA Foundation, Arlès) and Pere Llobera's ‘Acció’ (Bombon Projects, Barcelona) and ‘Kill Your Darlings’ (Sis Galería, Sabadell)

    Max Andrews, co-founder of Latitudes and contributing editor to frieze, recently reviewed the group exhibition ‘A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’ at LUMA Foundation in Arlès. The exhibition is curated by artist Walead Beshty and is on view until January 6, 2019. Published on frieze.com, 20 December 2018.
    Frank Gehry's LUMA building under construction, as of October 12, 2018. Above and following photos by Latitudes. 

    Views from the exhibition ‘A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’.

    "Le Fusil Photographique" by Étienne-Jules Marey. 

    Works by Wolfgang Tillmans (vitrines) and Christopher Williams (wall).

    Hans-Peter Feldmann's "9-12 Front Page", 2001. 


    ‘PICTURE INDUSTRY: A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’, curated by Walead Beshty. Exhibition views, les Forges, Luma Arles, Parc des Ateliers, Arles, France, 2018. © Marc Domage.

    ‘PICTURE INDUSTRY: A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’, curated by Walead Beshty. Exhibition views, les Forges, Luma Arles, Parc des Ateliers, Arles, France, 2018. © Marc Domage.

    ‘PICTURE INDUSTRY: A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’, curated by Walead Beshty. Exhibition views, les Forges, Luma Arles, Parc des Ateliers, Arles, France, 2018. © Marc Domage.


    ‘PICTURE INDUSTRY: A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’, curated by Walead Beshty. Exhibition views, les Forges, Luma Arles, Parc des Ateliers, Arles, France, 2018. © Marc Domage.


    Also for frieze, Max Andrews reviewed two concurrent exhibitions by Pere Llobera: Acció’ at Bombon Projects (Barcelona) and ‘Kill Your Darlings’ at Sis Galería (in nearby Sabadell), ‘exploring the artist’s ever-changing styles and painterly references.’ Published online on 13 November 2018, and included in January-February 2019 print issue #200.

    “As if tormented by his own cursed hand, Llobera’s darkly fugitive shtick is his alarm at its ability to paint so adeptly so easily, despite his mind’s suspicion of painters painting to be admired.” 


     Views from Pere Llobera's exhibition ‘Acció’ at Bombon Projects, Barcelona. Courtesy the artist. Above and photos below: Roberto Ruiz.



    RELATED CONTENT:
    • Writing archive on Latitudes' website (since 2005);
    • Max Andrews reviews Lúa Coderch; "Crash Test. The Molecular Turn" and Julia Spínola for frieze 9 April 2018
    • "The Kørner problem” essay by Max Andrews in the monograph "John Kørner" published by Roulette Russe, 19 February 2018
    • Max Andrews essay on Christopher Knowles for NoguerasBlanchard at Liste 2017, 21 July 2017
    • Cover Story – January 2017: How open are open calls? 4 January 2017
    • Cover Story – December 2016: Ten years ago – Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook, 5 December 2016
    • January 2016 Monthly Cover Story: Kasper Akhøj's Eileen Gray’s E.1027, 4 January 2016
    • Review of the exhibition "What cannot be used is forgotten" in the May issue of frieze magazine, 29 April 2015
    • Review of Maria Thereza Alves' exhibition at CAAC Sevilla published in frieze magazine 9 March 2015




    Inscripción para asistir a la performance ‘Máquina esquizofrénica’ de Joan Morey



    Se abre el proceso de inscripción (¡hasta el 20 de diciembre 2018!) para asistir a ‘Máquina esquizofrénica’, una performance inédita de Joan Morey que tendrá lugar el 10 de enero de 2019 a las 19 h en una ubicación muy relevante de la ciudad de Barcelona pero que se mantiene expresamente en secreto.

    Máquina esquizofrénica’ es la tercera y última parte del proyecto COLAPSO de Joan Morey y comisariado por Latitudes. La primera parte del proyecto, titulada Máquina deseante, máquina de trabajo se exhibe en el Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats. La segunda parte tiene lugar en el Centre d’Art Tecla Sala, en L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, y es la versión definitiva de la exposición itinerante ‘Cuerpo social’. Ambas pueden visitarse hasta el 13 de enero 2019.


    Formulario de inscripción aquí.

    Observaciones:


    Performance a puerta cerrada y de acceso restringido. Aforo limitado. La performance es exclusivamente para público adulto y, debido al entorno arquitectónico, no es apta para personas con movilidad o visibilidad reducida. El acceso a la performance está sujeto a normas de protocolo, entre ellas el código de vestimenta y la aceptación por escrito de condiciones para la asistencia. Aun habiendo recibido confirmación y cumplir de forma correcta el protocolo de asistencia indicado, el artista, el Fabra i Coats. Centre d'Art Contemporani y el Centre d'Art Tecla Sala se reservan el derecho de admisión. En la confirmación de asistencia se facilitarán todos los detalles organizativos.


    + info

    Comparte: #JoanMoreyColapso

    CONTENIDO RELACIONADO
    • December 13, 2018, 7pm: Performance reenactment of "TOUR DE FORCE. El cos utòpic" (2017) by Joan Morey 10 December 2018
    • "Joan Morey presenta "Col·lapse. Cos social", programa Taquilla Inversa, L'Hdigital Mitjans de Comunicació de L'Hospitalet, 29 Novembre 2018
    • Pía Cordero, "COL·LAPSE, o l’avenir il·limitat de l’obscenitat", www.nuvol.com, 6 Desembre 2018
    • November 29, 2018, 5–8pm: Performance reenactment of "IL LINGUAGGIO DEL CORPO. Pròleg" (2015-16) by Joan Morey 26 November 2018
    • November 15, 2018, 7 pm: Performance reenactment of "BAREBACK. Fenomenología de la comunión" (2010) by Joan Morey 12 November 2018
    • October 25, 7pm: Performance reenactment of "GRITOS Y SUSURROS" (2009) by Joan Morey 22 October 2018
    • October 11, 2018, 7pm: Performance reenactment of ‘LLETANIA APÒRIMA’ [APORIC LITANY] (2009) by Joan Morey 8 October 2018
    • Performance programme in the context of Joan Morey's exhibition ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring Machine, Working Machine’ 24 September 2018
    • Maria Palau, "Contra l'abús de poder", El Punt Avui, p. 32, 23 Setembre 2018 (Catalan) 
    • Full performance programme 
    • Wakelet archive of social media content
    • NOTA DE PRENSA: ‘Joan Morey. COLAPSO’, diversos espacios, Barcelona, 20 septiembre 2018–13 enero 2019, 19 September 2018
    • Save the date: 19 September at 7pm, opening of the solo show by Joan Morey ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring machine, working machine’, Centre d'Art Contemporani Barcelona - Fabra i Coats, 3 September 2018




    December 13, 2018, 7pm: Performance reenactment of "TOUR DE FORCE. El cos utòpic" (2017) by Joan Morey




    Event: Reenactment of "TOUR DE FORCE. El cos utòpic" (2017) by Joan Morey
    Date and time: December 13, 2018, 7pm
    Interpreter: Eduard Escoffet
    Location: Third floor, Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats.


    The reenactment is part of the live programme of six performances reactivated within Joan Morey's exhibition survey ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring Machine, Working Machine’ at the Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats (on view until January 13, 2019).

    Each of the performances of the programme is extracted from their original context as studies or scenes from earlier projects and given an independent life. These live-action fragments encompass ritualistic exercises following the artist’s rules, tableaux vivants, and dramatic orations based on texts by the artist or by playwrights such as Samuel Beckett. Whenever possible the performances maintain their original interpreters, yet inevitably they are reinforced or degraded through their repetition, adding another layer to the artist’s exploration of control.

    Access to all performances is unrestricted.


    Joan Morey. ‘POSTMORTEM. Pour en finir avec le jugement de dieu’ (2006-2007). Performance, reenactment, 27 September 2018. Photo by Noemi Jariod. Courtesy of the artist.


    Joan Morey. ‘LLETANIA APÒRIMA’ (2009). Performance, reenactment, 11 October 2018. Photo by Noemi Jariod. Courtesy of the artist.


    Joan Morey. ‘GRITOS Y SUSURROS. Conflicte dramatic cinquè (ambos l’obra d’art)’ (2009). Performance, reenactment, 25 October 2018. Photo by Noemi Jariod. Courtesy of the artist.


    Joan Morey. ‘‘BAREBACK. Fenomenología de la comunión’ [BAREBACK. Phenomenology of Communion]’ (2010). Performance, reenactment, 15 November 2018. Photo by Noemi Jariod. Courtesy of the artist.


    A dramatic extract from the fifth act of TOUR DE FORCE (2017), which has only previously been witnessed by an audience of six people in the setting of a white limousine driving on a route through Barcelona. The project as a whole puts together a conceptual history of the HIV/AIDS pandemic—from the fear and stigma surrounding diagnosis and infection in the 1980s and 1990s to the possibility today of its management and control via pharmaceutical compliance.

    This performance corresponds to the latter historical context, addressing the complexities of understanding the disease in an epidemiological sense and as a symbolic phenomenon enmeshed with global governance, human rights, and civil liberties. A performer dressed in black leather garments makes a ritualistic reading from a mobile device, listing the dates on which new antiretroviral drugs have been approved for use in the US, beginning from 1987. The brand names of each of the medications join the litany of dates, and the pill trademarks are repeated as though they were figures worthy of veneration: Saint Genvoya, Saint Stribild, Saint Odefsey, etc.

    The subtitle refers to a 1966 radio broadcast by the philosopher Michel Foucault, known for his histories of healthcare and sexuality, who in 1983 became the first public figure in France to die from an AIDS-related illness.

    COLLAPSE. Desiring Machine, Working Machine’ is the first chapter of a three-part project curated by Latitudes. The second part of COLLAPSE will take place at the Centre d’Art Tecla Sala, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat from November 23, 2018 (on view until January 13, 2019). Titled ‘Schizophrenic Machine’, the third comprises a major new performance event which will take place on January 10, 2019, at an especially resonant – yet, for the moment, deliberately undisclosed – location in Barcelona.

    RELATED CONTENT
    • November 29, 2018, 5–8pm: Performance reenactment of "IL LINGUAGGIO DEL CORPO. Pròleg" (2015-16) by Joan Morey 26 November 2018
    • November 15, 2018, 7 pm: Performance reenactment of "BAREBACK. Fenomenología de la comunión" (2010) by Joan Morey 12 November 2018
    • October 25, 7pm: Performance reenactment of "GRITOS Y SUSURROS" (2009) by Joan Morey 22 October 2018
    • October 11, 2018, 7pm: Performance reenactment of ‘LLETANIA APÒRIMA’ [APORIC LITANY] (2009) by Joan Morey 8 October 2018
    • Performance programme in the context of Joan Morey's exhibition ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring Machine, Working Machine’ 24 September 2018
    • Maria Palau, "Contra l'abús de poder", El Punt Avui, p. 32, 23 Setembre 2018 (Catalan) 
    • Full performance programme 
    • Wakelet archive of social media content
    • NOTA DE PRENSA: ‘Joan Morey. COLAPSO’, diversos espacios, Barcelona, 20 septiembre 2018–13 enero 2019, 19 September 2018
    • Save the date: 19 September at 7pm, opening of the solo show by Joan Morey ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring machine, working machine’, Centre d'Art Contemporani Barcelona - Fabra i Coats, 3 September 2018





    Cover Story–December 2018: "Treasures! exhibitionism! showmanship!"

    Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org

    The December 2018 Monthly Cover Story "Treasures! exhibitionism! showmanship!" is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org


    "A clutch of shows in Vienna (where Latitudes was recently a guest of Art Week) and Amsterdam (which just held its Art Weekend) offer a distinctive take on curatorial liberty and creative exhibition display.

    —> Continue reading
    —> After December it will be archived here.


    Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.

    RELATED CONTENT:

    • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
    • Cover Story—November 2018: "Joan Morey—postmortem judgement reenactment" 1 November 2018
    • Cover Story–October 2018: "I can’t take my eyes off you: Eulàlia Rovira and Adrian Schindler" 1 October 2018
    • Cover Story–September 2018: Harald Szeemann’s travel sculpture, 10 September 2018
    • Cover Story–August 2018: Askeaton Joyride, 2 August 2018
    • Cover Story–July 2018: No Burgers for Sale 2 July 2018
    • Save the date: 13 September, 6–9pm. Latitudes-curated exhibition ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’, Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna, 21 June 2018
    • Cover Story—June 2018: Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group, 4 June 2018
    • Cover Story – May 2018: Shadowing Roman Ondák, 7 May 2018 




    Photo report: Trip to Vienna Art Week and Amsterdam Art Weekend

    A snowy Belvederegarten. All photos (unless stated otherwise): Latitudes.

    As part of this year’s VIENNA ART WEEK, Latitudes was invited to get to know Vienna's art scene over the course of three days (19–21 November). On Tuesday 19 November, the visiting group of curators and artists participated in the panel ‘Some Current Positions of Curating’ at das weisse haus. The panel, chaired by Alexandra Gausman of das weisse haus, briefly introduced recent projects by Argentinian artists Guillermo Faivovich & Nicolás Goldberg; soon-to-be Paris-based curator Claire Hoffmann (Centre Culturel Suisse de Paris); artists and curators FICTILIS from San Francisco; Avi Lubin (Faculty at Jerusalem’s Beit Berl College); and Stephanie Weber (Curator of Contemporary Art at Lembachhaus in München).

    Above and below photos: eSeL.

    Grand staircase of the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna.

    (Above and nine below) Views from the exhibition ‘Spitzmaus Mummy in a Coffin and other Treasures’ guest curated by filmmaker Wes Anderson and writer and illustrator Juman Malouf, in collaboration with Jasper Sharp (Kunsthistorisches Museum) and Mario Mainetti (Fondazione Prada). ‘Anderson and Malouf have assembled more than 400 objects drawn from all fourteen of the museum’s historical collections. Among them are Egyptian, Greek and Roman antiquities, Old Master paintings, selections from the Kunstkammer and the Imperial Treasury, items from the Imperial Armoury, Coin Collection, and Collection of Historic Musical Instruments, as well as pieces from the Theatermuseum, the Weltmuseum, the Imperial Carriage Museum, and Schloss Ambras Innsbruck. A handful of special guests from the Natural History Museum are also included. Particular attention was given to the museum’s storage: more than 350 of the objects have been brought from depots, with many of them on public display for the very first time. (...) The gathering and arrangement of these treasures – from the earliest, a necklace of ceramic beads strung together in Ancient Egypt, to the most recent, a wooden monkey carved in Indonesia almost 5,000 years later – suggest the spectacular breadth, depth, history and complexity of the Kunsthistorisches Museum’s collections.’ (from the venue website)


    (Above and below) Donna Huanca exhibition ˝Piedra quemada˝ at the Lower Belvedere.

     (Above and two below) One of the rooms at the Naturhistorisches Museum (NHM). Below Faivovich and Goldberg intervention ˝In Search of Mesón de Fierro˝, part of their long-term research on meteorites at El Chaco region in northern Argentina. For the exhibition, they presented a 19-gram fragment in a meteorite in the collection of the NHM Vienna, which they were able to trace quite convincingly to Mesón de Fierro.

    (Above and three below) On our own time, we arranged a visit to the artist-run-space Guimarães. Hugo Canoilas, one of the artists that run it alongside Nicola Pecoraro and Christoph Meier, gave us a detailed tour of the show which explored the concept of excessive sentimentality. ‘SCHMALTZ’ showcased unique editions, amusing finds, objects that accompany artists in their studio, as well as artworks by over 50 artists. 
    A special edition of Luisa Gardini's photos. 

    (Above and four below) Views from ‘55 dates. Highlights of the MUMOK collection’, presenting 55 works with an exhibition design by (Portscapes artist) Hans Schabus.
    (Above and below) Also at MUMOK, "a photographic journey through Austrian history from 1918 to the present" was the focus of ‘Photo/Politics/Austria’ this time with exhibition design by Markus Schinwald.

     (Above and two below) Views from Asier Mendizábal's solo exhibition at Galerie Martin Janda.

     At the nearby Kunsthalle Wien, Vanessa Joan Müller and Nicolas Schafhausen curated ‘Antarctica. An Exhibition on Alienation’, showing works by Viltė Bražiūnaitė / Tomas Sinkevičius, Burak Delier, Buck Ellison, Isabella Fürnkäs, Eva Giolo, Thibaut Henz, Jan Hoeft, Hanne Lippard, Joanna Piotrowska, Jeroen de Rijke / Willem de Rooij, Jana Schulz, Andrzej Steinbach, Ingel Vaikla, Peter Wächtler, Ian Wallace and Tobias Zielony. ˝The exhibition explores how the term “alienation” functions in our world today. In doing so, it also addresses the following question: What other forms of relationship to the self and to the world do we need? Before we can even begin to create something like a space supportive of self-determination and self-realization?" (from the venue website)

     One of the nine studio visits at Prater Ateliers. Here with Christian Kosmas Mayer. 
    Studio visit with Judith Fegerl at Prater Ateliers.

     Tour by curator Moritz Stipsicz of Tomás Saraceno's intervention in the baroque Karlskirche in Karlsplatz. 
     Views of Karlsplatz and Vienna skyline from the cupola.

     (Above and three below) Ed Ruscha's ‘Double Americanisms’ at Secession
    (Above) Detail from Philipp Timischl's ‘Artworks For All Age Groups’ in the downstairs galleries of Secession.
    (Above) View of Kris Lemsalu's ‘Keys Open Doors’ in the upper Secession gallery.

    On November 22, we took off to Amsterdam taking advantage of the Amsterdam Art Week events which included the Rijksakademie open, the opening of two exhibitions at Stedelijk Museum (a solo show by Raquel van Haver and the biannual group exhibition presenting Amsterdam’s Municipal Art Acquisitions, ‘Freedom of Movement’). We also visited De Appel, kunstverein, Rongwrong, a few galleries that opened jointly.


    (Above and below) De Appel exhibited Ben Russel's film ‘Good luck’ (2017) premiered during documenta 13. ‘Accompanying the installation, the artist created a sculptural analogue to process and portraiture, Good Luck (Echo) that turns a sheet of copper into a resonant, speaking subject.’ (from the venue website)


     Mr Peanut exhibition at kunstverein Amsterdam, gathering material from Vincent Trasov who became Mr. Peanut in 1971. In 1974 he ran for mayor of Vancouver. ‘The exhibition traces the history of Trasov’s revolutionary alias and includes historical documents, publications, correspondence, video footage as well as more recent drawings of Mr. Peanut and paintings by Vincent Trasov. A major retrospective on Image Bank will follow in the summer of 2019 at Kunst-Werke in Berlin.’


     (Above and below) Works by Cees Mogami de Haas.

     (Above and below) Works by Riet Wijnen.

     (Above and below) Works by Marieke Zwart.

     (Above and below) Works by Morgan Courtois.

      (Above and below) Works by Marina Xenofontos.

     (Above and below) Works by Mire Lee.

      (Above and below) Works by Omar A. Chowdhury.

     (Above and below) Works by Maurice van Es.

      (Above and below) Works by Isabelle Andriessen.


      (Above and below) Works by Omar Vega Macotela.

       (Above and below) A film by Tyna Adebowale.

     (Above and below) Works by Josse Pyl. 

      (Above and below) Works by Gaëlle Choisne.

      (Above and below) Works by Dan Zhu.

      (Above and below) Works by Danielle Dean.

     (Above and below) Works by Polina Kani.

      (Above and below) Works by Femke Herregraven.

      (Above and below) Works by Kévin Bray.

      (Above and below) Library display initiated by Anna Dasovic. 

    (Above) Exhibition by Paul Kooiker at the tegenboschvanvreden gallery.

     Gabriel Lester exhibition at Fons Welters, Amsterdam. 

     Lara Almarcegui's video at Ellen de Bruijne. 
     Rory Pilgrim exhibition at andriesse eyck.

     Talk with Janet Cardiff at Oude Kerk. Below her work, with Georges Bures Miller, an intervened mellotron ‘The Instrument of Troubled Dreams˝ (2018), with 72 keys each of them programmed with a sound effect, a vocal track or a musical fragment.


    (Above and four below) Stedelijk Collection in the basement of the museum. 

     (Above and two below) Metahaven exhibition at the Stedelijk Museum.

    Merlin Carpenter exhibition at Rongwrong.


    RELATED CONTENT:




    November 29, 2018, 5–8pm: Performance reenactment of "IL LINGUAGGIO DEL CORPO. Pròleg" (2015-16) by Joan Morey


    Event: Reenactment of "IL LINGUAGGIO DEL CORPO. Pròleg" (2015–16) by Joan MoreyDate and timeNovember 29, 2018, 5–8pm
    Interpreter: Catalina Carrasco and Gaspar Morey
    Location: Third floor, Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats.


    The reenactment is part of the live programme of six performances reactivated within Joan Morey's exhibition survey ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring Machine, Working Machine’ at the Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats (on view until January 13, 2019).


    Each of the performances of the programme is extracted from their original context as studies or scenes from earlier projects and given an independent life. These live-action fragments encompass ritualistic exercises following the artist’s rules, tableaux vivants, and dramatic orations based on texts by the artist or by playwrights such as Samuel Beckett. Whenever possible the performances maintain their original interpreters, yet inevitably they are reinforced or degraded through their repetition, adding another layer to the artist’s exploration of control.

    Access to all performances is unrestricted.


    Third floor of the Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats. Photo: Eva Carasol.


    Preparatory study of the project THE LANGUAGE OF THE BODY (2015), in which the human body is considered as an ambiguous channel of communication. It is a tableau vivant that bridges Greco-Roman sculpture and minimalist dance, following dancer and choreographer Yvonne Rainer’s No Manifesto (1965), a set of rules that pare down dance to its essential elements. A nude male dancer adopts a dynamic, sinuous pose from classical statuary, described by the term contrapposto [counterpoise], while adhering to the apparently incompatible decrees from No Manifesto, which requires embodying a “No to spectacle... No to style. No to camp”. At the same time, a female choreographer dressed in black repeatedly reads a transcription of a radio broadcast entitled The utopian body given in 1966 by the French philosopher Michel Foucault. Foucault notes that the ancient Greeks had no real word for body except to designate a corpse, and he draws on a first-person account of sensory experience to suggest that the body has its special “placeless places” that are even more potent than all the myths about trapped souls.

    COLLAPSE. Desiring Machine, Working Machine’ is the first chapter of a three-part project curated by Latitudes. The second part of COLLAPSE will take place at the Centre d’Art Tecla Sala, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat from November 23, 2018 (and on view until January 13, 2019). Titled ‘Schizophrenic Machine’, the third comprises a major new performance event which will take place on January 10, 2019, at an especially resonant – yet, for the moment, deliberately undisclosed – location in Barcelona.

    Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats
    c/ Sant Adrià, 20 
    08030 Barcelona
    centredart.bcn.cat

    RELATED CONTENT:
    • November 15, 2018, 7 pm: Performance reenactment of "BAREBACK. Fenomenología de la comunión" (2010) by Joan Morey 12 November 2018
    • October 25, 7pm: Performance reenactment of "GRITOS Y SUSURROS" (2009) by Joan Morey 22 October 2018
    • October 11, 2018, 7pm: Performance reenactment of ‘LLETANIA APÒRIMA’ [APORIC LITANY] (2009) by Joan Morey 8 October 2018
    • Performance programme in the context of Joan Morey's exhibition ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring Machine, Working Machine’ 24 September 2018
    • Maria Palau, "Contra l'abús de poder", El Punt Avui, p. 32, 23 Setembre 2018 (Catalan) 
    • Full performance programme 
    • Wakelet archive of social media content
    • NOTA DE PRENSA: ‘Joan Morey. COLAPSO’, diversos espacios, Barcelona, 20 septiembre 2018–13 enero 2019, 19 September 2018
    • Save the date: 19 September at 7pm, opening of the solo show by Joan Morey ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring machine, working machine’, Centre d'Art Contemporani Barcelona - Fabra i Coats, 3 September 2018




    November 15, 2018, 7 pm: Performance reenactment of "BAREBACK. Fenomenología de la comunión" (2010) by Joan Morey


    Event: Reenactment of "BAREBACK. Fenomenología de la comunión" (2010) by Joan Morey
    Date and time: November 15, 2018, 7 pm
    Interpreter: Manuel Segade

    Location: Third floor, Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats.

    The reenactment is part of the live programme of six performances reactivated within Joan Morey's exhibition survey ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring Machine, Working Machine’ at the Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats (on view until January 13, 2019).


    Each of the performances of the programme is extracted from their original context as studies or scenes from earlier projects and given an independent life. These live-action fragments encompass ritualistic exercises following the artist’s rules, tableaux vivants, and dramatic orations based on texts by the artist or by playwrights such as Samuel Beckett. Whenever possible the performances maintain their original interpreters, yet inevitably they are reinforced or degraded through their repetition, adding another layer to the artist’s exploration of control.

    Access to all performances is unrestricted.


    Third floor of the Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats. Photo: Eva Carasol.

    This reading was originally conceived as the closing performance of BAREBACK: Power and death (2010), which took place at the former chapel of La Casa de la Misericòrdia in Palma de Mallorca. The speaker, dressed in the clerical attire of a priest, delivers a personal and theoretical address, a form of self-reflective homily or sermon, accompanied by an image of a billboard showing an unmade double bed with the hollows left by two heads in the pillows. This image documents artist Félix González-Torres’s Untitled (1991), a public art project about private loss, a memorial to the artist’s partner who had recently died of an AIDS-related illness. 

    The text begins as a reflection on the experience of the act of lending authority to the voice and announces itself as a series of digressions around its ostensible topic: the practice of unprotected sex and the homosexual “barebacking” subculture, in which the risk of HIV infection is considered irrelevant or even desirable. The speech hinges on the elision of the words community—in particular, the gay community—and communion. While acknowledging the Christian ceremonial connotations of the latter, the text more abstractly deals with communion as the intimate union of feelings and bodies, and the compounding of the private, political, and philosophical spheres in the life and work of individuals such as Michel Foucault, Roland Barthes, and the speaker himself.

    COLLAPSE. Desiring Machine, Working Machine’ is the first chapter of a three-part project curated by Latitudes. The second part of COLLAPSE will take place at the Centre d’Art Tecla Sala, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat from November 23, 2018 (and on view until January 13, 2019). Titled ‘Schizophrenic Machine’, the third comprises a major new performance event which will take place on January 10, 2019, at an especially resonant – yet, for the moment, deliberately undisclosed – location in Barcelona.

    Share: #JoanMoreyColapso

    Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coatsc/ Sant Adrià, 20 
    08030 Barcelona
    centredart.bcn.cat


    RELATED CONTENT:
    • Wakelet social media archive.
    • October 25, 7 pm: Performance reenactment of "GRITOS Y SUSURROS" (2009) by Joan Morey 22 October 2018
    • October 11, 2018, 7 pm: Performance reenactment of ‘LLETANIA APÒRIMA’ [APORIC LITANY] (2009) by Joan Morey 8 October 2018
    • Performance programme in the context of Joan Morey's exhibition ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring Machine, Working Machine’ 24 September 2018
    • Maria Palau, "Contra l'abús de poder", El Punt Avui, p. 32, 23 Setembre 2018 (Catalan)
    • Full performance programme 
    • Wakelet archive of social media content
    • NOTA DE PRENSA: ‘Joan Morey. COLAPSO’, diversos espacios, Barcelona, 20 septiembre 2018–13 enero 2019, 19 September 2018
    • Save the date: 19 September at 7pm, opening of the solo show by Joan Morey ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring machine, working machine’, Centre d'Art Contemporani Barcelona - Fabra i Coats, 3 September 2018




    Cover Story—November 2018: "Joan Morey—postmortem judgement reenactment"

    Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org

    The November 2018 Monthly Cover Story "Joan Morey—postmortem judgement reenactment" is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org


    "Joan Morey’s COLLAPSE is a three-part project curated by Latitudes. Six one-off performances are integral to the first, a survey exhibition at the Fabra i Coats. Centre d'Art Contemporani. Comprising reenactments of scenes excerpted from a selection of Morey’s projects from the last fifteen years exploring the use and misuse of control, these live-action fragments encompass dramatic orations, tableaux vivants, and ritualistic exercises following the artist’s rules."

    —> Continue reading
    —> After November it will be archived here.

    Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.


    RELATED CONTENT:
    • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
    • Cover Story–October 2018: "I can’t take my eyes off you: Eulàlia Rovira and Adrian Schindler" 1 October 2018
    • Cover Story–September 2018: Harald Szeemann’s travel sculpture, 10 September 2018
    • Cover Story–August 2018: Askeaton Joyride, 2 August 2018
    • Cover Story–July 2018: No Burgers for Sale 2 July 2018
    • Save the date: 13 September, 6–9pm. Latitudes-curated exhibition ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’, Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna, 21 June 2018
    • Cover Story—June 2018: Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group, 4 June 2018
    • Cover Story – May 2018: Shadowing Roman Ondák, 7 May 2018 




    "Barcelona / Such a beautiful horizon: Critical social infrastructure to promote art scene health resilience" sessions with BAR Tool 2018–19 participants

    Poster produced for the 2015 seminar at the Kadist Art Foundation, San Francisco. Photo: Latitudes.

    Latitudes has been invited to lead three closed-door sessions with BAR Tool's 2018–19 participants Milagros Bedoya, Arash Fayez, Adëláide Feriot, Fran Glez, Céline Mathieu, Marina Salvo, Gabriella Torres-Ferrer. The sessions will take place on October 29, 2018; January 22 and March 5, 2019.

    Titled "Barcelona / Such a beautiful horizon: Critical social infrastructure to promote art scene health resilience", the three-part seminar will draw on the qualitative analysis of the legacy of three meetings of the "Near Future Artworlds Curatorial Foresight Disruption Group" convened in 2015 (Vessel–MADA International Curatorial Retreat, Bari, Italy; Kadist Art Foundation, San Francisco, USA; Eastside Projects, Birmingham, UK). The invitation is to collectively instigate a collective systematic review of proposed decisive factors that underpin the psychological fitness and physical well-being of a city art scene, with Barcelona as a case study.

    With a focus on developing taxonomies and diagnostics, as well as therapies and triage, this strand of BAR Tool will culminate in a series of institutional simulations and operations. Viva! Barcelona! Such a beautiful horizon!

    BAR TOOL is a practice-based training program articulated around research, production and presentation processes. Conceived by BAR project in collaboration with Fundació Antoni Tàpies and Fabra i Coats – Art Factory, Barcelona.


    RELATED CONTENT:

    • Cover Story—June 2018: Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group 4 June 2018
    • Sediments of the Geologic Time 4-week residency at the Banff Centre for Arts & Creativity 10 October 2017
    • Documentation of Latitudes' talks at the Athens Biennale summit and Tabakalera, Donostia-San Sebastián, November 2015 19 February 2016
    • 'Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group' seminar convenes in its third iteration in Birmingham's Eastside Projects, 15 November 2015 11 November 2015
    • Session with first-year participants of the MA Curatorial Practice at the California College of the Arts (CCA), San Francisco, 8 September 15 September 2015
    • Guest Faculty of the Thematic Residency 'Blueprint for Happiness' at The Banff Centre, Canada, 27 July–8 August 2015 16 July 2015 
    • Tutors of the 2015 International Curatorial Retreat, 9–13 May, Bari (Italy) 17 May 2015 
    • Lead Facilitators, Curating Lab 2014–Curatorial Intensive, National University of Singapore (11–14 June), symposium (14 June, 15–17h) and a field trip to Hong Kong (16–20 June) 30 May 2014




    Lawrence Weiner's THE CREST OF A WAVE tote bag in the Tate Archive and exhibited at The McManus Museum and Galleries, Dundee

    Limited edition tote bag designed by Lawrence Weiner in 2015. Photo: Latitudes.

    We're delighted to share that Latitudes' limited edition tote bag, exclusively designed by Lawrence Weiner to commemorate Latitudes' 10th anniversary in 2015, is now part of Tate Archive.


    Latitudes' donation is presented as part of Tate's "ARTIST ROOMS: Lawrence Weiner" exhibition, on view from November 2, 2018, at The McManus Museum and Galleries in Dundee, Scotland, until February 17, 2019.

    ARTIST ROOMS is a touring collection of over 1,600 works of modern and contemporary art. The collection is displayed in museums and galleries across the UK and is jointly owned by the National Galleries of Scotland and Tate.


    Photos: Latitudes.


    Weiner's tote silkscreening process. Photo: Print Workers.

    The Dundee presentation will include the limited edition tote bag and three sugar sachets with the striking typographic rendition of the statement "A CLOTH OF COTTON WRAPPED AROUND A HORSESHOE OF IRON TOSSED UPON THE CREST OF A WAVE" in Catalan, Spanish, and English, the latter first commissioned in 2008 as part of Weiner's solo exhibition at the Fundació Suñol, Barcelona.

    A booklet of the exhibition, the invitation card, and an audio rendition of the statement (the track can be listed to here) based on a track by Ned Sublette and The Persuasions are also featured in Dundee.

    (Above and below) Installation of Lawrence Weiner's "THE CREST OF A WAVE" at Fundació Suñol, Barcelona, October–November 2008. Photo: Latitudes.

    Weiner with his work at the Fundació Suñol. Photo: Jean-Pierre Moulis.

    One part of Lawrence Weiner's ‘THE CREST OF A WAVE’ project at the Fundació Suñol in 2008 consisted in an ephemeral sculpture distributed a few days prior to the exhibition opening. 300,000 7-gram sachets of sugar were printed and distributed throughout the most emblematic cafes around Barcelona. Photo: Latitudes.

    100,000 sugar sachets ready for distribution. Photo: Latitudes.

    Front and back of the 7-gram sugar sachet with Weiner's statement. 
    (Above and below) The last element of the project manifested as an intimate event realised by the sea during the opening week: an iron horseshoe was wrapped in a cotton cloth and was tossed upon a wave’s crest. Photos: Jean-Pierre Moulis.


    "Influential conceptual artist, Lawrence Weiner uses language as his medium. His text work takes many forms, but the core principle remains the same – his ideas should not be confined to the gallery but taken up by the viewer.

    Adopting this principle, The McManus has worked with the artist to present his texts in different forms. One cycle of wall texts will be presented in Scots – translated by distinguished author James Robertson. Texts, a selection of posters, drawings, artist books, and ephemera will also be installed within museum displays around the building – the text resonating alongside Dundee’s rich collections of natural history, archaeology, world cultures, industrial machinery and the spectacular architecture of The McManus itself." (text from Tate's website)


    Latitudes' full set of artists' totes were exhibited in 2015 at the Asia Art Archive in Hong Kong as part of Ingrid Chu's 15th-anniversary programme "15 Invitations | a short history of the art book bag". Photo: Asia Art Archive.

    RELATED CONTENT:




    October 25, 7pm: Performance reenactment of "GRITOS Y SUSURROS" (2009) by Joan Morey


    Event: Reenactment of "GRITOS Y SUSURROS. Conflicte dramàtic cinquè (amb l'obra d'art)" (2009) by Joan Morey
    Date and time: October 25, 2018, 7pm
    Interpreter: Carme Callol y Tatin Revenga
    Location: Third floor, Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats.


    The reenactment is part of the live programme of six performances reactivated within Joan Morey's exhibition survey ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring Machine, Working Machine’ at the Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats (on view until January 13, 2019).


    Each of the performances of the programme is extracted from their original context as studies or scenes from earlier projects and given an independent life. These live-action fragments encompass ritualistic exercises following the artist’s rules, tableaux vivants, and dramatic orations based on texts by the artist or by playwrights such as Samuel Beckett. Whenever possible the performances maintain their original interpreters, yet inevitably they are reinforced or degraded through their repetition, adding another layer to the artist’s exploration of control.

    Access to all performances is unrestricted.


    Third floor of the Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats. Photo: Eva Carasol.

    This dramatisation consists of a fragment of the last performance panel of the five that comprised CRIES & WHISPERS: Conversations with Radicals (2009). A female interpreter wears religious garments of a Catholic religious order and a black leather orthopedic boot with spurs. The artist directs the performer’s reading of a Catalan script based on excerpts from Éperons : Les styles de Nietzsche [Spurs: Nietzsche’s Styles] (1978), Jacques Derrida’s analysis of fellow philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche’s discordant conception of women in his work. The performer receives abrupt indications when the oration must be commenced or continued, and her body is summarily moved into various positions without warning, forcing the register of her voice and her delivery of the words to compensate differently each time. In the final position, the nun character is made captive, shrouded in a black sack, merely a detached head. 

    COLLAPSE. Desiring Machine, Working Machine’ is the first chapter of a three-part project curated by Latitudes. The second part of COLLAPSE will take place at the Centre d’Art Tecla Sala, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat from November 23, 2018 (and on view until January 13, 2019). Titled ‘Schizophrenic Machine’, the third comprises a major new performance event which will take place on January 10, 2019, at an especially resonant – yet, for the moment, deliberately undisclosed – location in Barcelona.


    Share: #JoanMoreyColapso

    Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats
    c/ Sant Adrià, 20
    08030 Barcelona
    centredart.bcn.cat


    RELATED CONTENT:
    • October 11, 2018, 7pm: Performance reenactment of ‘LLETANIA APÒRIMA’ [APORIC LITANY] (2009) by Joan Morey 8 October 2018
    • Performance programme in the context of Joan Morey's exhibition ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring Machine, Working Machine’ 24 September 2018
    • Maria Palau, "Contra l'abús de poder", El Punt Avui, p. 32, 23 Setembre 2018 (Catalan)
    • Full performance programme 
    • Wakelet archive of social media content
    • NOTA DE PRENSA: ‘Joan Morey. COLAPSO’, diversos espacios, Barcelona, 20 septiembre 2018–13 enero 2019, 19 September 2018
    • Save the date: 19 September at 7pm, opening of the solo show by Joan Morey ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring machine, working machine’, Centre d'Art Contemporani Barcelona - Fabra i Coats, 3 September 2018




    Liverpool Biennial 2018: "Beautiful world, where are you?" in photos



    The Liverpool Biennial 2018: Beautiful world, where are you? (14 July – 28 October 2018) presented the work of over 40 artists in locations across Liverpool including public spaces, civic buildings and the city’s leading art venues: Blackburne House, Bluecoat, FACT, Open Eye Gallery, Liverpool John Moores University’s Exhibition Research Lab, Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral, the Oratory, the Playhouse theatre, RIBA North – National Architecture Centre, St George’s Hall, Tate Liverpool, Victoria Gallery & Museum (University of Liverpool), public spaces and online.

    The 2018 edition was curated by Kitty Scott (Carol and Morton Rapp Curator, Modern and Contemporary Art at the Art Gallery of Ontario) and Sally Tallant (Director, Liverpool Biennial) with the Liverpool Biennial team.

    The following texts are from the Liverpool Biennial website. All photos by Latitudes.

    Above and below. Banu Cennetoğlu's "The List" on a 280-metre hoarding on Liverpool's Great George Street.

    Compiled and updated each year by UNITED for Intercultural Action, an anti-discrimination network of 550 organisations in 48 countries, "The List" traces information relating to the deaths of more than 34,000 refugees and migrants who have lost their lives within, or on the borders of Europe since 1993. Since 2007, in collaboration with art workers and institutions, Banu Cennetoğlu has facilitated up-to-date and translated versions of "The List"  using public spaces such as billboards, transport networks, and newspapers. An updated edition of The List is presented on Great George Street in Liverpool and can be accessed online at guardian.co.uk. Copies of "The List", which were distributed by The Guardian newspaper on World Refugee Day on 20 June, are also available at exhibition venues.

    Installed on a 280-metre hoarding on Liverpool's Great George Street, "The List" has been vandalised twice since the biennial opened in July. Cennetoğlu decided not to install it for a third time, leaving the ripped remains as a “reminder of the systematic violence exercised against people”. 


    Mathias Poledna at The Oratory.

    Screened within a specially designed structure, Mathias Poledna’s new film "Indifference" (2018) further advances his exploration of modernity’s visual imaginary. The work is set against the backdrop of early 20th-century European history, a period of traumatic modernisation and conflict.


    Suki Seokyeong Kang at Bluecoat

    Conceived as a visual translation of the Korean musical notation ‘Jeongganbo’, Land Sand Strand is a new multi-part installation by Suki Seokyeong Kang. The work transforms the exhibition space into a grid. Building on the concept of the hwamunseok – a traditional Korean woven mat, interpreted as the minimum space provided for each individual in society – it is activated by performers and the audience. The choreography, inspired by the Spring Oriole Dance and traditionally performed on the hwamunseok, is shared with visitors. The movements on the mat serve as the blueprint for the wider installation consisting of painting, sculpture and video.

    Brian Jungen at Tate Liverpool.

    Brian Jungen carves ‘feathers’ from the soles of Nike trainers to create a series of sculptures that resemble Cheyenne-style war bonnets. These headdresses, familiar from countless Westerns, address a long history of conflict and the lingering effects of colonisation. They signify the strength and pride of indigenous people today.

    Duane Linklater at Tate Liverpool.

    The sculptural works of Duane Linklater consider the notions of cultural loss, social amnesia and identity from the perspective of the indigenous peoples in Canada. Commenting on the economy of the fur trade, they suggest that animals, even in death, might retain their spirits or selfhood beyond the value they possess as commodities.






    Haegue Yang at Tate Liverpool.

    Haegue Yang presented her sculpture series "The Intermediates" (2015-ongoing) in Tate Liverpool's Wolfson Gallery. Made from artificial woven straw, The Intermediates allude to both traditional arts and crafts techniques and modern industrial production methods. Representing figures and sites from folk tales and ancient traditions, they question definitions of ‘paganism’. Yang’s environment for these works includes recordings of wildlife taken from the British Library’s sound collection, a wallpaper juxtaposing pagan traditions and modern history, and suspended ribbons that evoke folk traditions such as maypole dancing. Her multisensory, hybrid environments suggest fleeting connotations of time, place, figures and experiences that connect ‘folk’ traditions and contemporary culture.



     Not as part of the biennial programming, but this conversation coincided with our visit. 

    The White Pube's Zarina Muhammad and Gabrielle de la Puente were in conversation with Tate Liverpool's new director Helen Legg about their origins as "embodied art critics", their practice and the challenges art criticism presents today. 

    Aslan Gaisumov at St George’s Hall

    Tracing the struggles and turbulent histories of the Chechen people, Aslan Gaisumov’s most recent work Keicheyuhea (2017) follows the artist’s grandmother as she returns to her lost homeland in the mountainous scenery of the North Caucasus for the first time since the displacement of her family 73 years earlier. 

    Naeem Mohaiemen at the St George’s Hall.
      
    Screened in the courtroom at St George’s Hall is "Two Meetings and a Funeral" (2017), a three-channel film by Naeem Mohaiemen – currently nominated for the Turner Prize 2018. The work revisits the Cold War-era power struggles between the political coalitions of the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) and the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC). The project navigates alliances of convenience made during Bangladesh’s fight for UN recognition, as well as parallel decolonisation struggles in Palestine-Israel, the Portuguese colonies and South Africa.

    At the Victoria Gallery & Museum. Part of "Worlds within worlds" section. 

    Display of the Brendel Plant Models of World Museum anatomical models of plants, made for display and teaching purposes by the Berlin firm of R Brendel & Co in Germany around the turn of the 20th century.


    Francis Alÿs' paintings at the Victoria Gallery & Museum. 

    Francis Alÿs presents a selection of postcard-size paintings from the 1980s to today under the title Age Piece. Executed in the tradition of classic à plein air painting, these works allude to the condition of global tourism in the contemporary art scene. Many of the paintings were done while scouting new locations for future film projects, often in conflict zones such as Israel and Palestine, Afghanistan and Iraq.

    Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral Plateau.

    Five bench-like sculptures can be found on the plateau behind the Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral. For this new commission, Ryan Gander dissected a model of architect Frederick Gibberd’s modernist cathedral into a series of simple ‘building blocks’. The blocks were then reassembled into different configurations by schoolchildren from Liverpool: Jamie Clark, Phoebe Edwards, Tianna Mehta, Maisie Williams and Joshua Yates. The maquettes that Gander and the children created have been reproduced on a larger scale to produce this new public seating arrangement within the cathedral grounds. This presentation is part of a larger project, Time Moves Quickly.

     John James Audubon at the Central Library.

    One of the only 120 complete edition copies of The Birds of America by John James Audubon at the Central Library. The 19th-century book contains exquisite illustrations of a wide variety of birds of the United States.

    Paul Elliman's work at Exhibition Research Lab.

    Paul Elliman presents the "Vauxhall Astra 2020", the forthcoming and newest model of a car available since 1979 when General Motors launched the Vauxhall/Opel Astra, now the only car produced at Ellesmere Port. The Astra 2020 is offered as a constellation of raw materials, half-a-dozen boulders and rock-like lumps of the car’s constituent parts at original scale, made of steel (iron ore), glass, plastic, aluminum, rubber, and electrical components.


    Mohamed Bourouissa has created a garden working with local people, gardeners, school pupils, teachers and artists. The artist was inspired by a garden made by a patient of the psychoanalyst and writer Frantz Fanon at the Blida-Joinville Psychiatric Hospital in Blida, Algeria. Fanon’s patient created the garden as occupational therapy, reflecting the organisation of his mental space through its structure. Bourouissa researched and learned the patient’s approach to botany, architecture, and therapy in order to create a similar garden in Liverpool. The garden has been conceived as a space of ‘resilience’. Some of the plants are native to Algeria and others have healing effects. A film documenting the garden and its evolution is presented at FACT.


    Very close to Bourouissa's Resilience Garden is Assemble's ongoing project at Granby's Street.

    Assemble's ceramic workshop in Granby Street, "a manufacturer of architectural ceramics, based in Liverpool and established in 2015. The workshop is part of Assemble's ongoing involvement with the Granby Four Streets neighbourhood."

    Work by Taus Makhacheva at Blackburne House.

    Taus Makhacheva has created a ruin-like sculptural installation that serves as a spa, in collaboration with artist Alexander Kutovoi. The installation incorporates ASMR (Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response) techniques and video.


    RELATED CONTENT:
    • Report from Athens: "AGORA", 4th Athens Biennale 2013 4 November 2013
    • (Post 1/3) The 55th Venice Biennale: "The Encyclopedic Palace" in pictures and as seen by the critics, 1 June–24 November 2013 9 June 2013
    • (Part 2/3) "The Encyclopedic Palace", 55th Venice Biennale in tote bags 14 June 2013
    • (Post 3/3) The 55th Biennale di Venezia: National Pavilions and Collateral Events in pictures and as seen by the critics, 1 June–24 November 2013 17 June 2013
    • Manifesta 9, "The Deep of the Modern", Genk, Belgium, 2 June – 30 September 2012 in pictures and seen by the critics 12 June 2012
    • dOCUMENTA (13) in pictures & as seen by the critics, 9 June–16 September 2012 12 June 2012




    Mariana Cánepa Luna reviews Frieze week 2018 for art-agenda.com

    Advertising in Pimlico. Above and below photos by Latitudes.

    London Roundup
    Various locations, London
    October 12, 2018


    Just as Frieze Art Fair opened last Wednesday, Prime Minister Theresa May gave her keynote speech—and dared to dance again—at the Conservative Party Conference in Birmingham. She announced that freedom of movement would be terminated “once and for all” by limiting access to “highly skilled workers” (in short, migrants earning over 30,000 British pounds per year). Countless art professionals earn much less (including entry-level curatorial staff at Tate, and yours truly), as well as doubtless many of the myriad gallery and museum folks involved in the city-wide jamboree of Frieze week. How do we imagine London’s contemporary art ecology post-Brexit, a scene that has grown exponentially since Tate Modern’s opening in 2000 and the first Frieze Art Fair in 2003? The question of how the 2019 edition of the fair is going to be affected was the elephant in the tent. Most people I asked shrugged: negotiations are still ongoing, consequences are yet to be seen. “It’ll be fiiiiine,” a London museum director told me. “Maybe we’ll visit a smaller fair, like the first editions—remember those days?” opined a British gallerist friend working in New York. Although one could put this upbeat denial down to the cliché of dark British humor and the spirit of “muddling through,” I nevertheless left worried that something more troubling lay behind it.

    If Frieze might have triggered the relocation of many contemporary art galleries from the East to the West of the city, two recent institutional openings are enforcing a southern axis. The new Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art in New Cross, housed in a listed Victorian bathhouse refurbished by 2015 Turner Prize winners Assemble, kicked off with a sparkling survey show of Mika Rottenberg’s absurdist film installations offering grotesque parodies of current labor conditions. The second home of the South London Gallery at Peckham Road Fire Station, elegantly renovated by 6a architects, opened with “Knock Knock,” a group show about the uses of humor—from political satire to visual puns—in contemporary art. The addition of these spaces will surely benefit Gasworks, a short bus ride away in nearby Vauxhall, whose truly international program of residencies and exhibitions over the last two decades has been a vital antidote to the dangers of isolationism in the British art scene.


    —> Continue reading here.

    Text originally published in Art-agenda on October 12, 2018.



    Lucy Dodd at Sprüth Magers, London.

    Façade of the new Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art in New Cross.
    Detail of Mika Rottenberg's show at Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art in New Cross.
    Part of Tania Bruguera’s 2018 Hyundai Commission at Tate Modern. 
    Visitor's comments on the Turner Prize 2018 board.
    Installation from Atelier E.B's show at the Serpentine Sackler Galleries, London.
    Detail from Cayetano Ferrer's solo exhibition “Demaster” at Southard Reid, London.
    Martine Syms at Sadie Coles HQ, London. 
    Judith Kopf's "Flock of Sheep" (2017) at the South London Gallery.
    Cornelia Parker Transitional "Object" (PsychoBarn) at the Royal Academy.
     Johanna Unzueta at Proyectos Ultravioleta, Focus section, Frieze Art Fair.
     (Above + below) Sam Lewitt, "Core (the "Work")", BMW Open Work commission, Frieze Art Fair.
     Ian Law at RODEO, Frieze Art Fair.
    (Above and below) Oscar Humphries' "Sèvres and Japonism" at Frieze Masters, London. 

    (Above and below) Chris Burden at Gagosian, London.  

    Lawrence Abu Hamdan at Chisenhale, London.
    Daniel Silver at Frith Street Gallery, London.
    Kemang Wa Lahulere at Marian Goodman Gallery, London.
     Alicja Kwade's work in the "Space Shifters" exhibition, Hayward Gallery, London.
     (Above and below) Elmgreen and Dragset, "This is how we bite our tongue", Whitechapel, London.
    Amy Sillman at Camden Art Center, London.

    RELATED CONTENT: 




    October 11, 2018, 7pm: Performance reenactment of ‘LLETANIA APÒRIMA’ [APORIC LITANY] (2009) by Joan Morey

    Third floor of the Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats. Photo: Eva Carasol.

    Event: Reenactment of ‘LLETANIA APÒRIMA’ [APORIC LITANY] (2009) by Joan Morey

    Scheduled forOctober 11, 2018, 7pm
    Interpreter: Jordi Vall-lamora
    Location: Third floor, Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats.


    The reenactment is part of the live programme of six performances reactivated within Joan Morey's exhibition survey ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring Machine, Working Machine’ at the Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats (on view until January 13, 2019).


    Each of the performances of the programme is extracted from their original context as studies or scenes from earlier projects and given an independent life. These live-action fragments encompass ritualistic exercises following the artist’s rules, tableaux vivants, and dramatic orations based on texts by the artist or by playwrights such as Samuel Beckett. Whenever possible the performances maintain their original interpreters, yet inevitably they are reinforced or degraded through their repetition, adding another layer to the artist’s exploration of control.

    Access to all performances is unrestricted.


    APORIC LITANY’ was originally presented in 2009 as a pre-recorded spoken-word work in English (included in full in the audio programme of the present exhibition), and excerpts of it in Catalan were also read live as part of the final part of ‘CRIES & WHISPERS’ that same year. The second word in its title derives from aporia, a philosophical notion of dynamic uncertainty. In common use, the word litany has also come to signify a long list of failures, complaints, or disasters. The litany addressed to a deity conventionally takes the form of a series of set invocations recited by a priest, which alternate with the invariable responses of the congregation. Yet, here, the rhythmic and rhetorical expressions that have been scripted by the artist leave no semantic room for reply, and piety has been infused with profanity.

    This dramatized, repetitive oration—at moments marked by obedience, anguish, apostasy, regret, abuse, and provocation—is delivered in Catalan by an inscrutable priest-courtier character. Because the format of the litany has been folded in on itself (believers are neither being addressed nor obediently responding), the effect of the voice is more akin to a conflicted interior monologue that stutters and recurrently ties itself into the same knot of compulsions and desires.

    COLLAPSE. Desiring Machine, Working Machine’ is the first chapter of a three-part project curated by Latitudes. The second part of COLLAPSE will take place at the Centre d’Art Tecla Sala, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat from November 23, 2018 (and on view until January 13, 2019). Titled ‘Schizophrenic Machine’, the third comprises a major new performance event which will take place on January 10, 2019, at an especially resonant – yet, for the moment, deliberately undisclosed – location in Barcelona.

    RELATED CONTENT:
    • Performance programme in the context of Joan Morey's exhibition ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring Machine, Working Machine’ 24 September 2018
    • Maria Palau, "Contra l'abús de poder", El Punt Avui, p. 32, 23 Setembre 2018 (Catalan)
    • Full performance programme 
    • Wakelet archive of social media content
    • NOTA DE PRENSA: ‘Joan Morey. COLAPSO’, diversos espacios, Barcelona, 20 septiembre 2018–13 enero 2019, 19 September 2018
    • Save the date: 19 September at 7pm, opening of the solo show by Joan Morey ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring machine, working machine’, Centre d'Art Contemporani Barcelona - Fabra i Coats, 3 September 2018




    Cover Story—October 2018: "I can’t take my eyes off you: Eulàlia Rovira and Adrian Schindler"

    Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org

    The October 2018 Monthly Cover Story "I can’t take my eyes off you: Eulàlia Rovira and Adrian Schindler" is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org


    "Eulàlia Rovira and Adrian Schindler’s new performance, "One motif says to the other: I can’t take my eyes off you" took place on 14th September as part of the Latitudes-curated Cream cheese and pretty ribbons! at Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna, an exhibition that also features the talents of David Bestué, Sean Lynch, and Batia Suter. The exclamatory title of the exhibition (which continues until 13 October as part of the curated_by festival synthesises two of the satirist Karl Kraus’s similes for what, writing in 1910, he considered the cultural polarity of monotonous functionality on the one hand and frivolous adornment on the other. Kraus lampooned both the sobriety of Germanic culture and the good taste of Romance culture, yet judged an even greater taboo was to be found in Vienna’s dressing up of the former with the latter." 

    —> Continue reading
    —> After October it will be archived here.



    Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.


    RELATED CONTENT:

    • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
    • Performance “One motif says to the other: I can’t take my eyes off you” by Eulàlia Rovira and Adrian Schindler in the exhibition ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’, 17 September 2018
    • Cover Story–September 2018: Harald Szeemann’s travel sculpture, 10 September 2018
    • Cover Story–August 2018: Askeaton Joyride, 2 August 2018
    • Cover Story–July 2018: No Burgers for Sale 2 July 2018
    • Save the date: 13 September, 6–9pm. Latitudes-curated exhibition ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’, Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna, 21 June 2018
    • Cover Story—June 2018: Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group, 4 June 2018
    • Cover Story – May 2018: Shadowing Roman Ondák, 7 May 2018 




    Performance programme in the context of Joan Morey's exhibition ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring Machine, Working Machine’

    The third floor of the Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats. Photo: Eva Carasol.

    On September 27, 2018, a live programme of performances will begin as part of the exhibition survey by Joan Morey ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring Machine, Working Machine’ at the Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats.

    ‘POSTMORTEM. Pour en finir avec le jugement de dieu’ (2006-2007) will be the first of six the reenactments that will take place on the third floor of the exhibition

    Each of the six performances is extracted from their original context as studies or scenes from earlier projects and given an independent life. These live-action fragments encompass ritualistic exercises following the artist’s rules, tableaux vivants, and dramatic orations based on texts by the artist or by playwrights such as Samuel Beckett. Whenever possible the performances maintain their original interpreters, yet inevitably they are reinforced or degraded through their repetition, adding another layer to the artist’s exploration of control.

    Access to all performances is unrestricted.


    An extract from panel 7 of POSTMORTEM. A solo female performer wears a loudspeaker which plays excerpts from "To have done with the judgment of God" (1947) by Antonin Artaud, a radio play which here also serves as a form of a choreographic score. Made inert as an individual by the skin-tight garment that covers her entire body, the performer becomes a crawling and indeterminate body-thing that emits vocal expressions. She is literally burdened by a device that only amplifies Artaud’s constant evocation of the voice as a kind of excrement and his palpable obsession with the misery of existence.

    COLLAPSE. Desiring Machine, Working Machine’ is the first chapter of a three-part project curated by Latitudes. The second part of COLLAPSE will take place at the Centre d’Art Tecla Sala, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat from November 23, 2018 (on view until January 13, 2019). Titled ‘Schizophrenic Machine’, the third comprises a major new performance event which will take place on January 10, 2019, at an especially resonant – yet, for the moment, deliberately undisclosed – location in Barcelona.

    Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats
    c/ Sant Adrià, 20 
    08030 Barcelona
    centredart.bcn.cat


    RELATED CONTENT:




    Performance “One motif says to the other: I can’t take my eyes off you” by Eulàlia Rovira and Adrian Schindler in the exhibition ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’

    All photos: Latitudes.

    On September 14, Eulàlia Rovira and Adrian Schindler presented the performance ‘One motif says to the other: I can’t take my eyes off you’ in the context of the exhibition ‘Cream Cheese and Pretty Ribbons!’, curated by Latitudes at Galerie Martin Janda in Vienna.

    The new performance comprised a series of sartorial compositions, music clips, and readings from memory that were inspired by the belts, buckles, chains, harnesses, and tassels that appear on luxury silk scarf designs by brands such as Hermès, as well as the vogue for tattoos appropriating tribal patterns. A companion series of five photographic prints are derived from the intertwining designs of the latter textiles. 


    Rovira and Schindler also present another work in the exhibition. "The Feet Fixed to the Ground Betray no Impatience" (2016) features a camera-phone film based around a Barcelona park bench, as well as its sculptural reproduction. This model of street furniture is known as the ‘Romantic double’, and it inspires a narrative and a sequence of gestures that evoke the masterplans that opened up cramped European cities in the 19th-Century as well as ongoing impulses to organise public space and orchestrate the gaze. 

    Eulàlia Rovira & Adrian Schindler, born 1985 & 1989, live in Barcelona.


    The exhibition ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’ brings together works by David Bestué, Sean Lynch, Eulàlia Rovira & Adrian Schindler, and Batia Suter to reflect on the apparent dichotomy between the utilitarian versus the functional, and the artful, refined, decorative, adorned, of good taste. The artworks in the exhibition have managed to find a way to escape this apparent dichotomy in how they treat form and content, using wit and storytelling, and engaging with seemingly mundane things in a magical way.

    Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’ is part of the curated_by Vienna gallery festival inviting international curators. In 2018 the festival examines Vienna's systems and contradictions, life between the baroque and present times.

    + info

    Share:
    #CreamCheeseAndPrettyRibbons 
    #CuratedbyVienna 


    RELATED CONTENT:




    Cover Story–September 2018: Harald Szeemann’s travel sculpture

    Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org


    The September 2018 Monthly Cover Story "Harald Szeemann's travel sculpture" is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org

    "Summer vacations have a habit of turning into busman’s holidays in Latitudes' agenda. Undoubtedly the Swiss curator phenomenon Harald Szeemann (1933–2005) also often sensed or engineered, that trips for pleasure and travel for research and work would inevitably dovetail. Museum of Obsessions, a fascinating but flawed exhibition dedicated to his life and work has just closed at Kunsthalle Bern (it will tour to Kunsthalle Düsseldorf, Castello di Rivoli, and the Swiss Institute, New York)."

    —> Continue reading
    —> After September it will be archived here.

    Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.



    RELATED CONTENT:


    • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
    • 1 Diciembre, 20:30h: Latitudes introducirá el documental italiano "Harald Szeemann. Appunti sulla vita di un sognatore" (2016) 27 noviembre 2017
    • Cover Story–August 2018: Askeaton Joyride 2 August 2018
    • Cover Story–July 2018: No Burgers for Sale 2 July 2018
    • Cover Story—June 2018: Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group 4 June 2018
    • Cover Story – May 2018: "Shadowing Roman Ondák" 7 May 2018 
    • Cover Story – April 2018: "Cover Story—April 2018: Dates, 700 BC to the present: Michael Rakowitz" 3 April 2018
    • Cover Story – March 2018: "Armenia's ghost galleries" 6 March 2018
    • Cover Story – February 2018: Paradise, promises and perplexities 5 February 2018
    • Cover Story – January 2018: I'll be there for you, 2 January 2018




    Eighth episode of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Alejandra Aguado and Diego Bianchi from Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Episode 8 from Buenos Aires now online on http://incidents.kadist.org/


    In the eighth '
    Incidents (of Travel)' dispatch Móvil co-founder and curator Alejandra Aguado followed the itinerary devised by the artist Diego Bianchi around Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

    Their exploration took them from the self-regulated community Velatropa to the buzzing commercial area of Once, identifying human and non-human flows and interactions. This became an entry point for discussing Bianchi's interests in how, as consumers, we define a particular zeitgeist and appropriate trends that enable us to affirm our identities.

    Each of the 20 photographs is augmented by one or more extra assets – a brief commentary, a sound or a caption – accessed by clicking the words overlaying the images.








    'Incidents (of Travel)' explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter and an extended offline conversation between curator/s and artist/s. Online storytelling presents and documents curatorial fieldwork and a day conceived by an artist for a curator.

    Conceived by Latitudes in 2012 as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City (with five dispatches presented as part of an exhibition at Casa del Lago), 'Incidents of Travel' had sequels in 2013 in Hong Kong (online dispatches published via Twitter, Instagram, and Soundcloud) and San Francisco in 2015 (daily posts as part of Kadist's Instagram take over initiative #ArtistNotInTheStudioCuratorNotAtTheOffice).

    In 2016 Kadist and Latitudes partnered in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)' as part of Kadist Online Projects, publishing contributions from invited curators and artists working around the world.





    Earlier conversations have taken place in Hobart (Tasmania), Yerevan (Armenia), Terengganu (Malaysia), Lisbon (Portugal), Suzhou (China), Jinja (Uganda) and Chicago (US). 

    The first dispatch launched in April 2016 with an itinerary by curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – a day photographed by Nabiha Khan.





    The second dispatch came from Jinja in Uganda, where curator Moses Serubiri invited photographer Mohsen Taha to explore Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972.



    The third episode took place while curator Yu Ji and poet Xiao Kaiyu hiked on Dong Shan (East Mountain), 130 km west of Shanghai, on a peninsula stretching into Tai Hu lake near the city of Suzhou, China.

    The fourth dispatch came from Lisbon, where Galician curator Pedro de Llano visited key locations that marked the life and work of Luisa Cunha.



    The fifth episode took place in April 2016, when curator Simon Soon and artist chi too visited the Malaysian North Eastern state of Terengganu, where chi spent some time in 2013, surrounded by "men and women who work(ed) multiple jobs as a fishermen, house builders, boat builders, farmers, coconut pickers, food producers, and everything else that matters."


    The sixth episode narrates a walking itinerary conducted by curator Marianna Hovhannisyan with Vardan Kilichyan, Gohar Hosyan, and Anaida Verdyan in Yerevan, the capital of Armenia, documenting the transformed, disappeared, or permanently-closed art institutions in the city centre.



    The seventh episode comes from Hobart, capital of Tasmania. It is narrated by curator Camila Marambio, following an itinerary devised by artist Lucy Bleach. They spent the day "encircling the outer limits of human understanding by visiting the histories, both past, and present, of attempts to reach beyond our sensory capacities through governance, technology, and reverie", and ended the day cooking at Lucy's home sharing their mutual love for quinces.

    RELATED CONTENT:





    Save the date: 19 September at 7pm, opening of the solo show by Joan Morey ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring machine, working machine’, Centre d'Art Contemporani Barcelona - Fabra i Coats

    Joan Morey, ‘POSTMORTEM. Projet en sept tableaux’ (2006–2007). Courtesy of the artist. Documentation photography: Noemi Jariod.

    Since the late 1990s, Joan Morey (Mallorca, 1972) has produced an expansive body of live events, videos, installations, sound and graphic works, exploring the intersection of theatre, cinema, philosophy, sexuality and subjectivity. Most recently, in 2017 Morey was awarded the Ciutat de Barcelona Award for Visual Arts given by Barcelona City Council in recognition of excellence in creativity, research and artistic production.

    COLLAPSE encompasses three parts. The first, opening on September 19 at 7pm, will be presented over two floors of the Contemporary Art Centre of Barcelona - Fabra i Coats. ‘Desiring machine, working machine’ is a survey of ten major projects from the last fifteen years of the artist’s work and it will be on view until January 13, 2019.

    The second part will open on November 22 at 7:30pm at the Centre d’Art Tecla Sala, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat (also on view until January 13, 2019) and is the definitive version of the touring exhibition Social Body, the winning project of the third edition of the Video Production Prize launched by the Xarxa de Centres d’Arts Visuals de Catalunya, Arts Santa Mònica and LOOP Barcelona.

    Titled Schizophrenic machine, the third comprises a major new performance event which will take place on January 10, 2019, at an especially resonant – yet, for the moment, deliberately undisclosed – location in Barcelona, where live action will be integrated within the longer narrative of the site’s physical and discursive 
    past.

    Share: #JoanMoreyColapso

    Joan Morey, ‘IL LINGUAGGIO DEL CORPO’ (2015). Courtesy of the artist. 


    PERFORMANCE PROGRAMME

    27 September 2018, 7pm
    ‘POSTMORTEM. Pour en finir avec le jugement de Dieu [POSTMORTEM. To have done with the judgment of God], 2006–2007
    Interpreted by Sònia Gómez.

    11 October 2018, 7pm 

    LLETANÍA APÒRIMA [APORIC LITANY], 2009
    Interpreted by Jordi Vall-lamora.

    25 October 2018, 7pm

    GRITOS Y SUSURROS. Conflicte dramàtic cinquè (amb l’obra d’art) [CRIES & WHISPERS. Fifth Dramatic Conflict (with the Work of Art)], 2009
    Interpreted by Carme Callol and Tatin Revenga.

    15 November 2018, 7pm

    BAREBACK. Fenomenología de la comunión [BAREBACK. Phenomenology of Communion], 2010
    Interpreted by Manuel Segade.

    29 November 2018, 5pm

    IL LINGUAGGIO DEL CORPO. Prólogo [IL LINGUAGGIO DEL CORPONGUAGE. Prologue], 2015–2016
    Interpreted by Catalina Carrasco and Gaspar Morey.

    13 December 2018, 7pm

    TOUR DE FORCE. El cos utòpic [TOUR DE FORCE. The Utopian Body], 2017
    Interpreted by Eduard Escoffet.

    Centre d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats
    c/ Sant Adrià, 20
    08030 Barcelona
    centredart.bcn.cat

    Joan Morey, ‘COS SOCIAL. Lliçó d'anatomia’ (2017). Cortesía del artista. Foto documentación: Noemi Jariod.

    [ES]

    Desde finales de la década de 1990, Joan Morey (Mallorca, 1972) ha producido un amplio número de eventos en vivo, videos, instalaciones, sonido y obra gráfica, explorando la intersección del teatro, el cine, la filosofía, la sexualidad y la subjetividad. En 2017 Morey fue galardonado con el Premi Ciutat de Barcelona de Artes Visuales otorgado por el Ayuntamiento de Barcelona en reconocimiento a la excelencia en creatividad, investigación y producción artística.

    COLAPSO consta de tres partes. La primera se presenta en dos plantas del Centro de Arte Contemporáneo de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats: Máquina deseante, máquina de trabajo revisa diez proyectos del artista realizados en los últimos quince años.


    La segunda parte de COLAPSO inaugurará el 22 de noviembre a las 19:30h en el Centre d'Art Tecla Sala, en L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, y podrá visitarse entre el 23 de noviembre de 2018 y el 13 de enero de 2019Esta consiste en una presentación en evolución de la videoperformance COS SOCIAL. Lección de anatomía, que en 2017 contó para su producción con el Premio de Videocreación de la Xarxa de Centres d’Arts Visuals de Catalunya, Arts Santa Mònica, el Departamento de Cultura de la Generalitat de Catalunya y LOOP Barcelona.

    La tercera parte, que lleva por título Máquina esquizofrénica, consiste en una performance inédita que tendrá lugar el 10 de enero de 2019 en una localización de Barcelona muy relevante pero que, por el momento, se mantiene deliberadamente en secreto. La acción en vivo se integrará en la narrativa, más extensa, del pasado físico y discursivo de dicho espacio.

    Comparte: #JoanMoreyColapso


    Joan Morey, ‘TOUR DE FORCE’ (2017). Cortesía del artista. Foto documentación: Noemi Jariod.

    PROGRAMA DE PERFORMANCE

    27 septiembre 2018, 19 h
    ‘POSTMORTEM. Pour en finir avec le jugement de Dieu’, 2006–2007
    Intérprete: Sònia Gómez.

    11 octubre 2018, 19 h
    ‘LLETANÍA APÒRIMA’, 2009
    Intérprete: Jordi Vall-lamora.

    25 octubre 2018, 19 h
    ‘GRITOS Y SUSURROS. Conflicte dramàtic cinquè (amb l’obra d’art)’, 2009
    Intérpretes: Carme Callol y Tatin Revenga.

    15 noviembre 2018, 19 h
    ‘BAREBACK. Fenomenología de la comunión’, 2010
    Intérprete: Manuel Segade.

    29 noviembre 2018, 17 h
    ‘IL LINGUAGGIO DEL CORPO. Prólogo’, 2015–2016
    Intérpretes: Catalina Carrasco y Gaspar Morey.

    13 diciembre 2018, 19 h
    ‘TOUR DE FORCE. El cos utòpic’, 2017
    Intérprete: Eduard Escoffet.

    Centre d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats
    c/ Sant Adrià, 20
    08030 Barcelona
    centredart.bcn.cat



    RELATED CONTENT:




    Latitudes' "out of office": wrap up of the 2017–2018 season

    This is possibly our favourite post of the year. Not just because it means we’ll shortly be taking a deserved summer break. But also because it brings a sense of accomplishment to look back at what has happened during the last twelve months — to remember the many conversations we’ve had, the places we’ve been privileged to visit and to refresh all those ideas and plans we intended to move forward. Onwards!

    September 11—October 6, 2017
    : Lead Faculty of the month-long "Geologic Time" residency at The Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity in Alberta, Canada.


    In this blog post, we shared some lithic impressions of the four weeks we spent leading a programme in Alberta's Rocky Mountains.

    One of the epic moments of the month: hike to Stanley Glacier.
    At the base of Mount Stanley, we found 505-million-year-old Burgess Shale trilobites, soft-body fossils from the Eldon formation.
    Snow surprised us on our final week in Banff.
    Welcome coffee with third week Guest faculty Sean Lynch.
    A fun evening at High Rollers bowling alley in Banff town.

    The closing event of "Geologic Time" was conceived as a two-hour infiltration into the pages, shelves, and display possibilities of The Banff Centre library. Featuring storytelling, documentation, annotation, sculpture, video, conversation and other live situations, the event presented some sediments of the ten participants’ ongoing research and geological collaborations. Pdf of the event programme.

    Posters communicating some of the seminars and excursions programmed during the four weeks. Design/Photos: Latitudes.
    Intervention by Semâ Bekirovic, based in Amsterdam. Bekirovic employed a number of external hard drives to act as pedestals for small stones. How many terabytes can a hunk of rock hold? What fragments of data detritus, chunks and grains of documents, broken off images, or weathered files, might be read and written, stored or retrieved?

    Intervention by Caitlin Chaisson based in Vancouver. Chaisson has been researching a former experimental farm station in Agassiz, British Columbia, and a forgotten centennial time capsule buried under a granite marker there. Caitlin also presented a cut-and-paste station on the table next to the photocopier, and a display for the tall vitrine just behind it.

    Intervention by Caroline Loewen, based in Calgary. Caroline delves deep into the story of sandstone in Alberta, a rock that gained widespread favour for building and decorative use following Calgary’s Great Fire of 1886. The black-and-brown Rundle Rock that was once quarried at the base of Banff-Centre-neighbour Mount Rundle and was used extensively in creating the Banff Springs Hotel also joins a conversation that anticipates an exhibition scheduled for next summer at Lougheed House in Calgary.
    Intervention by Justy Phillips & Margaret Woodward (A Published Event) based in Hobart. Described by the Hobart-based duo as “an accumulative event of mineralogical, metaphysical and metallurgical telling”, the books that have come into the world to date have been incorporated into the library’s holdings alongside a glossary and can be found in the geology section upstairs.

    An audio narration drafted by Penelope Smart was also heard on the upper floor, near the “memoirs and narrative” section. Here, an image of the exquisite marble bust by Giovanni Strazza animated Penny’s writing during the last weeks. It came to St.John’s, Newfoundland, in 1856. Ring the bell to the right of the main door of the Presentation Convent adjoining the Basilica in St.John’s and maybe one of the sisters will let you see it.

    Remnants of the 2-hour event.

    For the final event on October 5th, participants Becky Forsythe and Camila Sposati decided to collaborate through a performance using the library photocopier on the main floor. ‘"Receding Agate" and "Receding Rhodochrosite" was a collection of pages produced during a procedural artwork that slowly and methodically extracted copies of Agate and Rhodochrosite from Roger Caillois' "The Writing of Stones". Each page is a copy of the last, so text begins to harden into pebble-like shapes, and images begin to simplify as darker forms in an experiment of accumulation and sedimentation.’


    Far Afield, the artistic-curatorial initiative led by the also participant Caitlin Chaisson, hand-bound the resulting two-part publication for Far Afield's library, a platform for "collecting and sharing publications that support experimental art practices".

          Photos by Far Afield's library.

    27 October 2017: Cabaret at the Capella space, a public programme organised by the Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona in the context of their Joan Brossa exhibition. The Capella space was decorated with fragments of Antoni Hervàs "El Misterio de Caviria" scenography, presented only a year earlier at the other La Capella space as part of the 2016 BCN Producció season. The project was mentored by Latitudes. Following Hervàs’s interests in Barcelona’s dwindling cabaret scene, he invited Gilda Love and castanets master Juan de la Cruz "el Rosillo" (who sadly passed away a few months after) to interpret a moving repertoire of popular Spanish copla, against the backdrop of parts of his scenography. 



    Gilda Love and castanets master Juan de la Cruz "el Rosillo". Photos by Dani Cantó/MACBA.

    5 November 2017: The 1878 painting by Alfred Roll "The Old Quarryman" is exchanged with Alfred Smith's "The Grave Docks" (1884) in the Latitudes-curated exhibition "4.543 billion" at the CAPC musée. The show remains on view another two more months, until January 7, 2018.

    Photo: Lysian Gauthier © Musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux.

    Photo: Alice Cavender.

    (Unframed) Alfred Smith's (Bordeaux, 1854–Paris, 1936) “Le Quai de la Grave” [The Grave Docks] (1884). Collection of the Musée des Beaux-Arts, Bordeaux.

    15 November 2017: Study day at CAPC musée "The Return of the Earth. Ecologising Art History in the Anthropocene." With a keynote by science historian Jean-Baptiste Fressoz, and a conversation between artists Xavier Ribas and Ângela Ferreira—the latter both featured in the exhibition—the event convened by '4.543 billion'-curators Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna, saw art practice and historical research intertwining with environmental and geological narratives, and vice versa.

    (Top) Left to right: Max Andrews, Xavier Ribas, Jean-Baptiste Fressoz and Ângela Ferreira during the debate. (Below) Ângela discussing her work in the exhibition. Photos (Above and below): Latitudes.

    22 November 2017: Launch of Anna Moreno's "The Drowned Giant" publication at the Col·legi d'Arquitectes de Catalunya alongside architect and researcher Lluis A. Casanovas. Moreno's project is part of the BCN Producció 2017–18 programme of which Latitudes' is a jury member and mentor. 

    Video of the presentation (in Catalan).

    Photos (this and following): Pep Herrero / La Capella—Barcelona Producció 2017.
    (Above) Photo: Anna Moreno.

    Earlier that week we spent two intense mornings unpacking, hand spraying, numbering, inserting poster and booklet and re-packaging the limited edition of 300 vinyl records in the former Escola Massana, nearby La Capella. 

    A short video on the project was screened on betevé tv (in Catalan, starting 04:24min).


    Photos (Above and below): Latitudes.




    1 December 2017: Latitudes introduces the documentary "Harald Szeemann. The Life of a Dreamer" premiered at Cinemes Girona as part of the first edition of Dart Festival 2017, the Festival of Documentary Cinema on Contemporary Art.


    Photo: Latitudes.

    9 December 2017: Mariana of Latitudes led the first "Parlem" [Let's talk] guided tour around the exhibition "Rosemarie Castoro. Focus at infinity", curated by Tanya Barson, MACBA's Chief Curator, a free event repeated on March 10 and March 31st.

    Photo: Latitudes.

    December 2017: Transition from Storify to Wakelet to archive all the social media stories related to Latitudes' projects.
    Latitudes' Wakelet profile.

    20 December 2017: Max Andrews of Latitudes (and Contributing Editor of frieze magazine) looks back at 2017 from Barcelona and beyond, at some art highlights from a tumultuous 2017, including Amie Siegel, Pierre Huyghe, Lúa Coderch, Francesc Torres, Adrià Julià, Jordi Mitjà, Eulàlia Rovira & Adrian Schindler, Joan Morey, and Claudia Pagès. 

    2017 from Barcelona and beyond.

    23 January 2018: Opening of the exhibition "Artengo2000" by Magda Vaz and Camille Orny at the sala petita of La Capella. This is the third and final Barcelona Producció project mentored by Latitudes.


    (Above and below) View from "Artengo2000", an exhibition by Camille Orny and Magda Vaz at the Sala Petita in La Capella. Photo: Pep Herrero / La Capella.


    23 January 2018: The online platform arteinformado.com publishes three artist recommendations by five Spanish-based curators. Mariana Cánepa of Latitudes selected Gerard Ortín, Martín Llavaneras and Anna Moreno.

    25 January 2018: Print proofs of the forthcoming John Kørner's monograph published by Roulette Russe with texts by Oliver Basciano, Marie Nipper and Max Andrews' of Latitudes, published on the occasion of his recent mid-career retrospective "Altid Mange Problemer" at Kunsthal Charlottenborg in Copenhagen (17 June–13 August 2017).



    2 February 2018: Roulette Russe publish an image of John Kørner's book hot off the press.




















    9–10 February 2018: Trip to Montpellier to attend the opening of "Crash Test" at La Panacée/Centre d'art Contemporain MoCo.

    16 February 2018: Max Andrews of Latitudes wrote a review of the show for frieze magazine published online and in the printed issue in April.

    Installation piece by Alice Channer.
    Work by Agnieszka Kurant (foreground) and Aude Pariset (background).

    Detail of a vitrine piece by Bianca Bondi.
    15 February 2018: Award ceremony of the 2017 Premis Ciutat de Barcelona, of which Mariana was a jury member in the Visual Arts category. Joan Morey was the awarded visual artist.

    20–23 February 2018: Trip to ARCOmadrid fair, below some social media posts.





    Photo: Roberto Ruiz.

    Lola Lasurt presented ‘Donació’ (Donation) in the Galeria Joan Prats booth, a body of work produced for the ‘Composiciones’ commissioning series Latitudes curated for the Barcelona Gallery Weekend 2016. Lasurt was also exhibiting as part of La Casa Encendida's "Generación 2018".

    22 February 2018: Max Andrews' review of Lúa Coderch's solo show "The girl with no door on her mouth" at àngels barcelona, is published online. The text is also be included in the printed issue in April. 
    Review of Lúa Coderch's solo show "The girl with no door on her mouth" at àngels barcelona.

    26 February 2018: After nearly two years in development, the sixth ‘Incidents (of Travel)dispatch from Yerevan, Armenia, is finally live! 

    In her day-long tour Yerevan-born, San Diego-based curator and researcher Marianna Hovhannisyan extended the invitation to Vardan Kilichyan, Gohar Hosyan, and Anaida Verdyan, three students from the studio college at the National Center of Aesthetics. The purpose was to document transformed, disappeared, or permanently-closed art institutions in the city centre. The shared inquiry was based on how knowledge transmission and generational exchanges in the Armenian contemporary art field could be approached—particularly in terms of exploring the fragmented histories of its institutional work. As they were putting together the touches on this online version of the offline day, the studio-college itself closed down permanently at the end of 2017.

    http://incidents.kadist.org/yerevan

    2 March 2018: Book launch of John Kørner's monograph in Copenhagen. Published by Roulette Russe with texts by Oliver Basciano, Marie Nipper and Max Andrews.


     (Above and below). Courtesy Roulette Russe. Photos by Finn Wergel Dahlgren.


    March 10 and 31, 2018: Second and third guided visits to Rosemarie Castoro's exhibition at MACBA led by Mariana Cánepa Luna of Latitudes.

    MACBA's Instagram story announcing the talk.

    March 20, 2018: Mariana Cánepa Luna of Latitudes reviews ‘Allora & Calzadilla’ at the Fundació Tàpies, Barcelona, for art-agenda."A piercing whistle punctuates the blaring of a trumpet. But in the columned central space of the Fundació Antoni Tàpies, the only visible instrument is a grand piano. For three days a week throughout the course of the exhibition, the instrument is played—and, one could say, worn—by a pianist who stands in a hole cut into its center."

    Mariana Cánepa Luna of Latitudes reviews ‘Allora & Calzadilla’ at the Fundació Tàpies, Barcelona, for art-agenda.

    The same day, we send the Spring newsletter to our contacts, in English and in Spanish.

    12—14 April 2018: Three performances by Les Brontë, Quim Pujol and Eliana Beltrán over three consecutive evenings at La Capella, part of the BCN Producció 2017–18 programme of which Latitudes' is a jury member and mentor.



    (Above and below) "Fine Cherry" performance by Les Brontë. Photos: Latitudes.
    "Verde Croma" by Quim Pujol. Photos: Latitudes.
    "Reading Room #3" by Eliana Beltrán. Photos: Latitudes.


    1 May 2018: Max Andrews' profile on Madrid-based artist Teresa Solar Abboud goes online on frieze website.



    28 April–4 May 2018: Trip to Berlin during the Gallery Weekend, and later to Cologne to visit Haegue Yang's mid-career retrospective ‘ETA 1994–2018’ at Museum Ludwig, and Ana Jotta's first solo exhibition in Germany at the Temporary Gallery. More on this blog post and on this Wakelet feed.





    23–29 May 2018: Trip to London to visit +35 exhibitions, friends, and family – highlights below, full photo report here. Short day trip to Oxford's Pitt Rivers Museum (a favourite of ours), the Natural History Museum and Modern Art Oxford. 

     (Above and below) Cinthia Marcelle's "The Family in Disorder" (2018) at Museum and Modern Art Oxford.
    (Above) The incredible main hall of the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford.
     (Above) The opening of Leonor Antunes's "a thousand realities from an original mark" at Marian Goodman.Polycarbonate and brass screens and rope sculptures. Each screen corresponds to the exact measurements of one of the glass panels in the Upper Lawn Pavilion in Wiltshire, built between 1959 and 1962 by the British architects Alison and Peter Smithson (1928-1993 and 1923-2003). 

     Fantastic assembly of Markus Lüperz's tent paintings at Michael Werner Gallery, which the artist painted at age 24 using distemper on canvas.
     Batia Suter's work at The Photographers' Galery. One of the nominees for the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2018, finally won by Luke Willis Thompson with his striking film "autoportrait".
       (Above) Antoni Hervàs studio at Gasworks during his 3-month residency.
       (Above) View of Trafalgar Square with Michael Rakowitz's "The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist" featuring on the Fourth Plinth commission.
    (Above) Peter Gabriel discussing his during the internet interspecies symposium "The Shape of a Circle in the Mind of a Fish" curated by Lucia Pietroiusti and Filipa Ramos for the Serpentine Gallery at the London Zoo.

    Things that make us very happy: when a friend travels half the world to find one of our publications (Amikejo catalogue by Mousse Publishing in 2011) in the library of TEORética in Costa Rica and shares a snapshot on Twitter. :-)

    28 June 2018: The seventh ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ dispatch from Hobart, Tasmania, goes live on http://incidents.kadist.org/ On this occasion, the offline conversation took place between curator Camila Marambio and artist Lucy Bleach. We're also working on the eighth destination: Buenos Aires.
    Throughout June–July 2018: Intense writing period in preparation of two forthcoming exhibitions: ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’ (Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna, opening on September 13 and, on view until October 14) and ‘COLLAPSE’, a solo exhibition by Joan Morey opening on September 19 over two floors of the Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats, with following chapters at the Centre d'Art Tecla Sala (23 November 2018–13 January 2019) and a new commission at a yet-undisclosed location (10 January 2019).


    18–29 July 2018: Two days in Dublin followed by a 10-day residency in Askeaton, as part of Askeaton Contemporary Art's (ACA) thirteenth annual event "Welcome to the neighbourhood". In 2018 ACA invited artists Matt Calderwood, Jonny Lyons, Ruth Clinton and Niamh Moriarty, alongside curators Gareth Bell-Jones (Flat Time House, London) and Latitudes. More on this post.

    Desmore castle undergoing restoration.
    Artists and POW workers after the tour.
    RUSAL Aughinish alumina plant from afar, this is the largest alumina refinery in Europe.
    Group trip to Lismore Castle upper garden in County Waterford.
    The gardens featured works by Franz West (above) and Rashid Johnson (below).

    The Grange Stone circle.

    During the residency, we learnt of the story of ‘the Pilgrim’, a merchant from Barcelona who arrived in Askeaton around 1767 and who lived out his life in the Franciscan friary, dying there in 1784. Digging further in the local library, we came across a 1984 article written by Tim Kelly in a back issue of the ABC News, Askeaton’s local publication of record. The story reveals a dramatic narrative bringing to life a cryptic inscription found in the cloister that reads “Beneath lies the Pilgrim’s body, who died January 17, 1784”. The tale involves an Italian, a Spaniard, and a morbid blood-hunt that links Barcelona with Askeaton and is read aloud by artist Carl Doran. 


    Matt Calderwood's boat ready to sail on the River Deel.
    Making of Jonny Lyons’ "Joyride" on the River Deel.
    "Welcome to the neighbourhood" Open day.


    August 2018: Aaaand we’re out of office! Kinda.

    Save the following dates:

    13 September, 6–9pm: Opening of ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’ at Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna. 


    14 September, 6pm: Performance “One motif says to the other: I can’t take my eyes off you” by Adrian Schindler and Eulàlia Rovira. Followed by the artist lecture: “A Blow by Blow Account of Stonecarving in Oxford” by Sean Lynch. Part of the exhibition ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’ at Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna.

    19 September, 19h: Opening of ‘Joan Morey. COLLAPSE’, Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats.




    RELATED CONTENT:





    Cover Story–August 2018: Askeaton Joyride

    Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org

    The August 2018 Monthly Cover Story "Askeaton Joyride" is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org


    "Strange and wonderful things happen in Askeaton—especially during each summer for the last thirteen years. Initiated by artists Michele Horrigan and Sean Lynch in 2006, the residency programme Welcome to the Neighbourhood hosts artists and curators in the midst of this small town community in County Limerick, Ireland, under the umbrella of Askeaton Contemporary Arts."

    —> Continue reading
    —> After August 2018 it will be archived here.

    Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.



    RELATED CONTENT:


    • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
    • Cover Story – July 2018: "No Burgers for Sale" 2 July 2018
    • Cover Story—June 2018: Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group 4 June 2018
    • Cover Story – May 2018: "Shadowing Roman Ondák" 7 May 2018 
    • Cover Story – April 2018: "Cover Story—April 2018: Dates, 700 BC to the present: Michael Rakowitz" 3 April 2018
    • Cover Story – March 2018: "Armenia's ghost galleries" 6 March 2018
    • Cover Story – February 2018: Paradise, promises and perplexities 5 February 2018
    • Cover Story – January 2018: I'll be there for you, 2 January 2018
    • Cover Story – December 2017: "Tabet's Tapline trajectory", 4 December 2017
    • Cover Story – November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
    • Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
    • Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
    • Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
    • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
    • Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
    • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
    • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
    • Cover Story – March 2017: Time travel with Jordan Wolfson 1 March 2017




    Residency: Askeaton Contemporary Arts, County Limerick, Ireland, 20–29 July 2018


    The annual residency programme ‘Welcome to the Neighbourhood’ curated by Askeaton Contemporary Art's director Michele Horrigan has situated Irish and international artists in the midst of Askeaton, a small town in County Limerick since its conception in 2006. Over one hundred artists projects have been realised in public spaces throughout the town, bringing forward layers of daily life and creating a rich framework for encounters.

    In its thirteenth year, the 2018 edition of ‘Welcome to the Neighbourhood’ invited artists Matt Calderwood, Jonny Lyons, Ruth Clinton and Niamh Moriartyand curators Gareth Bell-Jones (Flat Time House, London) and Latitudes

    The programme began on July 14 and wrapped up on July 28th with an Open Day where the artists-in-residence unveiled the works they had been produced.  

    Event programme.

    Latitudes arrived at Askeaton on the 20th, following a short stint in Dublin's The LAB Gallery where they participated in a closed-door seminar in the context of the exhibition ‘I Slept Like A Stone’ curated by Sheena Barrett and Julia Moustacchi.

    "Many public events have occurred during Welcome to the Neighbourhood, each introducing new perspectives to the role and purpose of contemporary art and knowledge production in the Limerick region. Public talks by Gareth Bell-Jones (Flat Time House, London), Latitudes, Patrick Comerford and Karin Dubsky (Coastwatch Europe) explored topics from contemporary curating practice to El Greco and marine ecology. Carl Doran’s ongoing collaborative work with Askeaton Castle’s conservation theme was showcased, while Anthony Sheehy led tours of Askeaton’s medieval heritage." [Text by Askeaton Contemporary Arts]


    Askeaton's square. Desmond Castle in the background. All photos: Latitudes.
    Artist and "Welcome to the neighbourhood" mastermind curator Michele Horrigan in the Desmond Castle.

    Artist Sean Lynch talking about the previous editions of "Welcome to the neighbourhood".
    Sunday BBQ with ACA family. Rory Prout (left) and 2018 "Welcome to the neighbourhood" artist Matt Calderwood (right).

    Local guide Anthony Sheehy has led tours around Askeaton since 1964.

    (Above and below) Visiting the RUSAL Aughinish alumina plant near Askeaton.

    Picnic site on our way to Lismore Castle.
    2018 "Welcome to the neighbourhood" artist Niamh Moriarty and ACA Assistant Curator, Jessica Kelly.
    (Above and below) Visiting Lismore castle’s impressive gardens.
    Detail of Stuart Whipps's work included in "The Expanded Field" exhibition co-curated by Lismore Castle Arts and Askeaton Contemporary Arts at the St Carthage Hall, Lismore, which also presents works by The Center for Land Use Interpretation, Olivia Plender, The Domestic Godless, Superfolk and Filip Van Dingenen.
    (Above and below) The Grange Stone circle, the largest stone circle in Ireland, was built by the Bronze Age people who lived around Lough Gur in 2100BC.
     Enchanting studio visit with local legend and stick-maker Seanie Barron.
    View of Desmond Castle from the top floor of the Civic Trust.
     Banqueting Hall next to Desmond Castle, also under restoration.
    Tour by the OPW workers restoring Desmond Castle.
    As we later learn, these two rectangular columns in Askeaton's Friary contained a much-hunted treasure. It became the spur for Latitudes' research in the links between Barcelona and Askeaton. To be continued...

    In "The Pilgrim", Latitudes reprised a 1984 article written by Tim Kelly in the back issues of The ABC News, Askeaton’s annual journal. Made available online and through social media platforms, an excerpt was heard at the Franciscan friary, of a dramatic narrative bringing to life a cryptic inscription found in the cloister there that reads "Beneath lies the Pilgrim's body, who died January 17, 1784". The story is read aloud by artist Carl Doran. The tale involves an Italian, a Spaniard, and a morbid blood-hunt that links Barcelona with Askeaton. 


    Cloister in the Franciscan friary.
    Ray Griffin's magic hands fabricating Matt Calderwood's boat.
    Matt's first rehearsal, testing the oars on the River Deel. 
    Ray and Matt carrying the boulder to the water.

    "London-based artist Matt Calderwood’s installation Erractic (Approximately 4.5 Tonnes) can be seen floating on the River Deel. With a healthy interest in what the artist describes as the “non-expert production of things”, Calderwood without any prior experience, guidance or clear blueprints, constructed his own boat, and vigorously rowed it up and down the Deel. On the Open Day, it is seen on the river with what appears to be an enormous rock inside it. The longer you look at this apparition, the more uncomfortable its appearance becomes as if the boat and stone were a tangential echo or parallel universe of the stone buildings and maritime traditions of the region. In addition, a series of large-scale prints detail a selection of Askeaton stones, some real, some not, seen in various locations throughout the town." [Text by Askeaton Contemporary Arts]

    Matt floatin’ out on the River Deel. He sails off accompanied by two show-dog Rottweilers (they are not part of the work!). 
    Matt Calderwood and rock on the River Deel in front of Askeaton's 14th Century Franciscan Friary
    (Making of) Jonny Lyons’s "Joyride" during the morning high tide at the River Deel. 

    "Glasgow-based artist Jonny Lyons debuts a new installation, Joyride, at Askeaton Community Hall. Impressed by the rhythm and assured style of card playing he encountered in Askeaton, his artwork was realised in collaboration with local card sharks William Sheehan, James and Antoinette Fitzgerald, and Noel McCarthy. Surreally they appeared unannounced early one morning at high tide in the middle of the River Deel, playing the trick-taking card game of forty-fives that originated in Ireland on a specially constructed pontoon." [Text by Askeaton Contemporary Arts]

    Players signing two joker cards.
    On Saturday 28 July, the Open Day, over 50 guests joined the tour which took of from Askeaton's Civic Trust.
    Matt Calderwood's boat made a new apparition upstream for the Open Day.
    Calderwood displayed some large prints at a former hair salon. Below Calderwood discussing his work in dialogue with Sean Lynch.
    Jonny Lyons new installation, Joyride, at Askeaton Community Hall. Featured in Latitudes' August 2018 Monthly Cover Story (after August it will be archived here).
    A paparazzi moment with the artist and the card players. Below Lyons' installation presents the table borrowed from Ranahan's pub on the pontoon, alongside a fresh Guinness pint, two signed joker cards and the 7 of hearts – the card that blew away during the making of.
     Ruth and Niamh reenact the small photograph on the upper left which can be found at Cagney’s Bar – featuring two local women aside a broken-hearted Kiefer Sutherland (here brought to life by artist Jonny Lyons). 

    “Dublin and Sligo-based artists Ruth Clinton and Niamh Moriarty are known for their intense sensitivity to microhistories and the local. In recent days they have uncovered the story of Hollywood star Kiefer Sutherland’s visit to Askeaton, soon after being dumped by Julia Roberts days before their planned wedding in 1990. A 24-year old Sutherland ended up in the west of Ireland where, in his own words, he was going to “try have a drink in every town I passed through.” Clinton and Moriarty’s artwork acts as a form of fan fiction, a stream of consciousness spread throughout the rooms of Cagney’s Bar and Ranahan’s Pub. A lino print and video accompany a photograph of Sutherland partying in Askeaton, while the artists will perform an intimate scripted theatrical performance in the snug of Ranahan’s at 3.15pm and 5pm respectively.” [Text by Askeaton Contemporary Arts]

    It's been grand!

    RELATED CONTENT:




    Cover Story–July 2018: No Burgers for Sale

    Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org


    The July 2018 Monthly Cover Story "No Burgers for Sale" is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org


    "In 1983, a Burger King opened on New York’s Governors Island, then a U.S. Coast Guard base. It was the first franchise to serve beer. After scoffing a Whopper combo, officers and enlisted men could enjoy a round of golf, play bingo, go to the movies, or throw balls at the adjacent bowling alley. In 1999, this Burger King featured in issue 615 of ‘The Amazing Spider-man’. After almost two centuries operating as a federal or military facility, the Island was vacated in 1996, and the Burger King shut up shop. The remnants were photographed in 2003 by Andrew Moore and Lisa Kereszi."

    No burgers were on sale though, just wooden pretzels!

    —> Continue reading

    —> Project photo documentation
    —> After July 2018 it will be archived here.

    Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.



    RELATED CONTENT:


    • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
    • Cover Story—June 2018: Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group 4 June 2018
    • Cover Story – May 2018: "Shadowing Roman Ondák" 7 May 2018 
    • Cover Story – April 2018: "Cover Story—April 2018: Dates, 700 BC to the present: Michael Rakowitz" 3 April 2018
    • Cover Story – March 2018: "Armenia's ghost galleries" 6 March 2018
    • Cover Story – February 2018: Paradise, promises and perplexities 5 February 2018
    • Cover Story – January 2018: I'll be there for you, 2 January 2018
    • Cover Story – December 2017: "Tabet's Tapline trajectory", 4 December 2017
    • Cover Story – November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
    • Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
    • Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
    • Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
    • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
    • Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
    • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
    • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
    • Cover Story – March 2017: Time travel with Jordan Wolfson 1 March 2017




    Seventh episode of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Camila Marambio and Lucy Bleach from Hobart, Tasmania

    http://incidents.kadist.org/hobart.html

    The seventh 'Incidents (of Travel)' dispatch comes from Hobart, capital of Tasmania. It is narrated by curator Camila Marambio, following an itinerary devised by artist Lucy Bleach. Lucy "shared her knowledge of volcanoes, lava, and magma leading (Camila) on a quest to relate local geochemical and geophysical conundrums to the expansive solar system." 

    They spent the day "encircling the outer limits of human understanding by visiting the histories, both past, and present, of attempts to reach beyond our sensory capacities through governance, technology, and reverie", and ended the day cooking at Lucy's home sharing their mutual love for quinces.

    Each of the 19 photographs is augmented by one or more extra assets – a brief commentary, soundscape or a caption – accessed by clicking the words which overlay the images
    .



    Originally conceived by Latitudes as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City in 2012 (with five dispatches presented as part of an exhibition at Casa del Lago) 'Incidents of Travel' had sequels in 2013 in Hong Kong (online dispatches published via twitter, Instagram, and Soundcloud) and San Francisco in 2015 (daily posts on Kadist's Instagram as part of their #ArtistNotInTheStudioCuratorNotAtTheOffice take over initiative).

    The project explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter and an extended conversation between curator/s and artist/s. Online storytelling presents and documents curatorial fieldwork and an offline day conceived by an artist for a curator.
    In 2016 Kadist and Latitudes partnered in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)' as part of Kadist Online Projects. This new phase is developed as an online periodical that publishes contributions from invited curators and artists working around the world.


    http://incidents.kadist.org/chicago

    A series of itineraries conceived by six curators, artists or researchers — previous fellows of the seminar The Place from Where We Look (Kadist Paris, June 2015) — launched in April 2016 with an itinerary by curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – a day photographed by Nabiha Khan


    http://incidents.kadist.org/jinja

    The second dispatch came from Jinja in Uganda, where curator Moses Serubiri invited photographer Mohsen Taha to explore Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972.


    http://incidents.kadist.org/suzhou

    The third episode took place while curator Yu Ji and poet Xiao Kaiyu hiked on Dong Shan (East Mountain), 130 km west of Shanghai, on a peninsula stretching into Tai Hu lake near the city of Suzhou, China
    http://incidents.kadist.org/lisbon

    The fourth dispatch came from Lisbon, where Galician curator Pedro de Llano visited key locations that marked the life and work of Luisa Cunha.
    http://incidents.kadist.org/terengganu

    The fifth episode took place in April 2016, when curator Simon Soon and artist chi too visited the Malaysian North Eastern state of Terengganu, where chi spent some time in 2013, surrounded by "men and women who work(ed) multiple jobs as a fishermen, house builders, boat builders, farmers, coconut pickers, food producers, and everything else that matters." 
    http://incidents.kadist.org/terengganu

    The sixth episode narrates a walking itinerary conducted by curator Marianna Hovhannisyan with Vardan Kilichyan, Gohar Hosyan, and Anaida Verdyan in Yerevan, the capital of Armenia, documenting the transformed, disappeared, or permanently-closed art institutions in the city centre.


    RELATED CONTENT:




    Save the date: 13 September, 6–9pm. Latitudes-curated exhibition ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’, Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna

    Sean Lynch, Still from “A Blow by Blow Account of Stonecarving in Oxford” (2013–14). Slide projection with voiceover (19’), stone carving, rubble, photographs, museum artefacts, printed matter. Courtesy of the artist.
    In his 1910 essay attacking the writing of Heinrich Heine "Heine und die Folgen” (Heine and the consequences), Viennese satirist Karl Kraus (1874–1936) identified two modes of what he called "intellectual vulgarity", an excess of content on the one hand and an excess of form on the other. "The one experiences only the material side of art", he writes, "It is of German origin. The other experiences even the rawest of materials artistically. It is of Romance origin." (In other words, French.) "To the one, art is an instrument; to the other, life is an ornament…”. 

    Kraus thought that what he saw as the specifically Viennese development of dressing up Germanic culture with decorative elements imported from Romance culture was a bullshit ornamentation of the utilitarian.


    Eulàlia Rovira and Adrian Schindler, ‘The Feet Fixed to the Ground Betray No Impatience’ (Els peus fixats al terra delatant cap impaciència) (2016), installation view at Fireplace, Barcelona. Courtesy the artists.

    Opening on September 13, 6–9pm, at Galerie Martin Janda in Vienna (and on view until October 14), the exhibition ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’ curated by Latitudes brings together works by David Bestué, Sean Lynch, Eulàlia Rovira & Adrian Schindler, and Batia Suter to reflect on the apparent dichotomy between the utilitarian versus the functional, and the artful, refined, decorative, adorned, of good taste. The artworks in the exhibition have managed to find a way to escape this apparent dichotomy in how they treat form and content, using wit and storytelling, and engaging with seemingly mundane things in a magical way.


    Given that Kraus conjures up a world of robust public debate, whether on the pages of newspapers or in the cafés, the exhibition space has been devised as a kind of uncanny street scene.  


    Façade of Galerie Martin Janda. Photo by Anna Konrath.

    Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’ is part of the curated_by Vienna gallery festival inviting international curators. In 2018 the festival examines Vienna itself, its systems and contradictions, life between the baroque and present times.

    + info

    #CreamCheeseAndPrettyRibbons 
    #CuratedbyVienna 



    RELATED CONTENT:




    Cover Story—June 2018: Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group

    Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org

    The June 2018 Monthly Cover Story "Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group" is now up on Latitudes' homepage.

    "Sporadically convened by Latitudes, the Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group is a forum for informal dialogue about megatrends and the future of contemporary art institutions.

    In order to be conducive to freedom of interaction, this by-invitation, closed-door meetings have been held under the Chatham House Rule. The list of attendees is not circulated beyond those participating in the meeting, and no documentation is made."


    —> Continue reading
    —> After June it will be archived here.

    Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.


    RELATED CONTENT:
    • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
    • Cover Story – May 2018: "Shadowing Roman Ondák" 7 May 2018 
    • Cover Story – April 2018: "Cover Story—April 2018: Dates, 700 BC to the present: Michael Rakowitz" 3 April 2018
    • Cover Story – March 2018: "Armenia's ghost galleries" 6 March 2018
    • Cover Story – February 2018: Paradise, promises and perplexities 5 February 2018
    • Cover Story – January 2018: I'll be there for you, 2 January 2018
    • Cover Story – December 2017: "Tabet's Tapline trajectory", 4 December 2017
    • Cover Story – November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
    • Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
    • Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
    • Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
    • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
    • Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
    • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017




    Photo report: Trip to London and Oxford


     (Above and four below) Cinthia Marcelle's "The Family in Disorder" (2018) at Museum and Modern Art Oxford.


    (Above and below) The magnificent main hall of the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford.

     An example of Micronesian currency – we're reminded of our extended conversation with Melbourne-based artist Nicholas Mangan published in his 2016 Sternberg Press publication "Limits to growth" (and also during Chisenhale's live conversation and while chasing Ancient Lights).


    (Above and below) These column capitals are the main reasons we visited Oxford. They were carved for the Oxford Museum of Natural History in 1859-60 by Irish brothers James and John O'Shea, along with their nephew Edward Whelan. Commissioned by John Ruskin, all the works were carved freestyle, without previous sketches, using only plant specimens from the botanical garden, and their sheer imagination, as references.

    They are the protagonists of Sean Lynch's 2013 piece "A Blow by Blow Account of Stonecarving in Oxford", which we have been discussing with Sean for a while and finally saw in 2015 in Bordeaux. We continued learning more about this piece and its making during our joint adventure in Banff's "Geologic Time" residency programme last Fall. 


     (Above) Apostolos Georgiou, "FROM MY HEART" at Rodeo Gallery.

     (Above and 3 below) Leonor Antunes's "a thousand realities from an original mark" at Marian Goodman.
     Polycarbonate and brass screens and rope sculptures. Each screen corresponds to the exact measurements of one of the glass panels in the Upper Lawn Pavilion in Wiltshire, built between 1959 and 1962 by the British architects Alison and Peter Smithson (1928-1993 and 1923-2003).


    (Above) Tacita Dean's "Landscape" exhibition premiered "Antigone", a new 1-hour long film and cloud paintings at The Royal Academy. Part 2 and 3 in the National Portrait Gallery (a retrospective of portrait films works) and at the National Gallery a two-room exhibition curated by the artist presents a selection of historical and contemporary still lives. 

     Fantastic assembly of square-format paintings by Markus Lüperz at Michael Werner Gallery, which the artist painted at age 24 using distemper on canvas.

     (Above and below) Batia Suter's work at The Photographers' Gallery. One of the nominees for the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2018.

    (Above) The 2018 awardee was Luke Willis Thompson with his striking film "Autoportrait" (also nominated for this year's Turner Prize).

     Nicolas Lamas (above and immediately below) and Petra Feriancová (two following) two-person show "Becoming animal" at Tenderpixel
    (Above) "Pregnant Landscape" by Phoebe Unwin at Amanda Wilkinson Gallery in SoHo.

     (Above and below) Wilhelm Sasnal at Sadie Coles.

      (Above and below) August Sander's "Men without masks" at Hauser & Wirth included an extensive selection of rare large-scale photographs made between 1910 and 1931. The photographs were printed in a unique oversize format for inclusion in an exhibition at the Mannheimer Kunstverein in 1973.
      (Above) Group exhibition curated by Gianni Jetzer at Hauser & Wirth. 


      (Above and detail below) Rose Wiley's "Lolita's House"three-floor solo show at David Zwirner.

      (Above and below) 1960s vinyl sculptures by South Korean Seung-taek Lee at White Cube (Mayfair). Works have been recreated for the exhibition using urethane vinyl to achieve greater durability whilst retaining a similar visual quality.

      (Above and below) Abigail Reynolds mid-career survey at Peer.

      (Above) Visiting Ian White and Sadie Benning (photographed) at Camden Art Center with Antoni Hervàs.


      (Above and 2 below) Last day to see Magali Reus solo show at South London Gallery. 

       (Above and two below) Osías Yanov's "Orphan Dance" at Gasworks.

       (Above and below) Antoni Hervàs studio at Gasworks, his 3-month residency is supported by Acción Cultural Española (AC/E)
       (Above and 2 below) Joan Jonas exhibition at Tate Modern.

       (Above) View of Trafalgar Square with Michael Rakowitz's "The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist" featuring on the Fourth Plinth commission.


    On the way to see Tacita Dean's-curated exhibition "STILL LIFE" at the National Gallery, a much-obliged stop in the room with Vermeer and Dutch still life. Jacob van Walscapelle (1644-1727) and Jan van Huysum (1682–1749) masters in flower painting.


    (Above) English singer-songwriter, record producer and humanitarian Peter Gabriel during the internet interspecies symposium "The Shape of a Circle in the Mind of a Fish" curated by Lucia Pietroiusti and Filipa Ramos for the Serpentine Gallery at the London Zoo.

    Not photographed but also visited: Chisenhale Gallery, Matt's Gallery, Spruth Magers, Blain Southern, Pilar Corrias, Frith Street Gallery (both locations), Hollybush Gardens, Josh Liley Gallery, Kate McGarry, Mother's Tankstation, Modern Art (unexpectedly closed when it should have been open!, and so was Project Native Informant – which had a broken lift so had to go up 3 flights of stairs). 

    RELATED CONTENT:




    Photo report: Trip to Berlin Gallery Weekend 2018 and Cologne

    (Above) Detail from the K, inaugural show dedicated to exploring the work of East German designer and exhibition-maker Klaus Wittkugel. K, A Year with P. Krishnamurthy on Ebersstrasse 3 (Schöneberg) is a workshop for exhibition-making led by designer, curator, writer and educator Prem Krishnamurthy, co-director of the multidisciplinary design Wkshps, which extends his previous exhibition space and ‘mom-and-pop’ P! based in New York between 2012-2017. The project is organised in collaboration with KW Institute for Contemporary Art. All photos: Latitudes.

     (Above and below) Claudia Comte's ‘When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth’ at König Galerie's St Agnes, Berlin. 

     (Above) ‘ARTHUR JAFA: A SERIES OF UTTERLY IMPROBABLE, YET EXTRAORDINARY RENDITIONS’ at the Julia Stoschek Collection

    (Above) Loris Gréaud at Max Hetzler.

     (Above and below) Lawrence Weiner and Manfred Pernice in the old/new venue of Konrad Fischer Galerie, Berlin. 

      (Above and below) Nevin Aladağ's ‘Mustrop’ exhibition at Wentrup, Berlin. 


    (Above) Andro Wekua at Spruth Magers. The gallery concurrently presented exhibitions by Senga Nengudi and Kara Walker. 

     (Above and two below)  Ibrahim Mahama at DAAD Galerie, Berlin.


     (Above and below) Views of the exhibition ‘Neolithic Childhood. Art in a False Present, c. 1930’ at Haus der Kulturen der Welt.

     (Above and two below) View of ‘Hello World. Revising a Collection’ in the central nave Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin.

     (Above and below) One of the most interesting sections of the expansive Hello World. Revising a Collection’ exhibition, was ‘Colomental. The Violence of Intimate Histories’ curated by Sven Beckstette and Azu Nwagbogu. The curators commissioned four artists (Joël Andrianomearisoa, Peggy Buth, Astrid S. Klein and Dierk Schmidt) to produce work critically reflecting on the lack of contemporary art holdings of the National Galerie on the connections between African countries and Germany. Above Peggy Buth's work tracking the display and inventories in colonial museum revealing their historical narratives and representations. Below works by Joël Andrianomearisoa.
    Very happy to finally be able to see this object in the flesh: "Nuage articulé" one of the most beautiful Surrealist objects firstly executed in 1937 with dry natural sponges by the German-Austrian-Mexican artist Wolfgang Paalen.
     (Above and below) Olivier Laric's ‘Year of the Dog’ at Tanya Leighton, included the European debut of his latest animation video ‘Betweenness’ (all 2018), alongside ‘Hundemensch’ a group of pigmented cast resin anthropomorphic sculptures.

     (Above and below) Becky Beasley's ‘Depressive Alcoholic Mother’ show at Galeria Plan B.

      (Above and below) AA Bronson + General Idea, 1968–2018, ‘Catch me if you can!’ exhibition at Esther Schipper.

      (Above and following two) Mariana Castillo Deball's ‘das Haut-Ich’ at Galerie Barbara Wien, taking the tonalpohualli calendar and the deity Xipe Totec as a starting point.

     (Above and below) Haegue Yang's installation ‘Silo of Silence – Clicked Core’ in the Boiler House space at KINDL - Centre for Contemporary Art in Berlin’s Neukölln district. 

    Berlin skyline from KINDL's second floor.

     (Above and below) ‘Defying Gravity’ exhibition by Swiss artists Taiyo Onorato and Nico Krebs occupying the two floors of the Maschinenhaus (Power House) at KINDL - Centre for Contemporary Art, gathering photographs, 16mm films, sculptures and new installations from the past decade.

     4h train to Cologne. The 2017 edition of "KölnSkulptur #9" titled ‘La fin de Babylone’ added new works by Andrea Büttner, Claudia Comte, Jan Kiefer, Eduardo Navarro, Solange Pessoa, Lin May Saeed, Teresa Solar and Pedro Wirz to the existing collection; and was curated by Chus Martínez. Above and following seven photos.

     (Above and below) ‘Pumping Station’ (2017) by Teresa Solar.
      (Above) ‘The Nordic Cactuses’ (2017) by Claudia Comte.
      (Above) Michael Sailstorfer (helicopter) and Mark di Suvero.
      (Above) ‘Untitled’ (2017) by Solange Pessoa.
      (Above and below) ‘Schale’ (2017) by Andrea Büttner.
     (Above) ‘Pagliaccio non son’ (2011) by Jimmie Durham. 
    (Above) ‘Garten’ (1997–1999) by Peter Fischli and David Weiss. 
    (Above) Pathway into the park.
     (Above and below) View of ‘Games of Decentralized Life’ exhibition by Simon Denny at Galerie Buchholz, Cologne, around Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. 

     (Above and below) View of the exhibition ‘The Superman’ by Alex da Corte on view the at Kölnischer Kunstverein. 

    (Above) Beautiful 1950s architecture of the Kölnischer Kunstverein. 

     (Above and following) View of Haegue Yang's mid-career retrospective ‘ETA 1994–2018’ at Museum Ludwig in Cologne. In this room ‘Series of Vulnerable Arrangements’ are displayed alongside ‘Seven Basel Lights’ and ‘Medicine Men’.

     (Above) ‘Mountains of Encounter’ and ‘Sol Lewitt Upside Down — K123456. Expanded 1078 Times. Doubled and Mirrored’.
    (Above) Installation ‘5, Rue Saint-Benoît’.

      (Above) View of the first solo exhibition ‘ DAS – IST — DAS?’ in Germany by Ana Jotta at Temporary Gallery, Cologne. Curated by Regina Barunke and Miguel Wandschneider.



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    Cover Story–May 2018: "Shadowing Roman Ondák"

    Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org

    The May 2018 Monthly Cover Story "Shadowing Roman Ondák" is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org

    This month we revisit Roman Ondák’s exhibition ‘Some Thing’ at The Common Guild, Glasgow, in 2013, during which Latitudes was invited to give a talk. Roman’s show comprised a series of composite works in display cases. Early still-life paintings and pencil drawings from his student days in Slovakia in the 1980s were coupled with the actual objects depicted – a chair, a length of rope, a helmet, a vase (a detail of "Shadow, 1981/2013" is the work above), and so on, which were placed in a deadpan way on top of them.

    —> Continue reading
    —> After May it will be archived here.

    Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.



    RELATED CONTENT:






    Max Andrews reviews Lúa Coderch; "Crash Test. The Molecular Turn" and Julia Spínola for frieze

    Review ‘The Molecular Turn’: While Social Media Flourishes Ecological Systems are Collapsing. At La Panacée, Montpellier, Nicolas Bourriaud’s manifesto for a new movement and attempt to demarcate an artistic peer group." on frieze magazine.

    Max Andrews, co-founder of Latitudes and contributing editor to frieze, has recently reviewed the group exhibition ‘Crash Test. The Molecular Turn’ (at La Panacée, Montpellier, until May 6, 2018) as well as Lúa Coderch's solo exhibition ‘The girl with no door on her mouth’ (àngels barcelona, on view until April 13, 2018) for friezeBoth texts are available online and are included in print in the April issue.

    —> Video of Lúa Coderch presenting her work (Spanish with English subtitles).

    Review "The Girl with No Door on Her Mouth: Lúa Coderch's Acts of Making Noise. The artist explores the politics of the female voice that speaks out or is shut up, at àngels barcelona, Spain." on frieze magazine.

    A review on Julia Spínola's solo show "Lubricán" at the Centro de Arte 2 de Mayo (Móstoles, Madrid), has also just been published online and will also be included in the forthcoming May 2018 issue.

    —> Video of Julia Spínola presenting the show (in Spanish).

    Review "Julia Spínola: Twilight. At Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo, Móstoles, a crepuscular glow lends acute poignancy to simple forms and materials" on frieze magazine.


    RELATED CONTENT:
    • Writing archive on Latitudes' website (since 2005);
    • "The Kørner problem” essay by Max Andrews in the monograph "John Kørner" published by Roulette Russe, 19 February 2018
    • Max Andrews essay on Christopher Knowles for NoguerasBlanchard at Liste 2017, 21 July 2017
    • Cover Story – January 2017: How open are open calls?, 4 January 2017
    • Cover Story – December 2016: Ten years ago – Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook, 5 December 2016
    • January 2016 Monthly Cover Story: Kasper Akhøj's Eileen Gray’s E.1027, 4 January 2016
    • Symposium participation, "The Shock of Victory", Glasgow, 25 September 2015
    • Review of the exhibition "What cannot be used is forgotten" in the May issue of frieze magazine, 29 April 2015
    • Review of Maria Thereza Alves' exhibition at CAAC Sevilla published in frieze magazine 9 March 2015




    Cover Story—April 2018: Dates, 700 BC to the present: Michael Rakowitz

    Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org


    The April 2018 monthly Cover Story "Dates, 700 BC to the present: Michael Rakowitz" is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org

    "As Michael Rakowitz’s fourth plinth commission is unveiled in London’s Trafalgar Square, this month’s cover story image revisits Return (2004-ongoing) a related project by the artist that also speaks about the turbulent history of Iraq. And dates. In London, Michael has deployed thousands of date syrup cans to make a 1:1 scale recreation of Lamassu, the fantastic winged bull that graced the gates of the city of Nineveh from 700 BC until it was destroyed by Isis in 2015."

    —> Continue reading
    —> After April it will be archived here.

    Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.

    RELATED CONTENT:

    • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
    • Cover Story – March 2018: "Armenia's ghost galleries" 6 March 2018
    • Cover Story – February 2018: Paradise, promises and perplexities 5 February 2018
    • Cover Story – January 2018: I'll be there for you, 2 January 2018
    • Cover Story – December 2017: "Tabet's Tapline trajectory", 4 December 2017
    • Cover Story – November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
    • Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
    • Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
    • Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
    • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
    • Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
    • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
    • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017





      Mariana Cánepa Luna reviews ‘Allora & Calzadilla’ exhibition for art-agenda.com


      Allora & Calzadilla. ‘Stop, Repair, Prepare: Variations on Ode to Joy, No.3’ (2008). Modifyed Piano Bechstein © Photo: Roberto Ruiz © Fundació Antoni Tàpies, Barcelona, 2018. 

      Jennifer Allora and Guillermo Calzadilla’s “Allora & Calzadilla
      Fundació Antoni Tàpies, Barcelona
      February 6—May 20, 2018

      by Mariana Cánepa Luna


      "A piercing whistle punctuates the blaring of a trumpet. But in the columned central space of the Fundació Antoni Tàpies, the only visible instrument is a grand piano. For three days a week throughout the course of the exhibition, the instrument is played—and, one could say, worn—by a pianist who stands in a hole cut into its center. Leaning over the rim of the piano to strike the keys, the performer energetically interprets the fourth movement of Ludwig van Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 (1824), while slowly pushing the wheeled instrument around the space. The building has become a musical box, the exhibition orchestrated such that one movement flows into the other, spilling through the gallery’s spaces to create a dissonant soundscape."


      —> Continue reading...

      Originally published in art-agenda.com on March 19, 2018.



      Allora & Calzadilla. ‘Stop, Repair, Prepare: Variations on Ode to Joy, No.3’ (2008). Modifyed Piano Bechstein © Photo: Roberto Ruiz © Fundació Antoni Tàpies, Barcelona, 2018.

      Allora & Calzadilla. ‘Stop, Repair, Prepare: Variations on Ode to Joy, No.3’ (2008). Modifyed Piano Bechstein © Photo: Roberto Ruiz © Fundació Antoni Tàpies, Barcelona, 2018.

      Allora & Calzadilla. ‘Hope Hippo’ (2005). © Photo: Roberto Ruiz © Fundació Antoni Tàpies, Barcelona, 2018.

      Allora & Calzadilla. ‘Lifespan’ (2014) © Foto: Roberto Ruiz © Fundació Antoni Tàpies, Barcelona, 2018.

      Allora & Calzadilla, ‘Sweat Glands, Sweat Lands’ (2006). Video SD, color, sound. Duration: 2 minutes, 21 seconds. Courtesy Galerie Chantal Crousel. Photo: Roberto Ruiz. © Fundació Antoni Tàpies, 2018.

      Allora & Calzadilla, ‘A Man Screaming is Not a Dancing Bear’ (2008). 16 mm film, color, sound. Duration: 11 minutes, 15 seconds. Courtesy Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary (TBA21). Photo: Roberto Ruiz. © Fundació Antoni Tàpies. 

      Allora & Calzadilla, ‘Apotomē’ (2013). 16 mm film transferred to HD, colour, sound. Duration: 23 minutes, 9 seconds. Courtesy Galerie Chantal Crousel. Photo: Roberto Ruiz. © Fundació Antoni Tàpies, 2018. 

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      Cover Story – March 2018: Armenia's ghost galleries

      Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org 

      The March 2018 Monthly Cover Story ‘Armenia's ghost galleries’ is now up on www.lttds.org – after this month it will be archived here.

      Incidents (of Travel)’ – Latitudes collaboration with Kadist – returns with a dispatch from Yerevan, Armenia. The itinerary leads us on something of a ghost tour. Photographs and reportage unearth the fragmented memories of galleries and art spaces that no longer exist. This haunted dispatch is the fruit of two-years of meticulous shared inquiry by Armenian curator Marianna Hovhannisyan (currently based in San Diego) with Vardan Kilichyan, Gohar Hosyan, and Anaida Verdyan, alumni of the former Studio College of the National Center of Aesthetics in Yerevan. 


      —> Continue reading

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.


      RELATED CONTENT:
      • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
      • Cover Story – February 2018: Paradise, promises and perplexities 5 February 2018
      • Cover Story – January 2018: I'll be there for you, 2 January 2018
      • Cover Story – December 2017: "Tabet's Tapline trajectory", 4 December 2017
      • Cover Story – November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
      • Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
      • Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
      • Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
      • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
      • Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
      • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
      • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
      • Cover Story – March 2017: Time travel with Jordan Wolfson 1 March 2017




      Iratxe Jaio and Klaas van Gorkum's installation ‘Work in Progress’ in the process of being acquired by ARTIUM, Vitoria-Gasteiz


      Above and below: Installation views of "Work in progress" in the exhibition "The Margins of the Factory", ADN Platform, 25 January–30 April 2014. Video (14’ 22”), 739 polyurethane sculptures, and 47 moulds. Produced with support from the Eremuak program of the Basque Government and from Centrum Beeldende Kunst Rotterdam. Courtesy of the artists. Photos: Roberto Ruiz.