Cover Story—April 2018: Dates, 700 BC to the present: Michael Rakowitz

Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org


The April 2018 monthly Cover Story "Dates, 700 BC to the present: Michael Rakowitz" is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org

"As Michael Rakowitz’s fourth plinth commission is unveiled in London’s Trafalgar Square, this month’s cover story image revisits Return (2004-ongoing) a related project by the artist that also speaks about the turbulent history of Iraq. And dates. In London, Michael has deployed thousands of date syrup cans to make a 1:1 scale recreation of Lamassu, the fantastic winged bull that graced the gates of the city of Nineveh from 700 BC until it was destroyed by Isis in 2015."

—> Continue reading
—> After April it will be archived here.

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.

RELATED CONTENT:

  • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
  • Cover Story – March 2018: "Armenia's ghost galleries" 6 March 2018
  • Cover Story – February 2018: Paradise, promises and perplexities 5 February 2018
  • Cover Story – January 2018: I'll be there for you, 2 January 2018
  • Cover Story – December 2017: "Tabet's Tapline trajectory", 4 December 2017
  • Cover Story – November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
  • Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
  • Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
  • Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
  • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
  • Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
  • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
  • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017





    Cover Story—February 2018: Paradise, Promises and Perplexities


    Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org 

    The February 2018 Monthly Cover Story "Paradise, Promises and Perplexities" is now up on www.lttds.org – after this month it will be archived here.

    "This month marks ten years since the opening of Greenwashing, curated by Latitudes and Ilaria Bonacossa. Subtitled Environment: Perils, Promises and Perplexities, this exhibition at the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin, addressed the melding of corporate agendas and individual ethics in the wake of the exhaustion of traditional environmentalism." Continue reading

    Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.

    RELATED CONTENT:


    Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
    Cover Story – January 2018: I'll be there for you, 2 January 2018
    Cover Story – December 2017: "Tabet's Tapline trajectory", 4 December 2017
    Cover Story – November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
    Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
    Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
    Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
    Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
    Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
    Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
    Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
    Cover Story – March 2017: Time travel with Jordan Wolfson 1 March 2017
    Cover Story — February 2017: The Dutch Assembly, five years on 1 February 2017
    Cover Story – January 2017: How open are open calls? 4 January 2017





      15 November 2017, 4:30–8pm: 'The Return of the Earth. Ecologising art history in the Anthropocene' study day at the CAPC musée, Bordeaux

      Xavier Ribas, detail of diptych num 7 'Caliche Fields' (2010), 22 Pigment prints on Harman Baryta paper 33 x 50 cm. Courtesy the artist and ProjecteSD, Barcelona.

      'The Return of the Earth. Ecologising art history in the Anthropocene'
      Study day
      Wednesday, 15 November 2017  
      4:30—8:00pm
      Auditorium
      CAPC musée d’art contemporain Bordeaux 
      7, rue Ferrère, 33000 Bordeaux, France 


      PROGRAMME

      4:30—5:30 pm

      Keynote by science historian Jean-Baptiste Fressoz (Paris) 
      5:30—5:45 pm
      Break
      5:45—6:45
      pm
      Conversation between artists Xavier Ribas (London) and Ângela Ferreira (Lisbon)
      6:45—7:45
      pm
      Roundtable discussion moderated by Latitudes (Barcelona)


      Free event. Simultaneous translation French/English. 

      Conference programmed in the context of the exhibition '4.543 billion. The matter of matter', CAPC musée d’art contemporain Bordeaux, 29 June 2017–7 January 2018. Curated by Latitudes.



      The work of many of the artists in the exhibition '4.543 billion. The matter of matter' explores the shared history of human activities and Earth systems. Yet this comes with a critical and political inflexion of the universalizing notion of the Anthropocene, the proposed geological ‘epoch of humanity’ that would cast all of the mankind as being responsible for the alarming damage caused by modernizing and capitalizing nature.

      With a keynote by science historian Jean-Baptiste Fressoz, and a conversation between artists
      Xavier Ribas and Ângela Ferreira—the latter both featured in the exhibition—this event hosted by Latitudes ('4.543 billion' curators Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna), sees art practice and historical research intertwining with environmental and geological narratives, and vice versa. Both Ribas and Ferreira make art that resists the generalising story of the Anthropocene that Fressoz unmasks in his book 'The Shock of the Anthropocene. The Earth, History and Us' (co-authored with Christophe Bonneuil, Verso Books, 2016). Echoing the meticulous historical approach of Fressoz, both Ribas’s and Ferreira’s projects in the exhibition deal with case studies with a very specific place and politics. Addressing mineral agency and colonial extraction, the artists will discuss their approaches to work that has sprung from diamonds in South Africa (Ferreira) to nitrate in Chile (Ribas).

      As Fressoz & Bonneuil have written, the Anthropocene “signals the return of the Earth into a world that Western industrial modernity, on the whole, represented to itself as above earthly foundation … Environmental history, natural anthropology, environmental law and ethics, human ecology, environmental sociology, political ecology, green political theory, ecological economics, etc., are among the new disciplines that have recently begun to renew the human and social sciences, in a dialogue with the sciences of nature.” The dialogue during the event will seek to discover what might happen when artists, curators, exhibitions and museums come into the mix of such emerging practices. What is at stake when artists venture beyond the conventional separation of humanities from sciences, and into environmental art history, cultural ecology, decolonial activism, and so on?


      Entrance to the exhibition at the CAPC. Photo: Latitudes/RK.

      GUESTS

      Jean-Baptiste Fressoz, formerly a lecturer at Imperial College, London, is a historian of science, technology and environment. He is based at the Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Paris, the largest governmental research organisation in France and the largest fundamental science agency in Europe. He is the author, with Christophe Bonneuil, of 'The Shock of the Anthropocene' (Verso, 2016). “This bold, brilliantly argued history of the Anthropocene epoch is a corrective to cosy thinking about humanity’s grave disruptions to Earth systems. Christophe Bonneuil and Jean-Baptiste Fressoz draw on climate science, economics and technological history to reveal how, starting in eighteenth-century France, imperial narratives that saw people and planet as a ‘totality to be governed’ laid the conceptual basis for the crisis. They call for a ‘new environmental humanities’, and a shift away from market-based approaches that feed the beast.” – Barbara Kiser, Nature.

      Ângela Ferreira’s works in the exhibition form part of a series titled “Stone Free” (2012) in reference to the 1966 hit song performed by Jimi Hendrix (1942–70). “Stone Free” creates correspondences between two voids below the ground, two ‘negative monuments’ as the artist has termed them: Chislehurst Caves, in southeast London, and Cullinan Diamond Mine in Gauteng Province, South Africa. 


      Chislehurst Caves is a man-made network of underground tunnels mainly worked in the late 1700s yet dating back to as early as 1250. The tunnels were excavated in order to mine chalk and flint. Following their use as an air-raid shelter during the second world war, the tunnels were transformed into a venue for rock concerts in the 1960s and 1970s. The Jimi Hendrix Experience played there in 1966 and again the following year, bringing Hendrix’s unique countercultural synthesis of social realism and psychedelic spiritualism based on African and indigenous-American imagery into the literal underground.

      Cullinan Diamond Mine (known as Premier Mine from its establishment in 1902 until 2003) is famed for being the source of the largest gem-quality rough diamond ever discovered, in 1905. Most of the gems cut-and-polished from this stone were used to adorn the Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom. The recent history of the diamond industry is inextricable from that of settler colonialism in southern Africa and a commodity cartel established by the De Beers corporation founded in 1888 by British imperialist Cecil Rhodes (1853–1902), two years before he became Prime Minister of the Cape Colony. De Beers owned all of the major mines in South Africa, as well as controlling global distribution until it began a recent sell-off of its less productive mines to the Petra Diamonds group, including divesting itself of Cullinan in 2008. 


      Ferreira was born in Maputo, Mozambique, in 1958, and lives in Lisbon, where she teaches Fine Art at the Lisbon University.
      http://angelaferreira.info

      “A History of Detonations” (2014) is a glimpse at an extensive body of work by Xavier Ribas devoted to exploring the legacy of the mining of sodium nitrate in northern Chile, which boomed from the 1870s until the early-twentieth century when it was discovered how to make the compound synthetically. Comprised of photographs taken by the artist during research visits, alongside vintage postcards and press prints bought on the internet, Ribas’s poster sequence takes us from Chile to London to the surface of Mars. The mining and trade of Chilean sodium nitrate was led by a class of British ‘gentleman capitalists’—aristocrats, bankers and merchants. The extraction of the resource not only industrialized the arid Atacama Desert at one end of the commodity chain, and enriched country estates at the other, but through its use as a chemical fertilizer and a component of explosives, it would radically alter a whole series of seemingly disparate geographies, bodies and institutions.

      Ribas was born in Barcelona, 1960, and lives in London.  He is a lecturer at the University of Brighton and associate lecturer at the Universitat Politècnica de València. http://www.xavierribas.com/

      Latitudes is a Barcelona-based curatorial office initiated in 2005 by Max Andrews (1975, Bath, United Kingdom) and Mariana Cánepa Luna (1977, Montevideo, Uruguay). They are the curators of the CAPC exhibition ‘4.543 billion. The matter of matter’, and led the related month-long residency programme ‘Geologic Time’ that took place in September 2017 at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity. During 2009 Latitudes developed ‘Portscapes’, a series of ten public commissions in the Port of Rotterdam, the Netherlands (2009); in 2010–11 it was a partner organisation in the exhibition ‘The Last Newspaper’ (New Museum, New York) and in 2011 was the guest curator of the project space of the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Castilla y León (MUSAC) in León, Spain. More recent curatorial projects include the solo exhibition ‘José Antonio Hernández-Díez. I will fear no evil’, Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA), Barcelona (2016); ‘Compositions’, site-specific commissions for two editions of the Barcelona Gallery Weekend (2015 & 2016); and editing the online curatorial reportage initiative ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ developed in partnership with Kadist (initiated in 2016).  
      www.LTTDS.org

      Share:
      #4543billion

      #4543milliards
      @LTTDS 
      @CAPCmusee 
      #CAPCmusee

      ‘4.543 billion’ is the contribution of the CAPC musée to the cultural season Paysages Bordeaux 2017

      Views of the exhibition at the CAPC musée. Photos: Latitudes / RK.

      RELATED CONTENT:
      • CAPC website (French, English, Spanish) http://www.capc-bordeaux.fr/programme/4543-milliards
      • Sediments of the Geologic Time 4-week residency at the Banff Centre for Arts & Creativity 10 October 2017
      • SAVE THE DATE: 29 June, 19h. Private view of the exhibition "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" at the CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux 30 May 2017
      • Cover Story – May 2017: "S is for Shale or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps" May 2017
      • Cover Story – May 2016: Material histories – spilling the beans at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux 10 May 2016.
      • Second research trip to Bordeaux 16 July 2016




      Cover Story – July 2017: "4.543 billion"


      The July 2017 Monthly Cover Story "4.543 billion" is now up on www.lttds.org after July it will be archived here

      "4.543 billion. The matter of matter recently opened at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux, and features the work of more than thirty artists. Curated by Latitudes, the exhibition looks at histories of art as fragments in geological time. The portentous mood of this gallery hinges on combustion and history violently formed through the fundamental reordering of the relations between humans and the rest of nature." Continue reading

      Social media archive related to the exhibition.
      Photo gallery of the exhibition.

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities. 

      RELATED CONTENT:




      SAVE THE DATE: 29 June, 19h. Private view of the exhibition "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" at the CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux


      Xavier Ribas, Chilean Nitrate publicity postcard, c. 1920 from "A History of Detonations", 2013. Courtesy the artist and ProjecteSD, Barcelona; and Lucas Ihlein, "Under Ground", 2010. Courtesy of the artist.


      SAVE THE DATE

      Exhibition ‘4.543 billion. The matter of matter’, CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux, June 29, 2017–January 7, 2018.  

      Opening: June 29, 2017 (6 pm)

      With: A.J. Aalders, Lara Almarcegui, Maria Thereza Alves, Félix Arnaudin, Amy Balkin, Alessandro Balteo-Yazbeck in collaboration with Media Farzin, Bernd Becher and Hilla Becher, Étienne Denisse, Hubert Duprat, Giulio Ferrario, Ângela Ferreira, Anne Garde, Ambroise-Louis Garneray, Terence Gower, Rodney Graham, Ilana Halperin (also at the Université de Bordeaux’s zoology department), Marianne Heier, Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, Lucas Ihlein and Louise Kate Anderson, Jannis Kounellis, Martín Llavaneras, Erlea Maneros Zabala, Nicholas Mangan, Fiona Marron, Alexandra Navratil, Xavier Ribas, Alfred Roll, Amie Siegel, Lucy Skaer, Alfred Smith, Rayyane Tabet, Pierre Théron, Pep Vidal, Alexander Whalley Light, Stuart Whipps (also at the Musée des Beaux-Arts) as well as documents and objects lent by the archives of the CAPC, the Archives Bordeaux Métropole, the Archives départementales de la Gironde, and the geology collection of the UFR Sciences de la Terre et de la Mer, Université de Bordeaux.

      Curated by Latitudes

      With contributions from more than 30 artists, “4.543 billion. The matter of matter” is a major exhibition that addresses works of art, collections and cultural histories in relation to ecological processes and a geological scale of time. It presents a continuum of materials and temporal landscapes – films, works on paper, photographs, sculptures, documents, and other meaningful things – and springs from the CAPC building’s former life as a warehouse for colonial commodities whose limestone walls were once deep in the ground and whose wooden beams were once part of a forest.


      A central proposal of the exhibition is that works of art are part of geophysical history as much as art history. 4.543 billion attempts to take into account both a micro-local and a planetary perspective, and to rethink some of the histories of art as fragments of broader narratives about the Earth and how our place in it has been represented. What is at stake when art and museums take on greater temporal and material awareness? How might they move beyond a spatial framework of “think globally, act locally”, to “think historically, act geologically”? 

      Collections are accumulations of real physical matter in time as well as of ideas, decisions, fashions, knowledge, and use. Likewise minerals and organic matter might be regarded as both cultural evidence and archival storage media. This exhibition takes a situated view of the past that resists an undifferentiated narrative in which modernity in general is at fault for global ecological disarray, or humanity in an invariably abstract sense must take responsibility.


      Accordingly, the artists included instead often address the specific roles and purposeful effects of individuals, practices, states or corporations in an account of how mineral agents and organic processes have intertwined with and underpinned culture. Marianne Heier’s contribution, for example, documents a project addressing the decisive roll North Sea oil has played in shaping art and culture in Norway. Rayyane Tabet’s works deal sculpturally with the legacy of the Trans-Arabian Pipe Line, a joint venture by three American oil companies that came together in 1946 to construct an pipeline from Saudi Arabia to the Mediterranean. Incorporating a fragment of Breccia Pernice marble from the lobby of Trump Tower, Dynasty (2017) by Amie Siegel weaves Italian geology into the political turmoil of the present. 

      Several of the more documentary projects on display (including those by Alessandro Balteo Yazbeck and Terence Gower) trace the relationships between Modern art, the museum, and wealth created through extractive industry, combining approaches framed by Earth sciences with colonial history, sociology and political reportage. Yet other works take a more atmospheric, filmic, sculptural or graphic approach to extraction, economy, energy and global exchange, whether orbiting around sunlight, forests, synthetic materials derived from fossil fuels (a subject addressed by Alexandra Navratil), or the services and substances entailed in buildings that display art (as seen through the work of Lucas Ihlein and Lara Almarcegui).
      In addition to two new projects in development for the occasion (by Christina Hemauer & Roman Keller and Ilana Halperin), the exhibition will include many works kindly lent by the artists and international galleries, as well as those from the CAPC collection and its archives. Loans from Bordeaux institutions include those from the Archives Bordeaux Métropole, the Archives départementales de la Gironde, the Musée des Beaux-Arts, the Musée d’Aquitaine and the geology collection of the UFR Sciences de la Terre et de la Mer, Université de Bordeaux.


      Located at opposite ends of the galleries will be two imposing works that bookend the exhibition conceptually as well as physically. Originally made for CAPC in 1985, Jannis Kounellis’s nine-metre-long Sans titre is a slab of steel draped with coffee sacks that spits flames. On the other side, Ancient Lights (2015) is a two-screen video installation by Nicholas Mangan that is powered by an off-grid solar system with panels on the roof of the CAPC building. With sections filmed at the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona, and a salt-storage solar plant near Seville, Mangan’s looped videos speculates on the ideology and politics of energy. 


      Several works by Ângela Ferreira also link diverse histories: those of the Cullinan Diamond Mine in South Africa, the source of one of the largest gems ever found, and the Chislehurst Caves in South East London, a crucible of counter-culture in the 1960s. In terms of an exploration of the underground – in this case with a sociological dimension – one could also mention All surface expectations disappear with depth (2010) a three-screen video work by Fiona Marron that juxtaposes text from a 1954 field report on working conditions in an American gypsum mine with footage from present-day excavation in Ireland.


      Share:
      #4543billion 

      @LTTDS 
      @CAPCmusee 
      @paysagesbx17

      ‘4.543 billion’ is the contribution of the CAPC musée to the cultural season Paysages Bordeaux 2017. Within the exhibition framework, Latitudes will lead the month-long residency programme ‘Geologic Time’ at Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity, Alberta, Canada, in September–October 2017.


      RELATED CONTENT:




      Cover Story – December 2016: Ten years ago – Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook


      The December Monthly Cover Story is now up on www.lttds.org after this month it will be archived here

      "The publication Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook is ten years old. Commissioned by the Arts & Ecology programme of The Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures & Commerce (RSA), in partnership with Arts Council England, this book was one of Latitudes’s first projects. Through the inspirational contributions of people as varied as Lucy Lippard, Stephanie Smith, Amy Balkin, or the late Wangari Maathai – to mention just a few – the compendium charted the twin legacies of Land Art and the environmental movement while proposing how the critical acuity of art might remain relevant in the face of the dramatic ecological consequences of human activity. The research and reflection involved set Latitudes on a course that led to several further projects engaging with ecology, explicitly or otherwise." Continue reading...

      Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, exhibitions and field trips related to our activities.  

      Related content:




      In conversation for the exhibition catalogue "Limits to Growth" by Nicholas Mangan (Sternberg Press, 2016)


      Photos: Latitudes.

      After much anticipation, we are elated to see (and touch!) Latitudes' five-part interview with Nicholas Mangan as part of his exhibition catalogue "Nicholas Mangan. Limits to Growth" (Sternberg Press, 2016). The publication is designed by Žiga Testen and includes newly commissioned texts by Ana Teixeira Pinto and Helen Hughes, alongside illustrations of Mangan's work and historical source material.

      The five-part interview weaves together a discussion around five of his recent works ‘Nauru, Notes from a Cretaceous World’ (2009), ‘A World Undone’ (2012), ‘Progress in action’ (2013), ‘Ancient Lights’ (2015) and his newest piece ‘Limits to Growth’ (2016) commissioned for this exhibition survey. Latitudes’ dialogue with Mangan, began around a research trip to Melbourne in 2014, and continued in the form of the public conversation event that took place at the Chisenhale Gallery, London, in 2015, as well as over Skype, email, snail mail and walks.






       

      The publication release coincides with Mangan's eponimous exhibition survey which began in July in Melbourne's Monash University Museum of Art and just opened this past weekend in Brisbane's IMA. The show will further tour to Berlin's KW Institute for Contemporary Art in Summer 2017.

      "Nicholas Mangan. Limits to Growth" 

      Publisher: Sternberg Press with the Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane; KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin; and Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne.
      Editor: Aileen Burns, Charlotte Day, Krist Gruijthuijsen, Johan Lundh. 
      Texts: Latitudes, Helen Hughes, Ana Teixeira Pinto 
      Design: Žiga Testen;
      October 2016, English;
      17 x 24 cm, 246 pages + 2 inserts, edition of 1500; 

      40 b/w and 102 color ill., with color poster and postcard Softcover;
      ISBN 978-3-95679-252-6;
      30 Euros.






















      RELATED CONTENT:




      In conversation with Lucas Ihlein for Artlink Magazine

      The September issue of Artlink Magazine – a quarterly themed magazine covering contemporary art and ideas from Australia and the Asia-Pacific – includes a conversation we recently made with artist Lucas Ihlein. Ihlein's projects explore subjects as diverse as agriculture, gardening and social ecology, everyday life, avant-garde cinema history, fan culture, urban planning, communication and social relations.

      The interview, titled "1:1 scale art and the Yeomans Project in North Queensland", is preceded with an intro contextualising our conversation and how we met:

      Lucas Ihlein and Ian Milliss, "The Yeomans Project", field trip. Farmer Peter Clinch demonstrates the keyline irrigation channels at The Oaks Organics, Camden, NSW, 2014. Photo by Caren Florance.

      We first met Lucas Ihlein in May 2014 at the recommendation of artist Nicholas Mangan. We had been invited to Melbourne to participate in Gertrude Contemporary’s Visiting Curator Program in partnership with Monash University of Art Design & Architecture, and had taken a few days out to visit the Biennale of Sydney and meet some Sydney-based artists. Nicholas was already familiar with our curatorial interests, stemming from ecology and site-specific practices; indeed, we’ve recently made an extended interview with him for the catalogue of his exhibition "Limits to Growth", so his matchmaking with Lucas was prescient. We talked for hours and have been corresponding ever since, with a view to collaborating further.

      We were struck by the breadth and enthusiasm of Lucas’s practice and his voracious approach to the process of learning from the point of view of a novice. Where other people might pain over the policing of the roles of artist, curator or researcher, Lucas happily didn’t spend much time worrying about it. Accordingly, although it was the engagement with social and environmental ecology that initially piqued our interest, we soon realised that his was a collaborative practice that has embraced, for example, the re-enactment of “expanded cinema” works from the 1960s and 1970s (in the form of Teaching and Learning Cinema, run with Louise Curham) as well as a “blogging as art”, an approach that really chimed with our project for The Last Newspaper for which we had edited a weekly newspaper within an exhibition.

      Indeed, a key impulse of our approach to the projects we have undertaken as Latitudes around art and ecology, in the broadest sense, has been to resist the narrow restraints of normative environmental-concern ecology, in part following Felix Guattari’s essay "The Three Ecologies" (2000), to encompass social and political relations, human subjectivity as well as historical research. In other words, thinking about a practice that does not necessarily give primacy to exhibition‑making as well as considering what an ecological art project might mean in terms of process and site, and thinking through what acting ecologically might entail in relation to acting curatorially, acting editorially, or acting historically, and so on.

      Looking back on our projects in collaboration with the Royal Society of Arts “Arts & Ecology” programme—a public commission for London with artist Tue Greenfort (2005–8), our publication "Land Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook" (Royal Society of Arts/Arts Council England, 2006), and the symposium of “Art, Ecology and the Politics of Change”, 8th Sharjah Biennial (2007)—as well as the exhibition "Greenwashing. Environment: Perils, Promises and Perplexities", Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin (2008), they now seem to belong to a very specific time when green issues gained wider traction. One might crudely say this began with the Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change in 2006 and effectively ended, or was overshadowed, by the 2008 financial crisis and its grim legacies.

      We begin this interview at a moment when we’re revisiting some of the concerns left in the wake of such projects from the near past while preparing a group exhibition for CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux in 2017 around the carbon cycle and narratives of raw materials. At the time of writing Lucas has just returned from Guangzhou, where he has been exploring the geographical and social dimensions of sea level rise in the Pearl River Delta.


      Continue reading... 

      Lucas Ihlein is an Australia Council for the Arts Fellow in Emerging and Experimental Arts. He is currently showing alongside Trevor Yeung (Hong Kong) in Sea Pearl White Cloud 海珠白雲 at 4a Centre for Contemporary Asian Art until 24 September 2016. Ihlein’s collaborative project Sugar vs the Reef will culminate in an exhibition at Artspace Mackay, Queensland, in mid-2018. 


       RELATED CONTENT:




      Guest Faculty of the Thematic Residency 'Blueprint for Happiness' at The Banff Centre, Canada, 27 July–8 August 2015

      (First) Views from the Vistas restaurant in the Sally Broden Building; (below) View from the Lloyd Hall building.

      As Guest Faculty of the Visual + Digital Art thematic residencyBlueprint for Happiness’ – a five week programme starting July 13 led by British artists Heather and Ivan Morison – Latitudes will join the group in the middle two weeks of the programme (27 July–7 August). 

       Participants of the Blueprint for Happiness Thematic Residency.

       Some art-as-research tips for reference on one of the Glyde Hall fridges.

      In Banff, Latitudes will lead a series of focused workshops bringing forward a series of case studies of (realised and unrealised) projects they have worked on as well as focusing on a number of artists whose practice has dealt with issues around public space in different geographical contexts. 

      Latitudes will also undertake studio visits with each of the 11 resident artists, participate in field trips and organise a closed-door evening film programme with films by Spanish artist Emilio Moreno, Irish artist Sean Lynch and Australian artist Nicholas Mangan. The three films share a focus on public sculptures, monuments or buildings that have been displaced from their original context.


      Ignasi Aballí, AM-4826 Digital Anemometer from Taking Measures (2009). Installation of 9 measuring devices. Courtesy of the artist and Galería Estrany–De la Mota, Barcelona.

      Tuesday 28 July 2015, 16–17:30h: Public Lecture, Presentation of Latitudes’ curatorial practice as part of the Visual Art Lecture Series. Jeanne and Peter Lougheed Building, 204. Free event.
       
      For the Public Lecture Latitudes will forgo a chronological account of its projects of the last decade, and instead attempt various transects through its curatorial projects determined by raw materials and their transformation. From the zinc which led to an Esperanto micro-nation, to the air of a Beijing shopping centre, or the dead trees of printed news, Latitudes will try and join some traits and ideas around extractive modernity, obsolescence and the carbon cycle.


       Music huts around campus.
       The creek around The Banff Centre.

      RELATED CONTENT:

      In conversation with the artist Nicholas Mangan at Chisenhale Gallery, London, 7 July 2015, 19h. 22 June 2015


      Tutors of the 2015 International Curatorial Retreat, 9–13 May, Bari (Italy) 17 May 2015





      This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
      All photos:
      Latitudes | www.lttds.org 




      Review of Maria Thereza Alves' exhibition at CAAC Sevilla published in frieze magazine

       View of the exhibition "The Long Road to Xico (1991–2014) at CAAC, Sevilla. Courtesy the artist and CAAC, Sevilla.

      The April issue of frieze magazine includes a review by Max Andrews' of Latitudes on Maria Thereza Alves' solo exhibition "The Long Road to Xico (1991–2014) at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Sevilla. 

      Curated by Los Angeles-based Spanish curator Pedro de Llano, this is a long-overdue midcareer retrospective comprising over a dozen works by an artist whose practice is little exhibited in Spain, and it's also very pertinent as it's hosted within the former Monasterio de Santa María de las Cuevas – from where Cristóbal Colón (Christopher Columbus) planned his second voyage of 1493. 

      Most importantly though is the connection to northern Spain with Alves' long-term research on Xico: "a town outside Mexico City, on the shores of one of the lakes that in the late 19th century, Íñigo Noriega, a Spanish immigrant from Asturias, drained the lake completing a cycle of environmental destruction and social marginalization that began with the arrival of Hernán Cortés and his soldiers." (from CAAC website) "This one man-made disaster in Chalco continues to have adverse effects that still plague the region with floods, contaminated water, land subsidence and the resulting destruction to infrastructure such as sewage pipes, large cracks which damage hundreds of houses, lack of drinking water and most recently earthquakes." (from the exhibition walltext)

        View of the installation The Return of a Lake, dOCUMENTA (13), Kassel, 2012.

      Excerpt of Max Andrews' frieze review:

      "Since the early 1990s, Maria Thereza Alves has addressed the devastating effects of Portuguese imperialism on the indigenous peoples of her native Brazil and of the Spanish conquest in the Americas. Hosted by the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo (CAAC), this long-overdue survey was in part a pre-history of her extensive project for Documenta 13, The Return of a Lake (2012). Extended in Seville, this room-sized installation centered on tabletop models that related the disastrous effects of the 1908 desiccation of Lake Chalco in Mexico City by Spanish businessman Íñigo Noriega Laso, and the ongoing injustices suffered by those who live in nearby Xico. Bookended by the earliest work in the exhibition, NoWhere (1991), in which overpainted photographs from Amazonas address European delusions of city planning in ‘empty’ territory, The Long Road to Xico (1991–2014) illuminates the ecological assault and epistemological violence ushered by colonialism. Given the city’s past as the main port for Spanish trade with the New World, the context of Seville granted particular acuity to the ethical armature of Alves’s decolonizing art. Moreover, CAAC’s home is the former Monasterio de Santa María de las Cuevas, from where Cristóbal Colón (Christopher Columbus) planned his second voyage of 1493 and where his remains were once interred."  


      RELATED CONTENT:


      The work of Maria Thereza Alves has been featured in several of Latitudes' projects, starting in 2006 with her contribution alongside Jimmy Durham for the publication "LAND, ART: A Cultural Ecology Handbook" (RSA/Arts Council England). In 2008 her film "The Sun" (2006, 5'03'') was presented in the group exhibition ‘Greenwashing. Ambiente: Pericoli, Promesse e Perplessità’ (Greenwashing. Environment: Perils, Promises and Perplexities), at the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin, Italy (29 February–18 May 2008) and later that year it was presented as part of the film programme "A Stake in the Mud, A Hole in the Reel. Land Art’s Expanded Field 1968–2008", premiered at the Museo Tamayo, Mexico City in April 2008 (toured to another seven venues in Europe between April and October that year).

      Latitudes to facilitate the Nature Addicts Fund Travelling Academy, 11–15 September, organised within the Maybe Education and Public Programs of dOCUMENTA (13), Kassel (9 September 2012)

      dOCUMENTA (13) artists and Latitudes (24 August 2012)

      Premiere del ciclo de video 'Una estaca en el lodo, un hoyo en la cinta. El campo expandido del Land Art, 1968-2008' en el Museo Tamayo, México DF (25 March 2008)



      This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
      All photos:
      Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
      Work is licensed under a
      Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




      Interview with Nicholas Mangan in Mousse Magazine #47, February–March 2015

      The February–March 2015 issue of Mousse Magazine (#47) includes the interview 'What Lies Beneath' between Melbourne-based artist Nicholas Mangan (1979, Geelong) and Mariana Cánepa Luna of Latitudes.  

       Layout of the interview in English and Italian on the pages of Mousse Magazine.

      The interview centers primarily on discussing the artists' methodologies through two of Mangan's recent works: 'A World Undone' – currently on view as part of Witte de With's show 'Art in The Age of...Energy' (23 January–3 May 2015) – and his film and sculptural work 'Nauru - Notes From A Cretaceous World' which will soon be featured as part of the New Museum's 2015 Triennial: Surround Audience curated by Lauren Cornell (Curator, 2015 Triennial, Digital Projects and Museum as Hub) and artist Ryan Trecartin.

      Read the full review here. Following is an excerpt of the beginning of their conversation: 


      'Dowiyogo’s Ancient Coral Coffee Table', 2010. Courtesy of the artist, Sutton gallery Melbourne and Hopkinson Mossman Auckland. 


      MCL: Unearthing narratives embedded within matter has been at the very core of your practice for some time now. Your most recent sculptural and film works have inquired into natural materials, their transit and energy flow and how their transformation – be it human-induced or ecological – have a social, political and an economic dimension. I'm particularly thinking of your 2010 project 'Nauru: Notes from a Cretaceous World' – featured at the New Museum 2015 Triennial– which focuses on the story of the tiny Micronesian island Republic of Nauru and its financial collapse as a consequence of a century of corrosive colonial exploitation of its phosphate ore resources. Could you elaborate on how this notion of transformation is explored in your sculpture works (traditionally static) and films (moving image) and how you have come to interrelate the two in the spatial narrative of your installations? 

      NM: As transformation is a process occurring in time, the necessity to explore duration has led me to test moving image as a sculptural possibility, to express not only the temporality of the assemblage, but also the forces and drives that produce such aggregations. In the video ‘Nauru: Notes from a Cretaceous World', narration sits over found footage and material that I shot myself, providing an account of Nauru’s material history as shaped by anthropogenic forces. The narration attempts to draw out the various histories that are embedded in material forms. In more recent projects, such as ‘A World Undone’ (2012)and ‘Progress In Action’ (2013), I have attempted to produce an intensified intersection between moving image and sculpture, enabling the materials to narrate themselves.
       
      'Nauru - Between A Rock and A Hard Place' installation view at Art Gallery Of New South whales 2009. Courtesy of the artist, Sutton gallery in Melbourne and Hopkinson Mossman in Auckland. Photo: Carley Wright.

      'Mined over matter', 2012. C-print on cotton paper, 69 x 103cm. 
      Courtesy of the artist and LABOR Mexico.


      'Matter over mined (for A World Undone)', 2012. C-print on cotton paper 69 x 103cm. 
      Courtesy of the artist and LABOR, Mexico.


      'A World Undone', 2012 (video Stills). HD colour, silent, 12min continuous loop. 
      Courtesy of the artist and LABOR Mexico.

      Mangan works with LABOR (México DF), Sutton Gallery (Melbourne) and Hopkinson Mossman (Auckland).

      Related Content:

      Visiting Curator Program, Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne, 12 May–7 June 2014 (28 April 2014).

      'Nice to Meet You – Erick Beltrán. Some Fundamental Postulates' by Max Andrews on Mousse Magazine #31 (30 November 2011) 

      Interview 'Free Forms' with Lauren Cornell part of Latitudes' 2012–13 long-term research #OpenCurating, released on April 2013 via Issuu.



      This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
      All photos:
      Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
      Work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




      Art and ecology exhibition and conference at Nottingham Contemporary


      Nottingham Contemporary continues their fantastic programme with an ambitious show centered on art and ecology. Ringing in the new year, 'Rights of Nature. Art and Ecology in the Americas' sets out expose how the "European idea of human mastery of the planet was imposed on the Americas. In contrast, new forms of resistance are inspired by, and linked to, indigenous cultures that see themselves as part of an ecological continuum. 'Rights of Nature...' will deliver a strong focus on the Amazon, the Andes, the Arctic and the Gulf of Mexico and is curated by TJ Demos and Alex Farquharson (Artistic Director, Nottingham Contemporary) with Irene Aristizábal (Head of Exhibitions at Nottingham Contemporary).

      One of the chosen press images for the exhibition is Minerva Cuevas' 2007 'Serie Hidrocarburos', which we selected back in 2008 for the cover of the catalogue of the exhibition 'Greenwashing. Environment: Promises, Perils and Perplexities' (29 February–18 May 2008) that we co-curated  with Ilaria Bonacossa at the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo. In Turin, Cuevas' 2004 'Egalité' was displayed alongside another 'Rights of Nature' participant Amy Balkin who is also presenting her ongoing 'Public Smog' (2004–ongoing) project.


      Front and back cover of the exhibition catalogue 'Greenwashing. Environment: Promises, Perils and Perplexities'.

      The 'Rights of Nature...' opening coincides with a promising day-long conference "drawing from lived and theoretical frameworks that de-privilege the human and recognize the agency of non-human entities", and will include presentations by participating artists Eduardo Abaroa, Minerva Cuevas, Subhankar Banerjee, Mabe Bethônico, Ursula Biemann and The Otolith Group as well as a performative intervention by Amy Balkin.  

       Section of the catalogue dedicated to Minerva Cuevas's 'Egalité' (2004).

      Related Content:

      Minerva Cuevas's 2012 'Incidents of Travel' tour around Plaza de las Tres Culturas in Tlatelolco, Tepito and Lagunilla neighbourhoods, and the Torre Latinoamericana. Photos of this and the other four artist' tours here



      This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
      All photos:
      Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
      Work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




      Lecture by Max Andrews "From Spiral to Spime: Robert Smithson, the ecological and the curatorial", 13 March, 2pm, Lecture Theatre 1, Royal College of Art, London

      Poster announcement at the Royal College of Art galleries.

      On Tuesday 13 March (2pm, Lecture Theatre 1), Max Andrews of Latitudes will give the lecture "From Spiral to Spime: Robert Smithson, the ecological and the curatorial" as part of the "Art and Globalisation" lecture series programmed by MA Curating Contemporary Art by Jean Fisher and Michaela Crimmin.
      Starting out from Robert Smithson's Broken Circle / Spiral Hill (1971), this lecture looks at projects by Lara Almarcegui, Jorge Satorre and Cyprien Gaillard to speculate on the 'when' and the 'shape' of art after Smithson in relation to synchronic concepts of post-environmental ecological thinking, and the flux between work and curatorial context. Based on an essay in the forthcoming publication 'Robert Smithson: Art in Continual Movement' (Alauda Publications, 2012).

      Robert Smithson, Broken Circle/Spiral Hill. Opening September 17, 2011. Emmen, The Netherlands. Photo by Jan Anninga. Courtesy SKOR.

      Following the lecture, Andrews will lead a seminar to first years students of the MA Curating Contemporary Art, Royal College of Art. 

      [Please note that the lecture is only open to students and staff of the college.]

      Tuesday 13 March 2012, 2pm
      Lecture Theatre 1
      Royal College of Art
      Kensington Gore 
      London SW7 2EU, UK


      All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
      Creative Commons Licence
      This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




      'Spaghetti Junctions', exhibition of Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller at Cubitt Gallery, London

      A Road Not Taken (2010), film still, Courtesy: Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller.

      'Spaghetti Junctions'
      Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller
      Cubitt Gallery, 16 April–29 May 2011
      Opening: Friday 15 April, 6.30–8.30pm

      7.30pm: Performance of an American president’s dedication to the White House solar installation
      Saturday 16 April, 2.30pm: A Road Not Taken (2010), film screening and Q&A with the artists

      Cubitt Gallery presents the first UK solo exhibition by Swiss artists Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller. Through performance, video, sculptural-recreation, text and archive material, Hemauer and Keller explore two short-lived experiments with solar energy, both marking points of change or crisis in the history of oil consumption.

      Latitudes recently collaborated with Hemauer and Keller for Portscapes (2009–10) (see making of video) and the solo show United Alternative Energies, at the Centre for Contemporary Art, Aarhus, Denmark (22 January–3 April 2011).

      The exhibition will present Sun of 1913 (2009), which looks back to the first commercial-scale solar power plant, which American engineer Frank Shuman built in Maadi near Cairo in 1913. However, the plant ceased operation after one year, at the onset of World War I, as the British Government began mass-scale crude oil production in Iran, precipitating a widespread turn to oil. A video projection shows the reconstruction of two segments of the plant by the artists and craftsmen in Cairo.

      A Curiosity, a Museum Piece and an Example of a Road not Taken (2006-2007) investigates former American president Jimmy Carter’s pioneering but ultimately futile energy programme. It culminated in his symbolic solar installation on the White House roof during the 1979 energy crisis, which was removed by the Ronald Regan administration.

      Using re-creation and re-enactment to revitalise the optimism of these pioneering projects, Hemauer and Keller also highlight the time that has since lapsed; that these were “roads not taken”. They revisit episodes in the history of oil and solar energy to ask questions about the present energy situation: increased dependence on, and continued conflict over, fossil fuels.

      Christina Hemauer (born 1973 Zurich, Switzerland) and Roman Keller (born 1969 Liestal, Switzerland) live in Zurich, Switzerland. Recent exhibitions include United Alternative Energies, Centre for Contemporary Art, Aarhus, Denmark, curated by Latitudes (2011) and the 11th Cairo International Biennale, Cairo (2009).

      Exhibition curated by Fiona Parry.

      -

      Saturday 16 April 2.30 pm
      A Road Not Taken (2010), 66 mins
      Film screening and Q&A with the artists

      This will be the UK premier of Hemauer and Keller’s documentary road trip film A Road Not Taken (2010). The film is structured around the conceptual act of finding and donating two of Carter’s solar panels to American history museums as the “museum pieces” he warned they might become. Through interviews (including with Carter) and archive footage the film investigates Carter’s energy programme in the context of his foreign policy on Iran during the 1979 oil crisis.

      CUBITT - Gallery and Studios
      8 Angel Mews
      London N1 9HH, UK
      Open: Wednesday-Sunday 12-6pm
      http://cubittartists.org.uk




      Installation views of 'Christina Hemauer | Roman Keller: United Alternative Energies', Århus Art Building, Århus, Denmark, until 3 April 2011

      Above and below: Installation view. Photo: Jens Møller Sørensen. Courtesy the artists.


      —> Slideshow of the publication.
      —> Slideshow of the exhibition.

      The exhibition 'Christina Hemauer | Roman Keller: United Alternative Energies', is the most comprehensive exhibition of the Swiss duo's work to date, presenting ten works of which four are new productions.

      Hemauer | Keller has investigated the concept of energy for several years. One of their main areas of interest is the history of oil and its competing alternatives, notably solar energy. Often involving historical research, remembrance, performance and film, their projects focus in particular on the politics of oil, energy crises, and the pursuit of new technology. (+ info...)

      A 36 full-colour page booklet can be purchased from the Århus Art Building for 35 DKK (aprox. €4,70). Exhibition remains on view until 3 April 2011.


      Photos and texts accompanying images: Latitudes | www.lttds.org




      Friday 21 January opening: 'Christina Hemauer & Roman Keller: United Alternative Energies', Aarhus Art Building, Århus, Denmark

      The exhibition 'Christina Hemauer & Roman Keller: United Alternative Energies' will open on Friday 21 January from 5pm and remain on view until 3 April 2011.

      Opening programme:

      17.45h Performance 'Postpetrolism was heralded here on 21 January 2011' (2006–ongoing)
      18.30h Performance 'Postpetrolistic Internationale'
      (2009–ongoing)
      Saturday 22 January, 11am: Panel discussion with
      Hemauer | Keller and the other exhibiting artist Søren Dahlgaard.

      The exhibition ‘Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller: United Alternative Energies’ is the most expansive presentation of the work of the Swiss duo to date, featuring ten works, four of which are new productions.

      Hemauer | Keller investigate energy – as an allegorical concept, an invisible force, and a defining theme of geopolitics and modernity. One of the main focuses of their practice is the history of oil and the fate and future of its competing alternatives, notably solar power.

      Hemauer | Keller make use of a range of strategies re-enactment and performance, as well as documentary video, sculpture and text. Their work often provides an opportunity to revitalize key historical moments. For example, the 66 minute documentary essay ‘A Road Not Taken’ (2010) examines former US President Jimmy Carter’s early and ultimately futile efforts to raise awareness about oil dependency, as symbolized by the installation, in 1979, of solar panels on the roof of the West Wing of the White House.

      Also featured in this exhibition is No.1 Sun Engine (2008–9). In 1913, American inventor Frank Shuman inaugurated the first large-scale solar power generator near Cairo, Egypt. Although it was economically viable compared to coal power, the plant was only used for one year. In 2008 the artists reconstructed two segments of this pioneering facility and established an information kiosk where local residents and passers-by could discover and contribute to its story.

      Globalising the Internationale (2006–ongoing) is a choral work which refers to the songs of socialism and the workers' movements – one of the most widespread social upheavals of the late 19th and early 20th Centuries. With this project, the artists aim to use the collective force of the human voice to herald a new age of alternative energy beyond fossil fuels. (+ info...)


      ABOUT THE ARTISTS

      Christina Hemauer (1973) and Roman Keller (1969) live and work in Zürich, Switzerland. Recent exhibitions and projects include: Globalising the Internationale, for Portscapes (2009) and Portscapes exhibition, at the Museum Boijmans van Beuningen, Rotterdam (2010); 11th Cairo International Biennale, El Cairo (2008–9), Nettoyage énergétique, Center Contemporary Art Fribourg (2007), A Manifestation, a Dedication and a Place to get the Word out, Swiss Art Awards, Basilea (2007); At this place, Postpetrolism was heralded on 27 April 2006, Kunsthof, Zurich (2006).

      ABOUT THE EXHIBITION

      The exhibition is one of the 5 proposals selected from over 600, received via Aarhus Art Building's open submission call, and launches the 2011 season 'IMAGINE – towards an eco-aesthetic'.

      A 36-page full colour publication in English and Danish will be printed on the occasion of the exhibition. It includes an introductory essay by the curators on the artists' practice as well as short texts about each of the works included in the exhibition.

      Christina Hemauer & Roman Keller: United Alternative Energies’ has been possible thanks to the generous support of The Danish Arts Council Committee for International Visual Art; Pro Helvetia and the Stanley Thomas Johnson Foundation.

      PRESS IMAGES
      Please contact Pernille Lyngsø, [email protected] or phone +45 86 20 60 53.
      Press photos can be downloaded at www.aarhuskunstbygning.dk



      The Aarhus Art Building

      J.M. Mørks Gade 13

      DK - 8000 Århus C

      DINAMARCA | MAPA





      Latitudes speak at seminar on Art and Ecology, 21 October 2009, The Wanås Foundation, Knislinge, Sweden



      Coinciding with the end of the 'Footprints' exhibition (17 May–25 October 2009) organised by The Wanås Foundation (presenting works by Tue Greenfort, Henrik Håkansson, Tea Mäkipää (with Halldór Úlfarsson), Tomás Saraceno and Nilsmagnus Sköld) this one-day seminar hosted by the foundation on the 21st October included three presentations from different areas of expertise and a panel discussion around the relationship between contemporary art practice and ecology, the language used by the media on climate change, individual and collective environmental efforts, etc.

      Speakers include:  Folke Tersman (Professor of Practical Philosophy at Uppsala University, author of 'Tillsammans: en filosofisk debattbok om hur vi kan rädda vårt klimat' (2009)); Joanna Yarrow (media commentator and expert in the field of ecologically sustainable lifestyles, founder of Beyond Green in London) and Latitudes, who presented projects including the group exhibition 'Greenwashing Environment: Perils, Promises and Perplexities' (2008), the publication Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook (2006) and the commissioning series in the port of Rotterdam 'Portscapes' (2009).
      Images: Latitudes and The Wanås Foundation




      Sharjah Biennial 8 (2007) part 2 publication with transcripts of the 3-day conference organised by Latitudes and the RSA, London



      Above images of the recently published catalogue of the Sharjah Biennial 8, United Arab Emirates [25º 22’N, 55º 24’E] titled 'Still Life: Art, Ecology and the Politics of Change (Part II)' which includes installation shots of the exhibition as well as transcripts of the 3-day conference Latitudes organised in collaboration with the Royal Society of Art's Arts & Ecology programme (today the RSA Arts and Ecology Centre) back in April 2007 (+ info).

      The symposium
      (images here) considered today’s uses and abuses of the ‘eco-’, notions of artistic agency and critical practice, as well as the role of the public realm in today’s artistic and institutional practices. How has it become fashionable (or profitable) to be seen to be eco? How has what we mean by ecology been transformed and evolved through the uses of terms such as ‘environmental’, ‘green’, ‘ethical living’, and so on?; How do some artists desire palliative results, while others offer strategies of friction or resistance? How far are the sources of materials a consideration for artists, designers and architects? And how does this relate to wider questions of resources—water, energy, oil in the Emirate and beyond?

      The symposium included focused presentations by keynote speakers such as Bruce Sterling (read his paper here), critical panels with participating artists Sergio Vega or Peter Fend as well as Van Abbemuseum director Charles Esche, or Smart Museum's
      Curator of Contemporary Art Stephanie Smith as well as breakout seminars with participating artists Tomás Saraceno and Michael Rakowitz.

      You can download the symposium programme, exhibition guide and view press-related materials in this archive.


      'Sharjah Biennial 8. Still Life: Art, Ecology and the Politics of Change (Part II)'
      568 pages, 233 x 165 mm, softcover 350g. Art Matt Card

      Paper: 80g. offset wood free and 135 g. Art Matt

      Publisher: Sharjah Biennial,
      www.sharjahbiennial.org
      ISBN 978-9948-04-328-6 Part II




      Latitudes in Kult Magazine (#10, October 2009)

      Milan-based Kult Magazine has published an article on art and ecology in their October issue written by art critic and curator Daniele Perra. In the section, Perra interviews curator Francesco Manacorda (curator of the exhibition 'Radical Nature: Art and Architecture for a Changing Planet 1969-2009' on view at the Barbican Art Gallery, London, until 18 October), as well as English artist Simon Starling and selects a few ongoing exhibitions and events that analyse the relationship between art and nature.

      In page 88 (see detail above) Perra mentioned Latitudes' ecology-related projects such as the 'Greenwashing. Environment: Perils, Promises and Perplexities...' exhibition at the Fondazione Sandretto in Turin in 2008, the guest-edition of UOVO #14 in 2007 and the publication 'Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook' in 2006, to introduce our participation in the forthcoming The Wånas Foundation seminar on Art and Ecology taking place on the 21 October in Knislinge, Sweden and in the symposium organised by Hinterland Projects on 26th November titled 'The evolving relationships between artists, the changing climate and new responsibilities'.

      [Above: Detail of page 88 of the magazine. With thanks to Daniele Perra]




      Proyección final ciclo entorno al Land Art, Centro Dos de Mayo, Móstoles, 25.10.08, 12–14.30h


      El próximo sábado 25 Octubre tendrá lugar en el Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo (Móstoles) la proyección final del programa de video "Una estaca en el lodo, un hoyo en la cinta. El campo expandido del Land Art, 1968-2008" que hemos presentado anteriormente en México DF, Vigo, Sevilla, Basilea, Barcelona, Wilheminapolder (Holanda) y Bristol.
      El ciclo se divide en dos partes: la primera parte (52m duración) muestra obras clásicas del Land Art realizadas en 1968 (algunas son post-producciones del 2004 y 2005) y la segunda parte (1h 15m duración) incluye obras contemporaneas producidas en los últimos 6 años.

      Para más información sobre la programación, consultar programa completo en w3art.es, en EXITMAIL o descargar programa de mano en el archivo. En la galería podreis ver imágenes de proyecciones anteriores.

      La proyección se presenta en contexto de la exposición 'Gustos, colecciones y cintas de vídeo', comisariada por Virginia Torrente.


       
      Sábado 25 Octubre
      De 12 a 14.30h


      CENTRO DE ARTE DOS DE MAYO
      Avda. de la Constitución, 23-25
      28931 Móstoles
      Tfno: 91 276 02 13 / 19[email protected]
      Acceso gratuito al centro y a sus actividades

      MAPA ubicación
      Metro: Móstoles Central L 12
      Renfe: Móstoles (línea C5 desde Atocha)
       


      Imagen: Programa impreso por el Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo; y WALTER DE MARIA, 'Two Lines Three Circles on the Desert', 1969, 4’45”, en: GERRY SCHUM 'LAND ART', 1969. 16mm transferido a DVD. Cortesía Groninger Museum, Groningen.





      Final dates 'Stake in the Mud...' film programme screenings

      The tour of the film and video programme "A Stake in the Mud, A Hole in the Reel. Land Art's Expanded Field, 1968-2008" [Una estaca en el lodo, un hoyo en la cinta. El campo expandido del Land Art, 1968-2008] is coming to an end, the two final screenings will take place on the:

      19 October
      , 3.30pm, Spike Island, Bristol, UK (in the context of the exhibition '
      Richard Long and Simon Starling', 4 October - 23 November, 2008)
      25 October
      , 12-2.30pm, Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo, Móstoles, Madrid (in the context of the exhibition '
      Gustos, colecciones y cintas de vídeo')


      Both of these screenings will present a selection of the material that conformed the programme, as follows:




      Still from Richard Long's 'Walking a Straight 10 Miles Line Forward and Back Shooting Every Half Mile (Dartmoor England, January 1969)', 1969, in Gerry Schum's 'LAND ART', 1969. Courtesy Groninger Museum, Groningen.

      Part 1 (duration 32' in Bristol and 52' in Móstoles)
       
      · Gerry Schum (1938 Bergisch Gladbach, Germany-1973 Düsseldorf, Germany): Land Art, 1969. 32'. Includes films by: Richard Long, Barry Flanagan, Dennis Oppenheim, Robert Smithson, Marinus Boezem, Jan Dibbets and Walter de Maria.· Nancy Holt (1938 Worcester, US. Lives in New Mexico,US) & Robert Smithson: Mono Lake, 1968/2004. 19'54" NOTE: Only screened at the Centro Dos de Mayo

       

      Francis Alÿs (in collaboration with Rafael Ortega and Cuauhtémoc Medina) 'When Faith Moves Mountains (Making of)', 2002. Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Peter Kilchmann, Zurich.

      Part 2 (duration 1h 15min)

      ·
      Francis Alÿs (1959 Amberes, Belgium. Lives in Mexico City, Mexico): Cuando la fe mueve montañas (Making of), 2002. 15'.
      ·
      Donna Conlon (1966 Atlanta, US. Lives in Ciudad de Panamá, Panamá): Country Road, 2002. 1'29".
      ·
      Hans Schabus (1970 Watschig, Austria. Lives in Viena, Austria): Western, 2002. 11'.
      ·
      Ibon Aranberri (1969 Itziar, Spain. Lives in Itziar, Spain): Zuloa (Ir.T. nº513), 2004. 8'.
      ·
      Mario García Torres (1975 Monclova, Mexico. Lives in La Jolla, US): Abandoned and Forgotten Land Works That Are Not Necessarily Meant To Be Seen As Art, 2004. 7'.
      ·
      Thiago Rocha Pitta (1980 Tiradentes, Brazil. Lives in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil): Zênite invertido, 2005. 11'54''.
      ·
      Maria Thereza Alves (1961 São Paulo, Brazil. Lives in Rome, Italy): The Sun, 2006. 5'03".
      ·
      Damián Ortega (1967 Mexico City, Mexico. Lives in Mexico City, Mexico and Berlin, Germany): Reticencia al trabajo, Segunda parte, 2006. 5'15".
      ·
      Nikolaj Recke (1969 Copenhague, Denmark. Lives in Copenhague, Denmark): Tomorrow is today, 2006. 3'.
      ·
      Jordan Wolfson (1980 New York, US. Lives in Nueva York and Berlin, Germany): Landscape for Fire, 2007. 7'.
      ·
      Cyprien Gaillard (1980, Paris, France. Lives in Paris, France): Real Remnants of Fictive Wars VI, 2008. 1'40''
      Read all press material that has appeared to date here and also view a slideshow of some screenings here.




      'Greenwashing' reviewed in summer issue of Artforum


      Eva Scharrer reviews 'Greenwashing' in the current issue of Artforum, Summer 2008, on p. 456. There is a printable pdf version on our Greenwashing archive along with other critical responses to the exhibition including from El Mundo, La Stampa and Artforum.com




      Site visit to Maasvlakte 2, the Port of Rotterdam expansion


      Last week Latitudes visited the port and industrial zone of Rotterdam (seen in the images). On the west of the existing port, construction is undergoing to build Maasvlakte 2, a new port area arising from the sea in front of the Maas estuary, which will be constructed between 2008 and 2013. The reclaimed land will add 20% of port area and triple the container capacity. Following such land reclamation or polder mega-projects such as the Flevopolder, Ijburg and Neeltje Jans, the second Maasvlakte will be the latest chapter of the Netherlands’ ongoing relationship between the sea and the land.

      As stated in the Maasvlakte website: "The land reclamation will measure around 2,000 hectares in total. Half of this will consist of infrastructure, such as sea defences, fairways, railways, roads and port basins. The other 1,000 hectares will provide the space for industrial sites."

      The Maasvlakte 2 project organisation of the Rotterdam Port Authority wants to involve artists in this 5 year development stage, and for that they have involved SKOR. The Port Authority and SKOR invited Latitudes to visit the area and to generate ideas for the forthcoming 5 year period, from planning to realisation of what will be one of the biggest trade zones in the world.

      All images: Latitudes | www.lttds.org




      'Una estaca en el lodo, un hoyo en la cinta. El campo expandido del Land Art' en el MARCO, Vigo




      CICLO DE VÍDEO. Panorámica
      Una estaca en el lodo, un hoyo en la cinta
      El campo expandido del Land Art, 1968-2008

      SALÓN DE ACTOS

      FECHAS
      jueves 8 y viernes 9 de mayo de 2008
      jueves 15 y viernes 16 de mayo de 2008 [repetición]

      COMISARIADO POR
      Latitudes | www.LTTDS.org

      ENTRADA LIBRE Y GRATUITA hasta completar aforo

      MARCO, Museo de Arte Contemporánea de Vigo.
      C/ Príncipe 54. 36202 Vigo.
      Tel: 986 113900. Fax 986 11 39 01
      [email protected] www.marcovigo.com

      Durante cuatro días del mes de mayo, el salón de actos del MARCO acoge el ciclo de vídeo “Una estaca en el lodo, un hoyo en la cinta. El campo expandido del Land Art, 1968-2008”, comisariado por Latitudes, después de su presentación en el Museo Tamayo de Arte Contemporáneo de México, y antes de continuar su itinerancia a Basilea, Sevilla, Barcelona y Holanda.

      Tomando prestado su título de los escritos de Robert Smithson, este programa presenta una selección de imágenes en movimiento que forman parte de la memoria histórica del Land Art, acompañadas de producciones de artistas contemporáneos.





      'Greenwashing' in Artforum Critics' Picks

      Below you can read the review of the 'Greenwashing. Environment: Perils, Promises and Perplexities' exhibition by Emily Verla Bovino in Artforum Critics' Picks. The project website (www.greenwashing.lttds.org) has also been updated with links to press articles (ongoing) and a photogallery with a selection of installation shots.

      - - -

      "Greenwashing"
      Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo
      Via Modane, 16
      February 29–May 18


      “Cyclus Offset,” “KeayKolour Recycled May,” “Shiro Alga Carta”: A series of “all natural,” “ecological” papers color the catalogue for “Greenwashing” in a muted rainbow of earthy greens, yellows, and pinks. Designed by the exhibition’s curators—Ilaria Bonacossa and Latitudes’s Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna—the volume offers its own version of “green sheen.” Are the Fondazione and the organizers self-consciously engaging in the same banal posturing they set out to critique? Or do they see the printing of an art catalogue on recycled paper as a step in the direction of philosopher Félix Guattari’s exhortation to “think transversally,” toward a reconciliation of the nature/culture dichotomy? Like most of the show’s twenty-five participating artists, the organizers are uncompromising in their ambiguity: They neither propose grand solutions nor shy away in passive resignation. An ambitious project that occasionally falters, “Greenwashing” is largely successful in broadening and interrogating the narrow views that dominate environmentalist debates.

      Works by Jorge Peris, Lara Almarcegui, and Chu Yun provide the most exemplary models of this approach. For Fairy, 2008, Peris bolted slabs of wet clay to the walls of a back room, transforming the space’s frigid architecture into a musty den of soft, sweating walls kept moist by a network of sprinklers. Like Peris’s installation, Almarcegui’s slide show and postcards, titled A Wasteland: Rotterdam Harbour, 2003–2018; Genk, 2004–2014; Arganzuela Public Slaughterhouse, Madrid, 2005–2006; Peterson Paper Factory, Moss, 2006–2007, documents microenvironments that are at once constructed and deconstructed, simultaneously additive and subtractive. In A Wasteland—wilderness by design—the artist negotiated with municipal authorities and landowners to preserve the atmosphere of disuse in a selection of urban lots, sparing them from the restoration and clean-up of urban planners. In Chu’s Constellation, 2006, various appliances set to “sleep” mode are arranged in a dark room. Their twinkling red, blue, and green lights are the stars of a heaven inhabited by obsolete electronics, including VHS players and soon-to-be-outmoded technologies, like CRT television monitors. While Chu’s work evokes what Andrews calls the “‘What can I do?’ responses to climate change,” it also explores the seductiveness of the spectacular apocalypse scenarios frequently invoked in environmentalist rhetoric. Such eschatological visions aren’t the province of environmentalists alone, however. As Noam Chomsky affirms in Cornelia Parker’s video, Chomskian Abstract, 2007: “About a third of the population probably believes it doesn’t matter what we do about global warming . . . because Jesus is coming and so . . . what’s the difference? . . . Those of us who are saved will rise to heaven, and everyone else will be massacred—and it’ll be wonderful.”

      Emily Verla Bovino





      'Greenwashing' en El Cultural (13 Marzo 2008)

      Ibon Aranberri 'Light over Lemoniz (without shockwave)', 2000–4. 
      Cortesía del artista e Isabella Bortolozzi, Berlin.

      A continuación una selección del artículo 'Verde es el color del dinero' de Mariano Navarro que se publicó en el suplemento 'El Cultural' de 'El Mundo' el 13 Marzo 2008:

      "Greenwashing se ocupa de un tema pujante, la situación del medioambiente en el mundo, y cómo su título indica lo hace desde una óptica tan amplia como determinada. Greenwashing es un neologismo que define la injustificable apropiación de las virtudes medioambientales por parte de la industria, los estamentos políticos o las organizaciones, con la finalidad de crear una imagen positiva de sus actividades o productos y una imagen mistificadora que distraiga la atención respecto a sus propias responsabilidades e impactos medioambientales negativos. Green significa verde, washing, lavar, y podría traducirse por “lavar con verde” o, más irónicamente, por “el verde lava más blanco.”

      El comisariado ha sido un trabajo colectivo entre Ilaria Bonacossa, jefa de exposiciones de la Fondazione, y el estudio Latitudes, formado por Max Andrews y Mariana Cánepa Luna, colaboradores del programa Arts & Ecology, autores del libro Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook, organizadores en la Bienal de Sharjah de un simposio sobre el tema y editores de un número de la revista UOVO, de Turín, con el tema Ecología, Lujo & Degradación. Cito esta parte de su curriculum porque sin el conocimiento previo del temario tratado, difícilmente podrían haber llevado a cabo una lectura que, sin ilustrar tesis preconcebida alguna, resulte tan rica, tan alertadora e instructiva, en el mejor sentido del término. Tampoco para la Fondazione, que ha dedicado esfuerzos en esos aspectos desde 2001." 






      Film programme ‘A Stake in the Mud, A Hole in the Reel. Land Art's Expanded Field 1968–2008'

      Gerry Schum, 'Land Art TV' (1969). Courtesy Groninger Museum, Groningen.

      Latitudes was invited to curate the Spring 2008 Panorámica cycle for the Museo Tamayo Arte Contemporáneo, Mexico City. The cycle is titled 'A Stake in the Mud, a Hole in the Reel. Land Art's Expanded Field 1968–2008' and will be screened in two parts on 1st and 2nd April at 19.30h (and repeated on 5–6 April at 13h.)

      Borrowing its title from the writings of Robert Smithson, the programme revisits a selection of moving-image works that form part of the historical memory of Land Art, through and alongside more recent productions by contemporary artists. Indeed a concern with remoteness, together with the powerful allure of specific sites, weaves throughout the films’ itinerary, which includes the sewers of New York and Vienna (Gordon Matta-Clark, Hans Schabus), the deserts of California (Mario Garcia Torres), the mountains of the Basque country (Ibon Aranberri), and the beaches of Taveuni (Nikolaj Recke).
      Dowload the screening programme here (Spanish, pdf, 624 KB)

      Part 1:Gerry Schum's LAND ART (1969) which includes films by Richard Long, Barry Flanagan, Dennis Oppenheim, Robert Smithson, Marinus Boezem, Jan Dibbets and Walter de Maria), Nancy Holt & Robert Smithson, Robert Smithson and Gordon Matta-Clark.
      Part 2:
      Maria Thereza Alves, Francis Alÿs, Ibon Aranberri, Donna Conlon, Cyprien Gaillard, Mario García Torres, Damián Ortega, Hans Schabus, Nikolaj Recke, Thiago Rocha Pitta and Jordan Wolfson.

      The programme will also be presented in Museo de Arte Contemporánea de Vigo, Vigo (8-9 and 15-16 May); Stadtkino/Kunsthalle Basel (27 May); Centro Andaluz Arte Contemporáneo, Sevilla (24-25 June) and Fundació Suñol, Barcelona (7–8 July).

      The programme is available for screenings in auditoriums. If you are interested in hosting it, please write to info[at]lttds[dot]org to receive information on the available dates and terms and conditions.




      Greenwashing update and Jorge Peris's 'Fairy' (2008)

      Curated by Latitudes with Ilaria Bonacossa, Greenwashing. Environment: Perils, Promises and Perplexities finally opened to the public on Thursday and continues at the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin, until 18 May (e-flux mailing). La Stampa previewed the show here. We are currently working on redesigning the project website (www.greenwashing.LTTDS.org) which will include installation photographs, audio interviews with participating artists and details about the 192-page catalogue (English and Italian editions). Details to be announced here on the Latitudes blog.

      Meanwhile to whet your appetite here are some photos of Jorge Peris's Fairy (2008), one of several new productions specially commissioned for the exhibition: a cave-like environment consisting of 400kg of clay kept from drying out through the use of a humidity system. Peris has likened the experience of the work – which took three weeks to complete – to being inside the belly of a whale.




      All images: Courtesy the artist and Zero..., Milan.




      Invitation to the group show exhibition 'Greenwashing. Environment: Perils, Promises and Perplexities', 28 February–18 May 2008, Fondazione Sandretto





      'Estratos', Proyecto Arte Contemporáneo 2008, Murcia


      31 January – 31 March 2008
       

      www.pacmurcia.es

      ARTISTS
      LARA ALMARCEGUI, BERND & HILLA BECHER, BLEDA Y ROSA, JUAN CRUZ, VERNE DAWSON, MARK DION, JIMMIE DURHAM, CYPRIEN GAILLARD, ILANA HALPERIN, JOACHIM KOESTER, MARK LOMBARDI, ALLAN McCOLLUM, PAUL NOBLE, PAULINA OLOWSKA, DIEGO PERRONE, ABRAHAM POINCHEVAL & LAURENT TIXADOR, MARJETICA POTRC, GREGOR SCHNEIDER, EVE SUSSMAN & THE RUFUS CORPORATION and KEITH TYSON.

      VENUES
      Centro Párraga, Espacio AV, MAM (Museo Arqueológico de Murcia), MUBAM (Museo de Bellas Artes de Murcia), Museo de Santa Clara, Sala San Esteban, Sala Verónicas, Cendeac, Filmoteca and three other public spaces in the city.

      The first Contemporary Art Project (PAC in Spanish) wants to make itself distinctive from the circuit of international biennials and art festivals by promoting a series of seminars for the duration of the project ('Heterocronías, Temporalitites in contemporary art practices' with guests including Pamela M. Lee, Peter Osborne, Manuel Cruz, Gary Shapiro and José Luis Villacañas), a film season in the regional filmoteca, and by offering six 3-month residency grants to Murcian artist to go to GlogauAIR, Berlin; Gasworks, London and Duende, Rotterdam; on top of the usual guided tours organised for this kind of events.

      Organiser _ Comunidad Autónoma de la Región de Murcia. Consejería de Cultura, Joventud y Deportes
      Curator _ Nicolas Bourriaud

      Assistant Curator _ Aurelia Kreienbühl
      Coordination & Communication _ Urroz Proyectos

      [all photos: Latitudes with courtesy to all the participating artists]




      Art&Co Nº1, 'El arte después de la ecología' por Max Andrews


      En primer número de la revista Art&Co se incluye un texto de Max Andrews donde se analiza la obra de los artistas Amy Balkin, Cyprien Gaillard, The Bruce High Quality Foundation y Allora & Calzadilla – cuyas obras estaran presentes en la exposición co-comisariada por Latitudes 'Greenwashing. Environment: Perils, Promises and Perplexities' (véase http://greenwashing.lttds.org), que inaugura el 28 Febrero en la Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Torino (exposición abierta del 29 Febrero al 11 Mayo).



      Max Andrews, 'El arte después de la ecología' / 'Art after Environmentalism', Art&Co, Número 1, Invierno 2008 / Number 1, Winter 2008, pp.28-32 & 116-118 (English translation). Descargar pdf aquí (3.7MB)

      Revista trimestral editada por la Asociación Amigos de ARCO.
      Directora Editorial: Ángela Molina
      Contacto: [email protected]
      Números anteriores: http://www.arco.ifema.es (véase menú 'Publicaciones')




      'Greenwashing...' preview in January's Artforum

      Two corrections:
      • Curated by ... Mariana Cánepa Luna, NOT Cánapa.
      • The exhibition will be on view until 11 May.




      Latitudes in 'Dazed & Confused' (December 2007 issue)


      The December 07 issue of 'Dazed and Confused' have profiled UOVO magazine as a 'heavy duty zine'. Their short review is subtitled 'Latitudes, the Spanish curators, take over the doorstep-sized art quarterly with the help from Dash Snow and Ryan McGinley' and the caption under the photograph reads 'Latitudes take over the reins at UOVO'.

      They are indeed dazed and confused. We have NOT taken over the magazine nor have we met Dash Snow or Ryan McGinley, at least not yet. Snow and McGinley were interviewed in previous UOVO issues as were in fact all the other artists mentioned in the review.

      However, Latitudes did guest edit the summer issue #14 (Green) 'Ecology, Luxury and Degradation' which included interviews and projects by artists such as Tue Greenfort, Sergio Vega, Michael Rakowitz, Lara Almarcegui, Federico Martelli, Noguchi Rika, Arturas Raila, etc. We are also collaborating with The Bookmakers Ed., the design office led by Chiara Figone which has just begun to publish monographs, as members of their Advisory Board together with Andrew Bonacina, Adam Carr, Lillian Davies, Silvia Sgualdini and Francesco Stocchi.

      [Thanks to Alexis Zavialoff for sending the photo of the magazine].




      'Greenwashing...' website

      Sergio Vega, 'Paradise on Fire', 2007. Series of five inkjet archival prints, 106 x 134 cm each. Courtesy the artist and Umberto di Marino Arte Contemporanea, Naples.

      We have launched the project website for 'Greenwashing. Environment: Perils, Promises and Perplexities': www.greenwashing.lttds.org. The site will be updated over time as an extension to the printed catalogue, with expanded contents such as installation shots, interviews, artists CVs, etc.

      So far we have confirmed the participation of Jennifer Allora & Guillermo Calzadilla, Lara Almarcegui, Maria Thereza Alves, Amy Balkin, The Bruce High Quality Foundation, Chu Yun, A Constructed World, Ettore Favini, Cyprien Gaillard, Tue Greenfort, Norma Jeane, Cornelia Parker, Jorge Peris, Wilfredo Prieto, RAF / Reduce Art Flights, Tomás Saraceno, Simon Starling, Nikola Uzunovski, Sergio Vega, Wang Jianwei and James Yamada.

      The show will open on 28 February 2008 at the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin and remain on view until 11 May. The exhibition is curated by Fondazione's curator Ilaria Bonacossa and Latitudes (Max Andrews & Mariana Cánepa Luna).

      For any press enquiries please email: [email protected]




      out of the studio! photos

      Here are a few photos of our recent presentation at the 'out of the studio! symposium of art and public space' in Hasselt, Belgium (26–28 October). We were joined in our session by Bristol-based curator Claire Doherty and Mexican-based curator Cuauhtémoc Medina.

      out of the studio!
      out of the studio!
      out of the studio!





      GREENWASHING exhibition announcement


       
      We are delighted to announce that Latitudes will curate, with Ilaria Bonacossa, the exhibition Greenwashing. Environment: Perils, Promises and Perplexities / Ambiente: Pericoli, Promesse e Perplessità / Medioambiente: Peligros, Promesas y perplejidades at the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin, Italy, 28 February – 4 May 2008.

      More information here. And eventually on this site.




      Latitudes' lecture 'Notes towards an ecology of risk' in 'Out of the Studio', Hasselt, Belgium

      Last Sunday 28th October we spoke during the final session of out of the studio!

      The session included lectures by:

      Cuauhtémoc Medina
      – Associated curator of art from Latin America, Tate Modern, London and researcher at the UNAM, Mexico. Lecture: “A different typology of public art in Latin America”
      Max Andrews & Mariana Cánepa Luna
      – Founders of Latitudes, an independent curatorial office, Barcelona. Lecture: “Notes towards an ecology of risk”
      Claire Doherty
      – Editor of 'Contemporary Art: From Studio to Situation' (2004), senior research fellow at the University of the West of England, Bristol. Lecture “Public Art as Situation: from temporary intervention to long-term commitment”
      Closing remarks by:
      Frank Lubbers – Independent curator and art advisor, Brussels.




      Lara Almarcegui's Wastelands

      Last weekend we visited 2 of Lara Almárcegui's wastelands. One in the Rotterdam harbour (www.braakliggendterrein.nl) and the other one in Genk, Belgium. The Rotterdam wasteland (first 4 pictures) has remained untouched since 2003 and will be kept until 2018. The Genk wasteland's dates are 2004-2014 (following 12 images).



      "Lara Almárcegui's work often explores neglected or overlooked sites, carefully cataloguing and highlighting each location's tendency towards entropy. Her projects have ranged from a guide to the wastelands of Amsterdam to the display, in their raw form, of the materials used to construct the galleries in which she shows. Her works are simple actions that belie the vast research process which she undertakes to achieve them." (Frieze Projects, 2006)




      Latitudes in the 'Out of Studio!' symposium

      The Out of the Studio! symposium is organised by Jan Debbaut and the Province of Limburg, in collaboration with Z33 Center for Contemporary Art, Hasselt, Belgium.

      More than twenty leading international artists, curators and scholars will present a variety of projects ranging from the Snow Show in Lapland to the Echigo Tsumari Triennial in Japan, from the make-over of Barcelona to the complexity of commissioning art in public space in New York City and addressing actual concerns and strategies.

      When: Friday 26, Saturday 27 and Sunday 28 October 2007
      Where: Hasselt, Belgium

      The number of participants is limited. Booking in advance is necessary by returning a.s.a.p. the registration form.
      The registration fee of €200 includes documentation, receptions, lunches, dinner and transfer to Alden Biesen. For further information and assistance with travel arrangements please contact Monique Verhulst at [email protected]

      Presentations and discussions will be in English. Proceedings will be published afterwards.

      For a printable version of the programme and registration form, please go to: http://www.z33.be/outofthestudio




      Tue Greenfort & Piotr Uklanski, Secession, Vienna



      Piotr Uklanski 'A Retrospective' (main space) and Tue Greenfort's 'Medusa' (upper and lower galleries) at the Secession, Vienna, 20 September – 18 November 2007.

      All images: Latitudes | www.lttds.org




      UOVO14 'GREEN – Ecology, Luxury & Degradation' Available now!


      GUEST EDITED BY LATITUDES
      JULY–SEPTEMBER 2007
      Issue #14 presents interviews, essays, projects and two CDs around art practices that resist the spectacularisation or romanticisation of ecological issues or the natural world. The issue was launched in Art Basel's Art Lobby on the 17 June (images below). See also inside the magazine here.
      Where to find it? here
      More info? here and here

       
      [Photos: courtesy UOVO | The Bookmakers Ed. & MCH Swiss Exhibition Basel/Zurich AG]




      'LAND, ART...' publication reviewed in Frieze



       Brian Dillon reviews LAND, ART: A Cultural Ecology Handbook in the summer issue (#108) of Frieze, devoted to ecology. Read the article online.

      In that same issue, there is also a feature article by Latitudes' Max Andrews entitled 'The Whole Truth' featuring the work of Mierle Laderman Ukeles, Christina Hemauer & Roman Keller, Maria Thereza Alves, among others.





      UOVO/14 GREEN - Launching 17 June 2007


      Latitudes is guest editing the forthcoming July–September 2007 issue of UOVO. #14 will be titled '(GREEN) Ecology, Luxury & Degradation'.

      The magazine will be launched in the Art Basel's Art Lobby section on 17 June (4-5pm). More information about the issue here – it's almost 500 pages!

      Full Art Lobby Programme here (pdf 87kb)




      Latitudes have just finished editing UOVO Issue#14


      We have just finished editing UOVO Issue#14 titled (GREEN) 'Ecology, Luxury and Degradation'. The magazine will be launched in Art Basel's Art Lobby section on June 17th am (exact time TBC - will let you know!).

      In the meantime, have a look at the issue 13 which was just launched in Berlin! 






      Exhibition 'Weather Report: Art & Climate Change'

      SEPTEMBER 14 - DECEMBER 21, 2007
      Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art

      "
      Weather Report: Art and Climate Change is an exhibition curated by internationally renowned critic, art historian, and writer Lucy R. Lippard. It is presented in collaboration with EcoArts. This exhibit partners the art and scientific communities to create a visual dialogue surrounding climate change. Historically, visual arts play a central role in attracting, inspiring, educating and motivating audiences. Weather Report: Art and Climate Change will exhibit artwork, in the museum and our partnering venues, and in outdoor site specific locations throughout Boulder, that will activate personal and public change."

      More here.






      Photos of the launch of the publication 'LAND, ART: A Cultural Ecology Handbook' at the LCE, London

       All images: Latitudes | www.lttds.org




      Invitation card for the launch of the publication 'LAND, ART: A Cultural Ecology Handbook'



      Edited by / Editor: Max Andrews
      Published by / Publica: RSA in partnership with Arts Council England
       

      Specs / Caracteríticas: 17 x 24 cm, 248 pages, colour throughout
      ISBN 0 901469 57 2
      Design by / Diseñado por: SMITH
      Distributed by / Distribuidor: Cornerhouse Publications


      | UK | 

      Here is the invitation for the publication launch of 'LAND, ART: A Cultural Ecology Handbook' which will take place on the Monday 11 December, 6.15–8pm at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), coinciding with the RSA/LSE international enquiry 'No Way Back?' (11–12 Dec). 

      The book is going to print in Italy in two weeks, so soon you will be able to see more on these pages.

      | ES | 

      Aquí tenéis la postal de la publicación en la que hemos trabajado a lo largo de este último año! Su presentación oficial se hará el 11 de Diciembre en Londres al final del primer día de la conferencia internacional organizada por la Royal Society of Arts (RSA) y la London School of Economics (LSE) titulada 'No Way Back?' (11-12 Dic). 

      El libro se imprimirá en dos semanas en Italia, así que pronto podréis ver más información en estas páginas.
       
      [Image on the book cover: Henrik Håkansson, Untitled (Khao Nor Chuchi), 2003, offset print on paper, 70 x 100 cm. Courtesy the artist; The Modern Institute, Glasgow; Galleria Franco Noero, Torino.]




      Older Posts / Entradas antiguas