‘Thinking like a drainage basin’ essay in the catalogue of the exhibition ‘Lara Almarcegui. Béton’


(Above and below) Installation views of the exhibition ‘Béton’ by Lara Almarcegui at the CAIRN centre d'art, Digne-les-Bains, 2019. All photos: François-Xavier Emery.

Lara Almarcegui's exhibition ‘Béton’ opened on April 5 at CAIRN Centre d'art, in Digne-les-Bains, France, and will be on view until June 30th, 2019.

Latitudes has collaborated in the bilingual catalogue ‘Lara Almarcegui. Béton’ (French/English) recently published by Silvana Editoriale on the occasion the exhibition, with the new essay ‘Thinking like a drainage basin’. The publication includes an introduction by Giulia Pagnetti (curator of the exhibition and director of CAIRN Centre d'art), a second essay titled ‘Lara Almarcegui's building sites’ by Natacha Pugnet, and a conversation between the artist and Winfried Dallmann (Associate Professor, Department of Geosciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø) titled ‘Earth Calculation’.



As Latitudes' writes in the essay (...) ‘As part of her most recent project for CAIRN Centre d’art, Almarcegui has produced ‘Roches et Materiaux du Bassin de la Bléone’ (2019), an inventory of the different types of geological matter comprising the entire drainage basin of the Bléone river from its source near Prads-Haute-Bléone to its confluence with the Durance at Chateau-Arnaux, a terrain of some 906 km2.

In discussing how storytelling might integrate with environmental science, anthropologist Julie Cruikshank poses the rhetorical question, “are glaciers ‘good to think with’?”[1] She suggests that glaciers and glacial stories be allowed to disrupt and exceed conceptual fields and dominant frameworks of knowledge. Ecologist Aldo Leopold coined the term “to think like a mountain” in his 1949 book ‘A Sand County Almanac’, proposing that history could be narrated, or indeed art could be made, from the point of view of non-human actors. Are drainage basins good to think with? What might it entail to think like the rocks and topological forms that funnel water into a river in the Alpes-de-Haute-Provence département in southeastern France?’



‘Lara Almarcegui. Béton’
April 2019, 48 pages, 24 x 17 cm
Texts by Natacha Pugnet, Latitudes and an interview between the artist and Winfried Dallmann. 
French/English 
Published by Silvana Editoriale
Edited by CAIRN centre d'art
ISBN 9788836640904
Purchase here for 10 Euros.

RELATED CONTENT:
  • Writing archive on Latitudes' website;
  • Review – ‘Domènec. Y la tierra será el paraíso', adn galería, Barcelona, frieze.com, 13 March 2019
  • Opinion – ‘Frank Zappa’s Genre-Defying ‘Civilization Phaze III’’, frieze, January-February 2019, Issue 200, and frieze.com, 14 January 2019
  • Review – ‘Te toca a tí’ [It's your turn], Espai d'art contemporani de Castelló, art-agenda, 7 January 2019
  • art-agenda review of Frieze week 2018 15 October 2018
  • Catalogue essay – ‘The Kørner Problem’, in the monograph ‘John Kørner', ed. by Maria Nipper. Published by Roulette Russe, 2017. 19 February 2018




(Part 3/3) The 55th Biennale di Venezia: National Pavilions and Collateral Events in pictures and as seen by the critics, 1 June–24 November 2013

Browsing 'The Ideological Guide' on iPad.

If you haven't been to this year's Venice Biennale and plan to go soon, download 'The Ideological Guide', a free app developed by the Dutch artist Jonas Staal. As reported in artinfo.com "the smartphone app offers information about each participating country’s 2013 pavilion, from its commissioner and curator to the sources of its funding, while also providing historical information about past pavilions, and charting that nation’s economic and political alliances with other participating countries. The app, according to its creators, shows that the Venice Biennale’s distribution of national pavilions around the city is in many ways a more accurate reflection of nations’ geopolitical position than any geographical map.

Allora. So. Let's begin with the Spanish Pavilion, not only as it's the country where Latitudes is based, but also as it's the first pavilion one encounters when entering the Biennale area, walking towards the Padiglione Centrale. Quinn Latimer
 in Art Agenda wrote: "In her discreetly powerful Spanish Pavilion, meanwhile, Lara Almarcegui also tread some familiar contemporary-art modes and ideas, though they were insistently material. And the pavilion was a natural: streaked with sunrays from the skylights above, the piles of stone, wood, glass, and dirt—the exact same amounts that were used in the building of the pavilion itself—were immediately comprehensible, inevitable, lucidly effective." [Press Release and more photos here, video interview here]

  
'Raw' mountains of the various materials that compose the very building where they were presented: the 1922 Spanish Pavilion.

Continuing with Latimer
: 

"Surrounded by Massimiliano Gioni’s larger show, the somewhat airless “Encyclopedic Palace,” with its Documenta hangover of late, and serious crush on cleanly framed taxonomies, the national pavilions’ representatives of culture and country felt antique and obvious and a mess—but also a relief. Gioni’s turning of private cosmos and personal struggle into a stylized interior design aesthetic was definitively lacking in the disordered, disparate pavilions, where taste was usually the least concern. Yet lack of taste does not always equal distastefulness, which often arises instead from an excess of the stuff. If sometimes bad taste materializes as poeticized and/or politicized kitsch (see the pavilions of Canada, the US, Israel, and, at moments, the Netherlands), other pavilions broke through the visual chatter."

On the Netherlands' presentation, Adrian Searle of UK's The Guardian commented that Mark Manders' "Room with Broken Sentence" (...) "is a sensitively conceived and quietly dramatic tableau, like the interior of a mind as much as an actual space. The human presence emerges and disappears, conjoins with furniture or is sandwiched between stacks of timbers." 

Following on from our previous post on biennale tote bags, we'd like to add that the Dutch press package gets our bravo for the most beautiful, comprehensive and effectively-designed communication materials (and what a great pavilion catalogue too, with contributions by 37 international writers invited to reflect on individual works by Manders, published by Roma Publications). The press folder includes a full-coloured booklet with beautiful installation views of the pavilion; an 8-page booklet with an interview between the pavilion curator, Lorenzo Benedetti, and the artist alongside black and white photos of the works on show and a floorplan of the exhibition; two double-sided thick card A4 postcards of the artist's work; and a copy of Manders' "fake newspapers" which also covers the entrance to the pavilion. You can see images of the materials on the website of Amsterdam-based designer Roger Willems, or read more in the website of the pavilion. Gefeliciteerd!

  
 (Three above) Installation views of Mark Manders's "Room with a Broken Sentence" (2013) at the Dutch pavilion. More photos via Contemporary Art Daily.

Latimer laments the somehow shy presentation of Valentin Carron at the Swiss Pavilion which according to her "provoked nostalgia. Bruno Giacometti’s austere, 1952 modernist idyll is one of the finest pavilions in the Giardini. If two years ago Thomas Hirschhorn [see a few photos here onwards] obliterated Giacometti’s clean lines with his overwrought, über-hoarding installation, this year Valentin Carron erred on the side of caution, hewing too close and careful to those very same lines."

 View of Valentin Carron's presentation at the Swiss Pavilion.

Despite Latimer's comments on the "disordered, disparate pavilions", Jörg Heiser was amazed to find a common thread: "Even in the national pavilions of the Giardini – which are not under any over-arching curatorial supervision, but in each case are commissioned according to very different agendas – there are numerous signs that artists are groping in the dark of the unconscious and the (supposedly) ‘primordial’: grottoes and caves all over the place, clay sculptures, enigmatic allegories, prehistoric flintstones, (pseudo-)fossil findings. Is this parallel between the curated show and the national pavilions merely coincidental or does it tell us – as it steers art away from sober abstraction, calculated boutique chic, and more straightforward forms of realist social comment – something about the current state of things, the position of art in society (and economy) at large?"

And speaking of clay figures and rocks, according to Carol Vogel Sarah Sze's 'Triple Point' spread beyond the US Pavilion, with a few merchants in Castello displaying simulations of her pieces adorning rooftops, balcones and shop windows. "Ms. Sze is asking questions of her audience: “What objects in your life have value, and how is value created?” she explained. “I wanted to show objects that we know and have seen in our bag or on the shelf of a store which have the residue of emotion... Ms. Sze, who is known for creating site-specific environments from everyday objects like toothpicks, sponges, light bulbs and plastic bottles, arrived here in a snow storm on March 28 and has been hoarding, foraging and installing ever since." [Full article here, you can also read another review here, watch a video interview with the artist or have a 360 degree virtual tour of the Pavilion].

(Above) Sarah Sze's 'Triple Point', United States of America Pavilion.


The mentioned 'spiritual turn' is also shared by Corinna Kirsch in her review in Art F City, which reads: "It seems there’s something in the air about The Encyclopedic Palace’s “dream of a universal, all-embracing knowledge” (...) Science fiction and spirituality, in particular, are present in the pavilions as well as Gioni’s exhibition, though the way these themes play out are to entirely different stylistic ends... Overall, these works are less emotional than Gioni’s; even when they’re grounded in science fiction and spirituality, they’re grounded in the concerns of the here-and-now. Simply put, Gioni’s artists tend to live in their head, and the pavilions’ artists, in the world." 

According to Kirsch, examples of this are the British pavilion with Jeremy Deller's "English Magic" [see a video of Adrian Searle visiting the pavilion], where the artist has "the grandest presentation on view of epic creation and destruction myths, and on a national scale." [Watch the full-length of the video 'English Magic' here]. Paul Teasdale went on to say that Deller delves in the "antiquated, faintly ridiculous notion of the ‘national pavilion’ and the antiquated, faintly ridiculous notion of Englishness itself that Deller is exploring. And the almost magical way in which we so quickly forget the past."

(Above) Visitors queue to have their own prints of "William Morris returns from the dead to hurl Roman Abramovich's vast yacht Luna, which blighted the waterfront beside the Giardini at the 2011 Venice Biennale, into the waves." (Adrian Searle) and of a Hen Harrier grabbing a Range Rover.

 Above: A steel-drum orchestra played A Guy Called Gerald and Bowie's The Man Who Sold the World during the afternoon of the opening day.

Moving on. The almost bare Romanian Pavilion presented a "retrospective history of Venice, with actors as breathing archives of the Biennale itself" as Kaelen Wilson-Goldie has described in her Artforum diary review. Adrian Searle went on to recommend everyone to visit "the Pavilion, where Alexandra Pirici, Manuel Pelmuş and a small group of performers restage dozens of works from the previous 54 Biennales: using nothing more than their own bodies, they act out and mime Picasso's Guernica, Hans Haacke's famous destruction of the German pavilion's floor in 1993, paintings by Modigliani, sculptures by Rodin, performances by Marina Abramović and photographs by Nan Goldin. Both homage and parody, these quick-change charades in the otherwise empty pavilion take place all day, every day. Marvellous, funny and affecting, An Immaterial Retrospective of the Venice Biennale is much more than a parlour game. It is about history and memory – and it shows that the real encyclopedic palace is not to be found in a collection of objects, but in people themselves." [see a video of Searle visiting the Romanian Pavilion, starting at min. 2.30 while the 'living sculptures' are performing a reenactment of Allora and Calzadilla's 2011 piece presented in the US Pavilion].


(Above) An Immaterial Retrospective of the Venice Biennale, Romanian Pavilion.


Above: 'Bang', a so-so installation assembled by 886 three-legged wooden stols by Ai Weiwei, at the entrance of the German Pavilion (this year housed in the French Pavilion).

More Giardini. For the Austrian Pavilion, Mathias Poledna takes us to the movies. "... to a very short movie, that is. At just over three minutes long, “Imitation of Life” should feel like a slap in the face to the hulking structure in which it sits (both literally and figuratively). But the single animated scene, which reproduces to exacting detail the process used by film studios in the late 1930s and early 1940s, is a joy. It’s simple, light (at least on the surface), heartwarming even, and then it ends leaving one wishing for more." Jörg Heiser of frieze adds: "Poledna shows a four-minute musical animation in the style of Disney’s Bambi or Snow White – realized, in Los Angeles, with specialists able to do it the classical way. It’s not an original found object, but a kind of new reconstruction. Poledna does not rely on readymade or parody, thus generating a kind of double perception: I see the film projection and am inevitably reminded of childhood experiences – don’t I know this cute donkey with drooping ears in sailor outfit? – that I never could have had. He taps into our real-existing, pop-cultural affect reservoir, while diverting it into perfect fiction."


Still from Poledna's “Imitation of Life”.

Adrian Searle also mentioned Anri Sala's "Ravel Raval Unravel": "... Albanian artist Anri Sala, representing France, is in the German Pavilion. He drew big queues last week for his three-part film installation, based on performances of Maurice Ravel's 1930 composition Concerto in D for the Left Hand. Impeccably staged though it is, Sala's is a minor work on a major scale." [Watch video here]

 A (poor) photo of Anri Sala's video installation.


Midwaythrough a 2-hour queue under the rain to enter Anri Sala's exhibition on Friday 31 May.
  
Other National Pavilions in the Giardini not very much mentioned by the press, but worth visiting: Czech Republic & Slovak Republic, exhibiting work by Petra Feriancová (first room) and Zbyněk Baladrán (with the film "Liberation or Alternatively", at the back). Feriancová's project takes "Venice as a starting point and theme disappears in a return to intimate history: although pigeons, shells, masks and cityscapes are universal figures with a specific information value right here in Venice, their photographs or their collections were taken for purely personal reasons (the artist and her family) and have in fact nothing in common with Venice." [More images and text via Mousse].
the exhibition project Still the Same Place by Petra Feriancová and Zbyněk Baladrán curated by Marek Pokorný. - See more at: http://moussemagazine.it/55vb-czechoslovak-pavilion/#sthash.hhxgS6c4.dpuf


Also, Lebanon was represented by a wonderful new film, "Letter To A Refusing Pilot", by Akram Zaatari. The story is centered on a powerful real-life account of an Israeli Air Force fighter who was sent to destroy a school outside of Saida, the artist hometown, in the early 1980s but refused to do so, and instead dropped the bombs in the sea. As a kid, Zaatari would hear the story from his father, director of the very same school. Years later Zaatari discovered the story wasn't a rumor and that the pilot was real. 

Nina Siegal includes a quote by the artist on her New York Times article: “The importance of the story is that it gives the pilot a human face,” Mr. Zaatari said. “It gives what he is about to bomb, which is considered terrorist ground; it also gives that a human face. I think it’s important to remember in times of war that everyone is a human being. Taking it to this level humanizes it completely, and we’re not used to this at all.” 

"The film was shot in the neighborhood around the school, which has been rebuilt and incorporates aerial photographs, drawings, computer imaging and some personal documents from Mr. Zaatari’s own life to tell the story from the perspective of a teenage boy. In the Lebanese Pavilion at the Biennale, it is part of an installation that includes a reel film projector, a single movie theater chair and a number of cylindrical stools."

Zaatari's film in the Lebanese Pavilion in the Corderie.

Holland Cotter of the New York Times wrote on Alfredo Jaar’s show at the Chilean pavilion [two photos below], which is "centered around a sculpture that moves, an exact model of the Giardini campus that emerges from and sinks back into a vat of fetid-looking water. Mr. Jaar is telling a story about the alignment of art and power: Many of the older, pre-World War II pavilions are relics of a murderous nationalism were built as cultural trophies by economically competitive nations that created colonial empires and eventually led Europe into war."
 

Elsewhere in Venice, a number of Pavilions bid for our attention. Not least Angola, which won the Golden Lion for the Best National Participation. The question here was, as rightly stated by Filipa Ramos in her Art Agenda review, "How much of the Golden Lion for the best National Participation was due to Edson Chagas's "Luanda, Encyclopedic City" and how much of it was due to the gallery of Palazzo Cini, which hosts the Angolan Pavilion?" The impressive Cini collection of Renaissance works (Piero della Francesca, Filippo Lippi, Fra Angelico, Botticelli, Pontormo...see photos below) is rarely open to the public. Chagas's low pillars of twenty-three off-set takeaway posters à la Felix González-Torres (though displayed on pallets), marked a contrast between classical products of Western culture and the photographed images of the streets of Luanda.

"The images consisted mostly of depictions of large pieces of junk (the seat of a broken office chair, a tattered soccer ball) that were displaced and then photographed by the artist in Luanda. Visitors were invited to collect the different images, thus producing a supersized album of all the gathered prints. Despite the naïve dualism generated by the blatant contrast between the two worlds (the location of production and location of display), the project presented an almost magical and secretive discovery to its visitors that was much in harmony with Massimiliano Gioni's exhibition's focus on parallel and lesser-known art histories."




Do check out – and leave plenty of time for – the Cyprus-Lithuania in Palasport "Giobatta Gianquinto" nearby the Arsenale entrance. The sports centre building alone is worth a visit. You'll be surprised to see such a large venue in what is seemingly such a small island. As Dan Fox of frieze writes "The Pavilion of Lithuania and Cyprus, held in a building one would never expect to find in Venice. An almost Brutalist-looking edifice, tucked next to the Arsenale, housed a huge, modern school gymnasium, where curator Raimundas Malasauskas had organized a show of performances, sculpture, painting, and dance in an environment that was about as un-Venetian as one could get ... What on earth was going on? What was the work and what wasn’t? For once it was nice to simply enjoy the mystery." 

Back to Quinn Latimer: "Maria Hassabi performed her intricate movement-based work on the steep, cinematic steps of the gymnasium, while far below, an installation of temporary walls made up of recycled walls from previous pavilions (by Gabriel Lester) and works by various artists—Jason Dodge, Elena Narbutaitė, and Dexter Sinister, among twelve others—looked, from above, as small and distant as a diorama." [Watch a video with interviews and images of the exhibition]


(Above) New York-based performance artist Maria Hassabi during Intermission (2013), surrounded with works by Phanos Kyriacou.


Another one to not miss is Richard Mosse's 'The Enclave' in the Irish Pavilion. The photo below doesn't do justice if you want a better idea to watch this wonderful 7min. video 'The Impossible Image' produced by frieze (and Vimeo staff pick!) in which you can hear the artist talking about the process of making the works. 

(Above) Multi-screen installation of Richard Moss' The Enclave in the Irish Pavilion in the Fondaco Marcello. 

Not to forget the Scottish Pavilion in the Palazzo Pisani which has one of the most solid shows in town, composed of three artists – Hayley Tompkins, Duncan Campbell and Corin Sworn. Filipa Ramos noted that "Hayley Tompkins’s floor installation of photographs and paintings puts together different scales of familiar, commonplace scenes and objects (from the depiction of a traffic jam to an electric plug or to the proliferation of plastic bottles) in such a way that they all become part of a set of recognizable, familiar presences."


Detail of  Hayley Tompkins's "Digital Light Pool (Orange)" (2013), composed of Acrylic on plastic trays, stock photographs, wooden boxes, glass, plastic bottles, watercolour.

Elsewhere in the city, dozens of Eventi Collaterali and other exhibitions piled up. Christy Lange wrote about one of the most talked-about events (particularly as queues became a real 'trending topic' in any conversation). Lange writes: "organized by the Fondazione Prada, the exhibition ‘When Attitudes Become Form: Bern 1969 / Venice 2013’ at Ca’ Corner della Regina ambitiously sets out to reconstruct Harald Szeemann’s seminal exhibition ‘Live in Your Head: When Attitudes Become Form. Works – Concepts – Processes – Situations – Information’, originally staged at the Kunsthalle Bern in Switzerland in 1969." (...) "The show also recreates the tile and wooden floors of Bern, and even imported and installed authentic radiators. The effect is not seamless; nor is meant to be. Instead, there are visible gaps where the white walls had to be cut to fit around the classical Venetian moldings, and the intricately painted wooden beams of the palazzo remain exposed overhead." (...) "Along with Szeemann’s preliminary sketches for the show’s poster, we also get to see evidence of the harsh reception the show received in the Swiss press: illustrated by several ridiculing cartoons in national newspapers, like one in which a cleaning woman forgets her mop bucket in the gallery, only to have it interpreted as a work of art by a museum guide."

Carol Vogel of the New York Times puts the exhibition into historical perspective: "Originally organized by Harald Szeemann, the Kunsthalle’s director at the time, the show is considered the first major exhibition of what was then regarded as radical art. It included little from outside the  Western Hemisphere and little by women, but it was the first big show to acknowledge a broad range of mixed-media work that fell under freshly coined terms like Arte Povera, Process Art, Anti-Form, Conceptual art and performance art. Its nearly 70 artists included Claes Oldenburg, Joseph Beuys, Eva Hesse and Bruce Nauman." (...) "Featured in the show, which ends on Nov. 3, are works from artists who were then emerging, including Carl Andre, Richard Artschwager, Alighiero Boetti, Sol LeWitt and Keith Sonnier. And when the curators were unable to locate a work of art, they just left a dotted outline of where the piece should have been placed — a ghost of what once was."

Ramos reminded readers of "Celant’s ongoing inquiry upon the possibilities of reproducibility—a line of research he has pursued since his early years as an exhibition maker—a step further, as he attempts to reproduce the unrepeatable, indeed to repeat the irreproducible."

Jannis Kounellis' "Untitled" (1969) was originally installed in the lower floor of the Kunsthalle Bern. Here it's on the second mezzanine floor of Ca' Corner della Regina. 

 Walter de Maria's "Art by Telephone" (1967). Reenacted.


 Richard Serra works from 1969.
 General view of the Schulwarte (third floor in the Fondazione Prada) which displayed works by Pino Pascali (floor), Marinus Boezem (left), Frank Lincoln Viner, Thomas Bang, Michael Buthe, Pier Paolo Calzolari, Paul Cotton, Ger van Elk, Rafael Ferrer, Hans Haacke, Roelof Louw, Emilio Prini, Allen Ruppersberg, Frank Lincoln Viner and William T. Wiley.

 Giovanni Anselmo's "Untitled" (floor, right); "Il cotone bagnato viene buttato sul vetro e ci resta" (left, wall) both from 1969; and the 1968 "Untitled" in the corner. (Displacement)

Szeemans' (pre-excell!) spreadsheet listing the artist's names, place of residence, title, technique, and measurements of the work to be displayed, and a projected travel and production budget.

Another interesting exhibition was the Future Generation Art Prize housed in the incredible  Palazzo Contarini Polignac nearby the Accademia. More photos here.

 Entrance to the exhibition. 

 Emily Roysdon, "Our Short Century", 2012. 

 Eva Kotátková, "Theatre of speaking objects (Becoming objects)", 2013.

Detail of Rayyane Tabet, "Architecture Lessons", 2012. From the series "Five Distant Memories: The Suitcase, The Room, The Toys, The Boat and Maradona". 

 Aurelien Froment, "Pulmo Marina", 2010.

And last but not least, the Palazzo Grassi's inauguration of Tadao Ando's Teatrino (or rather "Teatrone" as it's 1,000 square-meters and holds 225 seats), as stated by Ramos "a truly remarkable event for a country known for its epidemic of closing-down cinemas." During the opening days, the Teatrino screened Anri Sala’s "1395 Days Without Red" (2011), Philippe Parreno’s "Marilyn" (2012), and Loris Gréaud’s "The Snorks: A Concert for Creatures" (2012). This was undoubtedly the best contribution Pinault brought to this year's biennale. We agree with Christy Lange on that the exhibition "Prima Materia", curated by Caroline Bourgeois and Michael Govan at the Punta della Dogana "managed to reduce even good works of art to macho collections of ‘things’". The only room that was somehow 'saved' was the space mixing Japanese Mono-ha and Arte Povera with works by Merz, Paolini, Boetti, Penone, Sekine, Suga, Ufan, Koshimizu, Enokura (photo below). Adel Abdessemed's 2011 four life-sized sculptures of Christ modeled after the Crucifixion made of razor wire was one of the low points in Venice.
 
All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




Report from Urdaibai: commission series 'Sense and Sustainability', Urdaibai Arte 2012

The commission series "Sense and Sustainability", curated by Alberto Sánchez Balmisa within the framework of Urdaibai Arte 2012, and organized by the Fundación 2012 Fundazioa, was launched on 19 July (info here – in Spanish) and will remain open to the public until 23 September. It comprises ten installations developed by artists: Lara Almarcegui (Zaragoza, Spain, 1972), Liam Gillick (Aylesbury, UK, 1964), Carlos Irijalba (Pamplona, 1979), Gunilla Klingberg (Stockholm, Sweden, 1966), Maider López (Donostia, Spain, 1975), Rafael Lozano-Hemmer (México DF, México, 1967), Renata Lucas (Ribeirão Preto, Brasil, 1971), Oscar Tuazon (Tacoma, USA, 1975), Pieter Vermeersch (Kortrijk, Belgium, 1973) and Haegue Yang (Seoul, South Korea, 1971).

Launch of the project in the Playa de Laga. Left to right: Gunilla Klingberg, Haegue Yang, Maider Lopez, Alberto Sánchez Balmisa, Blanca Urgell (Consejera de Cultura), Renata Lucas, Carlos Irijalba and Lara Almarcegui.

The works are produced for and presented in different locations around the Urdaibai Biosphere Reserve (in the Basque Country), including urban, industrial and natural spaces.

Below images of the works as we visited them, starting with Gunilla Klingberg's "A Sign in Space" at Playa de Laga, Ibarrangelua, a tide-depending 'drawing' performance that takes place on the beach on the following days: 19, 20, 30, 31st of July; 1, 2, 14, 15, 16, 30 and 31st of August and 14, 15th of September.
Gunilla Klingberg's "A Sign in Space" at Playa de Laga, Ibarrangelua.

 
Haegue Yang, "Tectonic Texture", Cantera de Andrabide, Gautegiz-Arteaga.

 Following an excerpt from the text "Stack of evidence: Haegue Yang" included in the publication "Sentido y Sostenibilidad – Reading" written by Max Andrews' of Latitudes (you can download the full text from Latitudes' writing archive).

"Yang’s project, for Urdaibai – entitled 'Tectonic Texture' – has its beginnings and the bulk of its physical and metaphorical investment in what is perhaps the most traditional of raw materials for artistic decoration and representation: stone. In particular she became interested in the characteristic stones of the Urdaibai region – including grey limestone and Rojo Ereño, which has been quarried in the region since at least Roman times. The latter, also known as Rojo Bilbao, is technically a recrystallised limestone which is a deep meaty red colour with whorls of grey and white which are the fossilised remains of rudists, bivalves which were the major reef builders of the tropical seas of the Cretaceous. Yang proposed a stack in which 80 cm square slabs of Rojo Ereño are alternated with slabs of grey limestone. Additionally, a mason from Urdaibai was commissioned to carve the top surface – a square sandstone plate, also from the region – with a combination of his own raised geometric designs and a series of engraved handprints like impressions left in wet concrete. The five handprints are intended to encourage people to touch the form and initiate a direct contact with the materiality of the stone. 'Tectonic Texture' is installed one of the few Ereño marble quarries in the region which has not been completely abandoned and is surrounded by the stagger-cut cliff faces where millennia of excavations have cut down below the forested surface. The sculptural material of which it is comprised originated from the same quarry. The depth of the quarry witnesses the vast displacement of rock that has taken place, and the steady transposition of a section of landscape which itself originated as ocean life approximately 100 million years ago into symbolic and cultural forms – buildings facades, altars and monuments distributed throughout the Basque country and beyond.

Yang’s work is a kind of non-sculpture – perhaps closer to a memorial or a secular shrine – which connects to a highly-specific local labour tradition, through the apparent paradox of a representation of stone that is itself stone. Its form might also suggest that it is a kind of column or pedestal for an invisible form on top of it – an expectant platform articulated through the reorganisation of the excess symbolic value found in the anthropogenic landscape where it stands. The location of the quarry is somewhat hidden within the landscape of the Urdaibai biosphere reserve, and approaching the work in its context evokes a quasi-mystical feeling despite that fact the area bears the scars of modern industry. With
'Tectonic Texture', Yang was particularly interested in this strange collision of industrial exploitation and managed nature inherent in the site, as well as the Urdaibai region’s pride in its ecological fecundity as a new kind of resource with political dimensions."  
 
Haegue Yang, "Tectonic Texture", Cantera de Andrabide, Gautegiz-Arteaga. Views of the marble quarry where Yang's piece is installed.

Oscar Tuazon, "Birds" is on the way up to San Pedro Atxarre from the district of Garteiz and Akorda, Ibarrangelua. It consists of a bench of Marquina stone with a radio system broadcasting live (Radio3) within a remote and highly environmentally-protected area.


Liam Gillick, "Faceted Revision Structure (Es una clase muy pobre de memoria que sólo funciona hacia atrás)", Fábrica de Astra, Gernika-Lumo. The remodelling project of this future production centre is still undergoing, and will be presented with a finissage at the end of the project.


Pieter Vermeersch, "Untitled" in the Polígono Industrial, Gernika-Lumo. As the artist has written, these two paitings "represent a mental landscape as a subjective mirror of my experience in this region."

Renata Lucas, "El Visitante", Calle de Santa Clara, Gernika-Lumo. The project involved the planting of a Sibipiruna (Caesalpinia Peltophoroides), a tree native from the artist's birthplace, Brazil, in close proximity to Gernika's oak tree.
 
 Renata Lucas presenting her work placed in front of Gernika's oak tree.


Lara Almarcegui, "Materiales de la montaña Peña Forua", at the Antiguos Hornos de Cal, Barrio de Atxondoa de Forua. The piece consists in the calculation of the weight of the Peña Forua mountain, an active quarry, and the display of its materials in the wall of an old lime kiln.

Following an excerpt from the text included in the publication "Sentido y Sostenibilidad – Reading" written by Mariana Cánepa Luna of Latitudes (you can download the full text from Latitudes' writing archive).

"(...) (Almarcegui's) contribution to the series consisted in nothing less than the calculation of the weight of a mountain, and the display in list form of its geological composition. The Atxondo mountain is covered by Cantabrian holm oak and was known to be mostly composed of limestone, with small percentages of clay and sandstone. Once a more detailed geological analysis was concluded, a complex series of calculations took place in collaboration with geographers and speleologists which followed a 3D modelling of the mountain using the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) technique. This calculated physical volume using algorithms and mathematical formula.The final numbers were then broken down into a simple list of each of the materials which comprised the mountain followed by their weights. This list of geological composition is finally displayed within the site itself, on the wall of an old lime kiln in a nearby abandoned quarry, so that the visitor can firstly observe the staggering mountain, navigate its perimeter, before later reading its geological composition expressed in numbers. During the difficult pre-process to the final form of the work, Almarcegui and her collaborators faced two particular challenges. Firstly, the decision as to where Atxondo actually begins and ends. Secondly, the difficulty of calculating volume in a geographical site that has many internal and external chasms and caves.  

Almarcegui deliberately chose to focus her contribution in a site of continuous change. The mountain is being eaten away through the actions of an active quarry, Forua, which is dynamited in order to extract limestone, a sedimentary rock mainly used as a building material or as aggregate for the base of roads. Some of the limestone is processed directly on site where it is turned into gravel and then taken to a facility 5 km away near Gernika which processes it into concrete. It is in this process that we can appreciate a destruction and construction cycle as it loops: the mountain becomes limestone which becomes construction material. During her investigations, Almarcegui discovered that the quarry is now exploited less frequently due to the “brick crisis”. The building sector is one of the hardest hit industries in the current Spanish recession, and the raw materials are simply no longer in high demand. The effects of the economy are therefore clearly translatable into the terms of landscape and ecology: the mountain's transformation and the pace of its destruction, goes hand in hand with the growing or bursting bubble of the construction industry."

 Almarcegui presenting her project to visitors that joined the public presentation.
View of Lara Almarcegui's site in the old lime kiln of Atxondoa, Forua - also via photosynth.

Carlos Irijalba, "High Tides", Refuge in Paresi, Busturia. Irijalba's installation in this former Republican school is an investigation of a physical terrain: the result of a geotechnical drilling that Irijalba undertook on the parking lot of the former weapon factory of Astra in Gernika. 
View of Mundaka from the Refugio in Paresi, where Carlos Irijalba's work is displayed.

Maider López, "In Situ", Nine different locations around Urdaibai. Below the coordinates in front of Mundaka's Town Hall, designating where to find the yellow tiles the artist has placed which indicate daily movements, crossings, activities that happen in the area.
López (standing on right) placed a yellow tile in the market in Gernika, where Rosario (standing on left) goes daily to sell products from her farmhouse. The rest of the stalls are only joining once a week on Monday mornings.
Another of Maider López points of encounter: this is the only fountain in Gernika with drinkable water and therefore becomes a busy hub for neighbours as they fill their bottles.
 The tile marks the journey made by a boat that connects Mundaka with Laida, saving people from having to make the 24km drive.

We are missing images (our camera collapsed! but managed to rescue a photo we took with a phone) of Rafael Lozano-Hemmer's "Regar corazonadas", placed in the Centro de Biodiversidad de Euskadi-Torre Madariaga (Busturia). The piece consisted in an interactive hose located in the garden of Torre Madariaga. The hose has a sensor attached to the sprinkler which detects the pulse and makes the water flow following the heartbeat of the person handling it. The Biodiversity Center is also the info point from where to take a map and guide (includes GPS locations) to find the projects, and also screens a 'making of' video of the project.


All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org

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Manifesta 9, "The Deep of the Modern", Genk, Belgium, 2 June – 30 September 2012 in pictures and seen by the critics

 Façade of the Waterschei industrial complex of the former coal mine in Genk where Manifesta 9 takes place.

Extra materials:  
40-page 'Shortguide' newspaper as a PDF   
Digital catalogue

In her prologue Manifesta founding director Hedwig Fijen, defines the difference and the strength of the current incarnation of the European biennial: "'The Deep of the Modern'" is the first Manifesta biennial to intentionally leave behind its strictly contemporary origins as the basis of its exhibition model. As an uncompromising European contemporary art event, Manifesta 9 distances itself from the much-hyped model of showcasing only the latest artistic production by emerging talent, typical of these mega-shows. Instead it embarks on a critical attemps to foster interdisciplinary and intergenerational dialogue between the history of the site and the sometimes overlooked memories of the mining communities."

The introduction of an art historical perspective into the project has been a way to appeal to a more diverse audience, as Cuauhtémoc Medina, Chief Curator of Manifesta 9, has noted in his introductory essay: "our hope is that the long historical perspective will attact a local audience in a region that has not customarily been a consumer of contemporary art, along with a number of scholars and the descendants of the miners that built the region."



Art Agenda's review by writer and Co-Director of Tulips & Roses gallery in Brussels, Jonas Žakaitis provides the backstory:

"Genk is a town built for the sole purpose of getting the black stuff out of the ground. Early in the last century, after geologist André Dumont discovered significant amounts of coal lurking in the area, something like 60,000 people moved in from various parts of the world to work in and around the pits, building several large-scale mining complexes with the town's modest amenities sprinkled around them. When heavy industry glaciers started moving out of Western Europe in the 1980s, Genk was left with a large useless hole right in the gut. The remaining fraction of the Waterschei mine (23,000 sq. m of it) is an involuntary witness to this process of de-industrialization, a derelict but beautiful and proud building. After Manifesta 9, or so it tells me in the press pack, it "will be redeveloped as part of a master plan to create Thor park (is this name a jolly wink to the Germanic god of thunder, I wonder), a business and science complex focusing on innovation and knowledge."

 Stairs connecting the first and second floor of the Waterschei.

Kate Sutton's Artforum.com review also framed the loaded context: "Chief curator Cuauhtémoc Medina, together with co-curators Katerina Gregos and Dawn Ades, selected the Belgian province of Limburg, “a mini European Union” also known as “Euregio-Meuse-Rhine.” The region has spent much of this century heavily dependent on coal production, but, with the last mine closing in 1992, Limburg is now eager to transition to new technology. Once a kind of Emerald City for coal miners, the garden city of Genk provides the ideal venue with its massive, Art Deco–style André Dumont mine."

Top floor of the Waterschei building.

As Javier Hontoria noted in his El Cultural review, Medina wanted to concentrate everything in the Waterschei, "favoring the concept of "exhibition" versus the "festival", and consequently emphasizing the metaphor of the vertical versus the horizontal to the light of new economic systems." (...) "The idea of ​​strata" – he continues –  "so tied to the world of mining, backbones the sense of the exhibition, which, under the title "The Deep of the Modern", unfolds in a concise and accurate way throughout the three levels of the building."

As explained in the press kit, 'The Deep of the Modern' begins with '17 Tons' "an exploration of the cultural production that has been powered by the energy of memory that courses through the diverse heirs of coal mining in the Campine region of Limburg, as well as several other regions in Europe".
  
Models of the Underground from the 1950s, 3D representations used to teach 14–17 year old boys mining techniques and location of the coal layers.
Works by Manuel Durán (an 82 yeard old self-taught artist and former miner for 19 years) who has been making "Miners' heads" sculptures since the 1950s out of potato pulp, coal, salt and paint.

 Lara Almarcegui, "Wasteland (Genk), 2004–16. More than 1 hectare of wasteland in public space." For the project, Almarcegui identified a neglected plot of land and scouted, surveyed and described the land. "Through negotiations iwth the City of Genk, Almarcegui arranged to protect the terrain from development for ten years (...). For Manifesta 9, the City of Genk agreed to extend the work for an additional two years and is currently in the planning stages of protecting it in perpetuity." (text by Steven Op de Beeck included in Manifesta 9 manual "The Deep of the Modern – A subcyclopaedia", Silvana Editoriale). Latitudes' visited the site back in 2007 (see blog here).

Continuing on the second floor we encounter 'The Age of Coal': "An art historical exhibition comprising artworks from 1800 to the early 21st century about the history of art production aesthetically related to the industrial era" (...) "organized into several thematic sections with artworks in which coal played an important role. Coal as the main fuel of industry, as a major factor of environmental change, as a fossil with significant consequences in the field of natural science, as the main referent of certain forms of working class culture and as a material symbolic of the experience of modern life". 

One of the three works by Marcel Broodthaers, "Trois tas de charbon", 1966-67.

David Hammons, "Chasing the Blue Train" (1989) "focuses on the powerpul metaphor of the railroads that have tgransformed the landscape and socity of the US since the 19th Century." (text by Mieke Mels in Manifesta's "The Deep of the Modern – A subcyclopaedia", Silvana Editoriale).

 Richard Long's 26 meter long black "Bolivian Coal Line" carpet from 1992.
 
 Rossella Biscotti, "Title One: The Taks of the Community", 2012. Biscotti also contributed with "A Conductor", 2012: On December 2009, the Unit 2 of the Ignalina Nuclear Poer Plant in Lithuania closed, consequently materials from the site were put up for auction. Biscotti acquired lead which have now been reused in Belgium into the new electrical wires to supply electricity for the show. She also acquired lead, which is the basis for her floor sculptures in the spectacular Sint-Barbara's hall.
Antonio Vega Macotela (below) Study of Exhaustion — The Equivalent of Silver (2011), "a (failed) venture to export a “boleo” of coca leaves from Bolivian silver mines represented by a boleo-shaped piece of silver, roughly the amount of silver one miner gets out in a day" (Jonas Žakaitis in Art Agenda); and Rossella Biscotti (above).

Finally on the top floor, we find the section 'Poetics of Restructuring', with "contributions from 39 contemporary artists, focusing on aesthetic responses to the worldwide “economic restructuring” of the productive system in the early 21st century". 

"This archetypal kind of socio-econo-political development from industrialization to de-industrialization to post-industrial capitalism—and the corresponding forms of production, geographies, and distributions of resources—is what Manifesta's contemporary art section, mostly on the third floor of the building, is about." (Jonas Žakaitis in Art Agenda)

Manifesta educational materials and leaflets: "developed by the Manifesta 9 Education & Mediation department. There are 3 different 3x3 Newspapers for 3 age groups (12-, 12+ and 18+), so make sure you have the right one for you."

Ni Haifeng's "Para-Production", 2008-12 (ground floor) several tons of discarted fabric from trimmings originated in Chinese factories are re-sawn into a massive tapestry; and Bea Schilgelhoff's silk-screens "I'm too Christian for art" (2012) (top floor).

 Ante Timmermans' "Make a Molehill out of a Mountain (of Work)" (2012), shelves full of packed A4′s to be manually perforated in his office space during the opening days to make a heap of confetti with the resulting paper, placed on a table at the opposite side of the room and overlooking the window that frames the also "perforated" mining mountain. This tiresome and repetitive administrative task concludes with stamping each of the perforated papers (with stamps designed by the artists) and filing them in binders placed in shelves.

 Ante Timmermans' "Make a Molehill out of a Mountain (of Work)" (2012).

 View of the landscape from Ante Timmermans' space and the remaining Waterschei building (not in use).

Goldin + Senneby's "The decapitation of Money", 2010. From the exhibition newspaper: "Goldin + Senneby and team test the hypothesis that Headless Ltd. (a mysterious offshore company registrered in the Bahamas) is a reincarnation of the secret society "Acéphale", founded by Georges Bataille and friends in 1936."

Emre Hüner, "A little Larger Than the Entire Universe", 2012.

Duncan Campbell's "Make It New John", 2009, 50' video. Depicting the "history of the DMC-12, the extravagant, futuristic automobile created by American engineer and entrepeneur John Delorean (1925-2005). Campbell documents the strange attempt to use its production as a tool of social engineering. Relying heavily on archival footage, and incoporating a few staged scenes that introduce a political and biographical allegory, Campbell attempts to construct a panoramic view of the polar extremes that have characterized the social life of this icon of consumerism." (text by Cuauhtémoc Medina in in Manifesta's "The Deep of the Modern – A subcyclopaedia", Silvana Editoriale)

Back to Žakaitis analysis: (...) The weird part though is that all of these things, displayed in a generic and anemic way, are fenced from Mijndepot Waterschei, a full-blown and fully functioning museum assembled by former miners themselves back in 2004. Be sure to go there if you visit this Manifesta, and check out hundreds of mining tools, helmets, saint statues, a small train, and a 1:1 scale model of a coal shaft: great stuff that can get you really sooty.  

Miners museum in the Waterschei's first floor.

Nicoline van Harskamp, "Yours in Solidarity", 2009–12. Video, audio and archive material.

Praneet Soi's slideshow "Kumartuli Printer, Notes on Labor Part 1", 2010, which "parsed out the gestures of a printer's hands as he interacts with an ancient pedal-operated press in Calcutta. As the operator feeds paper into his anachronistic machine, it spits out grainy, high contrast images of his own hands, immersed in labor" (text by Cuauhtémoc Medina in in Manifesta's "The Deep of the Modern – A subcyclopaedia", Silvana Editoriale).

 Maarten Vanden Eynde, "Plastic Reef", 2008–12: a collection of melted down plastic trash collected while swirling in the Pacific Ocean. For more info see his comprehensive website.

As for the publication "The Deep of the Modern – A subcyclopaedia" (Edited by Silvana Editoriale), the curator writes that it has been "designed to suggest the complexity of meaning involved in the whole project as well as the richness of the individual elements themselves. (...) We have chosen to publish a book that breaks from the mould of conventional exhibition catalogues. We evoke the form of the encyclopaedia as a means of organising a whole made up of multiple unities (...). This Subcyclopaedia will thus serve as a record of the research process behind the biennial. (...) Our neologism is meant to suggest a comparison between the use of this reference book and the exhumation of modernity's underworld in the heritage, culture and history of coal mining.".  

 One of the pages of "The Deep of the Modern – A subcyclopaedia" (Edited by Silvana Editoriale).

Despite this intention of "breaking the mould", the 320-page book does include the traditional institutional forewords (to be precise, four) and an introductory curatorial essay by Medina. Many other texts are disseminated thoughout the publication, which is organised in alphabetical order A to Z, mixing concepts (starting with "Accumulation", ending with "Underground as Hell"), with artist texts by a network of over 30 writers, and essays by Gregos ("Poetics of Restructuring: On the question of production in the contemporary section of Manifesta 9") and Ades ("The Age of Coal: An Underground History of the Modern"), amongst other long form texts (by Medina himself, Svetlana Boym, as well as misfit entries such as "The Legacy of Manifesta" by Hedwig Fijen). 

Manifesta 9 curator Cuauhtémoc Medina (purple shirt) giving a tour during the opening weekend.

These and more photos (93 total) on Latitudes' flickr:







FAQ: Where can I find the publications edited by Latitudes?

We often receive enquiries from folks interested in purchasing our publications. As editors (or contributors) we only hold a few copies, which over the years have been mostly entirely gifted to colleagues and donated to expand institutional archives.

MACBA’s Centre d'Estudis i Documentació (MACBA Study Centre) and The Banff Centre Library (Banff, Canada) hold reference copies of all of our publications – including the 2006 publication 'Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook' (out of print); exhibition catalogues such as Amikejo (2011), 'Greenwashing. Environment: perils, promises and perplexities' (2008) and The Last Newspaper (2010), the monograph 'Lara Almarcegui, Projects 1995–2010’ (2010) publications accompanying projects such as Ignasi Aballí's Nothing or Something (2009), Simon Fujiwara's Museum of Incest (2009), Mataró Chauffeur Service (2010), Campus (2011) or Portscapes' (2010) limited edition which includes Jan Dibbets' DVD with his commissioned film '6 hours tide object with correction of perspective' (1969–2009); exhibition booklets of the exhibition 'Exposition International...' at Meessen de Clercq in Brussels, and that dedicated to Lawrence Weiner 2008 exhibition at Fundació Suñol.

MACBA's library also holds two further references: a recording of the conversation we organised as part of our #OpenCurating research with Dia Art Foundation Curator, Yasmil Raymond in 2013, later published as the #7 in the download-free edition; and Charley Independents, the issue that appeared coinciding with our participation in the second iteration of the festival 'No Soul for Sale' launched at TATE Modern in 2010. 

Below is a list of all our publications and links to the distributors from where you can purchase them:

'Amikejo' (Mousse Publishing, 2012)
+ info on the exhibition series.

'Lara Almarcegui, Projects 1995–2010' (Archive Books, 2011/12)
+ info on the publication
 
Roman Keller & Christina Hemauer, 'United Alternative Energies: Christina Hemauer & Roman Keller' (The Århus Art Building, 2011)
+ info on the exhibition

Martí Anson and Latitudes,'Mataró Chauffeur Service' (Save As...Publications, 2011)
Available via La Central (stores in Barcelona & Madrid)
+ photos 
+ info on the project

'The Last Newspaper' (Latitudes & The New Museum, 2010)
Available via Motto Distribution (Berlin) and La Central (stores in Barcelona & Madrid). Special edition (in the box) available via the New Museum store (New York)
+ photos
+ info on the exhibition

'Portscapes' (SKOR / The Port of Rotterdam, 2009)
Available via Motto Distribution (Berlin) and La Central (stores in Barcelona & Madrid)
+ photos 
+ info on the commissioning series

Simon Fujiwara, 'The Museum of Incest' (Archive Books, 2009)
Available via Archive Books (Berlin) and La Central (stores in Barcelona & Madrid)
+ photos
+ info on the exhibition


'Greenwashing. Environment: Perils, Promises and Perplexities' (The Bookmakers Ed. / Archive Books, 2008)
+ photos
+ info on the exhibition

Three of our earlier publications are out of print:
'Land, Art. A Cultural Ecology Handbook' (Arts Council England & Royal Society of Arts, 2006)
Out of print. Available for consultation at MACBA's library.
+ photos
+ info on the publication


UOVO #14 (The Bookmakers Ed., 2007)
Out of print. Available for consultation at MACBA's library.
+ photos
+ info on the publication

Ignasi Aballí, 'Nothing, or Something' (Today Art Museum, 2009)
+ photos
+ info on the exhibition

All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)




Publication "Robert Smithson: Art in Continual Movement" (Alauda Publications, 2012) includes essay by Max Andrews

 Cover of the publication.

We just received a copy of the wonderful and long-awaited publication "Robert Smithson: Art in Continual Movement" (Alauda Publications, 2012) for which Max Andrews of Latitudes contributes the essay "A Dark Spot of Exasperation: From Smithson to the Spime" (an essay which was the basis of his recent lecture at the Royal College of Art in London).

Pages 44-45, with the section "Art, Research, Ecology".

Robert Smithson's seminal Land Art work Broken Circle/Spiral Hill (Emmen, The Netherlands, 1971) is treated as a case study which opens up to a number of topics, still relevant in contemporary art: 'Models of Spectatorship', 'Art, Research, Ecology', 'Documentation', 'Museum, Media, Society' and 'The Cinematic'." 

 Above: pages with Max Andrews' essay "A Dark Spot of Exasperation: From Smithson to the Spime".



Max Andrews' essay "A Dark Spot of Exasperation: From Smithson to the Spime". 
In his text Andrews stresses that Smithson's innovations in terms of post-studio practice ar not about "the question where, or what is the work of art?", but about investigationg the structure of the multiple elements which constitute the form of an art project and its place in the world. According to Andrews, the essential feature of Smithson's kinship to post-studio practice is not so much his institutional critique, but a move away from the museum and the curator as existing power structures to a "curatorial function which incorporates a social ecology: a new meaning- and value–generating system in and around art." In his essay Andrews traces the points of congruence between Smithson and the practices of contemporary artists like Lara Almarcegui, Jorge Satorre and Cyprien Gaillard.

 Documentation pages, clippings from 1987.

  Pages 150-151, Section "A Living Archive – Film"

 Page 194-195, Section "A Living Archive"

 Pages 208-209, Section "A Living Archive"

The 240 page monograph publication will be launched on 30 March 2012 in The Hague during the symposia Rethinking Robert Smithson organised by the publishers in cooperation with Leiden University Institute for Cultural Disciplines.

Initiator and publisher: Alauda Publications
Edited by: Ingrid Commandeur and Trudy van Riemsdijk-Zandee
Authors: Max Andrews, Eric C.H. de Bruyn, Stefan Heidenreich, Sven Lütticken, Anja Novak, Vivian van Saaze
Design: Esther Krop
ISBN: 9789081531481
Price: 39,95 Euro
Available in bookshops or order online: alaudapublications.nl


Related links: 
September 2011 blog post on The Land Art Contemporary programme in Denthe, The Netherlands.

All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org




Lecture by Max Andrews "From Spiral to Spime: Robert Smithson, the ecological and the curatorial", 13 March, 2pm, Lecture Theatre 1, Royal College of Art, London

Poster announcement at the Royal College of Art galleries.

On Tuesday 13 March (2pm, Lecture Theatre 1), Max Andrews of Latitudes will give the lecture "From Spiral to Spime: Robert Smithson, the ecological and the curatorial" as part of the "Art and Globalisation" lecture series programmed by MA Curating Contemporary Art by Jean Fisher and Michaela Crimmin.
Starting out from Robert Smithson's Broken Circle / Spiral Hill (1971), this lecture looks at projects by Lara Almarcegui, Jorge Satorre and Cyprien Gaillard to speculate on the 'when' and the 'shape' of art after Smithson in relation to synchronic concepts of post-environmental ecological thinking, and the flux between work and curatorial context. Based on an essay in the forthcoming publication 'Robert Smithson: Art in Continual Movement' (Alauda Publications, 2012).

Robert Smithson, Broken Circle/Spiral Hill. Opening September 17, 2011. Emmen, The Netherlands. Photo by Jan Anninga. Courtesy SKOR.

Following the lecture, Andrews will lead a seminar to first years students of the MA Curating Contemporary Art, Royal College of Art. 

[Please note that the lecture is only open to students and staff of the college.]

Tuesday 13 March 2012, 2pm
Lecture Theatre 1
Royal College of Art
Kensington Gore 
London SW7 2EU, UK


All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
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Launch of the monograph 'Lara Almarcegui. Projects 1995–2010', edited by Latitudes at 'The Dutch Assembly', ARCOmadrid, 15 February, 19-20h

Cover of the publication edited by Latitudes. Photo: Latitudes.

Title: 'Lara Almarcegui. Projects 1995–2010'
Editor: Latitudes
Publisher & Design: Archive Books, Berlin
Texts: Cuauhtémoc Medina, Lars Bang Larsen and Latitudes
Format: 224 pages, colour, 21 x 27.5 cm. Black-and-white and colour illustrations. Flexicover, English.
ISBN: 978-88-95702-05-6

Published by Berlin-based Archive Books, 'Lara Almarcegui. Projects 1995–2010' is the first monograph presenting an overview of the last fifteen years of Almarcegui's artistic practice. The main part of the publication is formed by detailed documentation of the artist’s works and publications companioned by new descriptive texts written by the editors and the artist. These are presented in the following sections: ‘Demolition’, ‘Excavation’, ‘Construction materials’, ‘Ruins’, ‘Wastelands’ (survey, access, and preservation). (+ info...)

Lara Almarcegui (1972, Zaragoza. Lives and works in Rotterdam, the Netherlands) has had solo shows at Künstlerhaus Bremen, Bremen (2011); Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo, Sevilla (2011); TENT, Rotterdam (2011); Secession, Vienna (2010); Ludlow 38, New York (2010); the Centro Arte Contemporaneo, Málaga (2007), FRAC Bourgogne, Dijon (2004) and at INDEX, Stockholm (2003). She participated in group exhibitions such as Radical Nature – Art & Architecture for a Changing Planet 1969-2009, Barbican, London (2009); Taipei Art Biennial, Taiwan (2008); Estratos, Murcia (2008); Sharjah Art Biennial 8, Sharjah (2007); 27th São Paulo Bienal, São Paulo (2006); Frieze Art Fair Projects, London (2006) and the Liverpool Biennial (2004). In 2008 she presented the guidebook 'Ruins in the Netherlands XIX-XXI' published by Episode. Almarcegui studied Fine Arts in Cuenca (1991–95) and at the Ateliers 63, Amsterdam (1996–98). She has recently been awarded the Dolf Henkes Prize, Rotterdam (2011). In 2012 Almarcegui will have solo shows at the Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo, Móstoles and the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Castilla y León (MUSAC).

Spreads of the publication:









Publication has been possible thanks to the support of the former Fonds BKVB (Netherlands Foundation for Visual Arts, Design and Architecture), currently Mondriaan Fund. 


All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




Participación en el simposio 'Antimonumentos: Crítica en el Espacio Público', Espai d'Art Contemporani de Castelló, Sábado 22 Octubre 2011

Programa simposio

10.30 h: Ángela Molina Climent, Organizadora del simposio: 'ANTIMONUMENTOS: CRÍTICA EN EL ESPACIO PÚBLICO'

Más allá de su papel como sitey depósito de obras de arte, el museo como instrumento cultural –que se ha ido desarrollando paralelamente a la museización de la propia cultura– es una institución normalizadora y disciplinaria. Como repositorios de objetos del pasado, los museos dan sentido a la historia, pero también construyen activamente las relaciones entre la producción de la subjetividad y la producción de objetos materiales. Durante los últimos años, con la tendencia a fusionar los lugares de producción y exhibición (lugares discursivos), todo el aparato institucional que rodea a la obra participa en la creación de nuevos valores y significados estéticos. El activismo y el arte han transformado sus estrategias para producirgrupos de artivistas favorables a una concepción educativa y participativa de la institución. En este simposio, artistas, comisarios, historiadores y urbanistas hablarán de la necesidad de una crítica independiente desde el espacio público, con el fin de perturbar una cultura dominante que depende de un sistema de valores y líneas de autoridad aparentemente incólumes.

Ángela Molina Climent es Licenciada en Filología Española y doctora en Teoría de la Literatura y Literatura Comparada por la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), ejerció la crítica de arte en el suplemento de cultura del diario ABChasta 2000. Desde 2001 colabora en las secciones de arte y literatura de los suplementos culturales Babeliay Quadern (El País), y en publicaciones especializadas (LARS, Revista de Libros). Ha dirigido la revista de arte y pensamiento Art&Co, y es especialista en teoría feminista y estudios de género. Editora del libro Los Lugares de la Crítica(Ed. Universidad Pública de Navarra, 2011) y autora de La máquina de las solterasde próxima publicación (Ed. Periférica). 

11 h: Iria Candela: 'LATINOAMÉRICA: LA CALLE COMO EXPERIMENTO' 

El arte en Latinoamérica de las dos últimas dos décadas viene ensayando formas de intervención poético-políticas en la ciudad que difieren de las prácticas subversivas y anti-institucionales de las dos décadas anteriores, caracterizadas por el represivo contexto de las dictaduras. Estas nuevas formas se insertan en los diversos procesos de democratización y desdemocratización que experimenta el continente, cuestionando ciertos modelos culturales de la globalización y apuntando nuevos desafíos en el interfaz entre estética y política. Se discutirán algunos ejemplos destacados, como las intervenciones recientes de Héctor Zamora en Bogotá o Regina José Galindo en Guatemala.  

Iria Candela es curadora adjunta en la Tate Modern de Londres desde 2009, donde ha trabajado en exposiciones de artistas como Theo van Doesburg, Gabriel Orozco, Alejandro Cesarco y, actualmente, Tacita Dean y Roy Lichtenstein, entre otros. Es doctora en Historia del Arte por la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid y máster en Arte Moderno por Columbia University de Nueva York.Autora de los libros Sombras de Ciudad. Arte y transformación urbana en Nueva York 1970-1990 (Alianza, 2007) y Joan Miró(Tate, 2011), ha realizado la edición crítica del catálogo Francesc Torres. Da Capo(Macba, 2009). Ha escrito sobre arte para publicaciones como The Burlington Magazine, Lápiz,Tate EtcyEl País, y ha impartido ponencias en las universidades de Harvard, Oxford y Sorbonne. Miembro del Comité de Adquisiciones Latinoamericanas de la colección de la Tate, actualmente ultima la publicación de un libro sobre arte contemporáneo en América Latina.

12.30 h: Patricia Esquivias: 'LIEBE FRAU'  
Patricia Esquivias observa Castellón a la distancia y reflexionará en torno a su identidad geográfica. Compuesto de pequeños monólogos dirigidos a una señora alemana, que ocupa en la obra el papel de censora, Liebe Frauexpone los problemas que supone hablar de realidades estrambóticas. Al igual que en otros trabajos de la serie Folklore(videos seudoeducativos sobre España), la artista elaborará exquisitas asociaciones entrelazando referencias personales, cotidianas e históricas. En Liebe Frau, Esquivias llevará un paso más allá la naturaleza subjetiva de su trabajo, y pondrá en evidencia la limitación del lenguaje para explicar ciertas idiosincracias.

Patricia Esquivias nació en Caracas y creció en Madrid. Estudió arte en Londres y San Francisco.  En Madrid trabajó junto con Manuela Moscoso en la programación de los29enchufes.  Desde el 2005 trabaja en video y ha expuesto sus trabajos entre otros en Madrid (Museo Nacional Reina Sofía, Galería Maisterravalbuena, Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo), Alemania (Frankfurter Kunstverein, 5th Berlin Biennale), Nueva York (White Columns, Murray Guy, New Museum), Italia (Arcos Museum, Artissima) y en Inglaterra (East International, Royal College of Art). Actualmente disfruta de una beca en la Akademie Schloss Solitude en Stuttgart.

[Pausa almuerzo]

16h: Latitudes (Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna): 'PORTSCAPES: ITINERARIOS Y DESTINACIONES EN EL PUERTO DE RÓTERDAM' 
'Making of' de Jan Dibbets '6 hours tide object with correction of perspective' (2009).

Con la participación de diez artistas de diversos países (Lara Almarcegui, Bik van der Pol, Jan Dibbets, Marjolijn Dijkman, Fucking Good Art, Ilana Halperin, Roman Keller and Christina Hemauer, Paulien Oltheten, Jorge Satorre y Hans Schabus (web: Maria Barnas (poesía) y Markus Miessen (entrevistas)), el proyecto Portscapesexaminó las implicaciones físicas y conceptuales de los nuevos horizontes del Maasvlakte 2, la extensión de la zona portuaria e industrial de Róterdam, la más extensa de Europa, que entre el 2008 y 2013 robará 2.000 hectáreas de terreno al mar. Portscapes giró entorno al leitmotifitinerarios y destinaciones, creando proyectos de escala y temporalidad variable (performances, excursiones, esculturas efímeras y proyecciones), con la intención de desarrollarse como una guía de la zona portuaria que se extiende a lo largo 40 kilómetros. En el simposio se analizarán cuatro proyectos de Portscapes, los realizados por Jan Dibbets, Jorge Satorre, Lara Almarcegui y Cyprien Gaillard (no realizado), y se pondrá en cuestión la noción de anti-monumento y específicamente las negociaciones y retos que se plantearon a nivel artístico y curatorial. 

Latitudeses una oficina curatorial independiente dirigida por Max Andrews y Mariana Cánepa Luna, fundada en el 2005 y con sede en Barcelona. En el 2009 comisariaron Portscapes, una serie de diez proyectos públicos en el Puerto de Róterdam producidos en el contexto de la expansión del puerto, la zona portuaria e industrial más extensa de Europa. Latitudes ha participado en el festival de organizaciones independientes NO SOUL FOR SALE(X Initiative, Nueva York, 2009 y Tate Modern, Londres, 2010); fue organización asociada en la exposición The Last Newspaper, New Museum, Nueva York (2010–11) para la que publicó un periódico semanal durante la exposición. Durante la temporada 2011 ha comisariado el ciclo Amikejoen el Laboratorio 987, MUSAC, León.

17.15h: Racons Públics (Sara Dauge y Alejandro Giménez): "ARTE Y MICROCIRUGÍA URBANA"
La constante transformación de nuestras ciudades deja atrás espacios residuales, huecos y rincones. En el paisaje urbano actual, esos rincones ponen de manifiesto la falta de atención al detalle en el acelerado proceso de desarrollo que transforma nuestras ciudades. Son problemas de pequeña escala que quedan enquistados en los intersticios de la gran metrópoli: roces entre tejidos, en los perímetros y en el contacto con las infraestructuras, las dificultades de adaptación al relieve, las discontinuidades en las tramas, la desertización de la ciudad abierta, los monocultivos funcionales, las medianeras desnudas como evidencia de los conflictos internos de los crecimientos compactos, los cambios normativos, las imprecisiones del planeamiento, la desafección del promotor privado y la falta de recursos materiales o técnicos. El concurso de participación ciudadana en el diseño de la ciudad Racons Públicses una iniciativa que plantea la recuperación y dinamización de lugares degradados, olvidados o desaprovechados, para su uso público. Sus objetivos son abrir la disciplina urbanística a otras áreas del conocimiento, de las ciencias y de las artes al tiempo que se recuperan ocho enclaves significativos de la ciudad de Castellón.

Sara Dauge es historiadora urbana. Estudió en la Universidad de París Panthéon Sorbonne. En su doctorado investigó las formas de sociabilidad en Barcelona desde 1833 hasta 1844. Se dedicó a la investigación histórica y urbana dentro del despacho de arquitectura, urbanismo y paisaje de Beth Gali, Barcelona. Fue comisaria de la exposición Urbanismo y ocio en la Barcelona de 1850, casa Elizalde, Barcelona 1999. Desde 1998 en colaboración con Alejandro Giménez se dedica al comisariado y coordinación del concursode participación ciudadana Racons Públics, organizado en Barcelona en 2004 y 2010 porel FAD (Foment de les arts i del disseny) y con el apoyo del Ayuntamiento de Barcelona. Desde 2006 es secretaria ponente de la comisión de esculturas del Ayuntamiento de Barcelona, encargada de establecer un diálogo entre el arte contemporáneo y el espacio público.
Alejandro Giménez es arquitecto por la Escuela Técnica Superior de Arquitectura de Barcelona, donde es profesor en el Departamento de Urbanística y Ordenación del Territorio desde 1998. Es profesor en la Universidad de Salamanca, máster de Diseño de Interiores, desde 2004y profesor en la Universidad Pompeu Fabra, máster de Nuevos Formatos Expositivos. Ha colaborado con arquitectos de Barcelona: Beth Galí, Enric Miralles, Oriol Bohigas, y otros. Desde 1998 forma estudio propio, con proyectos de espacio público para el centro de Dublín, edificación y rehabilitación en Barcelona y otras poblaciones catalanas. Es comisario y coordinador del concurso Racons Públicsde participación ciudadana en el diseño urbano. 

18.30h: MESA REDONDACON LA PARTICIPACIÓN DE TODOS LOS PONENTES
    INSCRIPCIÓN AL SIMPOSIO
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    Robert Smithson's 'Broken Circle/Spiral Hill Revisited' (1971–2011) and The Land Art Contemporary programme

     
    Land Art Contemporary year-long initiative showcases works of art located in the countryside of Drenthe, a province in the northeastern Netherlands, which will be complemented with an international events programme dealing with the contemporary aspects of Land art. Starting on 17 September 2011, the programme is linked to the 40th anniversary of the creation of Robert Smithson's film Broken Circle/Spiral Hill in Emmen for the exhibition Sonsbeek 1971.  

    Coinciding with the anniversary, Land Art Contemporary kicks off with the exhibition 'Robert Smithson – Broken Circle/Spiral Hill Revisited', at the Centre for Visual Arts (CBK) in Emmen. The exhibition's star piece will be the recently completed film 'Breaking Ground: Broken Circle/Spiral Hill' (1971–2011), uncompleted due to Smithson's untimely death in 1973, which is now finally produced, following his instructions for direction and editing, by his widow Nancy Holt in collaboration with SKOR. The film will also be screened once on 22 September at the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. Holt will introduce the video.

    Parallel to this major exhibition, SKOR is also organising The Ultraperiferic (17 September – 27 November 2011), an exhibition that will feature the work of Lara Almarcegui (ES/NL), Jorge Satorre (MX/NL) and Cyprien Gaillard (FR/DE), three artists with whom Latitudes has worked in the recent past and whose work will also be featured in Max Andrews' essay "'A Dark Spot of Exasperation: From Smithson to the Spime'" in the forthcoming publication 'Robert Smithson: Art in Continual Movement' (ISBN 9789081531481) to be published by Alauda Publications in early 2012. The essay and The Ultraperiferic both feature Jorge Satorre's 'The erratic. Measuring compensation' (2009) which was produced in the context of 'Portscapes' and recently featured in his exhibition at Labor, Mexico City.


    The project will continue in 2012–13, with a series of 'assignments' to contemporary artists "a number of artists will be set the assignment of creating a work in the spirit of Smithson, whereby the landscape is viewed as a continual process that is constantly in a state of transformation due to the interaction between man and nature", to be curated by SKOR's curators Nils van Beek and Theo Tegelaers. + info...


    Land Art Contemporary is an initiative of STICHTING LACDA, Drenthe, a foundation established in 2011 by the Sanders-Ten Holte family. The program has been made possible thanks to (content and financial) support from SKOR | Foundation for Art and Public Domain, Province of Drenthe, European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development: Europe Investing in Rural Areas (LEADER), Municipality of Coevorden, Municipality of Emmen, Cultuurfonds BNG and the Sanders-Ten Holte family.




    Photos 'In conversation with Lara Almarcegui', 19 May 2011, TENT, Rotterdam



    'An evening with Lara Almarcegui', TENT Rotterdam, 2011. Photos: Aad Hoogendoorn.


    On Thursday 19 May, Latitudes hosted an in conversation with Zaragoza-born, Rotterdam-based Lara Almarcegui in TENT, where she currently has a solo show (until 26 June).

    Manifesta 9 curator, art historian and essayist for the catalogue, Cuauhtémoc Medina, also joined reading some of the passages of his essay 'Lara Almarcegui and the freedom of the unplanned' which will be included in the forthcoming monograph of the artist published by Archive Books and edited by Latitudes.







    During the event Latitudes showed 60 images of Almarcegui's recent work, discussed her TENT exhibition, showed draft pages of the forthcoming publication and shared a selection of questions sent by curators, gallerist, artists, colleagues and collaborators of Almarcegui, giving an opportunity to revisit some of her projects produced since 1995.

    These included questions from Bik van der Pol, Ellen de Bruijne, Claire Doherty, Eva González-Sancho, Lars Bang Larsen, Pablo León de la Barra, Francesco Manacorda, Markus Miessen, Eva Scharrer, Hans Schabus and Manuel Segade.







    Thank you to those who joined us and to those who participated from afar with their questions.




    19 May, 20h: 'An evening with Lara Almarcegui', TENT, Rotterdam

    Several guides by Lara Almarcegui. Photo: Latitudes | www.lttds.org

    On the occasion of Lara Almarcegui's solo show at TENT, Rotterdam (opening tomorrow 6 May and on view until 26 June 2011), Latitudes' will host an in conversation on May 19 (20h) with the Spanish-born Rotterdam-based artist to discuss their long-term collaboration as well as the editing process of the forthcoming monograph 'Lara Almarcegui. Projects 1995-2010'. (+ info...)

    Manifesta 9 curator, art historian and essayist for the catalogue, Cuauhtémoc Medina, will also participate reading some of the passages of his essay 'Lara Almarcegui and the freedom of the unplanned' during the evening.

    During the event Latitudes will also bring forward a selection of questions posed by curators, gallerist, artists, colleagues and collaborators of Almarcegui, giving an opportunity to revisit some of her projects produced since 1995
    – see photos event.

    Title:
    'Lara Almarcegui: Projects 1995–2010'
    Editor: Latitudes
    Publish & Design: Archive Books, Berlin
    Texts: Cuauhtémoc Medina, Lars Bang Larsen and
    Latitudes

    224 pages, colour, 21 x 27.5 cm. Black-and-white and colour illustrations. Flexicover, English.
    Print run: 2,500 copies
    ISBN: 978-88-95702-05-6
    Release date: Fall 2011
    Cover price: € 35
    Publication possible thanks to the support of the Fonds BKVB (Netherlands Foundation for Visual Arts, Design and Architecture).




    Newsletter #32 – April/Abril 2011



    THIS MONTH...

    'Amikejo: Iratxe Jaio & Klaas van Gorkum',
    Laboratorio 987, 2011 season guest curated by Latitudes, MUSAC, León. 9 April - 12 June 2011. Opening: 9 April, 5pm.

    LAST DAYS...


    Guest curators of the Laboratorio 987 2011 season, MUSAC, León: inaugural exhibition 'Amikejo: Pennacchio Argentato', on view until 3 April 2011 – see installation views here.

    'Christina Hemauer & Roman Keller: United Alternative Energies', Aarhus Art Building, Århus, Denmark, on view until 3 April 2011
    – see installation views here.

    'Exposition Internationale des Art Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes & des Arts et Techniques dans la Vie Moderne' showing works by Kasper Akhøj; Martí Anson; Maria Loboda; Charlotte Moth and Sarah Ortmeyer. Meessen De Clercq, Brussels, Belgium, on view until 16 April 2011 - see installation views here

    IN MAY...

    Publication launch and discussion with the artist, 'Lara Almarcegui. Projects 1995–2010' (edited by Latitudes, published by Archive Books, Berlin), 19 May at 8pm, TENT, Rotterdam + info...


    IN JUNE...


    'Campus': a free, temporary and non-credited art school, Espai Cultural Caja Madrid, 27 June–28 August 2011 - application form and guidelines here.


    Latitudes' web www.lttds.org
    Facebook page here
    Twitter here
    Flickr photosets here
    Youtube Latitudes Channel
    Previous newsletters here




    Editing the forthcoming publication 'Lara Almarcegui. Projects 1995–2010'

    Mock up of the publication cover.

    We are currently in the process of editing the first and most comprehensive monograph to date of Lara Almarcegui's work produced in the last fifteen years. Although Almarcegui has made many small format guidebooks as integral parts of her projects, this will be the first monograph presenting an overview of all of her artistic practice.

    The main part of the publication is formed by detailed documentation of the artist’s works and publications companioned by new descriptive texts written by the editors. These are presented in the following sections: ‘Demolition’, ‘Excavation’, ‘Construction materials’, ‘Ruins’, ‘Wastelands’ (survey, access, and preservation).

    Alongside an introductory essay by the editors, art critic, curator and art historian Cuauhtémoc Medina and the theorist and curator Lars Bang Larsen contribute texts. Medina presents a revised and updated version of a previously unpublished essay entitled ‘The beauty of open space: Lara Almarcegui and the freedom of the unplanned’. The essay involves an analysis of the ‘aesthetic tautology’ of the 17th-century English garden – ‘a field turned into a garden which is made to seem like a field’ – and develops a context for Almarcegui’s work through a partial history of man’s ‘perfection’ of nature, and more especially the concept of nature as coincidental with the origin of industrial modernity. Lars Bang Larsen offers an interpretation of a single work from the artist’s ‘Construction materials’ series: 'Construction materials, City of São Paulo' (2006). Based on a talk given by the author at the Creative Time Summit: Revolutions in Public Space, New York, October 2009, Bang Larsen argues that “Almarcegui’s work equips us with the hubris to reconceive of the city and evaluate and re-organise it as a social space”.

    Coinciding with Almarcegui's solo show at TENT, Rotterdam, Latitudes' will host an in conversation with the Spanish-born Rotterdam-based artist and discuss the process of editing the monograph. During the event, Latitudes will also bring forward a selection of questions posed to curators, gallerist, artists, colleagues and collaborators of Almarcegui, giving an opportunity to revisit some of her projects produced since 1995.

    Title:
    'Lara Almarcegui: Projects 1995–2010'
    Editor: Latitudes
    Publish & Design: Archive Books, Berlin
    Texts: Cuauhtémoc Medina, Lars Bang Larsen and Latitudes
    224 pages, colour, 21 x 27.5 cm. Black-and-white and colour illustrations. Flexicover, English.
    Print run: 2,500 copies
    ISBN: 978-88-95702-05-6
    Release date: Spring/Summer 2011
    Cover price: € 35
     





    Publication possible thanks to the support of the Fonds BKVB (Netherlands Foundation for Visual Arts, Design and Architecture).
     

    All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org




    Photo-impressions of Art Basel 2010


    All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org

    Includes a selection of images from Art Basel's Unlimited, Statements, Art Feature and the fair section as well as Matthew Barney's show 'Prayer Sheet with the Wound and the Nail' at Schaulager (only outside, sadly pictures not allowed inside), the exhibition 'Strange Comfort (Afforded by the Profession)' Kunsthalle Basel and Liste 15.




    Newsletter #22 – April 2010

     
    Newsletter in English | Newsletter en Español

    This month, Latitudes celebrates its 5 year anniversary! Together with Archive Books (Turin/Berlin) they are preparing a small publication gathering documentation from a selection of projects produced since 2005 (release date TBA).


    CURRENT
     

    Text 'Under Construction' on Lara Almarcegui's practice on the April–May issue of Milan-based magazine Mousse #23.

    FORTHCOMING


    Latitudes invited Martí Anson to create
    Latitudes’ temporary office-encampment for their participation in 'NO SOUL FOR SALE – A Festival of Independents', taking place at Tate Modern's Turbine Hall, 14–16 May, London, UK + info...

    Participation of Latitudes' Max Andrews in 'The Falmouth Convention', 20–23 May, Cornwall, UK + info...

    Collaboration in the
    exhibition 'The Last Newspaper' at the New Museum, New York, October 2010–January 2011 + info...
     

    LAST CHANCE

    Portscapes exhibition of the ten public commissions that took place throughout 2009 in the port of Rotterdam, on view until 25 April at the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
    + info...






    Check Latitudes' web www.lttds.org for further info and project updates
    Facebook fan page here.
    Flickr photosets here

    Newsletters archive here




    Latitudes at Collective Intelligence by Polyplicity, Barcelona

    Photo: Polyplicity.com

    On Monday 22 March Latitudes gave a talk about the practice of Lara Almarcegui and the project Portscapes to undergraduate students from CUArch (The Catholic University of America School of Architecture and Planning) and UTSA CoA (The University of Texas at San Antonio College of Architecture) who are spending a semester in Barcelona hosted by Collective Intelligence by Polyplicity. Collective Intelligence is "a platform that promotes collective creative thinking within a social environment that encourages dialogues, discussions, exchanges and collaborations on a local and international level within the field of architecture, design, urban studies and beyond. CI's objective is to create a learning hub in the city of Barcelona to serve as a fluid campus for foreign universities simultaneously encouraging the involvements of local students and professionals."




    Installation views of the 'Portscapes' exhibition, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, on view until 25 April. Free entrance.

    View of the outside of the Richard Serra Hall / Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen

    (Above and below) Ilana Halperin, "A Brief History of Mobile Landmass", 2009–2010.


    Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, "The Postpetrolistic Internationale", 2009–2010
    Video and audio installation with wooden stage.
     General view of the exhibition.
    Bik Van der Pol, "Facts on the Ground", 2010. Video. Duration: 23 min.

    Exhibition of the documentation material produced during the year-long commissioning series of works in and around Rotterdam's port extension project Maasvlakte 2, with works by Lara Almarcegui, Bik van der Pol, Jan Dibbets,Marjolijn Dijkman, Fucking Good Art, Ilana Halperin, Christina Hemauer & Roman Keller,Paulien Oltheten, Jorge Satorre, and Hans Schabus (website collaborators: Maria Barnas (poetry) and Markus Miessen (interviews)).


    On view at the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen until 25 April. Entrance free.

    More images of the exhibition here.
    More images of each commission here.
    'Making of' videos here.

    Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Museumpark 18-20, 3015 CX Rotterdam, The Netherlands
    Opening hours: Tue–Sun 11.00 to 17.00

    All images: Latitudes | www.lttds.org




    'Portscapes' "making of" videos on Latitudes' YouTube Channel




    We just opened a Latitudes' YouTube Channel with ten 'behind the scenes' videos from 'Portscapes', the evolving series of art projects presented and produced throughout 2009 in and around the port of Rotterdam. The videos present short interviews with the artists (Lara Almarcegui, Jan Dibbets (part 1 and part 2), Marjolijn Dijkman, Fucking Good Art, Ilana Halperin, Christina Hemauer & Roman Keller, Paulien Oltheten, Jorge Satorre, Hans Schabus) and an introduction to the project by SKOR curator Theo Tegelaers and Ria Haagsma, Senior Communications advisor of the Port of Rotterdam Authority.

    Latitudes' YouTube Channel also includes documentation of an action with Lawrence Weiner in the context of his 2008 Fundació Suñol exhibition 'THE CREST OF A WAVE' as well as Ignasi Aballí whitewashing a window for his exhibition 'Something, or nothing' in the Suitcase Art Projects, Beijing.




    Portscapes bus tour: Lara Almarcegui wasteland tour and Christina Hemauer & Roman Keller's 'Postpetrolistic Internationale' choir performance


    On Sunday 8 November, SKOR and the Port of Rotterdam Authority organised a bus tour around the Port of Rotterdam coinciding with the 4th International Architecture Biennial Rotterdam and the culmination of 'Portscapes' projects, a year-long series of commissions in and around Maasvlakte 2, the 2,000 hectare ongoing extension of the port.

     


    Over 80 visitors enjoyed the 'The Postpetrolistic Internationale' choir performance, a project by the Zurich-based artists Roman Keller & Christina Hemauer as well as the tour around four wasteland sites included in the research publication of the guide 'Wastelands of the Port of Rotterdam' by Rotterdam-based artist Lara Almarcegui.

    During the tour, visitors were also able to see and listen to other 'Portscapes' projects by Marjolijn Dijkman, Fucking Good Art, Ilana Halperin (audio here), Jorge Satorre, Hans Schabus and Paulien Oltheten.


    A exhibition of the projects will take place at the Museum Boijmans van Beuningen from 5 February, coinciding with Art Rotterdam. Exhibition on view until end of March 2010.

    Portscapes is a series of newly commissioned art projects initiated by the Port of Rotterdam Authority on occasion of the construction of Maasvlakte 2, with advice and support from SKOR (Foundation for Art and Public Space, Amsterdam) and is curated by Latitudes (Barcelona).

    Roman Keller and Christina Hemauer
    's participation has been made possible thanks to the support of Pro Helvetia.




    'Portscapes' news: Bus Tour around the Port of Rotterdam, Sunday 8 November 2009, 10–15h


    –ENG–

    Bus Tour – Portscapes public art projects on the Maasvlakte, Rotterdam.

    On Sunday 8 November SKOR and the Port of Rotterdam Authority are organising a tour coinciding with the 4th International Architecture Biennial Rotterdam. The tour is programmed in the context of Portscapes, a series of art projects related to the construction of the Maasvlakte 2 commissioned by the Port of Rotterdam Authority. The Maasvlakte 2 project is the ongoing extension of the port by 2,000 hectares, which will be constructed in the North Sea in the next five years.

    SKOR invited the duo Latitudes from Barcelona, who has curated a series of projects reflecting on the architectural, political, social and ecological aspects of the past, present and future of the Rotterdam port with a focus on the new Maasvlakte 2. Portscapes consists of ten new commissions in and about the Maasvlakte by Dutch and international artists, including interventions, films, performances and mobile seminars.

    Bus tour bookings: write to ad [at] skor.nl by 2 November 2009
    Free tour. English spoken


    An exhibition of the Portscapes projects will be on show at the Museum Boijmans van Beuningen in Rotterdam from 5 February, until late March 2010.

    Programme on 8 November
    (Programme subject to changes)


    9.45 am – 
Leave from NAI Rotterdam, Museumpark 25 3015 CB, Rotterdam
    
On the way to the port you can listen to interviews by Fucking Good Art on mp3 players in the bus. Amongst others, Hans Aarsman, an industrial ecologist, a botanist and an archaeologist, will describe his vision of the Maasvlakte on the basis of his field of expertise. The artistic duo FGA broadcast this and other conversations from a temporary web radio station in a container united placed on the Maasvlakte between 21 August and 21 September.


    10.45 am – Visit to wastelands by artist Lara Almarcegui and botanist Remko Andeweg
    The Spanish-born Rotterdam-based artist Lara Almarcegui has published a free newspaper research project concerning the ‘wasteland’ areas which can be encountered throughout the Port of Rotterdam. Almarcegui and botanist Remko Andeweg will describe these areas characterised by an apparent lack of human intervention.

    12.00 am – Arrival at Futureland, the Maasvlakte information centre
    On the way we pass the billboards by the artists Marjolijn Dijkman, Jorge Satorre, Paulien Oltheten and Hans Schabus.

    Lunch in Futureland, provided by the Rotterdam Port Authority.
    Introduction by Latitudes, curators of 'Portscapes'

    1.00 pm – 
Tour of the artworks in and around Futureland
    You can view work by Paulien Oltheten and Hans Schabus and explore the nearby area picking up Ilana Halperin’s audio tour. Halperin created a compelling narrative of fragments which draws on fact, fiction and personal fieldwork – as well as site surveys by volcanologists, geologists and the experts involved in the construction of Maasvlakte 2.

    1.30 pm – Performance 'Postpetrolistic Internationale'
    The project by Swiss artists Roman Keller & Christina Hemauer
 emerges from the medium of the collective human voice, the tradition of the aspirational social anthem alongside the artists’ long standing interest in energy use. The project starts with the transportation of a
    wooden stage along the Rhine from Basel (where the Rhine begins), near the artists’ home, to Rotterdam (where the Rhine joins the sea) – see post 30.10.09. Upon arrival a local choir will perform this anthem of hope-in-action (composed by the artists in collaboration with musician Mathias Vette) on the stage, against a backdrop of local industry, to mark man’s changing relationship with fossil fuels and energy use.

    2 pm – Return to NAI Rotterdam with a number of stops at various art projects along
    the way: wastelands by Lara Almarcegui and works by Paulien Oltheten

    3 pm – 
Arrival in NAI Rotterdam. End of the journey
    .
    Portscapes is commissioned by the Port of Rotterdam Authority with advice from SKOR (Foundation for Art and Public Space, Amterdam) and is curated by Latitudes.


    –CAST–
    Bus tour dirección al puerto de Rotterdam,
    Domingo 8 Noviembre 2009, 10–15h, organizado por SKOR y la Autoridad Portuaria de Rotterdam coincidiendo con la 4th International Architecture Biennial Rotterdam. Tour organizado en ocasión de Portscapes, la serie acumulativa de proyectos públicos que en el Puerto de Rotterdam
    Presentación de dos nuevos proyectos: performance de los suizos Roman Keller y Christina Hemauer (7–8 Noviembre) y publicación de la guía 'Wastelands of the Port of Rotterdam' realizada por Lara Almarcegui. Durante el tour se podrán ver y escuchar los proyectos realizados por Marjolijn Dijkman, Fucking Good Art, Ilana Halperin, Jorge Satorre, Hans Schabus y Paulien Oltheten.
    Para reservar tu plaza, escribe a [email protected] antes del 2 November 2009.
    Accesso gratuito, tour será en inglés.

    Exposición de los proyectos de Portscapes tendrá lugar en el Museum Boijmans van Beuningen, Rotterdam, a partir del 5 de Febrero y hasta finales de Marzo 2010.



    PROGRAMA 8 NOVIEMBRE
    9.45-15hs 
    (Programa sujeto a cambios de última hora)
     
    09.45 am – Salida desde NAI Rotterdam, Museumpark 25 3015 CB, Rotterdam
    Durante el recorrido se podrá escuchar mediante auriculares una entrevista al ecologista, botanista, y arqueólogo Hans Aarsman realizada por el duo FGA durante su residencia en un container emplazado en el Maasvlakte, desde donde recogieron conversaciones temáticas y exploraciones de campo. + info...
     

    10.45 am – 
Visita de terrenos baldíos por Lara Almarcegui y el botanista Remko Andeweg.
    La artista española afincada en Rotterdam Lara Almarcegui ha publicado una guía en formato periódico en la que se recoge su investigación entorno a los actuales terrenos baldíos que pueden encontrarse a lo largo de puerto de Rotterdam. En contraste con la gran planificación que circunda el futuro Maasvlakte 2, Almarcegui se interesa por los espacios definidos por la aparente falta de diseño y desarrollo. El público navegará el puerto como un territorio interconectado con la ayuda de esta guía que, como ha manifestado la artista, "actuará como una herramienta para conocerlo mejor (...) para ver cómo el territorio está cambiando. En el futuro, cuando la mayoría de estos terrenos se vean modificados, la guía actuará como un documento histórico que describirá cómo fue el puerto en el 2009".

    12.00 am – Visita del centro de visitantes Futureland y almuerzo
    Durante el viaje se podrán ver las vallas publicitarias de los artistas Marjolijn Dijkman, Jorge Satorre, Paulien Oltheten y Hans Schabus. A la llegada Latitudes, comisarios de 'Portscapes', introducirán los proyectos.
     
    1.00 pm – Visita de las obras presentadas en Futureland y alrededores
    Visita de las obras de Paulien Oltheten y Hans Schabus así como la audioguía 'A Brief History of Mobile Landmass' realizada por Ilana Halperin. La audioguía narra fragmentos reales y ficticios recogidos a partir de la investigación de la artista y expertos entorno a volcanes y estudios de campo relacionados con la presente construcción del Maasvlakte 2 – escuchar capítulos o descargar archivos aquí

    13.30h – '
Postpetrolistic Internationale', performance de Roman Keller & Christina Hemauer

     
    El proyecto de los suizos Roman Keller & Christina Hemauer
 comienza con el transporte de un escenario a lo largo del Rin, desde Basilea (donde el Rin abandona Suiza) y cerca de donde viven los artistas, hasta Rotterdam (donde el Rin desemboca en el mar) - léase post 30.10.09. A su llegada un coro cantará la 'The Postpetrolistic Internationale', un himno social compuesto por los artistas en colaboración con el músico y compositor Mathias Vetter, que proclama el comienzo de una nueva era donde el petróleo pertenece al pasado. Los días 7 y 8 de noviembre un coro local interpretará este himno de esperanza sobre el escenario en pleno paisaje industrial, para poner en perspectiva la historia evolución de hombre y su relación con los combustibles fósiles y el uso de la energía. Ésta será la primera vez que se cantará en inglés.
     
    2 pm – Regreso al NAI Rotterdam con varias paradas durante el recorrido a los terrenos valdíos seleccionados por Lara Almarcegui y obras de Paulien Oltheten

    3 pm – Llegada a 
NAI Rotterdam. Fin de trayecto.
    Portscapes es un encargo de la Autoridad Portuaria de Rotterdam con el consejo de SKOR (Foundation for Art and Public Space, Amsterdam) y comisariado por Latitudes.




    Text on Lara Almarcegui's project for Expo Zaragoza 2008 and exhibition at Pepe Cobo, Madrid


    Latitudes contributed a short text on Lara Almarcegui's work for the recently released publication 'Intervenciones artísticas en las riberas del Ebro' ('Artistic interventions around the riberas del Ebro'), printed on the occasion of the commissions series produced by Expo Zaragoza 2008.

    Almarcegui's 'Un descampado en la Ribera del Ebro' (Open Ground on the Banks of the Ebro) was commissioned by ExpoAgua Zaragoza 2008 and produced in collaboration with The Centro de Arte y Naturaleza–Fundació Beulas in Huesca.
    Here is an extract of the text:
     

    (...) Almarcegui’s project for Expo Zaragoza 2008 started from an agreement to preserve a section of land in an untouched state for as long as possible. The artist has set up a legal stipulation whereby an otherwise unremarkable 700 sq.m. ‘wasteland’ is put beyond the control of developers for 75 years. This project takes its place among several sites that she has sought to preserve, including Rotterdam Harbour, 2003-2018; Genk, 2004-2014 and Arganzuela Public Slaughterhouse, Madrid, 2005-2006, for example. Each place seems banal yet beautiful while confounding what we understand as ‘wild’. They are what they they are: what they have left to be.  
    (...) The terrain is located within the boundaries of the Parque del Agua, in the Sotos del Río area where the Expo fair itself takes place. Almarcegui chose this area as she was attracted by its proximity to the Ebro river and to the idea that the flux of the currents during the seasons would slowly modify its appearance―blurring the margins where land becomes water. This interstitial, entropic site was picked without the intention of “trying to experiment with new ideas”. As she has described, “The project is something I thought necessary ... given the speed of construction ongoing in Spain and also the construction involved in the Expo, I somehow felt compelled to stop and preserve something in its raw state.”
    Other artists included in the publication: Javier Peñafiel, Federico Guzmán, Christopher Janney, Klaus Bury, Nicolás Camoisson y Marion Coudert, Isidro Ferrer & Batlle i Roig, Atelier Van Lieshout, Miguel Ángel Arrudi, Fernando Sinaga, Dan Graham, Miquel Navarro, Jeppe Hein, Jaume Plensa, Tony Cragg and Richard Deacon.

    Distributes: Actar D, Turner, FNAC, Casa del Libro, Librería Central, Barrabes, amongst others.
    Editor
    : Expoagua Zaragoza 2008, S.A.
    Languages: Spanish, English, French
    Pages: 240 pp.
    Format: 22 x 27 cm
    ISBN: 978-84-93657-23-9
    Price: 35 Euros

    On 23 October Lara opened the solo exhibition 'Ruins in the Netherlands' at Galeria Pepe Cobo, Madrid, where she presented a selection of 26 photographs of sites in ruin (an abandoned open theatre, a barn, a bunker, a windmill, a ferry station, an IBM tower, a swimming pool...) which are featured in her publication 'Ruins in the Netherlands XIX–XXI' (Episode, 2008, ISBN 978-90-5973-092-2) – also present in the exhibition. Alongside this, a photograph of her recent project 'Removing the outside wall of a ruined house' is included, as well as a slideshow of 80 images, 'An empty terrain in the Danshui River', accompanied by a small guide analising this particular area – three elements related to her presentation at the 2008 Taipei biennial.




    Read Mariano Navarro's review 'Lara Almarcegui. Memoria de los lugares vacíos' here ('El Cultural' suplement, week 30 october, in Spanish).
    [First 2 images: 'Open Ground on the Banks of the Ebro' (2008) by Lara Almarcegui. Courtesy the artist. 

    Below: Installation views of the exhibition 'Ruins in the Netherlands' in Galeria Pepe Cobo, Madrid. Photos: Latitudes].




    Catálogo 'Estratos', texto sobre Lara Almarcegui, PAC Murcia 2008


    El catálogo de la exposición 'Estratos', PAC Murcia 2008 está ya disponible. La publicación contiene una selección de textos nuevos, 'rescatados' y reimpresos, entrevistas, textos de los propios artistas, etc. acompañados de fotografías del montaje, vistas de la exposición y de los proyectos que tuvieron lugar durante la exposición y actividades paralelas (Enero–Marzo 2008).

    Mariana Cánepa Luna de Latitudes escribió sobre 'La Montaña de Escombros' (2008) de Lara Almarcegui. Podéis descargar el texto desde el archivo de textos (5.6 MB).


    Para completar la lectura, podréis escuchar una breve entrevista con la artista sobre esta pieza en el blog, así como ver imágenes de todo el proyecto en este blog (4 Febrero 2008).

    Título: 'Estratos', Proyecto Arte Contemporáneo Murcia 2008
    Formato: 33,5cm x 21 cm, Color, 324 pp.
    Edita: Comunidad Autónoma de la Región de Murcia. Consejería de Cultura, Juventud y Deportes - Dirección General de Bellas Artes y Bienes Culturales.
    Diseño: Germinal Comunicación
    ISBN 978-847564-400-4
    Distribución: Cataclismo S.L., circulació[email protected]

    8 June update:
    See Latitudes' Max Andrews Frieze review of Estratos here (Frieze, Issue 116, June-August 2008, 180 KB jpg)

    [Imágenes: Latitudes | www.lttds.org]




    'Greenwashing' in Artforum Critics' Picks

    Below you can read the review of the 'Greenwashing. Environment: Perils, Promises and Perplexities' exhibition by Emily Verla Bovino in Artforum Critics' Picks. The project website (www.greenwashing.lttds.org) has also been updated with links to press articles (ongoing) and a photogallery with a selection of installation shots.

    - - -

    "Greenwashing"
    Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo
    Via Modane, 16
    February 29–May 18


    “Cyclus Offset,” “KeayKolour Recycled May,” “Shiro Alga Carta”: A series of “all natural,” “ecological” papers color the catalogue for “Greenwashing” in a muted rainbow of earthy greens, yellows, and pinks. Designed by the exhibition’s curators—Ilaria Bonacossa and Latitudes’s Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna—the volume offers its own version of “green sheen.” Are the Fondazione and the organizers self-consciously engaging in the same banal posturing they set out to critique? Or do they see the printing of an art catalogue on recycled paper as a step in the direction of philosopher Félix Guattari’s exhortation to “think transversally,” toward a reconciliation of the nature/culture dichotomy? Like most of the show’s twenty-five participating artists, the organizers are uncompromising in their ambiguity: They neither propose grand solutions nor shy away in passive resignation. An ambitious project that occasionally falters, “Greenwashing” is largely successful in broadening and interrogating the narrow views that dominate environmentalist debates.

    Works by Jorge Peris, Lara Almarcegui, and Chu Yun provide the most exemplary models of this approach. For Fairy, 2008, Peris bolted slabs of wet clay to the walls of a back room, transforming the space’s frigid architecture into a musty den of soft, sweating walls kept moist by a network of sprinklers. Like Peris’s installation, Almarcegui’s slide show and postcards, titled A Wasteland: Rotterdam Harbour, 2003–2018; Genk, 2004–2014; Arganzuela Public Slaughterhouse, Madrid, 2005–2006; Peterson Paper Factory, Moss, 2006–2007, documents microenvironments that are at once constructed and deconstructed, simultaneously additive and subtractive. In A Wasteland—wilderness by design—the artist negotiated with municipal authorities and landowners to preserve the atmosphere of disuse in a selection of urban lots, sparing them from the restoration and clean-up of urban planners. In Chu’s Constellation, 2006, various appliances set to “sleep” mode are arranged in a dark room. Their twinkling red, blue, and green lights are the stars of a heaven inhabited by obsolete electronics, including VHS players and soon-to-be-outmoded technologies, like CRT television monitors. While Chu’s work evokes what Andrews calls the “‘What can I do?’ responses to climate change,” it also explores the seductiveness of the spectacular apocalypse scenarios frequently invoked in environmentalist rhetoric. Such eschatological visions aren’t the province of environmentalists alone, however. As Noam Chomsky affirms in Cornelia Parker’s video, Chomskian Abstract, 2007: “About a third of the population probably believes it doesn’t matter what we do about global warming . . . because Jesus is coming and so . . . what’s the difference? . . . Those of us who are saved will rise to heaven, and everyone else will be massacred—and it’ll be wonderful.”

    Emily Verla Bovino





    Latitudes in Turin


    Tonight we are taking the 'Salvador Dalí' night train from Barcelona to Turin—in part as response to RAF / Reduce Art Flights—to install and work on the catalogue for our show 'Greenwashing. Environment: Perils, Promises and Perplexities', which will open at the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo on 28th February (19-21h). 


    The show will include works by Jennifer Allora & Guillermo Calzadilla, Lara Almárcegui, Maria Thereza Alves, Ibon Aranberri, Amy Balkin, The Bruce High Quality Foundation, Chu Yun, A Constructed World, Minerva Cuevas, Ettore Favini, Cyprien Gaillard, Tue Greenfort, Norma Jeane, Cornelia Parker, Jorge Peris, Wilfredo Prieto, RAF / Reduce Art Flights, Tomás Saraceno, Santiago Sierra, Simon Starling, Fiona Tan, Nikola Uzunovski, Sergio Vega, Wang Jianwei and James Yamada.






    'Estratos', Proyecto Arte Contemporáneo 2008, Murcia


    31 January – 31 March 2008
     

    www.pacmurcia.es

    ARTISTS
    LARA ALMARCEGUI, BERND & HILLA BECHER, BLEDA Y ROSA, JUAN CRUZ, VERNE DAWSON, MARK DION, JIMMIE DURHAM, CYPRIEN GAILLARD, ILANA HALPERIN, JOACHIM KOESTER, MARK LOMBARDI, ALLAN McCOLLUM, PAUL NOBLE, PAULINA OLOWSKA, DIEGO PERRONE, ABRAHAM POINCHEVAL & LAURENT TIXADOR, MARJETICA POTRC, GREGOR SCHNEIDER, EVE SUSSMAN & THE RUFUS CORPORATION and KEITH TYSON.

    VENUES
    Centro Párraga, Espacio AV, MAM (Museo Arqueológico de Murcia), MUBAM (Museo de Bellas Artes de Murcia), Museo de Santa Clara, Sala San Esteban, Sala Verónicas, Cendeac, Filmoteca and three other public spaces in the city.

    The first Contemporary Art Project (PAC in Spanish) wants to make itself distinctive from the circuit of international biennials and art festivals by promoting a series of seminars for the duration of the project ('Heterocronías, Temporalitites in contemporary art practices' with guests including Pamela M. Lee, Peter Osborne, Manuel Cruz, Gary Shapiro and José Luis Villacañas), a film season in the regional filmoteca, and by offering six 3-month residency grants to Murcian artist to go to GlogauAIR, Berlin; Gasworks, London and Duende, Rotterdam; on top of the usual guided tours organised for this kind of events.

    Organiser _ Comunidad Autónoma de la Región de Murcia. Consejería de Cultura, Joventud y Deportes
    Curator _ Nicolas Bourriaud

    Assistant Curator _ Aurelia Kreienbühl
    Coordination & Communication _ Urroz Proyectos

    [all photos: Latitudes with courtesy to all the participating artists]




    Lara Almarcegui audio interview: Estratos, Murcia

    Here is a brief (just over 3 mins) audio interview, complete with canary and dog, recorded this past Friday with Lara Almarcegui about her work Rubble Mountain, commissioned by Estratos, the first Contemporary Art Project / Proyecto Arte Contemporáneo, Murcia (photos here) and
    interview by Max Andrews.

    From the following archive you'll be able to download the text file 'ALMARCEGUI_Estratos.pdf', an essay written by Mariana Cánepa Luna on Almarcegui's contribution (and published in 'Estratos' catalogue).






    Latitudes in 'Dazed & Confused' (December 2007 issue)


    The December 07 issue of 'Dazed and Confused' have profiled UOVO magazine as a 'heavy duty zine'. Their short review is subtitled 'Latitudes, the Spanish curators, take over the doorstep-sized art quarterly with the help from Dash Snow and Ryan McGinley' and the caption under the photograph reads 'Latitudes take over the reins at UOVO'.

    They are indeed dazed and confused. We have NOT taken over the magazine nor have we met Dash Snow or Ryan McGinley, at least not yet. Snow and McGinley were interviewed in previous UOVO issues as were in fact all the other artists mentioned in the review.

    However, Latitudes did guest edit the summer issue #14 (Green) 'Ecology, Luxury and Degradation' which included interviews and projects by artists such as Tue Greenfort, Sergio Vega, Michael Rakowitz, Lara Almarcegui, Federico Martelli, Noguchi Rika, Arturas Raila, etc. We are also collaborating with The Bookmakers Ed., the design office led by Chiara Figone which has just begun to publish monographs, as members of their Advisory Board together with Andrew Bonacina, Adam Carr, Lillian Davies, Silvia Sgualdini and Francesco Stocchi.

    [Thanks to Alexis Zavialoff for sending the photo of the magazine].




    'Greenwashing...' website

    Sergio Vega, 'Paradise on Fire', 2007. Series of five inkjet archival prints, 106 x 134 cm each. Courtesy the artist and Umberto di Marino Arte Contemporanea, Naples.

    We have launched the project website for 'Greenwashing. Environment: Perils, Promises and Perplexities': www.greenwashing.lttds.org. The site will be updated over time as an extension to the printed catalogue, with expanded contents such as installation shots, interviews, artists CVs, etc.

    So far we have confirmed the participation of Jennifer Allora & Guillermo Calzadilla, Lara Almarcegui, Maria Thereza Alves, Amy Balkin, The Bruce High Quality Foundation, Chu Yun, A Constructed World, Ettore Favini, Cyprien Gaillard, Tue Greenfort, Norma Jeane, Cornelia Parker, Jorge Peris, Wilfredo Prieto, RAF / Reduce Art Flights, Tomás Saraceno, Simon Starling, Nikola Uzunovski, Sergio Vega, Wang Jianwei and James Yamada.

    The show will open on 28 February 2008 at the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin and remain on view until 11 May. The exhibition is curated by Fondazione's curator Ilaria Bonacossa and Latitudes (Max Andrews & Mariana Cánepa Luna).

    For any press enquiries please email: [email protected]




    Lara Almarcegui's Wastelands

    Last weekend we visited 2 of Lara Almárcegui's wastelands. One in the Rotterdam harbour (www.braakliggendterrein.nl) and the other one in Genk, Belgium. The Rotterdam wasteland (first 4 pictures) has remained untouched since 2003 and will be kept until 2018. The Genk wasteland's dates are 2004-2014 (following 12 images).



    "Lara Almárcegui's work often explores neglected or overlooked sites, carefully cataloguing and highlighting each location's tendency towards entropy. Her projects have ranged from a guide to the wastelands of Amsterdam to the display, in their raw form, of the materials used to construct the galleries in which she shows. Her works are simple actions that belie the vast research process which she undertakes to achieve them." (Frieze Projects, 2006)




    UOVO14 'GREEN – Ecology, Luxury & Degradation' Available now!


    GUEST EDITED BY LATITUDES
    JULY–SEPTEMBER 2007
    Issue #14 presents interviews, essays, projects and two CDs around art practices that resist the spectacularisation or romanticisation of ecological issues or the natural world. The issue was launched in Art Basel's Art Lobby on the 17 June (images below). See also inside the magazine here.
    Where to find it? here
    More info? here and here

     
    [Photos: courtesy UOVO | The Bookmakers Ed. & MCH Swiss Exhibition Basel/Zurich AG]




    'LAND, ART...' publication reviewed in Frieze



     Brian Dillon reviews LAND, ART: A Cultural Ecology Handbook in the summer issue (#108) of Frieze, devoted to ecology. Read the article online.

    In that same issue, there is also a feature article by Latitudes' Max Andrews entitled 'The Whole Truth' featuring the work of Mierle Laderman Ukeles, Christina Hemauer & Roman Keller, Maria Thereza Alves, among others.





    Sharjah Biennial 8 - part 3

    Pictures from our excursion/roving seminar to Dubai Pivot Fields, Ras Al Khor wetlands (bird list below); and Al Khan, an abandoned village in Sharjah and the basis of Lara Almárcegui's UNESCO-prize-winning project for the Biennial. Participants: Michaela Crimmin, Max Andrews, Mariana Cánepa Luna, Mark Nash, Sarah Rich, Susi Platt, Stephanie Smith, Lara Almárcegui, Ignasi Aballí, Gulnara Kasmamlieva, Muratbek Kjoumakliev,Tea Mäpikää. Bird guiding: Clive Temple.



    Birds we saw during the excursion:

    Little Egret (Egretta garzetta)

    Western Reef-egret (Egretta gularis)
    Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea)
    Purple Heron (Ardea purpurea)
    Great Egret (Ardea alba)
    Cattle Egret (Bubulcus ibis)
    Glossy Ibis (Plegadis falcinellus)
    Eurasian Spoonbill (Platalea leucorodia)
    Greater Flamingo (Phoenicopterus ruber)
    Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)
    Eurasian Marsh Harrier (Circus aeruginosus)
    Greater Spotted Eagle (Aquila clanga)
    Grey Francolin (Francolinus pondicerianus)
    Black-winged Stilt (Himantopus himantopus)
    Little Plover (Charadrius dubius)
    Kentish Plover (Charadrius alexandrinus)
    Red-wattled Lapwing (Vanellus indicus)
    White-tailed Lapwing (Vanellus leucurus)
    Wood Sandpiper (Tringa glareola)
    Common Sandpiper (Actitis hypoleucos)
    Temminck's Stint (Calidris temminckii)
    Black-headed Gull (Larus ridibundus)
    Caspian Tern (Sterna caspia)
    Laughing Dove (Streptopelia senegalensis)
    Eurasian Collared Dove (Streptopelia decaocto)
    Rose-ringed Parakeet (Psittacula krameri)
    Pallid Swift (Apus pallidus)
    Indian Roller (Coracias benghalensis)
    Eurasian Hoopoe (Upupa epops)
    House Martin (Delichon urbica)
    Meadow Pipit (Anthus pratensis)
    Red-throated Pipit (Anthus cervinus)
    White Wagtail (Motacilla alba)
    Citrine Wagtail (Motacilla citreola)
    Blue-headed Wagtail [sp] (Motacilla flava)
    Grey Wagtail (Motacilla cinerea)
    White-cheeked Bulbul (Pycnonotus leucogenys)
    Red-vented Bulbul (Pycnonotus cafer)
    Purple Sunbird (Nectarinia asiatica)
    House Crow (Corvus splendens)
    Asian Pied Starling (Sturnus contra)
    Common Myna (Acridotheres tristis)
    Bank Myna (Acridotheres ginginianus)
    House Sparrow (Passer domesticus)
    Indian Silverbill (Lonchura malabarica)





    Lara Almarcegui in Frieze Art Fair




    One of our many highlights of the manic Frieze week–last week–was finally meeting up with artist Rotterdam-based Spanish artist Lara Almarcegui. She was presenting a new work for Frieze Projects that listed all the weights of materials that made up the fair's tent structure (see above).

    We have been working with Lara as one of the contributors to LAND, ART: A Cultural Ecology Handbook (with pages documenting her wasteland projects), and she will also be presenting at the Arts & Ecology conference No Way Back? in London in December.




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