Cover Story – March 2017: Time travel with Jordan Wolfson


The March 2017 Monthly Cover Story "Time travel with Jordan Wolfson" is now up on www.lttds.org after March it will be archived here.  

"The film that lends its image to this month’s cover story – Jordan Wolfson’s Landscape for Fire, 2007 – was featured in the Latitudes-curated film programme A Stake in the Mud, A Hole in the Reel. Land Art’s Expanded Field 1968–2008, which premiered in April 2008 at the Museo Tamayo, Mexico City, before touring several venues in Spain, Switzerland, the Netherlands and the U.K. 

Landscape for Fire responded to a 1972 film of the same name by Anthony McCall in which the British artist, best known for his “solid light” works, attempted to integrate performance, installation, sculpture and images in movement. Thirty-five years on, Jordan had re-staged this work of the past as though it were a ritual, the repetition of which invoked the almost mystical aura that often surrounds the art of the late 1960s and early 1970s." Continue reading by clicking the grey bar underneath the image

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities, and are archived here.


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Latitudes' "out of office" 2015–2016 season

"CLOSED. We open when we arrive, close when we leave, and if you come and we're not here, we just didn't coincide."

The end of the season is approaching and high summer is looming. Following Latitudes tradition we mark the summer break not by presenting a memo of activities per se, but with an "out of office" post (see the 2008-9, 2009-10, 2010-11, 2011-12, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2014–15 versions) with a series of 'behind the scenes' photos revisiting moments from the year gone by. So here are some glimpses of the past season, starting September 2015 to July 2016. See you in September!

In order to be conducive to freedom of interaction, the ‘Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group’ meetings have been held under the Chatham House Rule: This allows participants to express personal views, to listen, reflect and gather insights with a clear distinction from the position of their employers and/or the policies of any associated organization. Participation is expected, but there will be no resolutions issued, no votes are undertaken, and no policy statements proposed. Only this photo was taken.

Latitudes 2015–16 season started with a residency at Kadist, San Francisco (26 August–9 September) during which time we had the opportunity to develop several projects. Three artist-led tours with SF-based artists Amy Balkin, Rick & Megan Prelinger and Will Brown were part of our ongoing series 'Incidents of Travel' (see 2012 in Mexico City, 2013 in Hong Kong and most recent 2016 online incarnation). We took over Kadist social media with an Instagram residency and contributed to the online programme 'One Sentence Exhibition'.

Furthermore, on August 29, we convened the second ‘Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group’ at Kadist, a "by-invitation meeting bringing together individuals and expertise from the Bay Area with an active interest in institutional prototyping and emergent usership" initially presented in May 2015 for the
International Curatorial Retreat in Bari, Italy.

The workshop is "a forum for informal dialogue about megatrends and the future of contemporary art institutions. In the San Francisco iteration, an emphasis was put on cross-pollination between design thinking and curatorial thinking. Participants also discussed, among other things, the notion of the post-disciplinary, and the question of appropriate speeds, scale or periodicities of institutions."

  Photo: Arash Fayed.

September 8: Our last activity in the Bay Area was a session with first-year participants of the MA Curatorial Practice at the California College of the Arts (CCA). We briefly introduced our curatorial practice and invited the new students to imagine the governance and daily operations of a range of institutions – a remote residency facility, a commissioning institution, and an annual festival.


(Above and below) BAF technical team and artist Daniel Steegmann Mangrané installing the sound piece “Surucuá, Teque-teque, Arara” (2012) at the Umbracle (shade house), Parc de la Ciutadella. One of the "Composiciones" commissions for the Barcelona Gallery Weekend.


September 25: Max Andrews of Latitudes participates in the symposium "The Shock of Victory" held at CCA Glasgow. Meanwhile, installation is well underway for the first Barcelona Gallery Weekend, for which Latitudes devised a special programme of five artists' commissions.
 (Above and below) David Bestué browsing and choosing ceramic pieces and moulds in the attic at the Cosme Toda factory, for his "Composiciones" installation.

(Above and below) Jordi Mitjà discussing his work to the team at the Museu Geològic del Seminari during the installation of his "Composiciones" piece.
Rasmus Nilausen lights up Pere Llobera's drawing in dust, part of their joint "Composiciones" adventure.

(Above) Second seminar at the Biblioteca del Campo Freudiano de Barcelona, project by Dora García for "Composiciones".

  (Above) Display of the books selected by Dora García from the holdings of the Biblioteca del Campo Freudiano de Barcelona.

'Composiciones' received some great write-ups – including a long text on Frederic Montornés popular blog and by Jörg Heiser in frieze magazine. We also gathered hundreds of tweets, Instagram shots and press material on this Storify.  

 Board announcing the seminar and public talk.

Closed-door seminar at Tabakalera. Photo: Consonni. 

Public presentation of Latitudes' projects at Tabakalera. Photo: Consonni.

November 2015: Latitudes travelled to Donostia's recently opened Tabakalera. We were invited by LaPublika's programme, created by Consonni, to lead a two-day seminar and public lecture around artists working in the public sphere.


Moments before starting the ESP people assembly at Birmingham's Eastside Projects.

On November 15 Latitudes convened the third iteration of the 'Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group', this time in Birmingham's Eastside Projects. This "forum for informal dialogue about megatrends and the future of contemporary art institutions" collectively imagined a ‘What if?’ – a post-apocalyptic scenario in which the entire art ecology of Birmingham had to be regrown from the ground up, an exercise that would help define and identify which are the most urgent organisations, facilities and tools.

International Summit Synapse 1 at New Rex of the National Theatre of Greece. 'Session II: Rethinking Institutions': (from left to right) Leo Panitch, Maria Hlavajova, Adam Szymczyk, Amalia Zepou (moderator), Hilary Wainwright, Emily Pethick, Latitudes (Max Andrews & Mariana Cánepa Luna) © Eva Galatsanou. 

  Second-day assembly at the Bargeion Hotel. 

Shortly after, on 18–19 November Latitudes participated in the OMONOIA summit which began the Athens Biennale 2015–2017. For a short report see the Cover Story of December 2015 and this blog entry.

December 2015: Mariana joined Hangar's renewed Board of Trustees as its Secretary, a responsibility she will fulfil for the next three years.

December 4: Participation in the BAR module: Curating the space / Space for curating open public conversation with Sofía Hernández Chong Cuy, Carles Guerra, Michy Marxuach and BAR module participants. 

(Above and below) Courtesy: BAR Project.  Photos: Eva Carasol. 

January 2016: After an intense jury process in January, we began the year-long mentoring process of three exhibition projects out of the nine selected projects as part of the 2016 season's BCN Producció 2016.



The first project Latitudes mentored was by Pau Magrané/PLOM who turned the Espai Cub, a 3x3x3 metre white cube, into "a sound stage/instrument, an echo chamber hosting different screenings and objects to be played by PLOM at the opening". The two other projects Latitudes is mentoring are by Antoni Hervàs (September 15) and a group exhibition "La dissidència nostàlgica" by curator Joana Hurtado Matheu (December 1). 

From January onwards: Preparations for the five projects produced in the context of the second edition of the Barcelona Gallery Weekend. Studio visits, site visits, project proposals, budget and production planning, taking measurements...

May 2016: Regina Giménez and Rafel G. Bianchi taking measures of Can Trinxet's walls, a former 19th Century textile factory in L'Hospitalet de Llobregat. 
March 2016: visiting Robert Llimós's studio in Sant Pere neighbourhood.

 Lola Lasurt doing some tests positioning her paintings at the Biblioteca Pública Arús.

February 2016: Trip to Arles to attend the 'How Institutions Think' symposium at the LUMA Foundation, this time not participating but listening and reporting. Read Max Andrews' report on the frieze blog.


Besides the reportage from the Arles conference, Max also published other reviews in Frieze magazine as one of its team of contributing editors: Xavier Ribas at ProjecteSD (Barcelona); Joachim Koester at BlueProject Foundation (Barcelona); Alexandre Estrela at the Museo Reina Sofía (Madrid) and Critic's Guide: Barcelona highlighting some of the interesting shows in the city on frieze website. He has also contributed the text "Soups & Symptoms" for a forthcoming publication of Barcelona-based Danish painter Rasmus Nilausen. 

View of Francesc Ruiz, “Correos,” garcía galería, Madrid, 2016. Courtesy of garcía galería, Madrid. Photo: Roberto Ruiz.

On February 25, Mariana Cánepa Luna's review of Francesc Ruiz's exhibition at garcía | galería, Madrid, was published online on art-agenda: "Ruiz’s second solo show at Madrid’s garcía galería delves into the visual communication of one of Spain’s most iconic institutions, the Sociedad Estatal Correos y Telégrafos—the national postal service, commonly known as Correos—whose graphic identity was created in 1977 by Spanish designer and artist José María Cruz Novillo (b. 1936)." continue reading...


Mariana also contributed to the publication "Great Expectations: Prospects for the Future of Curatorial Education" edited by Leigh Markopoulos and published by the California College of the Arts and The Banff Centre – with some insightful questions by Banff Centre Walter Phillips Gallery curator Peta Rake.

Miquel from MACBA's AV team checking the connections behind the monitor that presented 'Houdini' (1991) – one of the most challenging works in the exhibition for the technical team as it meant dismantling a 40-year-old TV and submerging the front part into water.


March 2016: Installation begins! After over year and half of preparation, the exhibition "I Will Fear No Evil" opened at Convent dels Àngels del MACBA on March 17, 2016. Two busy weeks of installation in the Convent dels Àngels space preceded the opening. Many press tours, exhibition reviews, photo and video recordings, guided visits, film screenings, and music events followedthey're all archived here!

 Alex from MACBA's restoration department scraping the old silicone off the acrylic box containing "San Guinefort" (1991).
Tria33, a programme broadcast at Canal 33, came to film during the installation.
 Lightbox of "El Resplandor de la Santa Conjunción aleja a los demonios" in progress, a piece from 1991, exhibited for the first time in the Sala RG in Caracas, and also reconstructed for the present exhibition. 
TTI installation team placing twelve pork rind skateboards on the metal structure. "La Hermandad" (1994) was commissioned for the 1994 exhibition "Cocido y Crudo" at the Museo Reina Sofía, Madrid, and it's now part of the "la Caixa" Collection.  

 Vinyls go up – design by Mucho. More on the exhibition graphic design. 
March 17, 11:30am: Presentation to the press. Left to right: Ferran Barenblit (MACBA director), exhibition curators Mariana Cánepa Luna and Max Andrews of Latitudes, and artist José Antonio Hernández-Díez. Photo: MACBA twitter.

Visitors in front of "Sagrado Corazón Activo", a work from 1991 reconstructed for this exhibition. Photo: Miquel Coll/MACBA.
Visitors next to "Houdini", a work from 1989 reconstructed for this exhibition. Photo: Miquel Coll/MACBA.

 General view of the exhibition. Photo: Roberto Ruiz/MACBA.

April: We love snail mail and handwritten notes! We received a note from Rick & Megan Prelinger alongside a copy of their Yearbook 2015. We relished spending time at the Prelinger Library in San Francisco last August as part of our 'Incidents of Travel' series! (Our extended heartfelt thanks to the Kadist team for hosting us!).

Card and Yearbook 2015 by the Prelinger Library.
 
April 20: Wrapped-up a five-part interview with Melbourne-based artist Nicholas Mangan to be published in the catalogue of his forthcoming solo exhibition ‘Limits to Growth’, co-produced by Monash University Museum of Art (MUMA), Melbourne (opening July 20) and Institute of Modern Art (IMA), Brisbane (where it will be on view from October 29). The exhibition will travel to KW in Berlin in Summer 2017.


 Installing Pau Magrané exhibition at the Cub space in La Capella. Photos: Pau Magrané.

April 27 (until June 12): Exhibition "Demo" of Pau Magrané/PLOM at Espai Cub, La Capella. This is the first of the three projects Latitudes is mentoring throughout 2016  as part of BCN Producció'16 production grant scheme. Video of the project here (Catalan with Spanish subtitles) or here (English).


April 25–May 7: Two-week residency at CAPC Bordeaux to research for a group exhibition which will take place in 2017. One strand of our investigations departs from the CAPC building itself, known as Entrepôt Lainé – a 19th Century warehouse for colonial commodities. We learnt from the museum staff that coffee beans are occasionally found atop a pile of papers on an office desk or in the middle of the exhibition galleries. This became the focus of our May Cover Story (archived here).

First and last pages of the first online dispatch by Chicago-based curator Yesomi Umolu within the distributed phase of Incidents (of Travel). http://incidents.kadist.org/
 

May: Launch of the online project Incidents (of Travel), produced by Kadist Art Foundation. The web marks a new ‘distributed’ phase of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ as an online periodical. The ongoing series will be edited by Latitudes and produced by Kadist.

Originally conceived by Latitudes as day-long artist-led tours commissioned to artists in and around Mexico City (2012) – followed by Hong Kong (2013) and San Francisco (2015) – ‘Incidents’ expands on the format of the curator-meets-artist studio visit to explore the chartered itinerary as a format of an artistic encounter. The first dispatch came from Chicago and featured Yesomi Umolu (Exhibitions Curator at the Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts at the University of Chicago) and artist Harold Mendez, an offline day photographed by Nabiha Khan.

  
June: Launch of the second Incidents (of Travel) dispatch, an encounter between curator Serubiri Moses and photographer Mohsen Taha in Jinja, Uganda, narrated throughout 18 photos by Taha with an introduction, captions, sound and commentary.
 

And finally July. Some are off on holiday but many remain working full speed despite the less frantic inbox. Many surely agree that this is one of the weirdest months in the calendar, a bit like the pre-Christmas rush, but with a whole month of heated intensity

4–8 July: Second trip to Bordeaux, more archival appointments and more geology. Led by Bruno Cahuzac (Maître de Conférences, UFR Sciences de la Terre et de la Mer) from the Faculté des Sciences de Bordeaux, we visited the incredible carothèque-lithothèque at the Université de Bordeaux in Talence which houses over 30,000 core samples from the subsoil of the Aquitaine basin.

(Above) Gerard Ortín's exhibition "Vijfhoek" at Galería Estrany-de la Mota and (below) Gerard receiving the award.



July 9 and 20: As jurors of this year's award Art Nou/Primera Visió we visited the twenty participating commercial galleries, non-profits, private foundations and museums alongside BCNProducció'16 co-tutors Mireia Sallarès and David Armengol. We unanimously decided to award Gerard Ortín for his solo show at Galería Estrany-de la Mota. Ortín receives 2,000 Euros to produce a new publication. The ceremony took place on July 21 at La Capella. Last year winner Rasmus Nilausen produced the publication "Soups & Symptoms" which includes a text by Max Andrews of Latitudes.


Instagram post by Fireplace project.

July 11: Presentation of the publications of the projects by artists Ricardo Trigo and Pau Magrané resulting from the production grant BCN Producció'16.  

 February 2016 Cover Story was dedicated to Sarah Ortmeyer. 

Cover Stories on www.lttds.org: Over a year ago we began the monthly section "Cover Story" on our home page (archive of this section). October 2015 was dedicated to David Bestué's "Luces" installation commissioned for Composiciones, November 2015 marked the sixth anniversary of Globalising the Internationale, Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller’s project for Portscapes; December presented a shot taken during OMONOIA, the International Summit at the National Theatre of Greece’s New Rex which kicked off the Athens Biennale 2015–2017. 

January shifted to black-and-white with a Mediterranean shot from E.1027, the 1920s Côte d'Azur house designed by Eileen Gray and Jean Badovici near Monaco meticulously documented since 2008 by Danish artist Kasper Akhøj. February stayed in France, going up to the Tour Eiffel and looking back at a piece by Sarah Ortmeyer presented in a 2011 exhibition in Brussels. March showed a behind-the-scenes moment of the production of "Sagrado Corazón Activo" (1991) a work by José Antonio Hernández-Díez that was only ever exhibited once before, in 1991 in Caracas. The piece was specially reconstructed for the exhibition "I Will Fear No Evil" at MACBA presenting a selection of his early works. In April we announced the forthcoming launch of 'Incidents (of Travel)', an online periodical produced by Kadist; and in May (back to France) we began our research at CAPC Bordeaux, where we'll be curating a group exhibition in June 2017. June took us back to Hernández-Díez's show which was coming to an end – some exhibition reviews here; and July took us back to the Latitudes-devised Composiciones commissions last October (the programme of artists’ interventions returns later this year).

June Cover Story – all cover stories archived here.

 Antoni Hervàs preparing his installation for BCN Producció'16.

We are presently preparing for what will be a rather intense September. Antoni Hervàs's exhibition "El Misterio de Caviria" at Sala Gran of La Capella (third round of exhibitions of the grant scheme BCN Producció) opens on September 15. It will be shortly followed by the presentation of the five "Composiciones" commissions by Lúa Coderch, Regina Giménez, Lola Lasurt, Robert Llimós and Wilfredo Prieto for the second Barcelona Gallery Weekend, inaugurating on Thursday 29 September, and on view until Sunday 2 October. 
 
We have also been invited to contribute to Oslo Pilot, the two-year project investigating the role of art in the public realm led by Eva González-Sancho and Per Gunnar Eeg-Tverbakk. We will be writing on a selection of case-studies based around their four areas of research – Reactivation, Periodicity, Public and Disappearancewhich will be published in the magazine launched during a three-day symposium in mid-November 2016. 

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Last days! Cover Story and exhibition of José Antonio Hernández-Díez: techno-pop, death and resurrection

Monthly cover story on www.lttds.org

José Antonio Hernández-Díez’s exhibition No temeré mal alguno (I will fear no evil) – curated by Latitudes – continues at the Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA) until 26 June. Reconstructed for the exhibition, the extraordinary Sagrado Corazón Activo was first shown in September 1991 in a group show titled El Espíritu de los Tiempos (The Spirit of the Times) in Caracas, Venezuela. It belongs to a body of work that José termed a ‘New Christian Iconography’ in which the application of communications and medical technology interlace with systems of paranormal belief, most prominently Christian theology.


Published as part of MACBA’s Portable Notebook series, Latitudes’s essay about José’s exhibition explains that “this visceral work deals with a key point of difference in theologies related with transubstantiation and ‘real presence’ – the notion that Jesus Christ is actually somehow present in a fleshy way in the bread and wine of the Eucharist versus being a symbolic or a metaphorical presence. Sagrado Corazón Activo seems to inhabit the peculiarly disjointed temporality that is proper to hauntology – a techno-medical vision of a science-gone-mad future within an ancient symbolic past.”   

Photo: Inés Balcells for ABC El Mundo.

No temeré mal alguno (I will fear no evil) focusses on José’s first experimental works with videography in the late 1980s and early 1990s and such early iconic vitrine-based works, alongside a new project made for the occasion. The presence of ghosts and bodily organs in this phase of Hernández-Díez’s out-of-joint art – videographic spectres, disembodied voices, preserved creatures, hearts and skin – is only enhanced by the necromantic aspect of the fact that several of his works were remade, as if brought back to life, for the exhibition.

#HernándezDíez
  
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Reseñas sobre la exposición "No temeré mal alguno" de José Antonio Hernández-Díez en el MACBA

A una semana de concluirse la exposición de José Antonio Hernández-Díez en el MACBA (finaliza el 26 de junio), hacemos revisión de la cobertura de prensa más relevante que ha recibido (por orden cronológico) y que encontraréis bajo la pestaña "Contenidos relacionados" en la sección final de ésta y en todas nuestras páginas, espacio desde donde también compartimos entradas al blog.

Compartimos una vez más el registro fotográfico de la exposición y el archivo de redes sociales (reseñas, instagrams, tweets) que diferentes usuarios han ido publicando a lo largo de los tres meses que ha durado la exposición. 

Recordad que quedan dos activides más: el 22 de junio, 19h, se proyectará "Vampyr" de Carl Theodor Dreyer (1932, Francia y Alemania, 75 min, b/n, sin sonido) dentro del ciclo "Sombras y silencios o los fantasmas que vuelven como la primera vez" que comisaría el cineasta Andrés Duque para la exposición y el sábado 25 de junio, 19h, Nieve Fuga realizará un concierto en vivo en la sala de exposiciones en el contexto de la programación #MACBAesviu, un collage sonoro inspirado en las obras de la exposición
 
“Las obras de José Antonio Hernández-Díez toman el MACBA”, eldiario.com, 17 marzo 2016.


“El MACBA acull una exposició amb instal·lacions experimentals de José Antonio Hernández-Díez”, Vilaweb.com, 17 març 2016.

Núvol, video by Ester Roig, 17 març 2016.
 

Sonia Ávila, "José Antonio Hernández-Díez mira a su pasado”, El Periódico, 17 marzo 2016.

Carlos Sala “Cuando el video era el rey”, La Razón, 18 marzo 2016.
 

Griselda Oliver, "Viu o mort. El gos d’Antonio Hernández-Díez", Núvol.com, 19 març 2016.


Eugènia Sendra, “Com recuperar la fe perduda”, revista Time Out, 23 març 2016.

Javier Díaz-Guardiola, “La obsolescencia artística programada también existe”, ABC Cultural, 25 marzo 2016.
Antoni Ribas Tur, "Nova iconografia religiosa i un gos sant, al Macba”, www.ara.cat 29 març 2016.

Jaume Vidal Oliveras, "Hernández-Díez, líbranos de todo mal", El Cultural, El Mundo, 1 abril 2016.

Maria Palau, "Art, vida i mort", El Punt/AVUI, 7 abril 2016.

Roberta Bosco, "Arqueología contemporánea", El País (Catalunya),17 abril 2016.

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Graphic communication of the exhibition 'José Antonio Hernández-Díez. I Will Fear No Evil' at MACBA

Exhibition announcement sent via email.

The invitation for the solo exhibition "I Will Fear No Evil" by José Antonio Hernández-Díez has been created by the Barcelona-Newark-Paris-San Francisco-New York graphic design studio Mucho, responsible for the visual communication of this and other exhibitions at MACBA

Departing from the religious and technological references included in Hernández-Díez's exhibition, the cross appears like a distorted televisual aparition.

The design was later applied on the large glass vitrine that frames the entrance to the Convent dels Àngels, respecting the presence of two video pieces also on display in this space: 'La caja' (1991) and 'Vas pa'l cielo y vas llorando' (1992), videoprojections that remain lit until midnight.
 
 (Above) Draft design and (following) tests on the windows, vinyls being applied and final look of the entrance to the exhibition space at Plaça dels Àngels.

 (Above) Façade by day and façade by night (below, photo by Miquel Coll, MACBA).
 Finally, a smaller vinyl is also applied at c/ dels Àngels, easily viewed when visitors come from c/ Elisabets.

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The story behind José Antonio Hernández-Díez's 'San Guinefort' (1991)

 Pages with the story behind Plaça dels Àngels.

When giving a presentation or tour of an exhibition or project we have worked on, we are often asked how the project emerged – if there was a particular trigger or point of origin. In the case of José Antonio Hernández-Díezs exhibition currently on view at MACBA (until June 26, 2016), our approach was a familiar one to us we started by both delving in-depth in researching the artists previous works while at the same time looking into the history of the venue where the exhibition was going to take place. 

We are very fond of a book that has been in our library for many years – 'Histories and legends of Barcelona' by Joan Amades (Edicions 62). This two-volume tome gathers some of the myths behind Barcelona place names and includes the tales behind both familiar and obscure buildings, streets and monuments in the city. The story that most captivated us concerned the chapel of the Convent dels Àngels, and it is recounted in the essay we wrote to accompany the exhibition (published as the Quaderns Portàtils #32 pdfs available in Spanish and English and epub in Spanish only). It goes as follows:

(...) "Outside the doorway of the deconsecrated sixteenth-century church that formed part of Barcelona’s Convent dels Àngels there once stood the stone figure of a dog, standing upright on its hind legs. Two separate legends account for its existence, as recorded by ethnologist and folklorist Joan Amades in the 1950s. A boorish man would routinely interrupt the services and torment the church congregation, it is said. He was punished by being turned into a dog. The other version states that the canine figure commemorates the thwarting of a robbery. The church once displayed an image of Saint Roch, the patron saint of dogs, accompanied by a hound. It is said that the prospective thieves were frightened away as the image miraculously began to bark. (The supernatural mythology of the chapel does not cease there – in 1627 an image of Christ began to sweat blood profusely.) 

Sculpture of a dog once stood in front of La Capella dels Àngels, church of the Convent dels Àngels.
 
Parallel to this, we started looking at Hernández-Díezs earliest works and investigating his pieces in MACBAs collection. We found that the museum had his 1991 work San Guinefort on long-term loan in their collection, but it had never been exhibited. As narrated in our essay: 

(...) "that José Antonio Hernández-Díez (Caracas, Venezuela, 1964) had already been dealing with Catholic belief and superstition in his art – and moreover, specifically addressing canine veneration – is much more than an uncanny coincidence for his exhibition at MACBA’s Convent dels Àngels in 2016."  

The legend behind Saint Guinefort is one of the more obscure intersections of Catholic history and folk tradition:

(...) "Writing around 1260, the Inquisitor and Dominican friar Étienne de Bourbon related his investigation into the veneration of Saint Guinefort in the Dombes region of France. He discovered that this supposed Saint was, in fact, a dog. The account he disclosed was that a knight and his wife had one day left their greyhound Guinefort to guard their baby. When they returned to the castle they found the cradle empty and Guinefort covered in blood. Assuming it had murdered the baby, the knight hastily killed the dog, only later realising his error. Guinefort had in fact fought off a snake in order to save the child, who was found unharmed. Guinefort was buried unceremoniously in the forest outside the castle walls. Hearing of the martyred dog, local people began to believe in its power to protect children and began to bring their sick infants to the grave. Étienne de Bourbon was horrified to discover the strength of the superstition that had taken root. Children were being left overnight by Guinefort’s grave in the belief that he would rid them of spirits, and several babies had died as a consequence. Defending the orthodoxy of the church, the friar had the heretical remains of the greyhound dug up and destroyed, razed the forest and outlawed the canine cult, yet there is evidence of its persistence into the nineteenth century. The episode is worth recounting in detail, as previous accounts of it in relation to Hernández-Díez’s work have been misleading."


Coinciding with our research period, in August 2014 we happened to be travelling near Lyon, France, and took the opportunity to visit to the Bois de Saint Guinefort in the Dombes region, where the story of Saint Guinefort emerged (and where the dog-saint may still be venerated every 22nd August, despite the regional tourism office assuring us the festival day was no longer celebrated). 

Somewhere on the road between Villars-les-Dombes and Châtillon-sur-Chalaronne one can, with the help of a tagged flickr photo and GPS, find a sign, as seen below, which briefly narrates these peculiar events from the 13th Century



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Public programmes related to the exhibition 'José Antonio Hernández-Díez. I Will Fear No Evil' at MACBA, Barcelona, on view until 26 June 2016

View of José Antonio Hernández-Díez's 'El resplandor de la Santa Conjunción aleja a los demonios" (1991). Installation. Lightbox, sampler, timer, flash, tripod and speakers. Collection Leonora and Jimmy Belilty. Photo: Miquel Coll, MACBA.


The exhibition I will fear no evil presents works from the beginning of José Antonio Hernández-Díez’s career in the late 1980s and early nineties – several of which have not been seen since they were first exhibited in 1991 – in dialogue with a new series produced especially for the occasion. 

The following series of events have been programmed to accompany the exhibition:

Thursday, 31 March, 7pm:
Visit with the artist and Latitudes. Exclusive to the Amic card. Limited places.

#MACBAAmic

Saturday 2 April, 7pm:
Experience MACBA, The secrets of conservation in ‘I will fear no evil’ by José Antonio Hernández-Díez. Visit with the artist, Latitudes and Lluís Roqué
Museum galleries.
5 €. No booking required. Limited places. 

#MACBAesviu


View of Hernández-Díez's exhibition "I will fear no evil". Photo: Miquel Coll, MACBA.

Film programme: 
Shadows and silences or the ghosts that return as if for the first time”. Curated by Andrés Duque.
Meier Auditorium. 
Admission: 5 €/session. Free with MACBA Amics card. Limited places.

Wednesday 4 May, 7pm
‘Schastye (Happiness)’, Aleksandr Medvedkin, 1935, Russia, 95 min, b/w, silent.
Despite being released in 1935, this is a silent movie. It narrates the hapless misadventures of a peasant unable to reap a good harvest. It takes a courageous act to reconcile himself with himself and other people.

Wednesday 18 May, 7pm
‘Finis Terrae’, Jean Epstein, 1929, France, 80 min, b/w, silent.
Four labourers leave for the island of Bannec to collect the harvest. One loses his hand and the wound becomes infected, so cannot work anymore.

Wednesday 15 June, 7pm
‘He Who Gets Slapped’, Victor Sjöström, 1924, USA, 83 min, b/w, silent.
After many years of research, Paul Beaumont, a scientist and humanist, discovers a revolutionary theory, but his patron (Marc McDermott) seduces his wife (Ruth King) and takes credit for his discoveries. To add insult to injury, he slaps Beaumont before the assembled scientific community, compounding his humiliation. Ashamed, Beaumont flees and takes refuge in a circus, where he becomes a famous clown known as ‘he who gets slapped’. As fate would have it, one night his perfidious patron appears in the audience, having abandoned Beaumont’s wife and intent on marrying the beautiful Consuelo (Norma Shearer).

Wednesday 22 June, 7pm
‘Kurutta Ippēji (A Page of Madness)’, Teinosuke Kinugasa, 1926, Japan, 70 min, b/w, silent.
Kurutta Ippēji tells the story of a worker in a psychiatric hospital who begins to feel a strange affection for a patient, who was allegedly committed after murdering her own baby. But he only wants to release her, to escape with her and start a new family. The film went missing for over fifty years and was barely seen after its release. It was the director himself who discovered the negative and a copy in his archive store in 1971.

Saturday 25 June, 7pm:
Nieve Fuga: music around 'I will fear no evil'
Exhibition galleries.
5 €. Free with museum ticket and with MACBA Amics cards. Limited places. Ticket includes free admission to current exhibitions until 9 pm.

#MACBAesviu

View of Hernández-Díez's exhibition "I will fear no evil". Photo: Miquel Coll, MACBA.


 Related Content:




Cover Story, March 2016: José Antonio Hernández-Díez: The sacred heart of the matter

March 2016 cover story. This and previous stories are archived here.

The March 2016 cover story marks the twelve of the series. This section published monthly on our home page, focuses on an artwork or moment related to our past, current or future practice – "close ups" of what we do, see and are thinking about. (When the next Cover Story is published, the March one will be archived here.)

'José Antonio Hernández-Díez. I will fear no evil' opens at MACBA’s Convent dels Àngels on 18 March 2016 (and runs until 26 June). Guest curated by Latitudes, the exhibition focuses on the Barcelona-based Venezuelan artist’s first experimental works from the late 1980s and early 1990s. 

The presence of ghosts and bodily organs in this phase of José Antonio’s out-of-joint art – videographic spectres, disembodied voices, preserved creatures, hearts and skin – is only enhanced by the somewhat necromantic aspect of the fact that several of his works are being reconstructed. Dealing with the symbology and spiritual practices of Catholicism, 'Sagrado Corazón Activo' (Active Sacred Heart, 1991) is one of the pieces which will be brought back to life. In a workshop in Barcelona’s Gràcia, sculptor Fernando Romeo is making its heart. Continue reading...


Related Content:




Curators: 'I Will Fear No Evil', José Antonio Hernández-Díez, Convent dels Àngels del Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA), 18 March–26 June 2016

José Antonio Hernández-Díez, "La Hermandad", 1994. Video installation. ”la Caixa” / MACBA Collection.

Latitudes is curating the solo exhibition 'I will fear no evil' of Venezuelan-born Barcelona-based artist José Antonio Hernández-Díez (Caracas, 1964), which will open at the Convent dels Àngels del Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA), on March 17.
 
'I will fear no evil' presents works from the beginning of Hernández-Díez’s career in the late 1980s and early nineties – several of which have not been seen since they were first exhibited – in dialogue with Filamentos (2016), a new series developed especially for the occasion.

José Antonio Hernández-Díez, "La Hermandad", 1994. Video installation. ”la Caixa” / MACBA Collection.

The present exhibition looks back to Hernández-Díez’s first experimental works with video alongside early iconic screen- and vitrine-based works, including three of those presented at the time of his landmark first monographic exhibition 'San Guinefort y otras devociones', held in 1991 at Sala RG in Caracas. This exhibition heralded what the artist termed as a ‘New Christian Iconography’, offering – as artist-colleague Meyer Vaisman described – ‘a techno-pop view of Catholicism’s most beloved symbols’. 

An newly text by Latitudes will be published in Spanish as No. 32 of the Quaderns portàtils (Portable Notebooks) series. This MACBA-produced collection is freely distributed and downloadable from the museum website in PDF and ePUB format. An English translation will also be available as a separate PDF.

Exhibition runs between 18 March–26 June 2016 and is organised and produced by the Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA).




Latitudes publications acquired by the Paul D. Fleck Library & Archives, The Banff Centre

The Paul D. Fleck Library & Archives is on the second floor of the Kinnear Centre building at The Banff Centre.
Views from the Paul D. Fleck Library & Archives.

We are delighted that a large selection of Latitudes'-edited publications is now available for public consultation at the Paul D. Fleck Library and Archives in The Banff Centre, Banff, Canada. Banff becomes the second location to host the set of Latitudes’s publications, which are also available for reference at the Library of the MACBA Study Centre, Barcelona.


Latitudes publications and others from the reading list of the 'Blueprint for Happiness' Thematic Residency, featured shelf at the Banff Library.


The following publications can be found in Banff's library online catalogue:

Amikejo
Catalogue of the exhibition series, Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Castilla y León (MUSAC), León
April 2012

United Alternative Energies
Christina Hemauer & Roman Keller
Catalogue of the exhibition, Aarhus Art Building, Centre for Contemporary Art, Århus
January 2012

Campus
Catalogue of the project, Espai Cultural Caja Madrid, Barcelona
July 2011


Martí Anson, Mataró Chauffeur Service
Catalogue of the project, 'No Soul For Sale', Tate Modern, London
January 2011


Portscapes
Catalogue of the commission series and exhibition 'Portscapes', Port of Rotterdam / Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam
February 2010

The Last Newspaper
Catalogue of the exhibition 'The Last Newspaper', New Museum, New York
October–December 2010

Simon Fujiwara: The Incest Museum–A Guide
Artist book published in the context of the exhibition 'Provenances', Umberto di Marino Arte Contemporaneo, Naples
May 2009

Ignasi Aballí: 没有,有 Nothing, or Something
Catalogue of the exhibition, Suitcase Art Projects, Beijing
July 2009


Greenwashing. Ambiente: Pericoli, Promesse e Perplessità (Greenwashing. Environment: Perils, Promises and Perplexities)
Catalogue of the exhibition, Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin
February 2008


Lawrence Weiner: THE CREST OF A WAVE
Booklet of the exhibition, Fundació Suñol, Barcelona
October 2008


Ecology, Luxury & Degradation
UOVO #14
Summer 2007

  
LAND, ART: A Cultural Ecology Handbook

RSA and Arts Council England
December 2006


Book shelves at the Paul D. Fleck Library & Archives.

RELATED CONTENT:

Where to find the publications edited by Latitudes? 22 April 2012



This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org 





La cultura en España (2a parte): estadísticas, cifras y porcentajes del 2013

Hace poco más de un año analizamos los resultados ofrecidos por el Anuario de Estadísticas Culturales 2012. Hace unos días el Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deportes ha publicado el del presente año, el Anuario de Estadísticas Culturales 2013, una publicación que aporta datos de los principales indicadores del quinquenio 2008–2012. Se puede descargar en formato pdf e incluye 345 páginas, así que paciencia.

Tal y como han resaltado varios periódicos, portales de noticias y blogs, las estadísticas desprenden ya claros datos sobre el devastador impacto que han tenido los recortes en la cultura, aunque sólo recoge datos sobre los últimos 4 meses del 2012 cuando subió el IVA al 21%, así que habrá que esperar al año próximo para ver con más claridad (¡si es que aún hubiese dudas!) el tremendo impacto que están teniendo los recortes en la economía española. Pero vayamos por partes. 

Como es de esperar, desde las adminstraciones (Gobierno central, local y Ayuntamientos) se ha invertido menos en cultura. La Administración General del Estado, por ejemplo, ha pasado de invertir 1.051.000 de Euros en el 2010 a 957.000 millones en el 2011, un descenso del 8,9% – no hay datos del 2012.


Estadística de Financiación y Gasto Público en Cultura, desarrollada por el Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte. Descargar pdf aquí.


El número de trabajadores dedicados a la cultura ha pasado de los 481.700 del año 2011 a los 457.600 de 2012, lo que supone un descenso de 24.100 empleos, según desprende el informe. Asímismo se han perdido 1.978 empresas cuya actividad económica era la cultura (pasando de 103.320 a 101.342 en el mismo periodo).

Estadística del empleo cultural en el 2012. Descargar pdf aquí.
Seguimos atónitos viendo cómo el Ministerio califica los datos de positivos, al reflejar que el sector cultural supone un 3,5% del Producto Interior Bruto (3,6% en el 2009), dato que incluye la aportación vinculada con la propiedad intelectual, y que genera un 2,6% del empleo total en España. El Ministerio ha recurrido una vez más a la recurrente frase que recalca "el significativo peso de las actividades culturales dentro de la economía española", y vuelve a señalar su importancia en la comparativa con otros sectores com la Agricultura, Ganadería y Pesca (2,5%), la industria química (1,1%) o las telecomunicaciones (1,8%).
 

No obstante, el gobierno hace oídos sordos a las contínuas demandas del sector en aplicar un IVA super-reducido a la Cultura tal y como tienen nuestros vecinos europeos – recordamos a partir del 1 Septiembre del 2012 España soporta el IVA más alto de la Unión Europea, y que sólo los libros impresos, periódicos y revistas disfrutan del 4% de IVA, el resto de actividades sufrieron la subida del tipo del 8% al 10% (música y cine) o mayores subidas de 13 puntos, del 8% al 21% en CDs, DVDs o importaciones de obras de arte y del 18% al 21% en la venta de obras de arte. 

En relación al cine: El número de festivales españoles de cine han descendido dramáticamente, pasando de 80 en el 2011 a 36 un año después. Este descenso se sigue reflejando prácticamente en todas sus cifras: en millones de espectadores (98,3 millones en el 2011 a 94,2 en el 2012); películas estrenadas (511 en el 2011, 472 en el 2012), y se han producido menos cortometrajes (249 en el 2011, 228 en el 2012). El cine, no obstante, sigue siendo el espectáculo cultural con más demanda, seguido por la asistencia a espectáculos en directo.
 Estadística sobre el cine y el video. Descargar pdf aquí. En más detalle aquí.
Más datos. Ahora libros (descargar pdf de las estadísticas). En el 2011 se inscribieron 111.907 libros en ISBN, en el 2012 han sido 104.724 (80.094 de ellos en soporte papel, 24.630 en otros soportes). 7.183 libros menos para disfrutar, y un 6.4% menos de un año a otro. En cuanto a editores, en el 2012 contamos con 96.910 editores privados, frente a 7.814 públicos (eran 104.118 en el 2011, frente a 7.789 públicos), ahí hay 7.208 editores que han terminado su actividad, y como siempre ocurre en cualquier caso, la cadena que genera de descenso de empleo para diseñadores, impresores, distribuidores y para lectores, claro está, que caen en picado. 

Más llamativo es el dato que aporta el apartado 18, el titulado "Cuenta Satélite de la Cultura", cuando vemos que por sectores culturales el sector que más aporta al PIB total, es el sector de Libros y prensa, con una aportación total que representa el 38,1% en el conjunto de actividades culturales, seguido por Audivisual y multimedia (25,9%), las Artes Plásticas (15,2%), las Artes escénicas (9,1%), el Patrimonio, archivos y bibliotecas (6,9%) y una zona gris del 5,8% perteneciente a "lo interdisciplinar" (¡a saber!). También fue el sector de los libros, quien tuvo el comportamiento más favorable del comercio exterior, con exportaciones por valor de 540,1 millones de euros (véase gráfico 6 de Comercio exterior de bienes y servicios culturales).
 Gráfico de la "Cuenta Satélite de la Cultura", descargable aquí.
En el 2012, el español ha gastado una media de €289 Euros en cultura, €24 menos que en el 2011, la mayoría de este gasto se ha invertido en "equipos y accesorios audiovisuales de tratamiento de la información e Internet", seguido por servicios culturales (cines, teatros, entradas museos, bibliotecas, etc...). 

A pesar de los datos aportados por los 18 capítulos (hubo 17 en el anuario pasado, este año se ha añadido "Asuntos taurinos" como nº 17), y de encontrar datos aislados sobre el comportamiento de las artes plásticas (¡esa terminología tan demodé!), no encontramos ningún gráfico específico a las artes visuales contemporáneas

Para completar el estudio, finalizamos aportando datos de una reveladora estadística que ha publicado recientemente el periódico El País sobre la representación de las mujeres españolas en el sistema del arte, con datos recogidos por la asociación Mujeres en las Artes Visuales (MAV). Y con un post que ha publicado NIAL Art Law sobre la obligación del Ministerio de Fomento a destinar en los contratos de obras públicas una partida de al menos el 1% (el llamado "1% cultural") a trabajos de conservación o enriquecimiento del Patrimonio Cultural Español.

Analicemos primero el artículo de El País. Lamentablemente, en él constatamos lo que ya sabemos: que en el sistema artístico también se reproduce la estructura piramidal que existe en otros sectores profesionales. Mientras que las mujeres predominan en las carreras de Bellas Artes (65% de las titulaciones) e Historia del Arte (74%), así como en los departamentos de coordinación y conservación de numerosos museos y centros de arte (un alto 81%; o un 67% que ha pasado por oposiciones para solicitar cargos de conservación en museos públicos), pocas ocupan puestos de responsabilidad (22% son directoras de museos o centros de arte contemporáneo) o de reconocimiento profesional (ninguna mujer española ha sido, por ejemplo, galardonada con el Premio Velázquez. Y aunque ya sabemos que éste es sólo un premio de los muchos existentes, es el que mejor dotación económica tiene: 100,000 Euros en 2013). 


Representación de las mujeres españolas en el sistema del arte publicado en El País.
En cuanto a la adquisición de obra realizada por mujeres, museos como el Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía (MNCARS) en Madrid han ido, desde 2008, adquiriendo obra con criterios paritarios (46% mujeres y 54% hombres), aunque las cifras de su colección permanente (un 4% de obras y un 6% de artistas españolas en su colección) arrastran, como apunta el artículo, un notable desequilibrio. 

Lo mismo le pasa al Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA), cuya colección tiene sólo el 9.5% de piezas producidas por mujeres frente a un total de 5,314 obras. El Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo (CAAC), es único museo que trabaja con criterios de estricta paridad en programación y compras desde 2010, aunque su colección permanente sólo tiene un 13,9% de creadoras de un total de 537. 

Y para finalizar, volvamos al llamado 1% cultural. El pasado 15 de octubre la ministra de Fomento y el ministro de Educación, Cultura y Deporte han firmado un acuerdo con el que se amplía la aportación del 1% destinado a los citados proyectos de restauración y enriquecimiento del Patrimonio Histórico al 1,5% Cultural (no aquellas obras que excedan los 601.012,10 Euros totales, o aquellas que afecten a la seguridad y defensa del Estado, así como a la seguridad de los servicios públicos). ¿Quién puede solicitarlo? Como bien apunta el post de Nial Art Law y recoge la web del Ministerio es el propio Estado (las Comunidades Autónomas, Ayuntamientos, Diputaciones Forales y Provinciales, Consejos y Cabildos Insulares), Universidades públicas o Fundaciones públicas o privadas sin ánimo de lucro quienes pueden solicitarlo. Está por ver qué procedimientos se seguirán para su gestion, si se regirán bajo los deseados principios de transparencia y qué requisitos se establecen en las convocatorias públicas, pues ya sabemos que muchas veces la redacción, expectativas, plazos y términos que éstas imponen determinan quienes serán los destinatarios de tales ayudas.

Una de las medidas más preocupantes es, tal y como lamenta el post de Nial Art Law, que en la gran mayoría de las ocasiones, las medidas van encaminadas a favorecer la conservación y el mantenimiento del patrimonio cultural ya existente (mayormente en inmuebles declarados de interés cultural o similares, véanse por ejemplo las actuaciones llevadas a cabo en el 2011), y no necesariamente a favorecer la generación de nuevo patrimonio cultural, es decir, a apoyar a creadores activos, peligrando en consecuencia la generación de futuro patrimonio y el apoyo a la creación actual. Y es que a este paso, si no fomentamos a la producción actual, no tendremos patrimonio futuro que queramos exponer ni proteger para generaciones venideras.



This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




Two texts by Manuel Segade and Max Andrews analyse the current Spanish art scene

Two recent texts reflect on the current Spanish art scene, both noting the damaging effects of not only the ongoing budget cuts, but on the deleterious political interference in the programming of numerous museums and art centres throughout the country – perhaps the most notorious of which saw the resignation of MUSAC's Eva González-Sancho after three months as director of the León museum, followed by the resignation of the museum's artistic committee

The texts are written by Manuel Segade, a Spanish-born independent curator based in Paris; and by British Barcelona-based curator Max Andrews of Latitudes, offering critical and analytical perspectives from both the inside and the outside of Spain.
 
"Art and Society in Spain on the Edge of Critical Emergency" by Manuel Segade written for the September 2013 issue of Artpress (see pages below), offers a brief genealogy from the 1990s until today, mapping the rise and the activities of art centres, museums, art fairs, commercial galleries and artists. (Click on the images below for a larger view of the text.)



"On a Shoestring – Institutions in Catalonia" written for the October 2013 issue (#158) of frieze magazine by Max Andrews of Latitudes, focuses on the art scene of the Catalan capital and the effects of its cultural policies towards the creative industries. Mentioning the documentary MACBA: The Right, the Left and the Rich (1h 27m, 2013) [watch it here – in Catalan with Spanish subtitles] as an example of a critical strategy, the text questions the direction of the city's politics with regards to art.  

 (Click on the image for a larger view of the text, or else you can read it here online.)



This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter
All photos: Latitudes (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)




"Host and Ambassador: A Conversation with Yasmil Raymond" Curator of Dia Art Foundation, New York. Seventh in the #OpenCurating research series


Yasmil Raymond has been the curator of Dia Art Foundation in New York since 2009. Previously, between 2004–9, she worked at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis. At Dia she has organised exhibitions and projects with artists including Jean-Luc Moulène, Yvonne Rainer, Ian Wilson, Robert Whitman, Koo Jeong A, Franz Erhard Walther and Trisha Brown. She is currently working on the retrospective Carl Andre: Sculpture as Place, 1958–2010, due to open in May 2014, as well as on Gramsci Monument, a project by Swiss artist Thomas Hirschhorn that begins this July.
The published text [available via Latitudes' web on pdf and ISSUU format] is a transcription of a conversation between Raymond and Latitudes that took place on 19 February 2013 at the auditorium of the Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA), as the public event of Latitudes’ #OpenCurating research. The conversation begins with an overview of this research, followed by a brief introduction to Dia and its projects since 1974. It incorporates “crowd-sourced” questions that were received via Twitter and Facebook, including from Raymond’s current and former work colleagues, and concludes with questions from the audience.  

Interview with Yasmil Raymond available via Latitudes' web as a pdf and in ISSUU format.

 



ABOUT #OPENCURATING

Drawing on the emerging practices of so-called 'Open Journalism' – which seek to better collaborate with and use the ability of anyone to publish and share#OpenCurating is a research project that investigates how contemporary art projects may function beyond the traditional format of exhibition-and-catalogue. #OpenCurating is concerned with new forms of interaction between publics – whether online followers or physical visitors – with artworks and their production, display and discursive context.

The project is articulated around a series of ten new interviews with curators, artists, writers and online strategists published as a free digital edition [read here the published ones so far], a Twitter discussion moderated around the hashtag #OpenCurating and an public conversation with Dia Art Foundation curator which took place at MACBA on the 19 February.

#OpenCurating is a research project by Latitudes produced through La Capella. BCN Producció 2012 of the Institut de Cultura de Barcelona. 










Content partners: Walker Art Center

 




All photos above: Joan Morey

Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




#OpenCurating: "Latitudes in conversation with Yasmil Raymond", Curator, Dia Art Foundation, New York. Tuesday 19 February, 19:30h. Auditori MACBA, Barcelona

Dia Art Foundation curator, Yasmil Raymond. Photo: Lina Bertucci

| ENG |
 
"Latitudes in conversation with Yasmil Raymond" 

Tuesday 19 February 2013, 19:30h
Auditori MACBA, Barcelona
Free admission. Limited seating. With simultaneous translation.

This event is part of Latitudes' ongoing #OpenCurating research, which analyses the implications of Web 2.0, participation and transparency for contemporary art production and programming. The core of #OpenCurating is formed through a series of interviews, freely available online, most recently with Steven ten Thije (Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven), Sònia López and Anna Ramos (MACBA, Barcelona), and Badlands Unlimited (New York).

The conversation with Dia Art Foundation's curator Yasmil Raymond will address Dia's historical identity, the evolving role of the curator, and Raymond's vision in commissioning and preserving art projects. The dialogue will be later transcribed and published as the seventh interview of the #OpenCurating research series.

The evening will incorporate "crowd-sourced" questions by the public previously solicited via Twitter (hashtag #OpenCurating) and Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/LTTDS).

Yasmil Raymond has been Curator at the Dia Art Foundation since 2009, where she has organized exhibitions and projects with artists such as Jean-Luc Moulène (2012); Yvonne Rainer (2011-12); Koo Jeong A (2010-11); Franz Erhard Walther (2010-2012); and Trisha Brown (2009-10). Prior to joining Dia, Raymond worked at the Walker Art Center (2004–2009) in Minneapolis where she organized solo exhibitions with Tomás Saraceno (2009), Tino Sehgal (2007) and group exhibitions including Abstract Resistance (2010); Brave New Worlds (2007, co-curated with Doryun Chong). Raymond studied at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago (1999) and the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College (2004).

As a non-profit institution founded in 1974, the Dia Art Foundation is renowned for initiating, supporting, presenting, and preserving art projects. Between 1987 and 2004, the Dia Center for the Arts in Chelsea, New York, saw presented site-specific exhibitions and projects including those by Robert Gober, Jenny Holzer, Jorge Pardo and Pierre Huyghe. Dia:Beacon opened in 2003 in upstate New York, as the home for Dia’s distinguished collection of art from the 1960s to the present. Dia Art Foundation maintains long-term, site-specific projects including Walter De Maria’s The New York Earth Room (1977) and The Broken Kilometer (1979), Max Neuhaus’s Times Square (1977), Joseph Beuys’s 7000 Eichen (7000 Oaks) (1988), and Dan Flavin’s untitled (1996), all in Manhattan; the Dan Flavin Art Institute in Bridgehampton, New York; De Maria’s The Vertical Earth Kilometer (1977) in Kassel, Germany; Robert Smithson’s Spiral Jetty (1970) in the Great Salt Lake, Utah; and De Maria’s The Lightning Field (1977) in Quemado, New Mexico. Currently Dia is developing a project space on West 22nd Street in New York City.


#OpenCurating is a research project by Latitudes produced through BCN Producció 2012. La Capella, Barcelona City Council.   


 






Content partner: Walker Art Center, Minneapolis / walkerart.org





Related posts:
"Host and Ambassador: A Conversation with Yasmil Raymond" Curator of Dia Art Foundation, New York. Seventh in the #OpenCurating research series (7 March 2013)


| ES |

"Latitudes conversa con Yasmil Raymond"

Martes 19 de febrero, 19:30h
Auditori MACBA, BarcelonaEntrada gratuita. Aforo limitado. Con traducción simultánea.  

Este evento es parte del proyecto de investigación #OpenCurating de Latitudes, enfocado en el análisis de las implicaciones de la web 2.0, así como la expectación de participación y transparencia, en la producción y programación de arte contemporáneo. El núcleo de #OpenCurating consiste en una serie de diez entrevistas, disponibles en línea y gratuitas, con artistas, comisarios y escritores tales como Steven ten Thije (Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven), Sònia López and Anna Ramos (MACBA, Barcelona), y Badlands Unlimited (Nueva York).  

La conversación con la comisaria del Dia Art Foundation, Yasmil Raymond se centrará en la identidad histórica del Dia, la evolución del rol del comisario y la visión de Raymond en el encargo y el comisariado de proyectos artísticos. La charla será posteriormente transcrita y se publicará como la séptima entrevista en la serie #OpenCurating .

La sesión incorporará preguntas previamente enviadas por el público a través de Twitter (@LTTDS con hashtag #OpenCurating) y Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/LTTDS).

Yasmil Raymond ha sido Comisaria del Dia Art Foundation en Nueva York desde el 2009, donde ha organizado exposiciones y proyectos de artistas como Jean-Luc Moulène (2012); Yvonne Rainer (2011–12); Ian Wilson (2011–13); Robert Whitman (2011); Koo Jeong A (2010-11) (2010-11); Franz Erhard Walther (2010-2012); y Trisha Brown (2009–10). Anteriormente Raymond trabajó en el Walker Art Center en Minneapolis, donde organizó exposiciones individuals de Tomás Saraceno (2009), Tino Sehgal (2007) y exposiciones colectivas como Abstract Resistance (2010); Statements: Beuys, Flavin, Judd (2008); y Brave New Worlds (2007, co-comisariada con Doryun Chong). Raymond estudió en The School of the Art Institute of Chicago (1999) y cursó un máster en el Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College (2004).

Como institución sin ánimo de lucro fundada en el año 1974, el Dia Art Foundation es conocida por haber iniciado, apoyado, presentado y preservado proyectos artísticos. Entre 1987 y 2004, el Dia Center for the Arts en Chelsea, Nueva York, presentó exposiciones y proyectos site-specific de Robert Gober, Jenny Holzer, Jorge Pardo y Pierre Huyghe, entre otros. Dia: Beacon abrió sus puertas en 2003 en el norte del estado de Nueva York, como sede de la distinguida colección de arte desde la década de 1960 hasta la actualidad. Dia Art Foundation mantiene proyectos a largo plazo en sitios específicos tales como The New York Earth Room (1977) y The Broken Kilometer (1979) ambos de Walter De Maria; Times Square (1977) de Max Neuhaus, 7000 Eichen (7000 Oaks) (1988) de Joseph Beuys; untitled (1996) de Dan Flavin, todos en Manhattan; el Dan Flavin Art Institute in Bridgehampton, Nueva York; The Vertical Earth Kilometer (1977) de Walter De Maria en Kassel, Alemania; Spiral Jetty (1970) de Robert Smithson en Great Salt Lake, Utah; y The Lightning Field (1977) Walter De Maria  en Quemado, Nuevo Mexico. En la actualidad, Dia está desarrollando un espacio para proyectos en la calle West 22nd de Nueva York. 

#OpenCurating es un proyecto de investigación de Latitudes producido por La Capella. BCN Producció 2012 del Institut de Cultura de Barcelona. 


 







Content partner: Walker Art Center, Minneapolis / walkerart.org





Contenido relacionado:"Host and Ambassador: A Conversation with Yasmil Raymond" Curator of Dia Art Foundation, New York. Seventh in the #OpenCurating research series (7 de marzo 2013)




This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter
All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in individual photo captions).  
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"Itinerarios transversales", tercera entrevista de la investigación #OpenCurating, con Sònia López y Anna Ramos del Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA)

El estudio radiofónico de Ràdio Web MACBA en el Auditorio del MACBA. 
Foto: Gemma Planell / MACBA, 2012. Some rights reserved.

La entrevista "Itinerarios transversales" con Sònia López y Anna Ramos del Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA), es la tercera en la investigación #OpenCurating – leer la primera con el equipo del Walker Art Center aquí (inglés), y la segunda con Ethel Baraona Pohl aquí (en inglés aquí).

El Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA) abrió sus puertas en el Raval de Barcelona en el 1995, aunque su fundación se remonta a 1987 cuando miembros representantes de la sociedad civil catalana y empresas privadas crean Fundación MACBA, una de las cuatro entidades que integran el Consorcio junto con la Generalitat de Catalunya, el Ayuntamiento de Barcelona y el Ministerio de Cultura. La nueva página web del museo (macba.cat), se lanzó a principios del 2012 tras un periodo de rediseño y reconceptualización, e incluye novedades como los Recorridos (permite al visitante crear itinerarios transversales seleccionando entre las cinco mil obras que componen la Colección MACBA, además de vídeos, fichas de artista, podcasts, publicaciones, etc.) y la unificación de bases de datos de la colección y el Archivo del Centro de Estudios y Documentación, entre otras muchas. Ràdio Web MACBA, el proyecto radiofónico del museo iniciado en el 2006, cuenta con su propia web rwm.macba.cat e incluye una selección de más de 250 podcasts sobre arte, filosofía, música experimental y material documental con la voluntad de fomentar una aproximación crítica a la producción sonora y el pensamiento contemporáneo. 

Sònia López es la responsable de la web y las publicaciones digitales del MACBA desde el 2001. Ha participado en diversos proyectos artísticos y pedagógicos en el MACBA y otras instituciones culturales de Barcelona. Activista crafter a tiempo parcial.

Anna Ramos es la coordinadora del proyecto radiofónico online Ràdio Web MACBA, y co-responsable del sello ALKU, plataforma pluridisciplinar que opera desde 1997. Bajo ambos paraguas desarrolla publicaciones, proyectos, instalaciones y ciclos en torno a la música por ordenador, el audio generativo, la síntesis, el pensamiento contemporáneo y otras áreas relacionadas. Asimismo, acaba de co-editar el libro del artista danés Goodiepal, El camino del hardcore (ALKU, 2012).

El documento se puede visualizar en ISSUU, y también se puede descargar como pdf desde la web del proyecto y por de ahí leerlo en vuestro iPad (visualización optimizada para la pantalla Retina).


 Foto: Latitudes.
 –

ACERCA DE #OPENCURATING


Partiendo de las preocupaciones exploradas por Latitudes durante el proyecto editorial realizado durante 'The Last Newspaper' (New Museum, Nueva York, 2010), y basándose en las prácticas del denominado 'periodismo abierto' (Open Journalism) – que trata de mejorar la colaboración y utilizar la habilidad de cualquier persona para publicar y compartir – #OpenCurating es un proyecto de investigación que indaga en las nuevas formas de interacción entre los públicos – sean seguidores en red o visitantes físicos – con obras de arte, su producción, exhibición y su contexto discursivo.

El proyecto se estructura a partir de tres elementos: una serie de diez entrevistas a comisarios, artistas, escritores y expertos web publicada en una edición digital gratuita (véase aquí), una discusión en Twitter moderada por el hashtag #OpenCurating y por último, un evento que tendrá lugar en Barcelona (fecha por determinar).
  
#OpenCurating es el proyecto ganador de la primera convocatoria BCN Producció 2012 en la categoría de investigación, otorgada por el Institut de Cultura de Barcelona.

Síguenos en Twitter: #OpenCurating
 






 

   
Content partners : Walker Art Center






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Max Andrews reviews 'Utopia is possible' in frieze magazine's October 2012 issue

Below Max Andrews' frieze review on the exhibition 'Utopia is possible. ICSID. Eivissa, 1971' currently on show (on view until 20 January 2013) at the Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA)An interesting follow up is Ethel Baraona Pohl's review on Domus (published 15 October 2012) which is accompanied by a lot more photodocumentation presented in the exhibition.

 Instant City, 1971. Col·lecció MACBA. Centre d'Estudis i Documentació. Fons Xavier Miserachs

‘This will be an ICSID Congress only 10 metres from the sea,’ read the welcoming Bulletin of the Seventh Congress of the International Council of Societies of Industrial Design in 1971. ‘The environment, the climate and the sea bathing will act as a stimulant to the general business of the Congress.’ As 1,500 delegates registered at the ziggurat-like hotel venue in northern Ibiza, the more adventurous made their way to
 Instant City, an inflatable camp below on Sant Miquel bay. Three days of meetings, debates, performances and partying were to follow –a professional design conference that was also a beach-side experiment in leisure and the creative potential of industrial plastic. The exhibition ‘Utopia is Possible’ was not only significant as an exercise in advocating the pioneering importance of an interdisciplinary festival that predated the better-known Encuentros de Pamplona’ (Pamplona Meetings) the following year – both all the more astonishing as Spain remained under the grip of dictatorship until 1975 – but also (and following a sprawling exhibition about the latter at Madrid’s Museo Reina Sofía in 2009) as a corollary of the emergence of curatorial and exhibition history as legitimate fields of study, as exhibition.

‘Utopia is Possible’ remembered and celebrated an event that evoked a meltdown of academia, inflatable architecture, cinema, Catalan artistic vanguardism and countercultural ceremonies – part ‘Exploding Plastic Inevitable’, part technology enthusiast craft convention. Through teeming type and handwritten correspondence arranged in vitrines, hundreds of photographs, technical notes and newspaper reports – as well as four projections showing archival footage and a dozen monitors presenting newsreels and newly-made interviews with those involved – it revealed a project that clearly had a life-changing impact on those who experienced it. ICSID 1971 championed liberal social innovation and user-generated content. ‘This is an “open” congress’, declared its introductory statement, ‘a new experience […] for the first time the congress members will be able to participate to the utmost […] this is YOUR congress.’ The proceedings in the hotel comprised ‘Speaking Rooms’ with themes proposed by delegates, 65 talks including ‘The House Style of the Netherlands railway’,‘What We Are Doing in the Belgrade School of Design’, and ‘Basic Design with Computers’ – the latter led by the pioneering Centro de Cálculo (Computing Centre), a collaboration between Madrid’s Complutense University and IBM.

Down by the beach, meanwhile, the participation was of a somewhat different order – kinetic sculptural events with air, water, fire and food. Josep Ponsatí collaborated with members of the Grup Obert de Disseny Urquinaona (Urquinaona Open Design Group), who themselves collaborated in the pop-style signage of the congress, which was replicated in the show’s exhibition design. They tethered together 12 pairs of huge air-filled white plastic pillows that floated out over and on the bay like a giant flower. Vacuflex-3 (1971) by Antoni Muntadas and Gonzalo Mezza is a portable sculpture in the form of a 150-metre flexible plastic pipe which, with teamwork, can be variously carried around, used to spell out words on the sand (‘LOVE’, ‘LAND’, ‘HERE’) or floated on the sea. The opening dinner took the form of a multi-colour ritual orchestrated by Antoni Miralda, Jaume Xifra and Dorothée Selz; masked performers and diners wore green, red, blue and yellow cloaks, and feasted on similarly coloured paella and wine.

Yet Instant City took such multi-coloured experiences to architectonic dimensions, and it remains the ideological and pictorial emblem of the congress. Architecture students Carlos Ferrater and Fernando Bendito had persuaded architecture professor José Miguel de Prada Poole to transform their idea of inflatable student accommodation into reality. What resulted was a global manifesto for a new way of living intended to embrace the ‘nomadic and mobile’ values of impermanence and flexibility. Following publicity in colleges and magazines around the world, scores of volunteers came in the weeks before the congress to collaborate in stapling together a pop-up plastic community. Instant City was the backdrop to some of the exhibition’s most striking images, of bemused locals in traditional dress watching bearded design hippies building something between Hélio Oiticica’s ‘Penetrables’ and Maurice Agis’s ill-fated Dreamspace V (an inflatable environment that killed two women when it broke free from moorings in 2006). And although the taste of Utopian living was evidently challenged by the whiff of residing in sweltering polytunnel tentacles with too few toilets, it also inspired some soaring prog rock poetry that, perhaps more succinctly than any other words in the exhibition, gave a blast ofthe elaborate techno-paganism which must have blown minds at this extraordinary Congress. ‘Green cornfields alongside Instant City / Awaken to Ibizan sunrise’, read a typewritten sheet alongside module construction diagrams. ‘We are children of the future / Born into the paleo-cybernetic age / our minds extended electrically through the video sphere.’ 

‘Utopia is Possible’ offered a timely pre-history of participatory practice from a Spanish perspective and, against the backdrop of contemporary funding cuts, an object lesson in artistic solidarity and internationalism against the odds. 

– Max Andrews

 (Originally published in Frieze, October 2012, Issue 150)  


 Antoni Muntadas and Gonzalo Mezza Ceremonial and Vacuflex-3, 1971.  


Related materials:
  • Video where participants' discuss their experience here 
  • Tour of the exhibition by exhibition co-curator Teresa Grandas, here (both in Catalan)
  • Latitudes' writing archive




Rita McBride "Public Tender" at MACBA and "Blind Dates" programme with Barcelona-based artists

Bartomeu Marí and Rita McBride (right) in front of the audience seating at McBrides' 'Arena' (1997).

Coinciding with the opening of Rita McBride's solo exhibition "Oferta Pública / Public Tender" (18 May–24 September 2012) that opened last night at MACBA, Bartomeu Marí, director of the museum and curator of the exhibition, was in conversation with the artist in the second floor galleries, where McBride's "Arena" (1997) has been installed.

Below the stream of @LTTDS' tweets posted during their conversation (chronologically from bottom to top):


One of the activities programmed around the exhibition is "Blind Dates", with the participation of Barcelona-based artists who will intervene in McBride's "Arena" once a month: Tamara Kuselman (20 June, 16–19.30h), Laia Estruch (18 July, 20h), Jordi Ferreiro (August, during museum opening hours), Ryan Rivadeneyra (19 September, 20h), Miguel Noguera (20 September, 20h). + info here.

Some of them made it to the talk...

From top to bottom, left to right: Jordi Ferreiro, Ryan Rivadeneyra, Tamara Kuselman and Laia Estruch.

All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org




When did we start being 'Contemporary'? Peter Osborne's MACBA lecture

Peter Osborne lecture at MACBA, 12 April 2012. Photo: Latitudes
Yesterday at MACBA, Peter Osborne made a sparkling analysis of the emergence of 'contemporary' as a fully critical art term. Starting from the "decisive and devastating" hinge of Tino Sehgal's 2005 "This is So Contemporary", Osborne, the Professor of Modern European Philosophy at Kingston University London, asked what it implies to be making a claim to being 'contemporary' beyond being "the up-to-date", the "new".

Tracing a genealogy of 'contemporary' from its first emergence in post-war Britain, with the founding of the Institute of Contemporary Art in London in 1946 ("to be contemporary in 1946 was very avant-garde!") through The Boston Museum of Modern Art changing its name to become the Institute of Contemporary Art in 1948, he charted how it disengaged from the 'modern', yet was then eclipsed by the 'postmodern' as the term of choice for the condition of the new in the 1980s. 'Contemporary', he argued, found its feet as a term of "disjunctive temporality" which also provided space for the 'repressed' modernities of the "event-concept transmedia tradition" (Fluxus, Dada, etc.). Whereas the questions asked of the Modern work of art is "What does this negate?", one asks of the Contemporary work "When did the present of this work begin?".

"The present began in 1989, because previously the present began in 1945", concluded Osborne (dismissing Giorgio Agamben's 'What is the Contemporary?' as "weak" along the way), noting that publishers Phaidon would not allow any pre-1945 works by Duchamp to be illustrated in his "Conceptual Art" as the series was about contemporary art.

Yet, surely different geo-political contexts propose different contemporaneities? Osborne talked about a philosophical and cultural debate in Japan asking 'has the post-war ended yet?' Similarly from a Spanish perspective, we might ask ourselves when did our present begin? After Franco's death in 1975? In 1979?

Latitudes promotional tie-in: With similar philosophical and art-historical aplomb Osborne presents his thoughts on the ubiquity of the term 'project' in contemporary art in his essay for the Latitudes-edited Amikejo, accompanying the exhibition series at MUSAC's, Laboratorio 987."The idea of ‘project space’ is a peculiar one insofar as it characterizes a type of space wholly by its appropriateness for a particular kind of temporalization: the temporalization of the project. What is the distinctive spatialization corresponding to this? And how is it affected by the specifically artistic coding of a project? This essay will reflect upon these questions from the standpoint of both their philosophical structure and the historical development of project space as a type of art space."
  
All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)

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MACBA y Fundación Han Nefkens anuncian premio de arte contemporáneo

Bartomeu Marí (izq) y Han Nefkens (dcha) presentan a los medios el Premio Fundación Han Nefkens MACBA de arte contemporáneo.

Bartomeu Marí (Director, MACBA) y Han Nefkens (escritor, coleccionista y fundador de la Fundació Han Nefkens) han anunciado esta mañana la instauración del Premio Fundación Han Nefkens MACBA de arte contemporáneo, "dirigido a artistas no consagrados pero con una trayectoria prometedora" de países no occidentales, "sin restricciones de edad, nacionalidad o género". El premio tiene "el objetivo de consolidar Barcelona como capital del arte contemporáneo", una ciudad que, como ha dicho Nefkens "tiene arroz negro, el Liceu, cielos azules en enero y calles como Joaquín Costa que son un poco como mi vida, de todas partes del mundo". Nefkens ha añadido que le apasiona descubrir artistas, hacer de enlace entre el público y el artista y entre los mismos artistas, como si fuese una Celestina.

El primer premio se anunciará el próximo 28 Noviembre del 2012, coincidiendo con el 17º aniversario del MACBA. El premio, de carácter bienal, está dotado con 50.000 euros (20.000 euros en concepto de honorarios y 30.000 euros destinados a producción). El proyecto resultante se presentará en algun espacio de la ciudad condal ("extra muros de el MACBA", según palabras de Marí), dependiendo de las características del proyecto y se producirá en colaboración con MACBA/Fundación Han Nefkens. El ganador dispondrá de un año para desarrollar el proyecto, que se presentará a lo largo del 2013.

La selección de artistas se realizará exclusivamente a través de las propuestas presentadas por diez 'scouts' (profesionales del mundo del arte residentes en los cinco continentes), cada uno de los cuales propondrá a tres artistas de su zona geográfica a los cinco miembros del jurado. Éstos seleccionarán 5 finalistas de entre las 30 candidaturas presentadas. El jurado de la primera edición está compuesto por Iwona Blazwick (Directora Whitechapel, Londres), Adriano Pedrosa (Comisario independiente, escritor y editor, São Paulo), Christine Tohmé (Fundadora de Askal Alwan, Asociación Libanesa de Artes Plásticas, Beirut), Han Nefkens y Bartomeu Marí (los tres primeros se renovarán en cada edición). 


All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)

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Report in quotations from 'Talking Galleries', 19–21 September 2011, MACBA auditorium

A report in quotations from the first evening's two panels and the first session of the second day of Talking Galleries.

19 September 2011
15.30h: Welcome by
Ferran Mascarell, Regional Minister of Culture of the Generalitat
Jaume Ciurana, Deputy Mayor of Culture, Knowledge, Creativity and Innovation of Barcelona
Faustino Diaz Fortuny, Deputy Director General for the Promotion of Cultural Industries and Foundations and Patronage of the Ministry of Culture
Adriaan Raemdonck, President of FEAGA (Federation of European Art Galleries Association)
Llucià Homs, main promoter of the project TALKING GALLERIES
Bartomeu Marí, MACBA's Director




Llucià Homs: "according to an art market report commissioned by TEFAF (The European Fine Art Foundation), 51% of the art business is done by gallerists and 49% by auction houses. 30% of that is done in art fairs."

Faustino Diaz: "Galeries are the basis for the construction of value". "Galleries are a fundamental cultural sector for the economic development of knowledge". 

Mascarell: "Talking Galleries should connect Catalan art to the international trends and vice-versa". "Artists are the ones making sense of our world".

16.00 h: 'The new role of the Gallerist in the art market' with:
Casey Kaplan, Casey Kaplan Gallery (New York)
Claes Nordenhake, Galerie Nordenhake (Berlín, Stockholm)
Emilio Álvarez, Galeria Àngels Barcelona (Barcelona)
Moderated by: Ann Demeester,  Director of De Appel Arts Centre (Amsterdam)



Ann Demeester: "We are not able to project a 20-50 year future anymore"..."are galleries going to become agencies for artists or are they able to foster new experiments in a globalised 21st century?"; "Collaboration should not be an enemy of competition"; "Galleries are a site for free education"; "A gallery should perform an informal efficiency"

Emilio Álvarez: "The work of a gallery is articulated in connection with the past. Memory gives meaning, one constructs value through time". "Circuits of the artworld are closed, although the product we present is open."; "A gallery has a ongoing relationship with an artist and shows him/her continuously over time, no institution will give a solo show to an artist 3 times"; "A gallery has a single monogamous relationship, museums have plural relationships with artists." 

Casey Kaplan: We (with David Zwirner and Friedrich Petzel amongst others) have done New York Gallery Week (NYGW) twice now, but I don't think is necessary to repeat it again and again if, for instance, Frieze New York is starting in May 2012"; "We are taking the risks, we produce art, we research artists, basically we do it first and then everyone follows";"A gallery is about trust in your artists and them in you. Is a small family extension that grows organically. It's also about constant reinvestment in a new space, in a new piece, in shipping ridiculous works to art fairs to show your ambition."

Claes Nordenhake: "New art should be shown in galleries first, thereafter in art fairs, kunsthalles, etc. Not the other way around!"; "A gallerist is an eternal improvisor, a cleaner, a guard, an interior designer, a carpenter, a shipping agent, a graphic designer, a bookeeper, an art historian, a teacher and sometimes a professor, a therapist, a pimp and sometimes a lover, a storage administrator, a divorce councilor, a good banker, a sympathetic drinking companion, an arrogant bastard, an interpreter, a travel agent, a cook (professional or amateur), a waiter, a restaurateur, a philosopher (or at least in late hours of the night...), an actor, a business strategist, a secretary (where the boss is the artist)... 


18.00 h: 'Dealing with the economic crisis' with
Georgina Adam, Journalist Financial Times (London)
Robert Tornabell, Professor of Economics at ESADE Business School (Barcelona)
Soledad Lorenzo, Galería Soledad Lorenzo (Madrid)
Moderated by: Carlos Urroz, Director ARCOmadrid (Madrid)



Dr. Robert Tornabell: "The most profitable investments are first art, then gold, and then...I don't know!"

Georgina Adam: "The size of the market is U$ 43 billion: 21 bn in auction, 22 bn in dealership. The global share in 2006 breaks up in 46% for the US; 27% for UK, 6% for France; 5% for China, 16% Others. In 2010 is 34% for the US; 22% for UK, 5% for France, a huge increase to 23% for China and, 15% Others". "Today, there are 20 top auction houses, 11 of which are chinese, which did not exist a decade ago"; "Today money is not inherited, it is made."

20 September 2011
10.00 h: 'The future of art fairs' with
Victor Gisler, Mai 36 Galerie (Zurich)
Noah Horowitz, Director VIP Art Fair (New York)
Pierre Huber, Galerie Art & Public (Geneva)
Moderated by: Carles Guerra, Chief Curator of the MACBA (Barcelona)



Carles Guerra: "Barcelona was considering initiating a fair, but with ARCOmadrid nearby and seeing how profits stand now, maybe a meeting amongst professionals such as this, is the way forward"

Noah Horowitz: "The 1970s market was trade; today it's retail and event-led" ; "Going back to TEFAF's figures: 30% of the business is done in fairs, that's obviously an average figure because for some galleries fairs are 70% of their year sales"; "The VIP Art Fair is accessible, international, transparent, communicative, it is still a one-to-one relationship with the buyer"

Victor Gisler: "A gallery shows – tells – sells". "Art fairs like Art Basel have become so hugely important that they now validate quality. If an artits hasn't been shown in Basel, it may seem not valuable". "Initiatives like the VIP Art Fair are great for telling, maybe not so much for selling, but it is online, and that is the language of the next generation which you can not neglect, and one must embrace."

Biographies of the speakers
More about Talking Galleries.
Follow #talkinggalleries




Latitudes publications available for consultation in MACBA's Library

MACBA's Library now has a complete set of Latitudes' publications and exhibition catalogues available for consultation, these include: Portscapes (2009-10), Nothing or Something (2009), No Soul for Sale (2010), The Last Newspaper (2010) and United Alternative Energies (2011).

These complete the already included publications such as the exhibition catalogue 'Greenwashing. Environment: Perils, Promises and Perplexities' (2008), the publication 'Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook' (2006) and Lawrence Weiner's small booklet and public pieces in the form of sugar packets (2008).

Biblioteca del MACBA
Plaça dels Àngels, 8
08001 Barcelona
T: +34 93 481 33 66
F: +34 93 412 46 02
[email protected]

Monday-Thursday, 10am-7pm
Bank holidays, closed
http://www.macba.cat/en/library




Newsletter #13 June 2009 | Junio 2009

We have just circulated our #13 newsletter (read English version or Versión española). If you would like to subscribe to our mailing list please fill your data on this contact form (see left) and choose one language. If you would like to read previous newsletters, click here.

In June we are presenting the film programme 'What are we going to do after we’ve done what we’re doing to do next?' in the context of 'The Uncertainty Principle', Capella MACBA, Barcelona (1–7 June, 11–17.30h, closed tuesdays) with films by Jordan Wolfson, Mariana Castillo Deball, Neil Cummings & Marysia Lewandowska, Chris Marker and Marjolijn Dijkman.


We are also participating in 'NO SOUL FOR SALE – A Festival of Independents, a four day festival where over 30 independent centers, alternative institutions, artists’ collectives and independent enterprises from around the world present their activities (see list of participants here). The festival will take place in X initiative's spaces in 548 West 22nd Street, New York (24–28 June, 1–9pm. Opening: 23 June, 6–9pm with a performance by Martin Soto Climent. Free admission.)
+ info...




2009 Cartier Award winner: Jordan Wolfson


Frieze has announced the 2009 Cartier Award winner: New Yorker Jordan Wolfson (New York, 1980. Lives in New York and Berlin). The 2008 winner was Cuban artist Wilfredo Prieto, see Latitudes' post here and artist profile here).

In 2006 Latitudes collaborated with Wolfson in the production of the sound piece 'Day' (2006) for an exhibition in Barcelona. In 2008 his film 'Landscape for Fire' was exhibited in different venues as part of the touring film programme 'A Stake in the Mud, a Hole in the Reel. Land Art's Expanded Field 1968–2008' (Museo Tamayo, Mexico City and other venues, April–October 2008) and will soon present the film 'Untitled (the nothing)' (2005–9, 4mins) as part of the cinema, performance and lectures programme 'The Uncertainty Principle' at Capella MACBA.

R
ead more about Jordan Wolfson: download a 2006 interview in the writing archive and a May 2005 exhibition review in Frieze Magazine here.

[Image: Jordan Wolfson, still of 'Perfect Lover' (2007). Courtesy of the artist, Johann König, Berlin, and T293, Napoli]




Newsletter #12, May 2009


Newsletter #12 is out!

If you would like to read it, please click here for English version or here for Spanish version.

In our forthcoming Newsletter #13 (June–July 09) we will inform you about a video programme to be screened daily at Capella MACBA (1–7 June); our participation in the festival of independent and non-profit art organisations in New York hosted by the X initiative (24–28 June) and the exhibition 'Sequelism. Episode 3: Possible, Probable, or Preferable Futures', to open at Arnolfini, Bristol on 17 July.

In the current issue of frieze (Issue 123, May 2009) you will find a review by Max Andrews on the 2nd Canary Islands Biennial of Architecture – read short report and images of the exhibition in our 8 March 2009 post.

You can also follow us on facebook.




Latitudes reviews MACBA's 'Universal Archive', Frieze #121, March 2009


The forthcoming issue of Frieze magazine (Issue 121, March 2009) includes a review by Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna on MACBA's exhibition 'Universal Archive' (23 October 2008–6 January 2009). 

Below a short extract:

"Of the blockbuster cultural initiatives that have been inspired and hosted by the Catalan capital in 2008, no two could be further apart than Woody Allen’s dismaying Vicky Cristina Barcelona (2008) and the MACBA exhibition ‘Universal Archive: The Condition of the Document and the Modern Photographic Utopia’, a hugely ambitious genealogy of the documentary form of photography (co-produced and touring to the Museu Colecção Berardo-Arte Moderna e Contemporãnea, Lisbon). While Allen’s facile vision of Barcelona and the ‘flamboyant artist’ character of his male lead (played by Javier Bardem) demonstrated the ‘Olé!’ version of the city’s self-branding, ‘Universal Archive’ was difficult to digest by comparison. The exhibition, which comprised some 2,000 photographs, presented a tough and awkward depiction of the grittier sides of the city and uncompromisingly explored the often-unglamorous role of the artist–documentarian within it. 



The exhibition’s wonderfully unwieldy scale and its dizzying categorization refused benign consumption. Both its strength and its weakness lay in the fact that it was really three projects under one roof, covering a time span from 1850 to the present day. Even three visits did not truly do the show justice, but its exhausting extent nevertheless perfectly complemented the archival strategies it presented, as if its densely-installed two floors – encompassing legions of framed prints and closely-packed vitrines and several digital slideshows – were inspired by a labyrinthine Borgesian tale. For many visitors, the stamina required to experience it could have been off-putting. There are only so many images of shift workers, tract housing, farmland or grain silos that one can absorb. Yet, attempting to embrace such immense amounts of data – whether Timothy H. O’Sullivan’s territorial surveys of the USA in the 1860s and ’70s, August Sander’s collective portrait of the German people in the late 1920s, or the Mass-Observation movement in Britain from 1937 until the early 1950s – provided the exhilarating, if relentless, basis for the whole project."

...Continue reading on Frieze online.

[Image above: Cover of Frieze's issue 121; Image below: Pere Català Pic, 'Fotomuntatge sobre el Barri Gòtic per a la societat d'Atracció de Forasters de Barcelona', 1935. Arxiu Històric de la Ciutat de Barcelona – Arxiu Fotogràfic.]




Süddeutsche Zeitung reports the "malaise" of Spanish contemporary art

Last weekend an article on the Spanish art landscape appeared in the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung (pdf 248KB), which was later reported and summarised in English by Jennifer Allen in Artforum.com's International News Digest (week 12 January 2008).

According to the writer, Merten Worthmann, the Spanish art scene lacks experimentation and this is effecting Spanish galleries as well as ARCO, the country's main art fair. The whole discussion as to why Spanish contemporary art is not where it should be on the international map is not an easy one to tackle. The truth is, there is not one reason – there are as many as there are challenges. Although a lot has been achieved in the last 30 years of democracy and today we have many museums and art centres, the question is now not just about more, but about improving and investing in the existing quality.

Here is a 'shopping list' for starters: renewed focus on debate and theory with productive confrontations; targeted resources for medium-scale institutions; engaged art magazines and cultural supplements with less 'press release-y' or purely descriptive writing; simplification and modernisation of the 'cultural-export' model of funding and bureaucracy to reflect contemporary practice; wider transparency in selection processes for key curatorial positions; pragmatic vocational teaching at graduate level (and a life for post-Picasso art history); a competitive postgraduate art practice programme that meets the international standards of Amsterdam's Rijksakademie or Frankfurt's Städelschule; improved teaching of foreign languages; fiscal benefits to autónomos (self-employed) on a par with other EU countries...

The list continues. Without trying to sound profound or political, changes have to be made from within through sheer initiative, and that, alongside rabid generosity, is surely the way forward. It is certainly not all doom and gloom (we would not be here otherwise!), but the current economic climate will certainly focus the minds as well on the 'values that we value'. Onwards 2009!
Here is Artforum's summary...

REPORT FROM SPAIN (Artforum.com, International News Digest)
 
In anticipation of ARCO, the Süddeutsche Zeitung’s Merten Worthmann delivers a mixed report from Spain. According to Worthmann, the young Spanish arts scene is missing some experimentation—a deficiency that has had a negative impact on both galleries and the Madrid-based fair. Moreover, the Centre d’Art Santa Mónica—which has featured exhibitions by younger artists—will be closing at the end of January, according to a directive from the Catalan minister of culture. “Barcelona is a kind of anti-Berlin,” says Bartomeu Marí, head of Barcelona’s MACBA. “A city that doesn’t know how to attract any artists.” For Worthmann, the closure of Santa Mónica is a sign of a larger malaise. “The Spanish arts scene suffers from its weak connection to central Europe, the center of the market, and of discourses,” writes Worthmann, who cites the lack of both an international public and a national network. “To be an artist in Spain is a handicap, both inside and outside the country,” artist Jorge Galindo told the newspaper.

Ferran Barenblit, who was until recently the director of Santa Mónica, and who now heads the art center Dos de Mayo outside Madrid, believes that Spain doesn’t have enough international pull and has lost its “exotic” status in the ever-expanding European community. “Barenblit can be very critical with respect to the homegrown arts scene,” writes Worthmann. “But he holds the unclear reception from outside the country responsible for the lack of resonance.” Chus Martínez, who headed the Frankfurt Kunstverein before recently heading to Barcelona to direct the MACBA collection, adds some “geopolitical” arguments. “Germans, for example, orient themselves above all toward the United States and, since reunification, strongly toward the east,” Martínez told the newspaper. “Spain long existed on the outside. We were never a stop on the Grand Tour, nor could we profit later from the Marshall Plan.” The Franco dictatorship, which ended just over thirty years ago, also played a major role in the isolation of the country’s artists. Despite the end of the dictatorship, many artists still leave the country. And despite the rise of several spectacular exhibition sites—MUSAC in León, MACBA in Barcelona, Herzog and de Meuron’s Caixaforum in Madrid, Gehry’s Guggenheim in Bilbao, and Madrid’s Matadero, a multidisciplinary center that will be fully complete in 2011—few institutions have managed to create a “solid profile.” “For regional politicians, often the architectural gesture was more important than the ongoing maintenance of an ambitious program,” writes Worthmann, who adds that museum directors are often at the mercy of changing ruling parties of the government. Despite new directives for running museums from the minister of culture, the sudden closure of Santa Mónica as an art center is a case in point.

As for ARCO, a public initiative dating from the 1980s, the new director Lourdes Fernández will be decreasing the number of Spanish galleries in order to increase international participation at the fair. Last year, the fair dedicated more space to curatorial projects featuring artworks with an experimental edge. “And the display window has long functioned in both directions,” writes Worthmann. International collectors acquire Spanish art while Spanish collectors are increasingly acquiring works by international artists. In 2009, all purchases may well be welcome, whatever the artist’s origin.

On another note, Matt Elmore from the The Art Newspaper has also written about the Barcelona art scene, though giving a much more simplistic and superficial account - including mistakes such as the "Santa Monica space as a visual arts centre devoted to Catalan artists...", when only one of the three exhibition spaces it had was penciled for Catalan or Spanish artists. See archive of previous shows to see exhibition history between 2003-9.




Asier Mendizabal solo exhibition at MACBA, Barcelona

The first artist under the age of 40 to have exhibited at MACBA (link in English and Catalan) if we are not wrong...? And Happy Birthday for today Asier! Curated by Peio Aguirre, likewise the youngest curator to have produced a project at MACBA? The Times They Are a-Changin'.


Photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org




MACBA's director Manuel J. Borja-Villel to direct the Reina Sofia from end January 2008


The news broke on Saturday afternoon that Manuel J. Borja-Villel (Burriana, Castellón, 1957) will be the new Artistic Director of the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía (MNCARS), and will start his new job at the end of January 2008. Borja-Villel has been Director of the Museu d'Art Contemporani Barcelona (MACBA) since 1998, and was founding director of the Fundació Tàpies (1990-1998). Despite his appointment not being a shock exactly, the news is important as it is one of the first appointments in Spain to follow the controversial 'Código de buenas prácticas' (Code of good practice) whereby there shouldn't be any more 'al dedo' ('made') appointments. Instead an international call for applications should be held, and was in this case, and appointments be made according to the decision of a selected international committee. And following each candidate's proposals and presentations, and not their political orientation.

That said, the decision to appoint the MACBA director has not been surprising for two reasons. Firstly, a few weeks ago the Spanish newspaper El País [15.11.07] announced Borja-Villel as the favourite for the job, together with a list of the top candidates. How were their names known when the process is supposedly strictly secret? Rightly, there was much discussion in the artistic community [read A-Desk and SalonKritik]. Secondly, the requirements for the job were that candidates should be a 'Spanish or national of a country member of the European Union' (appearing to rule out any Spanish-speaking Latin American candidates, or indeed any other non-European Spanish speaker, and clearly questioning the tip-off that had Dan Cameron shortlisted in the El País article). The candidates were also asked to have 'Excellent level of Spanish' and 'To present, in Spanish or anyone of the co-official languages in the Independent Communities, or English or French, the main lines of the Museum Plan for the Institution'. Spanish, spanish, spanish, we get it. It makes one wonder what will be the requirements for the now vacant MACBA Director job, if they are to follow the 'código de buenas prácticas' with an open call.

One of the first responses to the appointment was from art critic and curator David G. Torres in A-Desk's blog, in which he briefly analysed the pros and cons of the mandate: Borja-Villel has put MACBA on the map – for sure – and has given a direction and coherence to its collection – again, yes – but it has lacked a dialogue with the city of Barcelona and its visitors. According to Catalina Serra [El País, 23.12.07], the catalan arts community (visual artists, gallerists and critics) has already responded by demanding an international open call for the MACBA position, but with more time for the potential applicants to prepare proposals (candidates had a month to make their applications for the MNCARS job). Let's see what happens here; interesting times ahead! The news are however, great for MNCARS, Spain's forever-in-crisis national museum, which has had no leading figure since September 2007, that lacks coherence in its collection, has a so-so programme, but of course holds a precious treasure in world history: Picasso's Guernica.

For more info read MNCARS' Press Release (Spanish) and the announcement in El País (23.12.07)




MACBA Study and Documentation Centre

MACBA yesterday officially opened its excellent Centre d'Estudis i Documentació / Centro de Estudios y Documentación in an adjacent building to the main museum site on Plaça dels Àngels, Barcelona. 

The ground floor hosts an exhibition space, and the third floor hosts the luminous MACBA library and archive, with books, magazines and journals, as well as videos available for consultation. The tolomeo-lamped study tables have plugs for laptops, and according to staff, wi-fi will soon be available throughout. 

As the Director himself has commented, while other museums add cafés and shops, MACBA invests in hardcore study. For those who have been craving a no-appointment-needed contemporary art resource and study environment in the centre of Barcelona (us!), this initiative is a godsend.

MACBA Study Center
Plaça dels Àngels 8, 08001 Barcelona, Tel. 93 481 33 66

[email protected]




In Memoriam: Luciano Fabro (1936–2007)

 



Acabamos de leer en Flash Art la notícia del fallecimiento del artista povera, Luciano Fabro el pasado viernes 22 en Milan. No queremos dejar pasar la ocasión para recordar su última aparición en Barcelona en ocasión de la exposición de la Herbert Collection en el MACBA en Febrero 2006. En su inauguración me presentaron al artista y entusiasmado con que hubiese alguien que hablase italiano en la habitación me animó a hacerle de traductora en la charla del día siguiente en el museo. Al día siguiente, nos encontramos 1 hora antes de la conferencia. Tomamos un café en c/Elisabets e intercambiamos comentarios sobre sus notas y sobre la exposición. Al rato me lancé a traducirle lo que sus colegas hablaban en inglés. Luciano era de los que aprendió francés. A pesar de mis torpes referencias él siempre sonreía...

D.E.P.

Photo: Latitudes | www.lttds.org




White House attack

MACBA

"Una manifestación no autorizada en la que participaron unas 400 personas finalizó anoche en Barcelona con un mosso herido en la cabeza, dos detenidos y destrozos en el Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Barcelona..." La Vanguardia...




Recent openings in Barcelona

The 2006-7 season kicked off this week and last:

Jean-Marc Bustamante - Estrany de la Mota
Ivan Grubanov - NoguerasBlanchard

Recent acquisitions of MACBA's collection + Galeria Cadaqués (Bombelli collection) - MACBA
Christine Borland - Galeria Toni Tàpies
Hannah Collins - Galeria Joan Prats
'Registros y Habitos (Máquina del tiempo - Imágenes del espacio)' with work by artists Erick Beltrán, Bleda y Rosa, Xisco Mensua, José Luis Pardo, Yael Bartana, Jeanne Faust, Francesc Ruiz & Massimo Bartolini - Fundació Tàpies
'Extrañas Parejas' - Fundación Colectania
Centre d'Art Santa Mònica's (CASM) season will include a curated-'consulta' by Victor Palacios and the continuing programme of Guest Curator Jacob Fabricius.
Fundació Miró opens their contemporary space Espai 13 with a Le Fresnoy-curated programme starting with a show of Fabien Giraud




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