Max Andrews reviews in frieze: ‘A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’ (LUMA Foundation, Arlès) and Pere Llobera's ‘Acció’ (Bombon Projects, Barcelona) and ‘Kill Your Darlings’ (Sis Galería, Sabadell)

Max Andrews, co-founder of Latitudes and contributing editor to frieze, recently reviewed the group exhibition ‘A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’ at LUMA Foundation in Arlès. The exhibition is curated by artist Walead Beshty and is on view until January 6, 2019. Published on frieze.com, 20 December 2018.
Frank Gehry's LUMA building under construction, as of October 12, 2018. Above and following photos by Latitudes. 

Views from the exhibition ‘A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’.

"Le Fusil Photographique" by Étienne-Jules Marey. 

Works by Wolfgang Tillmans (vitrines) and Christopher Williams (wall).

Hans-Peter Feldmann's "9-12 Front Page", 2001. 


‘PICTURE INDUSTRY: A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’, curated by Walead Beshty. Exhibition views, les Forges, Luma Arles, Parc des Ateliers, Arles, France, 2018. © Marc Domage.

‘PICTURE INDUSTRY: A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’, curated by Walead Beshty. Exhibition views, les Forges, Luma Arles, Parc des Ateliers, Arles, France, 2018. © Marc Domage.

‘PICTURE INDUSTRY: A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’, curated by Walead Beshty. Exhibition views, les Forges, Luma Arles, Parc des Ateliers, Arles, France, 2018. © Marc Domage.


‘PICTURE INDUSTRY: A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’, curated by Walead Beshty. Exhibition views, les Forges, Luma Arles, Parc des Ateliers, Arles, France, 2018. © Marc Domage.


Also for frieze, Max Andrews reviewed two concurrent exhibitions by Pere Llobera: Acció’ at Bombon Projects (Barcelona) and ‘Kill Your Darlings’ at Sis Galería (in nearby Sabadell), ‘exploring the artist’s ever-changing styles and painterly references.’ Published online on 13 November 2018, and included in January-February 2019 print issue #200.

“As if tormented by his own cursed hand, Llobera’s darkly fugitive shtick is his alarm at its ability to paint so adeptly so easily, despite his mind’s suspicion of painters painting to be admired.” 


 Views from Pere Llobera's exhibition ‘Acció’ at Bombon Projects, Barcelona. Courtesy the artist. Above and photos below: Roberto Ruiz.



RELATED CONTENT:
  • Writing archive on Latitudes' website (since 2005);
  • Max Andrews reviews Lúa Coderch; "Crash Test. The Molecular Turn" and Julia Spínola for frieze 9 April 2018
  • "The Kørner problem” essay by Max Andrews in the monograph "John Kørner" published by Roulette Russe, 19 February 2018
  • Max Andrews essay on Christopher Knowles for NoguerasBlanchard at Liste 2017, 21 July 2017
  • Cover Story – January 2017: How open are open calls? 4 January 2017
  • Cover Story – December 2016: Ten years ago – Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook, 5 December 2016
  • January 2016 Monthly Cover Story: Kasper Akhøj's Eileen Gray’s E.1027, 4 January 2016
  • Review of the exhibition "What cannot be used is forgotten" in the May issue of frieze magazine, 29 April 2015
  • Review of Maria Thereza Alves' exhibition at CAAC Sevilla published in frieze magazine 9 March 2015




Latitudes' "out of office": wrap up of the 2017–2018 season

This is possibly our favourite post of the year. Not just because it means we’ll shortly be taking a deserved summer break. But also because it brings a sense of accomplishment to look back at what has happened during the last twelve months — to remember the many conversations we’ve had, the places we’ve been privileged to visit and to refresh all those ideas and plans we intended to move forward. Onwards!

September 11—October 6, 2017
: Lead Faculty of the month-long "Geologic Time" residency at The Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity in Alberta, Canada.


In this blog post, we shared some lithic impressions of the four weeks we spent leading a programme in Alberta's Rocky Mountains.

One of the epic moments of the month: hike to Stanley Glacier.
At the base of Mount Stanley, we found 505-million-year-old Burgess Shale trilobites, soft-body fossils from the Eldon formation.
Snow surprised us on our final week in Banff.
Welcome coffee with third week Guest faculty Sean Lynch.
A fun evening at High Rollers bowling alley in Banff town.

The closing event of "Geologic Time" was conceived as a two-hour infiltration into the pages, shelves, and display possibilities of The Banff Centre library. Featuring storytelling, documentation, annotation, sculpture, video, conversation and other live situations, the event presented some sediments of the ten participants’ ongoing research and geological collaborations. Pdf of the event programme.

Posters communicating some of the seminars and excursions programmed during the four weeks. Design/Photos: Latitudes.
Intervention by Semâ Bekirovic, based in Amsterdam. Bekirovic employed a number of external hard drives to act as pedestals for small stones. How many terabytes can a hunk of rock hold? What fragments of data detritus, chunks and grains of documents, broken off images, or weathered files, might be read and written, stored or retrieved? 

Intervention by Caitlin Chaisson based in Vancouver. Chaisson has been researching a former experimental farm station in Agassiz, British Columbia, and a forgotten centennial time capsule buried under a granite marker there. Caitlin also presented a cut-and-paste station on the table next to the photocopier, and a display for the tall vitrine just behind it. 

Intervention by Caroline Loewen, based in Calgary. Caroline delves deep into the story of sandstone in Alberta, a rock that gained widespread favour for building and decorative use following Calgary’s Great Fire of 1886. The black-and-brown Rundle Rock that was once quarried at the base of Banff-Centre-neighbour Mount Rundle and was used extensively in creating the Banff Springs Hotel also joins a conversation that anticipates an exhibition scheduled for next summer at Lougheed House in Calgary.
Intervention by Justy Phillips & Margaret Woodward (A Published Event) based in Hobart. Described by the Hobart-based duo as “an accumulative event of mineralogical, metaphysical and metallurgical telling”, the books that have come into the world to date have been incorporated into the library’s holdings alongside a glossary and can be found in the geology section upstairs.


An audio narration drafted by Penelope Smart was also heard on the upper floor, near the “memoirs and narrative” section. Here, an image of the exquisite marble bust by Giovanni Strazza animated Penny’s writing during the last weeks. It came to St.John’s, Newfoundland, in 1856. Ring the bell to the right of the main door of the Presentation Convent adjoining the Basilica in St.John’s and maybe one of the sisters will let you see it.

Remnants of the 2-hour event.

For the final event on October 5th, participants Becky Forsythe and Camila Sposati decided to collaborate through a performance using the library photocopier on the main floor. ‘"Receding Agate" and "Receding Rhodochrosite" was a collection of pages produced during a procedural artwork that slowly and methodically extracted copies of Agate and Rhodochrosite from Roger Caillois' "The Writing of Stones". Each page is a copy of the last, so text begins to harden into pebble-like shapes, and images begin to simplify as darker forms in an experiment of accumulation and sedimentation.’


Far Afield, the artistic-curatorial initiative led by the also participant Caitlin Chaisson, hand-bound the resulting two-part publication for Far Afield's library, a platform for "collecting and sharing publications that support experimental art practices".

      Photos by Far Afield's library.

27 October 2017: Cabaret at the Capella space, a public programme organised by the Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona in the context of their Joan Brossa exhibition. The Capella space was decorated with fragments of Antoni Hervàs "El Misterio de Caviria" scenography, presented only a year earlier at the other La Capella space as part of the 2016 BCN Producció season. The project was mentored by Latitudes. Following Hervàs’s interests in Barcelona’s dwindling cabaret scene, he invited Gilda Love and castanets master Juan de la Cruz "el Rosillo" (who sadly passed away a few months after) to interpret a moving repertoire of popular Spanish copla, against the backdrop of parts of his scenography. 



Gilda Love and castanets master Juan de la Cruz "el Rosillo". Photos by Dani Cantó/MACBA.

5 November 2017: The 1878 painting by Alfred Roll "The Old Quarryman" is exchanged with Alfred Smith's "The Grave Docks" (1884) in the Latitudes-curated exhibition "4.543 billion" at the CAPC musée. The show remains on view another two more months, until January 7, 2018.

Photo: Lysian Gauthier © Musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux.

Photo: Alice Cavender.

(Unframed) Alfred Smith's (Bordeaux, 1854–Paris, 1936) “Le Quai de la Grave” [The Grave Docks] (1884). Collection of the Musée des Beaux-Arts, Bordeaux.

15 November 2017: Study day at CAPC musée "The Return of the Earth. Ecologising Art History in the Anthropocene." With a keynote by science historian Jean-Baptiste Fressoz, and a conversation between artists Xavier Ribas and Ângela Ferreira—the latter both featured in the exhibition—the event convened by '4.543 billion'-curators Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna, saw art practice and historical research intertwining with environmental and geological narratives, and vice versa.

(Top) Left to right: Max Andrews, Xavier Ribas, Jean-Baptiste Fressoz and Ângela Ferreira during the debate. (Below) Ângela discussing her work in the exhibition. Photos (Above and below): Latitudes.

22 November 2017: Launch of Anna Moreno's "The Drowned Giant" publication at the Col·legi d'Arquitectes de Catalunya alongside architect and researcher Lluis A. Casanovas. Moreno's project is part of the BCN Producció 2017–18 programme of which Latitudes' is a jury member and mentor. 

Video of the presentation (in Catalan).

Photos (this and following): Pep Herrero / La Capella—Barcelona Producció 2017.
(Above) Photo: Anna Moreno.

Earlier that week we spent two intense mornings unpacking, hand spraying, numbering, inserting poster and booklet and re-packaging the limited edition of 300 vinyl records in the former Escola Massana, nearby La Capella. 

A short video on the project was screened on betevé tv (in Catalan, starting 04:24min).


Photos (Above and below): Latitudes.




1 December 2017: Latitudes introduces the documentary "Harald Szeemann. The Life of a Dreamer" premiered at Cinemes Girona as part of the first edition of Dart Festival 2017, the Festival of Documentary Cinema on Contemporary Art.



Photo: Latitudes.

9 December 2017: Mariana of Latitudes led the first "Parlem" [Let's talk] guided tour around the exhibition "Rosemarie Castoro. Focus at infinity", curated by Tanya Barson, MACBA's Chief Curator. (repeated on March 10 and 31st).

Photo: Latitudes.

December 2017: Transition from Storify to Wakelet to archive all the social media stories related to Latitudes' projects.
Latitudes' Wakelet profile.

20 December 2017: Max Andrews of Latitudes (and Contributing Editor of frieze magazine) looks back at 2017 from Barcelona and beyond, at some art highlights from a tumultuous 2017, including Amie Siegel, Pierre Huyghe, Lúa Coderch, Francesc Torres, Adrià Julià, Jordi Mitjà, Eulàlia Rovira & Adrian Schindler, Joan Morey, and Claudia Pagès. 

2017 from Barcelona and beyond.

23 January 2018: Opening of the exhibition "Artengo2000" by Magda Vaz and Camille Orny at the sala petita of La Capella. This is the third and final Barcelona Producció project mentored by Latitudes.


 (Above and below) View from "Artengo2000", an exhibition by Camille Orny and Magda Vaz at the Sala Petita in La Capella. Photo: Pep Herrero / La Capella.

23 January 2018: The online platform arteinformado.com publishes three artist recommendations by five Spanish-based curators. Mariana Cánepa of Latitudes selected Gerard Ortín, Martín Llavaneras and Anna Moreno.

25 January 2018: Print proofs of the forthcoming John Kørner's monograph published by Roulette Russe with texts by Oliver Basciano, Marie Nipper and Max Andrews' of Latitudes, published on the occasion of his recent mid-career retrospective "Altid Mange Problemer" at Kunsthal Charlottenborg in Copenhagen (17 June–13 August 2017).



2 February 2018: Roulette Russe publish an image of John Kørner's book hot off the press.




















9–10 February 2018: Trip to Montpellier to attend the opening of "Crash Test" at La Panacée/Centre d'art Contemporain MoCo.

16 February 2018: Max Andrews of Latitudes wrote a review of the show for frieze magazine published online and in the printed issue in April.

Installation piece by Alice Channer.
Work by Agnieszka Kurant (foreground) and Aude Pariset (background)

Detail of a vitrine piece by Bianca Bondi.
15 February 2018: Award ceremony of the 2017 Premis Ciutat de Barcelona, of which Mariana was a jury member in the Visual Arts category. Joan Morey was the awarded visual artist.

20–23 February 2018: Trip to ARCOmadrid fair, below some social media posts.





Photo: Roberto Ruiz.

Lola Lasurt presented ‘Donació’ (Donation) in the Galeria Joan Prats booth, a body of work produced for the ‘Composiciones’ commissioning series Latitudes curated for the Barcelona Gallery Weekend 2016. Lasurt was also exhibiting as part of La Casa Encendida's "Generación 2018".

22 February 2018: Max Andrews' review of Lúa Coderch's solo show "The girl with no door on her mouth" at àngels barcelona, is published online. The text is also be included in the printed issue in April. 
Review of Lúa Coderch's solo show "The girl with no door on her mouth" at àngels barcelona.

26 February 2018: After nearly two years in development, the sixth ‘Incidents (of Travel)dispatch from Yerevan, Armenia, is finally live! 

In her day-long tour Yerevan-born, San Diego-based curator and researcher Marianna Hovhannisyan extended the invitation to Vardan Kilichyan, Gohar Hosyan, and Anaida Verdyan, three students from the studio college at the National Center of Aesthetics. The purpose was to document transformed, disappeared, or permanently-closed art institutions in the city centre. The shared inquiry was based on how knowledge transmission and generational exchanges in the Armenian contemporary art field could be approached—particularly in terms of exploring the fragmented histories of its institutional work. As they were putting together the touches on this online version of the offline day, the studio-college itself closed down permanently at the end of 2017.

http://incidents.kadist.org/yerevan

2 March 2018: Book launch of John Kørner's monograph in Copenhagen. Published by Roulette Russe with texts by Oliver Basciano, Marie Nipper and Max Andrews.


 (Above and below). Courtesy Roulette Russe. Photos by Finn Wergel Dahlgren.


March 10 and 31, 2018: Second and third guided visits to Rosemarie Castoro's exhibition at MACBA led by Mariana Cánepa Luna of Latitudes.

MACBA's Instagram story announcing the talk.

March 20, 2018: Mariana Cánepa Luna of Latitudes reviews ‘Allora & Calzadilla’ at the Fundació Tàpies, Barcelona, for art-agenda."A piercing whistle punctuates the blaring of a trumpet. But in the columned central space of the Fundació Antoni Tàpies, the only visible instrument is a grand piano. For three days a week throughout the course of the exhibition, the instrument is played—and, one could say, worn—by a pianist who stands in a hole cut into its center."

Mariana Cánepa Luna of Latitudes reviews ‘Allora & Calzadilla’ at the Fundació Tàpies, Barcelona, for art-agenda.

The same day, we send the Spring newsletter to our contacts, in English and in Spanish.

12—14 April 2018: Three performances by Les Brontë, Quim Pujol and Eliana Beltrán over three consecutive evenings at La Capella, part of the BCN Producció 2017–18 programme of which Latitudes' is a jury member and mentor.



(Above and below) "Fine Cherry" performance by Les Brontë. Photos: Latitudes.
"Verde Croma" by Quim Pujol. Photos: Latitudes.
"Reading Room #3" by Eliana Beltrán. Photos: Latitudes.


1 May 2018: Max Andrews' profile on Madrid-based artist Teresa Solar Abboud goes online on frieze website.



28 April–4 May 2018: Trip to Berlin during the Gallery Weekend, and later to Cologne to visit Haegue Yang's mid-career retrospective ‘ETA 1994–2018’ at Museum Ludwig, and Ana Jotta's first solo exhibition in Germany at the Temporary Gallery. More on this blog post and on this Wakelet feed.





23–29 May 2018: Trip to London to visit +35 exhibitions, friends, and family – highlights below, full photo report here. Short day trip to Oxford's Pitt Rivers Museum (a favourite of ours), the Natural History Museum and Modern Art Oxford. 

 (Above and below) Cinthia Marcelle's "The Family in Disorder" (2018) at Museum and Modern Art Oxford.
(Above) The incredible main hall of the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford.
 (Above) The opening of Leonor Antunes's "a thousand realities from an original mark" at Marian Goodman.Polycarbonate and brass screens and rope sculptures. Each screen corresponds to the exact measurements of one of the glass panels in the Upper Lawn Pavilion in Wiltshire, built between 1959 and 1962 by the British architects Alison and Peter Smithson (1928-1993 and 1923-2003). 

 Fantastic assembly of Markus Lüperz's tent paintings at Michael Werner Gallery, which the artist painted at age 24 using distemper on canvas.
 Batia Suter's work at The Photographers' Galery. One of the nominees for the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2018, finally won by Luke Willis Thompson with his striking film "autoportrait".
   (Above) Antoni Hervàs studio at Gasworks during his 3-month residency.
   (Above) View of Trafalgar Square with Michael Rakowitz's "The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist" featuring on the Fourth Plinth commission.
(Above) Peter Gabriel discussing his during the internet interspecies symposium "The Shape of a Circle in the Mind of a Fish" curated by Lucia Pietroiusti and Filipa Ramos for the Serpentine Gallery at the London Zoo.

Things that make us very happy: when a friend travels half the world to find one of our publications (Amikejo catalogue by Mousse Publishing in 2011) in the library of TEORética in Costa Rica and shares a snapshot on Twitter. :-)

28 June 2018: The seventh ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ dispatch from Hobart, Tasmania, goes live on http://incidents.kadist.org/ On this occasion, the offline conversation took place between curator Camila Marambio and artist Lucy Bleach. We're also working on the eighth destination: Buenos Aires.
Throughout June–July 2018: Intense writing period in preparation of two forthcoming exhibitions: ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’ (Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna, opening on September 13 and, on view until October 14) and ‘COLLAPSE’, a solo exhibition by Joan Morey opening on September 19 over two floors of the Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats, with following chapters at the Centre d'Art Tecla Sala (23 November 2018–13 January 2019) and a new commission at a yet-undisclosed location (10 January 2019).


18–29 July 2018: Two days in Dublin followed by a 10-day residency in Askeaton, as part of Askeaton Contemporary Art's (ACA) thirteenth annual event "Welcome to the neighbourhood". In 2018 ACA invited artists Matt Calderwood, Jonny Lyons, Ruth Clinton and Niamh Moriarty, alongside curators Gareth Bell-Jones (Flat Time House, London) and Latitudes. More on this post.

Desmore castle undergoing restoration.
Artists and POW workers after the tour.
RUSAL Aughinish alumina plant from afar, this is the largest alumina refinery in Europe.
Group trip to Lismore Castle upper garden in County Waterford.
The gardens featured works by Franz West (above) and Rashid Johnson (below).

The Grange Stone circle.

During the residency, we learnt of the story of ‘the Pilgrim’, a merchant from Barcelona who arrived in Askeaton around 1767 and who lived out his life in the Franciscan friary, dying there in 1784. Digging further in the local library, we came across a 1984 article written by Tim Kelly in a back issue of the ABC News, Askeaton’s local publication of record. The story reveals a dramatic narrative bringing to life a cryptic inscription found in the cloister that reads “Beneath lies the Pilgrim’s body, who died January 17, 1784”. The tale involves an Italian, a Spaniard, and a morbid blood-hunt that links Barcelona with Askeaton and is read aloud by artist Carl Doran. 


Matt Calderwood's boat ready to sail on the River Deel.
Making of Jonny Lyons’ "Joyride" on the River Deel.
"Welcome to the neighbourhood" Open day.


August 2018: Aaaand we’re out of office! Kinda.

Save the following dates:

13 September, 6–9pm: Opening of ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’ at Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna. 


14 September, 6pm: Performance “One motif says to the other: I can’t take my eyes off you” by Adrian Schindler and Eulàlia Rovira. Followed by the artist lecture: “A Blow by Blow Account of Stonecarving in Oxford” by Sean Lynch. Part of the exhibition ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’ at Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna.

19 September, 19h: Opening of ‘Joan Morey. COLLAPSE’, Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats.




RELATED CONTENT:





Max Andrews reviews Lúa Coderch; "Crash Test. The Molecular Turn" and Julia Spínola for frieze

Review ‘The Molecular Turn’: While Social Media Flourishes Ecological Systems are Collapsing. At La Panacée, Montpellier, Nicolas Bourriaud’s manifesto for a new movement and attempt to demarcate an artistic peer group." on frieze magazine.

Max Andrews, co-founder of Latitudes and contributing editor to frieze, has recently reviewed the group exhibition ‘Crash Test. The Molecular Turn’ (at La Panacée, Montpellier, until May 6, 2018) as well as Lúa Coderch's solo exhibition ‘The girl with no door on her mouth’ (àngels barcelona, on view until April 13, 2018) for friezeBoth texts are available online and are included in print in the April issue.

—> Video of Lúa Coderch presenting her work (Spanish with English subtitles).

Review "The Girl with No Door on Her Mouth: Lúa Coderch's Acts of Making Noise. The artist explores the politics of the female voice that speaks out or is shut up, at àngels barcelona, Spain." on frieze magazine.

A review on Julia Spínola's solo show "Lubricán" at the Centro de Arte 2 de Mayo (Móstoles, Madrid), has also just been published online and will also be included in the forthcoming May 2018 issue.

—> Video of Julia Spínola presenting the show (in Spanish).

Review "Julia Spínola: Twilight. At Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo, Móstoles, a crepuscular glow lends acute poignancy to simple forms and materials" on frieze magazine.


RELATED CONTENT:
  • Writing archive on Latitudes' website (since 2005);
  • "The Kørner problem” essay by Max Andrews in the monograph "John Kørner" published by Roulette Russe, 19 February 2018
  • Max Andrews essay on Christopher Knowles for NoguerasBlanchard at Liste 2017, 21 July 2017
  • Cover Story – January 2017: How open are open calls?, 4 January 2017
  • Cover Story – December 2016: Ten years ago – Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook, 5 December 2016
  • January 2016 Monthly Cover Story: Kasper Akhøj's Eileen Gray’s E.1027, 4 January 2016
  • Symposium participation, "The Shock of Victory", Glasgow, 25 September 2015
  • Review of the exhibition "What cannot be used is forgotten" in the May issue of frieze magazine, 29 April 2015
  • Review of Maria Thereza Alves' exhibition at CAAC Sevilla published in frieze magazine 9 March 2015




"The Kørner problem” essay by Max Andrews in the monograph "John Kørner" published by Roulette Russe

Exhibition poster of "Altid Mange Problemer" at Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen, Summer 2017. Photo: Latitudes.

Last Summer, Max Andrews of Latitudes was invited to contribute an essay for the forthcoming monograph of John Kørner's work published by the Danish editorial Roulette Russe and designed by Spine Studio. The publication is out now and includes essays by Max, London-based writer Oliver Basciano, and a conversation between the artist and Marie Nipper, curator of John's recent mid-career exhibition in Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen. 

The 280-page bilingual Danish/English monograph will be launched on March 2, 2018, at 4:30pm, in Kunsthal Charlottenborg's Apollo Kantine, though it will become available for online orders from February 26.

(Above and following): Photos: Finn Wergel Dahlgren. Courtesy Roulotte Russe. 













In his essay, Max tries to define what "The Kørner problem” (the title of the essay) might be:

(...) "The apparently ‘wicked’ problems and appalling catastrophes that interpenetrate Kørner’s works are manifold. The upsurge in jihadist terrorist activity in Europe since 2015 and its fallout are unavoidable (whether vestiges of the Charlie Hebdo shootings and the Bataclan attacks in Paris, suicide bombings in Brussels and Manchester; or truck attacks in Nice, Berlin, Barcelona; rampaging attacks in London, and so on). The civil war and the rise of ISIL (ISIS, Daesh) in Syria and the exacerbating effects of climate change and mega-drought that affected the region are inescapable. The European debt and migrant crisis are here. Yet elsewhere Kørner also brings to mind what at first seem like unrelated problems: the 2011 Tōhoku tsunami and the calamity of the Fukushima nuclear power plant meltdown, human trafficking, et cetera, states of exception that seem to confirm that the problem is evermore radical, atrocious, ungrounded—more diffuse while remaining intractably real. American pop star Ariana Grande knows this as well as Kørner. Released in spring 2014, three years before the suicide bombing of her concert at Manchester Arena, her most successful single to date is titled “Problem”. We are witnessing new kinds of wicked problems and Kørner paints accordingly."


In preparation for the catalogue essay, in July 2017 Latitudes visited Kørner's impressive "Altid Mange Problemer" mid-career exhibition at Kunsthal Charlottenborg, the largest exhibition of his works to date, gathering paintings and sculptural pieces from 2004 to the present.

(Above and following): Photos by Latitudes.


Max has previously written on John's work for the catalogue of his 2006 exhibition "Problems" at Victoria Miro Gallery in London.

Latitudes' first visit to Copenhagen also involved Kørner's work, as we visited his solo show 'ARoS Bank' at the ARoS Århus Kunstmuseum, Denmark (13 June–10 September 2006), which became the subject of our first blog post over a decade ago, in September 2006 (!).

RELATED CONTENT:
  • Latitudes' writing archive
  • Latitudes' "out of office" 2016–2017 season 1 August 2017
  • Max Andrews essay on Christopher Knowles for NoguerasBlanchard at Liste 2017 21 July 2017
  • Mariana Cánepa Luna reviews Ana Jotta’s “Abans que me n’oblidi (Before I forget)” exhibition in art-agenda 11 November 2016
  • '2006 Problems' exhibition and publication by John Kørner, Victoria Miro Gallery, London 29 November 2006
  • Copenhagen trip. 'Woman with 24 problems' by John Kørner 30 September 2006




Max Andrews essay on Christopher Knowles for NoguerasBlanchard at Liste 2017

 
Max Andrews of Latitudes contributed the essay "C-H-R-I-S-T-O-P-H-E-R-K-N-O-W-L-E-S. SO LISTEN UP" about the spoken-word works, "typings", poetry and paintings by Christopher Knowles. The publication was made to accompany his recent solo presentation in the stand of NoguerasBlanchard gallery at Liste art fair in Basel. 

Max reviewed Knowles’ exhibition at Gavin Brown's enterprise for frieze magazine back in October 2004, and his work "Untitled (Alert Paintings)" (2004) depicting the Department of Homeland Security’s Threat Advisory System, was the linchpin of the Latitudes-curated 2007 exhibition "Extraordinary Rendition" at NoguerasBlanchard.  

The exquisite short-run publication (500 copies) was designed and printed by Barcelona-based independent publishers and Riso printers Do The Print.


All photos: Latitudes.

Christopher Knowles was born in New York City, USA, in 1959. Lives and works in New York. He has taken part in several exhibitions, among which: 'In a Word', Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia, USA, curated by Anthony Elms and Hilton Als (2015); 'Secret Codes', Galeria Luisa Strina, São Paulo (2014); 'The Sundance Kid is Beautiful', The Louvre Museum, Paris, France, 2013; 'Merci Mercy', 980 Madison Avenue, New York (2013); 'Ecstatic Alphabets/Heaps of Language', MoMA, New York (2012); 'En el primer cercle', Fundació Antoni Tàpies, Barcelona (2011); 'Poor. Old. Tired. Horse', Institute of Contemporary Arts, London (2009); 'Visions of the Frontier', curated by Robert Wilson, Institut Valencia d’Art Modern (2009); 'Glossolalia: Languages of Drawing', Museum of Modern Art, New York (2008); 'Get Lost: Artists Map Downtown New York', New Museum Project, New York (2007); 'Learn to Read', Tate Modern, London (2007); 'Extraordinary Rendition', NoguerasBlanchard, Barcelona (2007).

Knowles' is represented by NoguerasBlanchard, Barcelona / Madrid; Gavin Brown's enterprise, New York / Rome; and Office Baroque in Brussels.


RELATED CONTENT:





Cover Story – January 2017: How open are open calls?


The January 2017 Monthly Cover Story is now up on www.lttds.org after January it will be archived here.  

"The first issue of frieze of 2017 includes “Salon Selectives”, an article by Latitudes’s Max Andrews that, with a wink to sassy 1980s hair care, asks “how open are open calls?”. The text is accompanied by this astonishing drawing from the collection of The Metropolitan Museum of Art by Felicien Myrbach-Rheinfeld entitled Candidates for Admission to the Paris Salon (c.1900)." Continue reading...

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions or field trips related to our activities.  

Related content:




Cover Story – December 2016: Ten years ago – Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook


The December Monthly Cover Story is now up on www.lttds.org after this month it will be archived here

"The publication Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook is ten years old. Commissioned by the Arts & Ecology programme of The Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures & Commerce (RSA), in partnership with Arts Council England, this book was one of Latitudes’s first projects. Through the inspirational contributions of people as varied as Lucy Lippard, Stephanie Smith, Amy Balkin, or the late Wangari Maathai – to mention just a few – the compendium charted the twin legacies of Land Art and the environmental movement while proposing how the critical acuity of art might remain relevant in the face of the dramatic ecological consequences of human activity. The research and reflection involved set Latitudes on a course that led to several further projects engaging with ecology, explicitly or otherwise." Continue reading...

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, exhibitions and field trips related to our activities.  

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Latitudes' "out of office" 2015–2016 season

"CLOSED. We open when we arrive, close when we leave, and if you come and we're not here, we just didn't coincide."

The end of the season is approaching and high summer is looming. Following Latitudes tradition we mark the summer break not by presenting a memo of activities per se, but with an "out of office" post (see the 2008-9, 2009-10, 2010-11, 2011-12, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2014–15 versions) with a series of 'behind the scenes' photos revisiting moments from the year gone by. So here are some glimpses of the past season, starting September 2015 to July 2016. See you in September!

In order to be conducive to freedom of interaction, the ‘Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group’ meetings have been held under the Chatham House Rule: This allows participants to express personal views, to listen, reflect and gather insights with a clear distinction from the position of their employers and/or the policies of any associated organization. Participation is expected, but there will be no resolutions issued, no votes are undertaken, and no policy statements proposed. Only this photo was taken.

Latitudes 2015–16 season started with a residency at Kadist, San Francisco (26 August–9 September) during which time we had the opportunity to develop several projects. Three artist-led tours with SF-based artists Amy Balkin, Rick & Megan Prelinger and Will Brown were part of our ongoing series 'Incidents of Travel' (see 2012 in Mexico City, 2013 in Hong Kong and most recent 2016 online incarnation). We took over Kadist social media with an instagram residency and contributed to the online programme 'One Sentence Exhibition'.

Furthermore on August 29, we convened the second ‘Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group’ at Kadist, a "by-invitation meeting bringing together individuals and expertise from the Bay Area with an active interest in institutional prototyping and emergent usership" initially presented in May 2015 for the
International Curatorial Retreat in Bari, Italy.

The workshop is "a forum for informal dialogue about megatrends and the future of contemporary art institutions. In the San Francisco iteration, an emphasis was put on cross-pollination between design thinking and curatorial thinking. Participants also discussed, among other things, the notion of the post-disciplinary, and the question of appropriate speeds, scale or periodicities of institutions."

  Photo: Arash Fayed.

September 8: Our last activity in the Bay Area was a session with first-year participants of the MA Curatorial Practice at the California College of the Arts (CCA). We briefly introduced our curatorial practice and invited the new students to imagine the governance and daily operations of a range of institutions – a remote residency facility, a commissioning institution, and an annual festival.


(Above and below) BAF technical team and artist Daniel Steegmann Mangrané installing the sound piece “Surucuá, Teque-teque, Arara” (2012) at the Umbracle (shade house), Parc de la Ciutadella. One of the "Composiciones" commissions for the Barcelona Gallery Weekend.

September 25: Max Andrews of Latitudes participates in the symposium "The Shock of Victory" held at CCA Glasgow. Meanwhile, installation is well underway for the first Barcelona Gallery Weekend, for which Latitudes devised a special programme of five artists' commissions.

 (Above and below) David Bestué browsing and choosing ceramic pieces and moulds in the attic at the Cosme Toda factory, for his "Composiciones" installation.

(Above and below) Jordi Mitjà discussing his work to the team at the Museu Geològic del Seminari during the installation of his "Composiciones" piece.
Rasmus Nilausen lights up Pere Llobera's drawing in dust, part of their joint "Composiciones" adventure.

(Above) Second seminar at the Biblioteca del Campo Freudiano de Barcelona, project by Dora García for "Composiciones".

  (Above) Display of the books selected by Dora García from the holdings of the Biblioteca del Campo Freudiano de Barcelona.

'Composiciones' received some great write-ups – including by Frederic Montornés and by Jörg Heiser at frieze magazine. We also gathered hundreds of tweets, Instagram shots and press material on this Storify.  

 Board announcing the seminar and public talk.

Closed-door seminar at Tabakalera. Photo: Consonni. 

Public presentation of Latitudes' projects at Tabakalera. Photo: Consonni.

November 2015: Latitudes travelled to Donostia's recently opened Tabakalera. We were invited by LaPublika's programme, created by Consonni, to lead a two-day seminar and public lecture around artists working in the public sphere.


Moments before starting the ESP people assembly at Birmingham's Eastside Projects.

On November 15 Latitudes convened the third iteration of the 'Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group', this time in Birmingham's Eastside Projects. This "forum for informal dialogue about megatrends and the future of contemporary art institutions" collectively imagined a ‘What if?’ – a post-apocalyptic scenario in which the entire art ecology of Birmingham had to be regrown from the ground up, an exercise that would help define and identify which are the most urgent organisations, facilities and tools.

International Summit Synapse 1 at New Rex of the National Theatre of Greece. 'Session II: Rethinking Institutions': (from left to right) Leo Panitch, Maria Hlavajova, Adam Szymczyk, Amalia Zepou (moderator), Hilary Wainwright, Emily Pethick, Latitudes (Max Andrews & Mariana Cánepa Luna) © Eva Galatsanou. 

  Second-day assembly at the Bargeion Hotel. 

Shortly after, on 18–19 November Latitudes participated in the OMONOIA summit which began the Athens Biennale 2015–2017. For a short report see the Cover Story of December 2015 and this blog entry.

December 2015: Mariana joined Hangar's new Board of Trustees as its Secretary, a responsibility she will fulfil for the next three years. 

December 4: Participation in the BAR module: Curating the space / Space for curating open public conversation with Sofía Hernández Chong Cuy, Carles Guerra, Michy Marxuach and BAR module participants. 
(Above and below) Courtesy: BAR Project.  Photos: Eva Carasol. 

January 2016: After an intense jury process in January, we began the year-long mentoring process of three exhibition projects out of the nine selected projects as part of the 2016 season's BCN Producció 2016.



The first project Latitudes mentored was by Pau Magrané/PLOM who turned the Espai Cub, a 3x3x3 metre white cube, into "a sound stage/instrument, an echo chamber hosting different screenings and objects to be played by PLOM at the opening". The two other projects Latitudes is mentoring are by Antoni Hervàs (September 15) and a group exhibition "La dissidència nostàlgica" by curator Joana Hurtado Matheu (December 1). 

From January onwards: Preparations for the five projects produced in the context of the second edition of the Barcelona Gallery Weekend. Studio visits, site visits, project proposals, budget and production planning, taking measurements...

May 2016: Regina Giménez and Rafel G. Bianchi taking measures of Can Trinxet's walls, a former 19th Century textile factory in L'Hospitalet de Llobregat. 
March 2016: visiting Robert Llimós's studio in Sant Pere neighbourhood.

 Lola Lasurt doing some tests positioning her paintings at the Biblioteca Pública Arús.

February 2016: Trip to Arles to attend the 'How Institutions Think' symposium at the LUMA Foundation, this time not participating but listening and reporting. Read Max Andrews' report on the frieze blog.


Besides the reportage from the Arles conference, Max also published other reviews in Frieze magazine as one of its team of contributing editors: Xavier Ribas at ProjecteSD (Barcelona); Joachim Koester at BlueProject Foundation (Barcelona); Alexandre Estrela at the Museo Reina Sofía (Madrid) and Critic's Guide: Barcelona highlighting some of the interesting shows in the city on frieze website. He has also contributed the text "Soups & Symptoms" for a forthcoming publication of Barcelona-based Danish painter Rasmus Nilausen. 
View of Francesc Ruiz, “Correos,” garcía galería, Madrid, 2016. Courtesy of garcía galería, Madrid. Photo: Roberto Ruiz.

On February 25, Mariana Cánepa Luna's review of Francesc Ruiz's exhibition at garcía | galería, Madrid, was published online on art-agenda: "Ruiz’s second solo show at Madrid’s garcía galería delves into the visual communication of one of Spain’s most iconic institutions, the Sociedad Estatal Correos y Telégrafos—the national postal service, commonly known as Correos—whose graphic identity was created in 1977 by Spanish designer and artist José María Cruz Novillo (b. 1936)." continue reading...


Mariana also contributed to the publication "Great Expectations: Prospects for the Future of Curatorial Education" edited by Leigh Markopoulos and published by the California College of the Arts and The Banff Centre – with some insightful questions by Banff Centre Walter Phillips Gallery curator Peta Rake.

Miquel from MACBA's AV team checking the connections behind the monitor that presented 'Houdini' (1991) – one of the most challenging works in the exhibition for the technical team as it meant dismantling a 40-year-old TV and submerging the front part into water.

March 2016: Installation begins! After over year and half of preparation, the exhibition "I Will Fear No Evil" opened at Convent dels Àngels del MACBA on March 17, 2016. Two busy weeks of installation in the Convent dels Àngels space preceded the opening. Many press tours, exhibition reviews, photo and video recordings, guided visits, film screenings, and music events followedthey're all archived here!

 Alex from MACBA's restoration department scraping the old silicone off the acrylic box containing "San Guinefort" (1991).
Tria33, a programme broadcast at Canal 33, came to film during the installation.
 Lightbox of "El Resplandor de la Santa Conjunción aleja a los demonios" in progress, a piece from 1991, exhibited for the first time in the Sala RG in Caracas, and also reconstructed for the present exhibition. 
TTI installation team placing twelve pork rind skateboards on the metal structure. "La Hermandad" (1994) was commissioned for the 1994 exhibition "Cocido y Crudo" at the Museo Reina Sofía, Madrid, and it's now part of the "la Caixa" Collection.  

 Vinyls go up – design by Mucho. More on the exhibition graphic design. 
March 17, 11:30am: Presentation to the press. Left to right: Ferran Barenblit (MACBA director), exhibition curators Mariana Cánepa Luna and Max Andrews of Latitudes, and artist José Antonio Hernández-Díez. Photo: MACBA twitter.

Visitors in front of "Sagrado Corazón Activo", a work from 1991 reconstructed for this exhibition. Photo: Miquel Coll/MACBA.
Visitors next to "Houdini", a work from 1989 reconstructed for this exhibition. Photo: Miquel Coll/MACBA.

 General view of the exhibition. Photo: Roberto Ruiz/MACBA.

April: We love snail mail and handwritten notes! We received a note from Rick & Megan Prelinger alongside a copy of their Yearbook 2015. We relished spending time at the Prelinger Library in San Francisco last August as part of our 'Incidents of Travel' series! (Our extended heartfelt thanks to the Kadist team for hosting us!).

Card and Yearbook 2015 by the Prelinger Library.
 
April 20: Wrapped-up a five-part interview with Melbourne-based artist Nicholas Mangan to be published in the catalogue of his forthcoming solo exhibition ‘Limits to Growth’, co-produced by Monash University Museum of Art (MUMA), Melbourne (opening July 20) and Institute of Modern Art (IMA), Brisbane (where it will be on view from October 29). The exhibition will travel to KW in Berlin in Summer 2017.


 Installing Pau Magrané exhibition at the Cub space in La Capella. Photos: Pau Magrané.

April 27 (until June 12): Exhibition "Demo" of Pau Magrané/PLOM at Espai Cub, La Capella. This is the first of the three projects Latitudes is mentoring throughout 2016  as part of BCN Producció'16 production grant scheme. Video of the project here (Catalan with Spanish subtitles) or here (English).


April 25–May 7: Two-week residency at CAPC Bordeaux to research for a group exhibition which will take place in 2017. One strand of our investigations departs from the CAPC building itself, known as Entrepôt Lainé – a 19th Century warehouse for colonial commodities. We learnt from the museum staff that coffee beans are occasionally found atop a pile of papers on an office desk or in the middle of the exhibition galleries. This became the focus of our May Cover Story (archived here).
First and last pages of the first online dispatch by Chicago-based curator Yesomi Umolu within the distributed phase of Incidents (of Travel). http://incidents.kadist.org/
 

May: Launch of the online project Incidents (of Travel), produced by Kadist Art Foundation. The web marks a new ‘distributed’ phase of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ as an online periodical. The ongoing series will be edited by Latitudes and produced by Kadist.

Originally conceived by Latitudes as day-long artist-led tours commissioned to artists in and around Mexico City (2012) – followed by Hong Kong (2013) and San Francisco (2015) – ‘Incidents’ expands on the format of the curator-meets-artist studio visit to explore the chartered itinerary as a format of an artistic encounter. The first dispatch came from Chicago and featured Yesomi Umolu (Exhibitions Curator at the Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts at the University of Chicago) and artist Harold Mendez, an offline day photographed by Nabiha Khan.

  
June: Launch of the second Incidents (of Travel) dispatch, an encounter between curator Serubiri Moses and photographer Mohsen Taha in Jinja, Uganda, narrated throughout 18 photos by Taha with an introduction, captions, sound and commentary.
 

And finally July. Some are off on holiday but many remain working full speed despite the less frantic inbox. Many surely agree that this is one of the weirdest months in the calendar, a bit like the pre-Christmas rush, but with a whole month of heated intensity

4–8 July: Second trip to Bordeaux, more archival appointments and more geology. Led by Bruno Cahuzac (Maître de Conférences, UFR Sciences de la Terre et de la Mer) from the Faculté des Sciences de Bordeaux, we visited the incredible carothèque-lithothèque at the Université de Bordeaux in Talence which houses over 30,000 core samples from the subsoil of the Aquitaine basin.

(Above) Gerard Ortín's exhibition "Vijfhoek" at Galería Estrany-de la Mota and (below) Gerard receiving the award.



July 9 and 20: As jurors of this year's award Art Nou/Primera Visió we visited the twenty participating commercial galleries, non-profits, private foundations and museums alongside BCNProducció'16 co-tutors Mireia Sallarès and David Armengol. We unanimously decided to award Gerard Ortín for his solo show at Galería Estrany-de la Mota. Ortín receives 2,000 Euros to produce a new publication. The ceremony took place on July 21 at La Capella. Last year winner Rasmus Nilausen produced the publication "Soups & Symptoms" which includes a text by Max Andrews of Latitudes.


Instagram post by Fireplace project.

July 11: Presentation of the publications of the projects by artists Ricardo Trigo and Pau Magrané resulting from the production grant BCN Producció'16.  

 February 2016 Cover Story was dedicated to Sarah Ortmeyer. 

Cover Stories on www.lttds.org: Over a year ago we began the monthly section "Cover Story" on our home page (archive of this section). October 2015 was dedicated to David Bestué's "Luces" installation commissioned for Composiciones, November 2015 marked the sixth anniversary of Globalising the Internationale, Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller’s project for Portscapes; December presented a shot taken during OMONOIA, the International Summit at the National Theatre of Greece’s New Rex which kicked off the Athens Biennale 2015–2017. 

January shifted to black-and-white with a Mediterranean shot from E.1027, the 1920s Côte d'Azur house designed by Eileen Gray and Jean Badovici near Monaco meticulously documented since 2008 by Danish artist Kasper Akhøj. February stayed in France, going up to the Tour Eiffel and looking back at a piece by Sarah Ortmeyer presented in a 2011 exhibition in Brussels. March showed a behind-the-scenes moment of the production of "Sagrado Corazón Activo" (1991) a work by José Antonio Hernández-Díez that was only ever exhibited once before, in 1991 in Caracas. The piece was specially reconstructed for the exhibition "I Will Fear No Evil" at MACBA presenting a selection of his early works. In April we announced the forthcoming launch of 'Incidents (of Travel)', an online periodical produced by Kadist; and in May (back to France) we began our research at CAPC Bordeaux, where we'll be curating a group exhibition in June 2017. June took us back to Hernández-Díez's show which was coming to an end – some exhibition reviews here; and July took us back to the Latitudes-devised Composiciones commissions last October (the programme of artists’ interventions returns later this year).

June Cover Story – all cover stories archived here.

 Antoni Hervàs preparing his installation for BCN Producció'16.

We are presently preparing for what will be a rather intense September. Antoni Hervàs's exhibition "El Misterio de Caviria" at Sala Gran of La Capella (third round of exhibitions of the grant scheme BCN Producció) opens on September 15. It will be shortly followed by the presentation of the five "Composiciones" commissions by Lúa Coderch, Regina Giménez, Lola Lasurt, Robert Llimós and Wilfredo Prieto for the second Barcelona Gallery Weekend, inaugurating on Thursday 29 September, and on view until Sunday 2 October. 
 
We have also been invited to contribute to Oslo Pilot, the two-year project investigating the role of art in the public realm led by Eva González-Sancho and Per Gunnar Eeg-Tverbakk. We will be writing on a selection of case-studies based around their four areas of research – Reactivation, Periodicity, Public and Disappearancewhich will be published in the magazine launched during a three-day symposium in mid-November 2016. 

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Cover Story: July 2016 – Through the grapevine – Rasmus Nilausen’s Soups & Symptoms


New Monthly Cover Story "Through the grapevine – Rasmus Nilausen’s Soups & Symptoms" is now on www.lttds.org (after July 2016 it will be archived here)

"Rasmus Nilausen’s "The Cluster" III (2014) sits tight in a cupboard in what was once the house of a priest. This painting formed just one part of the exhibition that, together with Pere Llobera, Nilausen made for the Latitudes-devised Composiciones last October (the programme of artists’ interventions returns later this year). "Vera Icon" took over the rooms of the abandoned house in the gardens of La Central bookstore, itself a former city-centre church, and tweeting Mayoress Ada Colau was one of the many curious visitors over the weekend." continue reading...

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage to highlight past, present or forthcoming projects, research, exhibitions or field trips related to our activities. 
"Highly recommended the #BarcelonaGAlleryWeekend @ArtBarcelona_AS". Twitter by Ada Colau, Barcelona Mayor during her visit to Rasmus Nilausen (photographed on the left and upper right corner) and Pere Llobera exhibition at the house of a former priest, La Central Bookstore. Slideshow starts here.

Related content:
  • Archive of Cover Stories.
  • Last days! Cover Story and exhibition of José Antonio Hernández-Díez: techno-pop, death and resurrection (20 June 2016)
  • Cover Story, May 2016: Material histories – spilling the beans at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux (10 May 2016)
  • Cover Story, March 2016: José Antonio Hernández-Díez: The sacred heart of the matter (3 March 2016
  • Cover Story, February 2016: Sarah Ortmeyer, Towering allusions (9 Febrero 2016)




A report from the symposium 'How Institutions Think' organised by the LUMA Foundation and CCS Bard College, Arles, 24–27 February 2016

All photographs: Latitudes.

[The following text was originally published on Frieze Blog on 9 March 2016].

Co-presented by the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College with the LUMA Foundation, the four-day symposium ‘How Institutions Think’ [pdf of the programme] met to reconsider the habits and rhetorics of contemporary art institutions and curatorial practice. The event, held at the Parc des Ateliers, Arles, from 24–27 February, was developed in partnership with a long list of collaborators (Valand Academy of Arts, Gothenburg, Sweden; Afterall Books and the Exhibition Histories programme at Saint Martins, London, UK; Goldsmiths, London; the V-A-C Foundation, Moscow; and de Appel art centre, Amsterdam).

Taking its title from the 1986 book by British anthropologist Mary Douglas, the symposium played out on the site of the future LUMA Arles, a 20-acre former railway yard that includes a new building designed by Frank Gehry scheduled to open in summer 2018 as exhibitions spaces, archives, residency and study facilities, as well as a restaurant, hotel and park. Introduced by CCS Bard’s Paul O’Neill and LUMA founder Maja Hoffmann, the presentations were hosted in the recently-restored L’Atelier des Forges spaces in the middle of this construction site. O’Neill took the work-in-progress status outside as an invitation for the more than 30 speakers and around 150 delegates to debate not only what the future of art institutions in general might be, but more immediately, how new ways of operating could underpin this nascent institution in the south of France. 

LUMA Arles is located in the former railway yards of Arles and includes a new building designed by Frank Gehry and the renovation of the industrial buildings on the Parc des Ateliers by Selldorf Architects.

Yet what transpired was something far more pervasive. An amplification of the noun ‘institution’ and the verb ‘instituting’ soon engulfed not only a discussion of art and academic establishments, but law, governance, and the psyche of the French state, post-November 2015 Paris attacks. The grim predicament of a Europe in the depths of the refugee crisis – as the symposium took place, at the other end of the country, Calais’s ‘Jungle’ camp was being dismantled – became the lens for considering nothing less than the spectral institution that is Western European colonial imperialism. In the first evening’s fragmented keynote by Zahia Rahmani, the writer and historian gave an account of the ‘Made in Algeria’ exhibition of colonial cartography she has curated for the MuCEM museum in Marseilles. She argued that we cannot plausibly think about the future of any institution without confronting the terrible failures and opprobrious injustices of the past, most glaringly what she characterised as the ‘toxicity’ of Western Europe’s colonial system. 


Céline Condorelli's 'All our tomorrows' (2015) hanging curtain.

‘Is institution building still desirable?’ wondered artist Céline Condorelli in her presentation the following day as she evoked All our tomorrows (2015), her installation that humbly corralled the symposium’s setting, comprised a large hanging curtain inspired by the ‘poor architecture’ of Lina Bo Bardi’s SESC Pompéia, the social and cultural centre established in São Paulo. 

Reflecting on his own transformative experiences made while directing the 2014 edition of the São Paulo Biennial, Charles Esche – Director of the Van Abbemuseum in Eindhoven, Netherlands – astutely articulated both the decisiveness of Western Imperialism’s poisonous effect on the rest of the world, and the nervousness about whether anyone can even venture to be hopeful about the future. Esche persuasively argued that Western museums must make decolonialisation fundamental to their missions and no longer a marginal issue by analysing the entrails of neoliberalism’s ‘dogged persistence’ and, soothsayer-like, intuitively sensing the ‘weak signals’ of a more just politics.
 
 Question from Mick Wilson, artist, educator and Head of the Valand Academy of Arts, University of Gothernburg, Sweden, and moderatior of one of the sessions.  

Attendees gather outside the symposium venue at the Parc des Ateliers.

Sociologists Luc Boltanski and Arnaud Esquerre spoke of France’s deep investment in what they termed the ‘economy of enrichment’ in observations that were particularly prickly given the art-destination place-making unfolding on the very site of the symposium. They submitted that the luxury brands that dominate the image of the country abroad enjoy a close but officially-unacknowledged complicity with heritage and culture. They argue that this compound myth of the French art de vivre accounts for the country consistently being the globe’s most visited tourist destination, yet also that, less innocuously, France’s defiance of normative economic rules about price and value make it both a haven for inequality as well as unusually susceptible to instability. Put candidly, the presence of refugee and terrorists is not conducive to tourism and handbag sales. Later, speaking about ‘turbo-fascism’ and a transition to ‘necropolitics’ (a term coined by philosopher Achille Mbembe regarding the politics of sovereignty over life and death), philosopher Marina Gržinić contended that we are living in a time of war in which our institutions battle to preserve this ‘good life’ at any cost. 

Céline Condorelli, Artist, Professor at Nuova Accademia di Belle Arti, Milan, and Founding Co-Director Eastside Projects, in conversation with Helena Reckitt, Senior Lecturer in Curating at Goldsmiths, University of London.  
 Clémentine Deliss, Independent Curator and Fellow of the Institute of Advanced Study (Wissenschaftskolleg).

Turning more specifically to art’s institutions, independent curator and editor Nataša Petrešin-Bachelez argued that they are so often so deeply implicated in an economy of precarity that they spawn new toothless art forms of ‘safe participation’ and ‘soft interactivity’. ‘Stubborn’ institutions thus appeared to be both the problem and the solution. Accordingly, Clémentine Deliss – recently dismissed as the Director of the Weltkulturen Museum in Frankfurt – delivered a scorching critique of the racism and intransigence persisting in ethnographic museums founded in the 19th century, particularly in Germany and France. She characterised how the hundreds of thousands of objects ‘salvaged’ from the frontline of the colonial project are now trapped in a legislative embargo, reduced to little more than dormant entries on databases. Access to these hoards of material culture and their restitution is critical she asserted, yet young curators are too afraid to deal with them – contemporary art offers an easier ride. 

In the context her work directing the SBG Gallery in Montréal, Canada, curator Pip Day discussed Canada’s settler-colonialist legacy, the evasions allowed by conceiving of decolonization as merely a metaphor, and her advocacy of the work of First Nation artists such as Maria Hupfield. Bassam El Baroni, an independent curator based in Alexandria, Egypt, later presented a paper that threaded a bewilderingly dense route through a tangle of cognitive philosophy and ‘prometheanism’. Yet Day’s case studies, as well as those discussed by Mélaine Bouteloup, curator of Paris’s Bétonsalon, regarding the recently opened Villa Vassilieff which is now the second site of that institution, helped to link such abstraction to more practical curatorial and artistic thinking-in-action that addresses the past while creating new knowledge. 

Gehry’s LUMA building will comprise presentation and exhibition spaces, archive, library, offices, seminar rooms, artist-in-residence facilities, café-restaurant and hotel and is due to open in summer 2018.

Yet it was through the presentations by writer Dave Beech and especially architect Keller Easterling that the symposium actually approached something resembling a strategy to address what had been almost uniformly painted as the shameful, broken state of the contemporary institution. According to both Beech and Easterling, we should be paying keener attention to infrastructure rather than institution per se. Following her book Extrastatecraft: The Power of Infrastructure Space (2014) Easterling’s bruising and exhilarating contention was that an enveloping urban medium (including preposterous towers, mall sprawl, special-trade-zone legal lacunae) defies consideration as a thing and is better thought of as a global operating system, a ‘disposition’ that thrives on saying one thing and doing quite another. 

Ljublijanan philosopher, theoretician and artist Marina Gržinić; writer and professor Dave Beech and curator and theorist Simon Sheikh.

At the start of the symposium artist Liam Gillick – one of LUMA’s luminary consultants alongside Tom Eccles, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Philippe Parreno and Beatrix Ruf – had asked somewhat rhetorically, ‘can an institution be thought collectively on this scale?’ It was clearly not only Charles Esche who looked out at the spine of what will be a 24,000 square metre Frank Gehry-designed tower and noticed that the institution’s die was cast already – and thanks to an architect long synonymous with the art museum as an importunate form of trophy. Following Keller’s strategic spatial repertoire of ‘counterbalances’, ‘interplays’, ‘toggles’, ‘incentives’ and ‘ratchets’, as well as her talk of heeding the dynamics of joke-telling or dough-tending, she implied that if we are going to formulate a resilient future for art institutions, we had better start feeling our way – and get a whole lot more canny. 


Max Andrews is a contributing editor of frieze and, with Mariana Cánepa Luna, runs Latitudes, an independent curatorial office based in Barcelona, Spain.
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 LUMA Foundation spaces under construction.

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January 2016 Monthly Cover Story: Kasper Akhøj's Eileen Gray’s E.1027


NEW YEAR / 
NEW MONTH / 
NEW MONTHLY COVER STORY /

The January "Cover Story" features a black-and-white photo by Danish artist Kasper Akhøj taken from the living room of Eileen Gray's E.1027, the seaside villa built at Roquebrune-Cap-Martin, France, in the late 1920s. The image is part of the series 'Welcome (TO THE TEKNIVAL)' that Kasper has been working on since 2008 examining the process of restoration and the convoluted history of this icon of modern architecture. On January 16, Kasper will open a solo show at Ellen de Bruijne PROJECTS, Amsterdam. A publication designed by Copenhagen-based designer Anni's will include an essay by Latitudes’s Max Andrews.

We first got to know Kasper in 2007 in the United Arab Emirates. Kasper was there installing 'Autoxylopyrocycloboros' (2006) for Simon Starling as part of Sharjah Biennial 8, while we were there curating the biennial’s symposium. Four years later, in 2011, we were delighted to include Kasper’s work in the Latitudes’ group show Exposition International des Art Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes & des Arts et Techniques dans la Vie Moderne (International Exhibition of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts & Art and Technology in Modern Life) at Meessen De Clercq, Brussels, in 2011. Here he presented a slideshow which centred on the ‘Abstracta’ display system, originally designed by the Danish architect and designer Poul Cadovious in the 1960s. 

Happy 2016! 



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Symposium participation, "The Shock of Victory", Glasgow, 25 September 2015


Symposium participants: In the Shadow of the Hand, Sacha Kahir, Caleb Waldorf, Max Andrews of Latitudes, Angeliki Roussou, WHW (What, How and For Whom?). 

9.30am | Arrival and coffee
10am - 10.15am | Introduction by CCA Curator Remco de Blaaij and Dr Deborah Jackson
10.15am - 11am | In the Shadow of the Hand
11am - 11.45am | Angelika Roussou
11.45am - 12.30pm | Caleb Waldorf
1pm - 2pm | Lunch (provided)
2pm - 2.45pm | Sacha Kahir
3pm - 3.45pm | Sabina Sabolovic, WHW
3.45pm - 4.15pm | Break
4.15pm - 5pm | Max Andrews, Latitudes

The Shock of Victory is a programme consisting of an exhibition, a symposium organised in partnership with the University of Edinburgh and digital publication. Taking place exactly one year after the Scottish Independence Referendum of 18 September 2014, the programme proposes artistic approaches, techniques, provocations and motivations in a post-referendum reality departing from Scotland, but certainly not constrained by it.

The programme takes its title from the pivotal essay ‘The Shock of Victory’ from 2007, by anarchist and scholar David Graeber, in which he argues that protesters often have difficulty in recognising their moments of success. Accompanying the exhibition the symposium allows for a timely re-consideration of the complexities of the relations between alternative and established (art) institutions that might have been sparked by political moments such as the Scottish Independence Referendum of 2014.

The underpinning emphasis is on the ‘organisational turn’, a shift from hierarchical to self-organised models of organisation. In particular the focus is on the potency of radical (artistic) practices and ideas, which propose imaginative ways of organising – collectivism, anarchism, activism, networks, and self-organising. Can we think of a new artistic landscape that might have been formed? How do we organise ourselves in such times?


 Article by Max Andrews published in Frieze, October 2013.

Max Andrews from Latitudes will offer a perspective on recent cultural politics in Barcelona. Looking in particular at visual art institutions, the 'open submission' format has become a pervasive tool. As an extraction of a democratic process, such an apparently accountable mechansim can nevertheless be complicit in a neo-liberal agenda, undermining institutional robustness and advocating continual 'present-ness'.

Other independent and self-organised realities do of course exist, and following recent municipal elections the political tide offers the promise of change. With reference to art practices that have connected with specific moments of Catalan social history, some contemporary case studies show a thinking around site, scale, longevity and depth – and perhaps reveal a connection with Scotland.
 

Organised in partnership with the University of Edinburgh.
Co-convened by Dr Deborah Jackson.
Funded by The University of Edinburgh’s Innovation Initiative Grant.


CCA, 350 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow G2 3JD, UK


Related content:

Two texts by Manuel Segade and Max Andrews analyse the current Spanish art scene 16 October 2013

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Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
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Limited Edition Tote Bags Commemorating Latitudes' 10th Anniversary

As announced on an earlier post, this Spring we celebrate our 10th Anniversary! 

Many of you know of our love for tote bags – as we made it clear on one of our 2013 Venice biennale posts! Well, this time we have produced our very own totes: we are delighted to mark the special occasion by presenting limited editions of four specially commissioned silkscreened tote bags featuring designs by four artists with whom Latitudes has collaborated over the past decade: Lawrence Weiner (New York, 1942), Haegue Yang (Seoul, 1971), Ignasi Aballí (Barcelona, 1958) and Mariana Castillo Deball (Mexico City, 1975).



With the summer art calendar in mind, the bags are made from natural durable cotton canvas with a reinforced base. They feature a press-stud closure, an internal pocket with a zip (never loose your biennale pass again!), an adjustable shoulder strap, as well as smaller handles for carrying like a briefcase. Versatility from vaporetto to vernissage

Each bag have been hand silkscreened in Print Workers, Barcelona; this is an artisanal process and each printing results in slight variations.
 
Place your order(s) from our website.

Launch Price: 45 Euros + delivery. After 1 June 2015: 50 Euros + delivery.
Edition: 35 + 5 A.P. (Haegue Yang's tote is ed. 20 + 10 AP)
Measurements: 38 high × 40 width × 14 base (in cm)
Fabric: 475 gsm natural chlorine-free cotton canvas
Strap: Adjustable  

Capacity: 15 litres
Weight: 420 gr aprox.



Related content:

Latitudes' 4th anniversary (April 2009)
Newsletter #22 – April 2010  
It's our 10th anniversary! (22 May 2015)
Latitudes' Limited Edition Totes


This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
Work is licensed under a
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It's our 10th anniversary!


We find it hard to believe, but April 2015 marked our 10th anniversary!

In October last year we started working on our new website so that it would be ready to mark the decade of our two-person self-organisation. We submerged ourselves in the exercise of looking back and consolidating our physical and digital archives. The last decade has certainly been marked by the transition towards the latter, and hence files and hard drives now hold the most voluminous evidence of our activity, with all manner of USB-sticks and obsolescent CDs (remember those?) having fallen by the wayside.

We devised a plan for what we wanted to improve with a website conceived as a place for reportage as well as a publicly-accessible archive. This process included developing more extensive, and larger-format, photo galleries, cross-referencing to previously "buried" texts, making descriptions more concise, adding a related content section to cross-reference project information with blog posts, and consolidating locations as well as events. After six months of work, and some down-the-rabbit-hole endless weekends with the intricacies of CSS, we had re-edited ten years of our professional life online. Ta-da!



But we also hold on to physical archives and printer matter and they continue to delight! They also bear witness to something of what has been lost. The decline of the post as a means for distributing video (VHS! DVDs!) with the rise of DropBox, or Vimeo, for example, has meant no more of those sweet hand-written notes that used to accompany artists' packages. Exhibition invitations are frankly a rarity now too, and these are filed alongside various postcards, discarded fragments of artists' work and other amusing ephemera. 

Since we commissioned our mail-and-stamp graphic identity from More Associates back in April 2005, we have seeped more-and-more online to document and communicate: our first newsletter (November 2005), our first website, our early blog posts (starting in September 2006!), our Facebook page in early 2009 started with the presentation of Jan Dibbets' filming for Portscapes, our Flickr photo archive (also in 2009, now with nearly 4,000 photos online), followed by our first tweets in 2010, and sporadically YouTube, Issuu, Storify, Soundcloud followed.


 Presentation of 7 years of practice as part of the programme "La Sucursal" at Casa del Lago, Mexico City, September 2012. This invitation gave us the opportunity to begin the series 'Incidents of Travel' commissioning artists tours in Mexico and Hong Kong. Photo: Latitudes.

This "ecstasy of communication" as Dieter Roelstraete has ironically put it, a day-to-day reality, has certainly defined our practice and how we have come to produce, document and disseminate our projects. We always stress this rapid digital transition when presenting our practice, as adapting to it has certainly been crucial as a two person spaceless self-organisation. Not running a regular programme of exhibitions or events has meant we have found the need to communicate the duration of what we are working on while being seemingly offline. Sometimes the standard drop-in question, "What are you working on?", is not so straightforward to answer. Back to Roelstraete – "getting organised" could often be the most suitable answer. "Getting organised" for the next project, reflecting on a recently concluded activity, anticipating the one after that, sorting out finances, seeing how we might put together the next research trip, finding it a challenge to find the time to read a book from beginning to end, watching life and work go by in 'likes' and 'retweets' and 'regrams'... Yet far than being nostalgic, this transition has itself given us great food for thought. For example, we dedicated over a year to discussing the consequences of online presence for art practice and curating with colleagues from Hong Kong to Minneapolis in the #OpenCurating interview series. 


 In 2010 we were awarded the inaugural Curatorial Prize given by the Catalan Gallery Association, recognising our "curatorial work and especially for their involvement in the local context and their efforts to disseminate national art in an international context." Photo: Latitudes.

We are thankful to the many artists and other creative people who have supported us throughout this past decade. Some projects started with innocuous conversations that eventually led to ongoing collaborations and friendships, and we are also grateful to colleagues willing to offer critical feedback and words of encouragement in those moments in which we most needed to regain trust. A huge thanks too to the institutions and organisations for financing our projects

Very soon more news on a commemorative project we've been cooking up...
 
Related content:

Latitudes' 4th anniversary (April 2009)
Newsletter #22 – April 2010 


This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
Work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




Review of the exhibition "What cannot be used is forgotten" in the May issue of frieze


Entrance to the group exhibition "Ce qui ne sert pas s'oublie".

As reported earlier in this channel, at the end of last January we visited the exhibition 'Ce qui ne sert pas s’oublie' (What Cannot be Used is Forgotten)' (on view until 3 May 2015) at CAPC musée d'art coontemporain in Bordeaux.

Curated by Mexico-based Colombian-born curator Catalina Lozano, the exhibition presents the work of Mathieu K. Abonnenc, Sven Augustijnen, Mariana Castillo Deball, Sean Lynch, Pauline M’Barek, Museo Comunitario del Valle de Xico, Wendelien van Oldenborgh, Uriel Orlow, Beatriz Santiago Muñoz and Jorge Satorre.

Below is a fragment of Max Andrews' frieze review, published in the May 2015 issue of frieze magazine (#171):

‘What cannot be used is forgotten’ proposed a biographical approach to objects and the histories and allegiances they can constitute. With an emphasis on eroding the legacy of colonial-era ethnography and archaeology, the exhibition comprised the contributions of ten artists who emphasized the accrual and dispersal of objects' meaning over time. Objects were broken apart, animated, revered, rumored, memorized, melted; or – as in Pauline M’Barek’s sculptures mimicking display stands for imagined wooden masks – missing altogether. Sometimes, objects were not comfortably objects at all, but textiles or techniques. Occasionally they were alibis employed to provoke historical revision and necessitate textual commentary. In Uriel Orlow’s A Very Fine Cast (110 years) (2007), works ingested past traces of such commentary (captions taken from European museums’ descriptions of the Benin Bronzes robbed by the British punitive Benin Expedition of 1897).

– Max Andrews


  Installation view of Sean Lynch's 'A blog-by-blow account of stone-carving in Oxford' (2014).

General view of the exhibition. (Right wall) Museo Comunitario del Valle de Xico (Community Museum of the Xico Valley).

Related content:

Report from Bordeaux: Visit to CAPC/Musée d'Art Contemporain's shows of Franz Ehrard Walther and the group show "Ce qui ne sert pas s'oublie" (27 January 2015)

Review of Maria Thereza Alves' exhibition at CAAC Sevilla published in frieze magazine (9 March 2015) 

art-agenda review on Andrea Büttner show "Tische", at NoguerasBlanchard, Barcelona  (21 July 2014)


This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
Work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.





Archive of our first Cover Story (March): Wilfredo Prieto, ‘Grasa, jabón y plátano’ (2006)


As recently announced in this channel, we have re-designed our website. This has meant improving a few tech and editing things and introducing new sections such"cover story": a monthly focus on an artwork, artist, book, site or trip we've experienced in our recent past, accompanied by a short text. 

Our first cover story centers on Wilfredo Prieto's work "Grease, Soap, Banana" presented in 2007 in the group show "Extraordinary Rendition". Above you find the full picture, below details. Enjoy!
 


This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
Work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




Review of Maria Thereza Alves' exhibition at CAAC Sevilla published in frieze magazine

 View of the exhibition "The Long Road to Xico (1991–2014) at CAAC, Sevilla. Courtesy the artist and CAAC, Sevilla.

The April issue of frieze magazine includes a review by Max Andrews' of Latitudes on Maria Thereza Alves' solo exhibition "The Long Road to Xico (1991–2014) at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Sevilla. 

Curated by Los Angeles-based Spanish curator Pedro de Llano, this is a long-overdue midcareer retrospective comprising over a dozen works by an artist whose practice is little exhibited in Spain, and it's also very pertinent as it's hosted within the former Monasterio de Santa María de las Cuevas – from where Cristóbal Colón (Christopher Columbus) planned his second voyage of 1493. 

Most importantly though is the connection to northern Spain with Alves' long-term research on Xico: "a town outside Mexico City, on the shores of one of the lakes that in the late 19th century, Íñigo Noriega, a Spanish immigrant from Asturias, drained the lake completing a cycle of environmental destruction and social marginalization that began with the arrival of Hernán Cortés and his soldiers." (from CAAC website) "This one man-made disaster in Chalco continues to have adverse effects that still plague the region with floods, contaminated water, land subsidence and the resulting destruction to infrastructure such as sewage pipes, large cracks which damage hundreds of houses, lack of drinking water and most recently earthquakes." (from the exhibition walltext)

  View of the installation The Return of a Lake, dOCUMENTA (13), Kassel, 2012.

Excerpt of Max Andrews' frieze review:

"Since the early 1990s, Maria Thereza Alves has addressed the devastating effects of Portuguese imperialism on the indigenous peoples of her native Brazil and of the Spanish conquest in the Americas. Hosted by the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo (CAAC), this long-overdue survey was in part a pre-history of her extensive project for Documenta 13, The Return of a Lake (2012). Extended in Seville, this room-sized installation centered on tabletop models that related the disastrous effects of the 1908 desiccation of Lake Chalco in Mexico City by Spanish businessman Íñigo Noriega Laso, and the ongoing injustices suffered by those who live in nearby Xico. Bookended by the earliest work in the exhibition, NoWhere (1991), in which overpainted photographs from Amazonas address European delusions of city planning in ‘empty’ territory, The Long Road to Xico (1991–2014) illuminates the ecological assault and epistemological violence ushered by colonialism. Given the city’s past as the main port for Spanish trade with the New World, the context of Seville granted particular acuity to the ethical armature of Alves’s decolonizing art. Moreover, CAAC’s home is the former Monasterio de Santa María de las Cuevas, from where Cristóbal Colón (Christopher Columbus) planned his second voyage of 1493 and where his remains were once interred."  


RELATED CONTENT:


The work of Maria Thereza Alves has been featured in several of Latitudes' projects, starting in 2006 with her contribution alongside Jimmy Durham for the publication "LAND, ART: A Cultural Ecology Handbook" (RSA/Arts Council England). In 2008 her film "The Sun" (2006, 5'03'') was presented in the group exhibition ‘Greenwashing. Ambiente: Pericoli, Promesse e Perplessità’ (Greenwashing. Environment: Perils, Promises and Perplexities), at the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin, Italy (29 February–18 May 2008) and later that year it was presented as part of the film programme "A Stake in the Mud, A Hole in the Reel. Land Art’s Expanded Field 1968–2008", premiered at the Museo Tamayo, Mexico City in April 2008 (toured to another seven venues in Europe between April and October that year).

Latitudes to facilitate the Nature Addicts Fund Travelling Academy, 11–15 September, organised within the Maybe Education and Public Programs of dOCUMENTA (13), Kassel (9 September 2012)

dOCUMENTA (13) artists and Latitudes (24 August 2012)

Premiere del ciclo de video 'Una estaca en el lodo, un hoyo en la cinta. El campo expandido del Land Art, 1968-2008' en el Museo Tamayo, México DF (25 March 2008)



This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
Work is licensed under a
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Tuesday 18 March, 17:30h: Book launch of "European contextualising in analytical sociology and ethnographical representation on history and present" and conversation between Remco Torenbosch and Max Andrews (Latitudes) at the Library Fundació Tàpies

This and following images, courtesy of Remco Torenbosch.
Book launch
"European contextualising in analytical sociology and ethnographical representation on history and present"
Tuesday 18 March, 17:30h
Library of the Fundació Tàpies
c/ Aragó 255, 08007 Barcelona
Limited seating available. Please RSVP [email protected]

Book launch and conversation between Dutch artist and publication editor Remco Torenbosch and Barcelona-based curator Max Andrews of Latitudes.

In the context of the solo exhibition "European Contextualisation" by Dutch artist Remco Torenbosch (1982, Assen) opening next Thurday 20 March, 19h at NoguerasBlanchard, the gallery has organised the book launch of his most recent publication "European contextualising in analytical sociology and ethnographical representation on history and present" (Black Dog Publishing, 2014) at the library of Fundació Tàpies. The exhibition is part of the exhibition cycle "The Story Behind", curated by Direlia Lazo.



From the artist website:  

"Originally conceived for the Council of Europe, the successful design of the flag was later adopted by the European Union in 1985 whilst under the moniker of the European Economic Community. Designed by Arsene Heitz, a French draughtsman at the CoE, and Paul Levy, a Jewish-Belgian Holocaust survivor who worked for many years as the council's Director of Information, the finalised design was presented to the CoE in 1955 at its headquarters in Strasbourg, Heitz's hometown.

This publication profiles the documents, design proposals and written correspondence between Heitz, Levy and further collaborators that would form the painstakingly diplomatic development of an iconic vexillological moment. As part of the book's research, a collection of fabric monochromes woven by weavers from all 28 member states of the EU in the base colour of the flag was compiled. These collated monochromes as such become a map themselves of the socio-economic shift within EU member communities, an embodiment of the disappearing textile industries of Europe."




Author/Editor: Remco Torenbosch
Contributors: Charles Esche, Mihnea Mircan, Council of Europe Archive

Paperback: 244 pages
Publisher: Black Dog Publishing London

ISBN-13: 978-1908966698



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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




Two texts by Manuel Segade and Max Andrews analyse the current Spanish art scene

Two recent texts reflect on the current Spanish art scene, both noting the damaging effects of not only the ongoing budget cuts, but on the deleterious political interference in the programming of numerous museums and art centres throughout the country – perhaps the most notorious of which saw the resignation of MUSAC's Eva González-Sancho after three months as director of the León museum, followed by the resignation of the museum's artistic committee

The texts are written by Manuel Segade, a Spanish-born independent curator based in Paris; and by British Barcelona-based curator Max Andrews of Latitudes, offering critical and analytical perspectives from both the inside and the outside of Spain.
 
"Art and Society in Spain on the Edge of Critical Emergency" by Manuel Segade written for the September 2013 issue of Artpress (see pages below), offers a brief genealogy from the 1990s until today, mapping the rise and the activities of art centres, museums, art fairs, commercial galleries and artists. (Click on the images below for a larger view of the text.)



"On a Shoestring – Institutions in Catalonia" written for the October 2013 issue (#158) of frieze magazine by Max Andrews of Latitudes, focuses on the art scene of the Catalan capital and the effects of its cultural policies towards the creative industries. Mentioning the documentary MACBA: The Right, the Left and the Rich (1h 27m, 2013) [watch it here – in Catalan with Spanish subtitles] as an example of a critical strategy, the text questions the direction of the city's politics with regards to art.  

 (Click on the image for a larger view of the text, or else you can read it here online.)



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All photos: Latitudes (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)




"Focus Interview: Iratxe Jaio & Klaas van Gorkum", frieze, Issue 157, September 2013

 'Work in Progress', 2013, production still. All images courtesy: the artists

The image of ‘work’ and the relation between art and labour
  
Max Andrews: I’d like to talk about your current project, provisionally titled Work in Progress, set in the Lea-Artibai district of the Basque Country where Iratxe grew up. It began with your curiosity about the informal factories in the area where women trim moulded rubber parts destined for the car industry. What drew you to this subject?

Iratxe Jaio & Klaas van Gorkum: When we encountered these groups of women sitting in a circle in their makeshift workspaces, surrounded by crates and boxes, performing tedious repetitive tasks together, it struck us as an incredibly complex and layered image. Although it echoed a traditional and communal way of life in what is still a mainly rural area, instead of spinning wool or mending fishing nets these women were working with abstract industrial forms which had no direct use-value to them. A closer inspection of the pieces revealed the brand names of multinational corporations such as Renault, Mercedes and Volkswagen. The women are from countries like Moldova, Peru or Senegal, yet it’s a scene that is at once domestic, local and Basque, while being replete with the contradictions of global capitalism.

MA:  You are dealing with a representation of working, while also interweaving your own labour by making a film.

IJ & KvG:  We have a long-standing interest in the image of ‘work’, and in the relation between art and labour. So we took this scene as the starting point for a cinematic analysis of production processes, both in these semi-clandestine work­shops as well as in the main fac­tory itself. Our approach has been strictly dispassionate, free from any superficial attempt to give the workers a voice. Instead, we focused our camera on the disciplinary conditions and rationalization of these processes, reproducing them in the montage by breaking up complex scenes into smaller units and stitching them back together again.

MA: How has Jorge Oteiza’s Laboratorio de Tizas (Chalk Laboratory, c.1972–4) – thousands of small sculpture-studies made by the late Basque sculptor, yet never conceived as art works per se – come to play a key role in the project?

IJ & KvG:  To extend the analogy between editing a movie and working on an assembly line, we wanted to ‘splice’ ourselves into the relations of production at the factory by inventing an artistic task that resembled the one already being performed by the workers. So we hired the factory workers to make synthetic resin casts of Oteiza’s ‘Tizas’. Turning Oteiza’s experimental sculpture laboratory into a mass-production line, and recording it on camera is, in essence, a formal exercise that juxtaposes the production of Modernist sculpture with industrial manufacturing. It also allowed us to stage an image of the artist at work, and to superimpose it onto that of the wage-worker, ultimately presenting both as ideologically loaded social constructions.
 


 Producing time in between other things, 2011, installation view at MUSAC, León.

MA:  Is this project also a way for you to obliquely address the idea of Basque sculpture, from Oteiza and Eduardo Chillida through to Ibon Aranberri or Asier Mendizabal, for example?

IJ & KvG:  The legacy of Basque Modernism loomed over this project long before we decided explicitly to include a reference to the work of Oteiza – although, in hindsight, it seems inevitable. But to speak of ‘Basque sculpture’ is to turn it into a closed-off category. We prefer to consider how the political function and significance that was once attributed to the language of abstract sculpture in Basque society holds up under contemporary conditions.

MA:  In combining a study of the serial production of art with a social investigation into industrial manufacturing, you’re also reflecting on yourselves as cultural labourers. This was an important motif in your 2011 work Producing time in between other things (a project I co-curated with Mariana Cánepa Luna). Do you find it hard to be artists who make objects?

IJ & KvG:  Oteiza once said that it wasn’t he who made the sculptures, but that the sculptures made him a sculptor. And now that he is a sculptor, why should he create more? In a way, we have been travelling in the opposite direction. We’ve always referred to ourselves as artists who do not make objects, and we only started making things to be able to address the notion of practice itself. In Producing time in between other things, for example, the 50 ornamental wooden legs we manufactured were simply a by-product of the task we had set ourselves: to learn how to use the woodturning lathe left by Klaas’s late grandfather, a retired factory worker. We took his place behind the machine, and recorded our ac­tiv­ities on camera, not just as a ‘measurement’ of the passage of time required to gain a certain skill, but also as a reflection on how the disciplinary conditions of the wage-worker’s spare time inform our notion of artistic freedom and vice versa. Yet we’re also very much indebted to those thousands of ‘How to ...’ videos on YouTube, from cooking a steak to casting polyurethane action figures. Considering the generosity of all that is being shared between the producers and the viewers of these videos, is it any wonder that actually eating the steak doesn’t even enter into the picture?
 

Max Andrews



Iratxe Jaio and Klaas van Gorkum live in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, and have been working together since 2001. They recently completed a residency at LIPAC, Buenos Aires, Argentina. They will present a solo exhibition at FRAC Aquitaine, Bordeaux, France, opening on 4 October.




Max Andrews' review of Julia Montilla's exhibition 'El "cuadro" de la "calleja"', Espai 13, Fundació Joan Miró, Barcelona

Below Max Andrews' review of Julia Montilla's exhibition, 'El "cuadro" de la "calleja"', presented between February and April 2013 at the Espai 13 of the Fundació Joan Miró in Barcelona. Text was first published in the Issue 156 of frieze.
View of the exhibition at Espai 13. Courtesy of the artist and Fundació Miró.

Julia Montilla’s exhibition documented a minor miracle: between 1961 and 1965, in the tiny Cantabrian village of Garabandal, four young girls allegedly received repeated supernatural visitations from the Virgin Mary and were entrusted with her prophesies. However, the so-called Garabandal apparitions are not recognized by the Vatican, though they continue to be championed by a sprawling network of international enthusiasts. Montilla documented the visions – or, rather, documented their documentation – stressing how the beholding of physical testimony can access a vast surplus of politics and patriarchy, belief and body language.

Montilla was not primarily concerned with debunking the girls’ visionary experiences. Instead, the exhibition’s four annotated display cases (La construcción de una aparición, The Construction of an Apparition, all works 2012–13) – containing books, magazines, proselytising pamphlets, religious journals, collectors’ postcards, slide-lecture packs sold by ‘Garabandalist’ organizations, and so on – contextualized them with a forensic attention to how they were produced and publicized through photography. The girls’ theophanies and trances could be understood, it was proposed, as site-specific performances in a post-Lourdes tradition of remote ‘scheduled apparitions’. A monitor looped a 1971 television documentary, while an overhead projector beamed a 1994 newspaper article reporting that Hollywood were set to dramatize the autobiography of Conchita, the most precocious of the ‘seers’ (three of whom left Spain for the US in the 1970s) and that Luciano Pavarotti would sing the theme. Two slideshows entitled Soportes vivientes para la fabricación de un mito (Living Supports for the Fabrication of a Myth) were accompanied by Montilla’s commentary and, along with Garabandalistas, a new publication edited by the artist, compiled dozens of archival shots of the girls’ ecstatic night-time walks, taken by various amateur and professional photographers. Staring fixedly up into the beyond, offering crucifixes and rosaries, conversing with the divine, or open-mouthed to receive invisible communion, the girls are portrayed clasping their hands together or individually writhing on the ground, stupefied by Marian divinity, and all the while seemingly oblivious to the crowds, microphones and lenses around them.

 View of the exhibition at Espai 13. Courtesy of the artist and Fundació Miró. 
 
Tracking the emergence of ‘trance photography’ as a cult genre, Montilla considered how the documentary materials themselves have acquired venerated status as certificates of veracity. The quirk that some of the projected archival images had been noticeably pixelated in their to-and-fro from print to analogue display seemed like a confession of sorts, of Montilla’s own evident hand in their ongoing dramaturgy, here in an artistic context.

In the visionary events’ shift of emphasis from the small street where the first apparition was said to have appeared, to embrace the ‘epiphanic landscape’ and pious tourism throughout the entire context of the village, Montilla’s voice-over and captions proposed how the performances conformed to the expectations of naive and spiritually pure rural life, where hoax or conspiracy would be unthinkable. Through astute bibliographic research and juxtaposition of source materials with commentary, the apparitions’ enthusiastic casting as an apocalyptic warning was shown in its entanglement with the Franco dictatorship’s demonization of Communism and the left. Furthermore, as a sign that Spain’s peasantry had been chosen as spokespeople of God without the middlemen, Montilla articulated how the folkloric fervour of the apparitions’ thronged crescendo in 1965 would have spurned the concurrent doctrinal reforms of the Second Vatican Council.

From "Soportes vivientes para la fabricación de un mito" (2013). Courtesy of the artist.
 
Yet, Montilla’s bravest and most calibrated area of enquiry intimated how the moving imagery of the girls’ rapture established a legendary motif for the performing or occupied female body as an index of radical obedience, even to the extent of self-harm. Correspondingly, the two screens of El contagio visionario (The Visionary Contagion) and Ídolos y ídolitos (Idols and Lesser Idols) showed fragments of a 1961 film of the entranced girls alongside a video shot by the artist in Garabandal in 2012, showing a muttering woman devotee supposedly in a trance herself. In urging feminist questions about Garabandalism seemingly as a form of infectious hysteria, Montilla echoes Elaine Showalter’s 1997 study Hystories: Hysterical Epidemics and Modern Culture in which alien abduction and – more controversially among other case studies – Gulf War syndrome, are interpreted as fictional epidemics propagated through support groups, popular magazines, talk shows and the Internet. Whether the seers and believers of the apparitions reflect extreme symptoms of cultural anxieties and traumas, as Showalter would argue, or represent exultant communiqués from the Blessed Virgin, Montilla carefully beseeches that we must still pay attention to what they continue to tell us. 

– Max Andrews

This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter
All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).  
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




Latitudes' "out of office" photo album, 2012–2013 season

This is the fifth consecutive year [see 2008-9, 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2011-12] we say goodbye to the season with an 'out of office' post with some unseen and 'behind the scenes' moments lived in the past months. 

Regretfully, we're not exactly off to a beach-and-palmtree holiday, just slowing down our inbox activity as well as our posts on this blog, Facebook and Twitter. 

So happy holidays/felices vacaciones dear readers!  

3 September 2012: The season started with the exciting publication of the first #OpenCurating interview with the web team of the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, which became content partners of the interview series. "Beyond Interface: An Interview with Robin Dowden, Nate Solas and Paul Schmelzer" was the first of a series of ten publications which were released between September and April 2013. The compilation, gathers an array of voices and approaches around the challenges, expectations, and new possibilities that digital culture and social media present to contemporary art institutions. To what degree are curators, media teams, publishers and archivists concerned with a dialogue with their audiences? #OpenCurating has investigated these questions through how new forms of culture, participation and connectivity are being developed both on site and on line.

In 'Beyond Interface' Robin Dowden (Director of New Media Initiatives), Nate Solas (Senior New Media Developer) and Paul Schmelzer (Web Editor) of the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, discuss the museum's new website, relaunched in December 2011 following a two-year conceptual reboot and complete redesign.


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9 September 2012: Soon after publishing the first #OpenCurating interview, we participated in dOCUMENTA (13) series of readings based on their publications programme Readers' Circle: 100 Notes—100 Thoughts, for which we decided to read 'Lawrence Weiner IF IN FACT THERE IS A CONTEXT' (2011, Hatje Cantz). On the door steps of Fridericianum, we read Lawrence's book and played his voice reading some of the passages too. See our post on dOCUMENTA (13).


 Board announcing the 19h 'Readers Circle' event.

On the steps of the Fridericianum reading Lawrence Weiner.

11–15 September 2012: During the last week of dOCUMENTA (13) Latitudes facilitated the Nature Addicts Fund Travelling Academy, organised within the framework of the 100-days-long exhibition in Kassel, Germany. Here you can watch a summary of the week-long workshop that had 15 participants (Ackroyd & Harvey, Frédérique Aït‐Touati, Geir Backe Altern, Linus Ersson, Aurélien Gamboni, Fernando García‐Dory, Mustafa Kaplan, Zissis Kotionis, Julia Mandle, Clare Patey, Érik Samakh, Åsa Sonjasdotter, Elisa Strinna, and was punctuated by the partcipation of dOCUMENTA (13) artists Maria Thereza Alves, Toril Johannessen and Claire Pentecost.


 Im-port and Ex-port boat moared at Kassel's river Fulda. Photo: Nature Addicts Fund.

 Visiting Jimmie Durham's piece at the Karlsaue Park. Photo: Nature Addicts Fund.

Group discussion with Chus Martínez, Core Agent, dOCUMENTA (13) at the Import/Export boat. 
Photo: Nature Addicts Fund.

17 September–5 October: Installation and opening (27 September) of the two-part exhibition 'Latitudes Projects 2005–2012' and 'Incidents of Travel: Mexico City' as part of Casa del Lago's 'Sucursal' programme, for which self-organised, self-funded or non-profit organisations temporarily move their offices to Casa del Lago in order to expose the cultural strategies of such forms of organisation. 'Incidents of Travel: Mexico City', consisted of the invitation to Minerva Cuevas (19 September), Tania Pérez Córdova (20 September), Diego Berruecos (21 September), Terence Gower (23 September) and Jerónimo Hagerman (24 September), and to devise one-day-long tours throughout the city. More info and photos of the five tours.


E-invite to the opening of the exhibition "Latitudes. Proyectos 2005–2012 & Incidentes de viaje" at Casa del Lago.
 Around Lagunilla with Minerva Cuevas. Photo: Eunice Adorno.
 Visiting the Hemeroteca at the UNAM with Diego Berruecos. Photo: Eunice Adorno.

Lunch with Terence Gower at Sólo Veracruz es Bello!, Tlalnepantla Centro. Photo: Eunice Adorno.

Observing an overgrown ivy and an ash in Polanco. Photo: Eunice Adorno.

 Visiting the Espacio Escultórico in the UNAM with Jerónimo Hagerman. Photo: Eunice Adorno.

Installing one of the 200+ poster pannels that composed the exhibition 'Latitudes. Proyectos 2005–2012' gathering information on +30 projects presented over the last seven years. More on Latitudes' projects here.

 Post-opening chelas with artists Jerónimo Hagerman and Jorge Satorre at the social cathedral of the artworld in Mexico DF: the cantina Covadonga. 

8 October 2012: Release of the second #OpenCurating interview. 'Alguien dijo 'Adhocracy'?' with Barcelona-based architect, co-founder of the publishing project dpr-barcelona and blogger Ethel Baraona Pohl. Ethel was a member of the curatorial team of 'Adhocracy', the exhibition of the first Istanbul Design Biennial (13 octubre–12 diciembre 2012) which later toured to the New Museum's 'Ideas City' Festival (1–4 May 2013). Read here (in Spanish) or here (in English).

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17 October 2012: Mariana Cánepa of Latitudes participates in the season of talks Cultural Professions: the Curator, at the Aula de Cultura CAM, in Murcia. An initiative of the curatorial collective 1er Escalón.

Foto: Obra Social Caja Mediterráneo.

19–21 October 2012: Following on, we participated in a two-day meeting in Witte de With, Rotterdam, in preparation for Moderation(s), a year-long programme of residencies, performances, exhibitions, workshops and research initiated by Witte de With’s director Defne Ayas and Spring Workshop founder Mimi Brown, and presided over by artist, writer and curator Heman Chong.


Photos: Witte de With.

6–9 November 2012: Trip to Munich, to see Haus der Kunst's 'Ends of the Earth – Land Art to 1974' exhibition and attend the opening of Haegue Yang's "Der Öffentlichkeit" commission.


 Façade of Haus der Kunst in Munich.


Haegue Yang's "Der Öffentlichkeit" commission in Haus der Kunst atrium.


 Haegue Yang with Max Andrews discussing the installation process.

28 November 2012: Third #OpenCurating interview online. 'Itinerarios transversales' is the interview with Sònia López and Anna Ramos of the Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA). The new web of the museum, was launched at the beginning of 2012 and includes new features such as 'Recorridos' (Itineraries), a tool that allows visitors to create their own transversal itineraries selecting amongst the five thousand works that compose the MACBA Collection, besides videos, artist entries, podcasts, publications, amongst others. Read here (in Spanish) or here (in English).
 Testing the navigation on the iPad. Looking good.

5 December 2012: Fourth #OpenCurating interview up. 'Democratizando la sociedad informacional' analyses the practice of visual artist, art theorist and web activist Daniel G. Andújar. Though the use of irony, his work has questioned the use of new communicative technologies, the democratic and egalitarian promises these media prophesy, critisising their real yet hidden intentions to control users. Read here (in Spanish).



 17 December 2013: Reached the equator with #OpenCurating. Five out of ten interviews are up and running. The fifth, 'books_expanded_field' is the interview with Badlands Unlimited, a New York-based publishing house whose motto is “books in an expanded field”. Its publications and editions in paper or digital forms (e-books for iPad or Kindle) acknowledge that “historical distinctions between books, files, and artworks are dissolving rapidly”. Read here (in English).


The Walker Art Center's web continues to support the project re-publishing the interviews on their site. Read 'books_expanded_field'.


2 January 2013: Happy New Year and happy reading. Seventh #OpenCurating interview with Steven ten Thije, Research Curator at the Van Abbemuseum, in Eindhoven. In 'From One History to A Plurality of Histories', Latitudes conversed with the researcher from one the first public museums for contemporary art to be established in Europe. Under the directorship of Charles Esche since 2004, the museum has defined itself through “an experimental approach towards art’s role in society”, where “openness, hospitality and knowledge exchange are important”. Read here (in English).


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7 January–11 February 2013: Curators-in-residency at Spring Workshop, Hong Kong, as part of the above mentioned 'Moderation(s)' programme. Our residency continued the artist-led tour format we initiated in Mexico City a few months earlier. Hong Kong-based artists Nadim Abbas, Yuk King Tan, Ho Sin Tung and Samson Young were invited to develop day-long itineraries, thus retelling the city and each participant’s artistic concerns through personal references and waypoints. More info and more photos of the four artist tours.


Visiting Chung King Mansions and the nearby Mirador Mansions on Nathan Road with Yuk King Tan, 24 January. Photo: Mimi Brown.


 Navigating Tai Po with Ho Sing Tung, 29 January. Photo: Spring Workshop.

 Sound tour around the Kwun Tong Industrial district, with Samson Young, 7 February.
  
The residency included participating in the workshop "A Day at the Asia Art Archive" organised in collaboration with Spring Workshop and Witte de With, Rotterdam, on 31 January and concluded on February 2, with an Open Studios during which Latitudes and Heman Chong mantained a conversation about their experience in Hong Kong and their curatorial practice. [Related posts: Read the May 2013 interview between Christina Li and Latitudes here.]


Concentrating in the archives, "A Day at the Asia Art Archive". Photo: Mimi Brown.


2 February: Open Day at Spring. Conversation between Heman Chong and Latitudes. Photo: Spring Workshop.


 During an interview and photo session for Ming Pao Weekly. Photo: Athena Wu.

19 February 2013: Public event of the #OpenCurating research at the Auditorium of MACBA, Barcelona. Latitudes in conversation with Yasmil Raymond, Curator of the Dia Art Foundation in New York. The conversation was later transcribed and published at the #7 of the series.


Yasmil Raymond during the conversation at MACBA's Auditorium. Photo: Joan Morey.

8–14 March 2013: Research trip in Dublin. Invited by Dublin City Council: The Arts Office, Latitudes visited art spaces, artists' studios and galleries in Dublin and Derry-Londonderry throughout the week. The diary included participating in the round table 'Within the public realm', alongside artist Sean Lynch and curator Aisling Prior at the Hugh Lane Dublin City Gallery [video of the talk here]; and a Curatorial talk at CCA Derry-Londonderry. During the week we were hosted by artists, curators and studio managers who took us around the Red Stables Studios; Temple Bar Gallery + Studios; Fire Station Artists' Studios; Green On Red Gallery; Kevin Kavanagh Gallery and the Project Arts Centre - Visual Arts.


Visiting Fire Station Artists' Studios. Photo: Liz Burns.


 Walk with our hosts Aileen Burns and Johan Lundh, co-directors of CCA Derry–Londonderry, around Kinnagoe Bay in Donegal, site of 1588 shipwreck of one of the Spanish Armada ships.


 Gathered plenty of material during studio visits, lunches and dinners. How do we deal with this, Ryanair?


20 March 2013: Mariana Cánepa of Latitudes visits A*Desk's HQ and talks to A*Study's partipants about some of the practical challenges that came up in recent projects, how they were negotiated and ultimately, presented.

Photo: Oriol Fondevila.

2 April 2013: Publishing the eight #OpenCurating interview, "Digression(s), Entry Point(s): An interview with Heman Chong", Singapore-based artist, writer and curator of 'Moderation(s)'. 



18–22 April 2013: Attended the first International Association of Curators of Contemporary Art (IKT) congress, this year celebrated in Madrid. See more photos of the three-day event.


(Above) Symposium at the Cineteca in Matadero and (below) visit to the newly opened MediaLab Prado.

24 April 2013: Since mid-2010 we been members of the Programme Committee of Hangar Production Center in Barcelona, and have extended our mandate one more year until a new board is formed. Below a tweeted photo of a studio visit to Rasmus Nilausen' working space, during one of our periodic visits alongside other members of the Committee Joan Vilapuig, Jordi Mitjà and Àlex Mitrani.


27 May–2 June 2013: Venice Biennale week galore. We published three posts on our blog on 'The Encyclopedic Palace', the National Pavilions and Collateral Events and of the ubiquitous biennale tote bags.

After the art overdose, Venice rewarded biennale visitors with incredible sunsets between the several storms and showers that plagued the opening week.

4 June 2013: In Madrid for an in conversation with New York-based artist Alejandro Cesarco on the occasion of his solo exhibition "La noche agranda su silencio”, Parra & Romero, Madrid. 


Photo: Parra & Romero.

As far as press coverage, Stephanie Cardon of Boston's Big Red & Shiny featured a profile in September 2012 titled 'Meanwhile in Barcelona: Latitudes and #OpenCurating'. In the Autumn issue of D'ARS, Italian writer Saul Marcadent mentioned the (out of print, unfortunately) publication "LAND, ART: A Cultural Ecology Handbook", Latitudes edited in 2006 in the context of other ecological-oriented projects. During our March visit to Dublin, we chatted with Anne Mullee about the (then ongoing) #OpenCurating research, the conversation was soon after published in the International section of the May-June 2013 issue of The Visual Artists' News Sheet. Also in May, writer and curator Christina Li, interviewed us for the Moderation(s) blog Witness to Moderation(s), an opportunity to look back at our January residency in Hong Kong.

In the past months, Max Andrews of Latitudes has published the following texts in frieze: 'Utopia is possible' (October 2012 issue); review of Julia Montilla's exhibition "El «cuadro» de la Calleja" at Espai 13, Fundació Miró; and forthcoming, an interview with Rotterdam-based artists Klaas van Gorkum and Iratxe Jaio also for frieze, as well as two texts on the 1979 documentary film 'The Secret Life of Plants' for the final issue of the Dutch journal Club Donny!



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All photos: Latitudes (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)




Max Andrews reviews 'Utopia is possible' in frieze magazine's October 2012 issue

Below Max Andrews' frieze review on the exhibition 'Utopia is possible. ICSID. Eivissa, 1971' currently on show (on view until 20 January 2013) at the Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA)An interesting follow up is Ethel Baraona Pohl's review on Domus (published 15 October 2012) which is accompanied by a lot more photodocumentation presented in the exhibition.

 Instant City, 1971. Col·lecció MACBA. Centre d'Estudis i Documentació. Fons Xavier Miserachs

‘This will be an ICSID Congress only 10 metres from the sea,’ read the welcoming Bulletin of the Seventh Congress of the International Council of Societies of Industrial Design in 1971. ‘The environment, the climate and the sea bathing will act as a stimulant to the general business of the Congress.’ As 1,500 delegates registered at the ziggurat-like hotel venue in northern Ibiza, the more adventurous made their way to
 Instant City, an inflatable camp below on Sant Miquel bay. Three days of meetings, debates, performances and partying were to follow –a professional design conference that was also a beach-side experiment in leisure and the creative potential of industrial plastic. The exhibition ‘Utopia is Possible’ was not only significant as an exercise in advocating the pioneering importance of an interdisciplinary festival that predated the better-known Encuentros de Pamplona’ (Pamplona Meetings) the following year – both all the more astonishing as Spain remained under the grip of dictatorship until 1975 – but also (and following a sprawling exhibition about the latter at Madrid’s Museo Reina Sofía in 2009) as a corollary of the emergence of curatorial and exhibition history as legitimate fields of study, as exhibition.

‘Utopia is Possible’ remembered and celebrated an event that evoked a meltdown of academia, inflatable architecture, cinema, Catalan artistic vanguardism and countercultural ceremonies – part ‘Exploding Plastic Inevitable’, part technology enthusiast craft convention. Through teeming type and handwritten correspondence arranged in vitrines, hundreds of photographs, technical notes and newspaper reports – as well as four projections showing archival footage and a dozen monitors presenting newsreels and newly-made interviews with those involved – it revealed a project that clearly had a life-changing impact on those who experienced it. ICSID 1971 championed liberal social innovation and user-generated content. ‘This is an “open” congress’, declared its introductory statement, ‘a new experience […] for the first time the congress members will be able to participate to the utmost […] this is YOUR congress.’ The proceedings in the hotel comprised ‘Speaking Rooms’ with themes proposed by delegates, 65 talks including ‘The House Style of the Netherlands railway’,‘What We Are Doing in the Belgrade School of Design’, and ‘Basic Design with Computers’ – the latter led by the pioneering Centro de Cálculo (Computing Centre), a collaboration between Madrid’s Complutense University and IBM.

Down by the beach, meanwhile, the participation was of a somewhat different order – kinetic sculptural events with air, water, fire and food. Josep Ponsatí collaborated with members of the Grup Obert de Disseny Urquinaona (Urquinaona Open Design Group), who themselves collaborated in the pop-style signage of the congress, which was replicated in the show’s exhibition design. They tethered together 12 pairs of huge air-filled white plastic pillows that floated out over and on the bay like a giant flower. Vacuflex-3 (1971) by Antoni Muntadas and Gonzalo Mezza is a portable sculpture in the form of a 150-metre flexible plastic pipe which, with teamwork, can be variously carried around, used to spell out words on the sand (‘LOVE’, ‘LAND’, ‘HERE’) or floated on the sea. The opening dinner took the form of a multi-colour ritual orchestrated by Antoni Miralda, Jaume Xifra and Dorothée Selz; masked performers and diners wore green, red, blue and yellow cloaks, and feasted on similarly coloured paella and wine.

Yet Instant City took such multi-coloured experiences to architectonic dimensions, and it remains the ideological and pictorial emblem of the congress. Architecture students Carlos Ferrater and Fernando Bendito had persuaded architecture professor José Miguel de Prada Poole to transform their idea of inflatable student accommodation into reality. What resulted was a global manifesto for a new way of living intended to embrace the ‘nomadic and mobile’ values of impermanence and flexibility. Following publicity in colleges and magazines around the world, scores of volunteers came in the weeks before the congress to collaborate in stapling together a pop-up plastic community. Instant City was the backdrop to some of the exhibition’s most striking images, of bemused locals in traditional dress watching bearded design hippies building something between Hélio Oiticica’s ‘Penetrables’ and Maurice Agis’s ill-fated Dreamspace V (an inflatable environment that killed two women when it broke free from moorings in 2006). And although the taste of Utopian living was evidently challenged by the whiff of residing in sweltering polytunnel tentacles with too few toilets, it also inspired some soaring prog rock poetry that, perhaps more succinctly than any other words in the exhibition, gave a blast ofthe elaborate techno-paganism which must have blown minds at this extraordinary Congress. ‘Green cornfields alongside Instant City / Awaken to Ibizan sunrise’, read a typewritten sheet alongside module construction diagrams. ‘We are children of the future / Born into the paleo-cybernetic age / our minds extended electrically through the video sphere.’ 

‘Utopia is Possible’ offered a timely pre-history of participatory practice from a Spanish perspective and, against the backdrop of contemporary funding cuts, an object lesson in artistic solidarity and internationalism against the odds. 

– Max Andrews

 (Originally published in Frieze, October 2012, Issue 150)  


 Antoni Muntadas and Gonzalo Mezza Ceremonial and Vacuflex-3, 1971.  


Related materials:
  • Video where participants' discuss their experience here 
  • Tour of the exhibition by exhibition co-curator Teresa Grandas, here (both in Catalan)
  • Latitudes' writing archive




Publication "Robert Smithson: Art in Continual Movement" (Alauda Publications, 2012) includes essay by Max Andrews

 Cover of the publication.

We just received a copy of the wonderful and long-awaited publication "Robert Smithson: Art in Continual Movement" (Alauda Publications, 2012) for which Max Andrews of Latitudes contributes the essay "A Dark Spot of Exasperation: From Smithson to the Spime" (an essay which was the basis of his recent lecture at the Royal College of Art in London).

Pages 44-45, with the section "Art, Research, Ecology".

Robert Smithson's seminal Land Art work Broken Circle/Spiral Hill (Emmen, The Netherlands, 1971) is treated as a case study which opens up to a number of topics, still relevant in contemporary art: 'Models of Spectatorship', 'Art, Research, Ecology', 'Documentation', 'Museum, Media, Society' and 'The Cinematic'." 

 Above: pages with Max Andrews' essay "A Dark Spot of Exasperation: From Smithson to the Spime".



Max Andrews' essay "A Dark Spot of Exasperation: From Smithson to the Spime". 
In his text Andrews stresses that Smithson's innovations in terms of post-studio practice ar not about "the question where, or what is the work of art?", but about investigationg the structure of the multiple elements which constitute the form of an art project and its place in the world. According to Andrews, the essential feature of Smithson's kinship to post-studio practice is not so much his institutional critique, but a move away from the museum and the curator as existing power structures to a "curatorial function which incorporates a social ecology: a new meaning- and value–generating system in and around art." In his essay Andrews traces the points of congruence between Smithson and the practices of contemporary artists like Lara Almarcegui, Jorge Satorre and Cyprien Gaillard.

 Documentation pages, clippings from 1987.

  Pages 150-151, Section "A Living Archive – Film"

 Page 194-195, Section "A Living Archive"

 Pages 208-209, Section "A Living Archive"

The 240 page monograph publication will be launched on 30 March 2012 in The Hague during the symposia Rethinking Robert Smithson organised by the publishers in cooperation with Leiden University Institute for Cultural Disciplines.

Initiator and publisher: Alauda Publications
Edited by: Ingrid Commandeur and Trudy van Riemsdijk-Zandee
Authors: Max Andrews, Eric C.H. de Bruyn, Stefan Heidenreich, Sven Lütticken, Anja Novak, Vivian van Saaze
Design: Esther Krop
ISBN: 9789081531481
Price: 39,95 Euro
Available in bookshops or order online: alaudapublications.nl


Related links: 
September 2011 blog post on The Land Art Contemporary programme in Denthe, The Netherlands.

All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org




Lecture by Max Andrews "From Spiral to Spime: Robert Smithson, the ecological and the curatorial", 13 March, 2pm, Lecture Theatre 1, Royal College of Art, London

Poster announcement at the Royal College of Art galleries.

On Tuesday 13 March (2pm, Lecture Theatre 1), Max Andrews of Latitudes will give the lecture "From Spiral to Spime: Robert Smithson, the ecological and the curatorial" as part of the "Art and Globalisation" lecture series programmed by MA Curating Contemporary Art by Jean Fisher and Michaela Crimmin.
Starting out from Robert Smithson's Broken Circle / Spiral Hill (1971), this lecture looks at projects by Lara Almarcegui, Jorge Satorre and Cyprien Gaillard to speculate on the 'when' and the 'shape' of art after Smithson in relation to synchronic concepts of post-environmental ecological thinking, and the flux between work and curatorial context. Based on an essay in the forthcoming publication 'Robert Smithson: Art in Continual Movement' (Alauda Publications, 2012).

Robert Smithson, Broken Circle/Spiral Hill. Opening September 17, 2011. Emmen, The Netherlands. Photo by Jan Anninga. Courtesy SKOR.

Following the lecture, Andrews will lead a seminar to first years students of the MA Curating Contemporary Art, Royal College of Art. 

[Please note that the lecture is only open to students and staff of the college.]

Tuesday 13 March 2012, 2pm
Lecture Theatre 1
Royal College of Art
Kensington Gore 
London SW7 2EU, UK


All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




'Nice to Meet You – Erick Beltrán. Some Fundamental Postulates' by Max Andrews on Mousse Magazine #31

In the current Mousse Magazine #31 (November 2011) you can read the interview 'Nice to Meet You – Erick Beltrán. Some Fundamental Postulates' where Max Andrews converses with the Mexican-born Barcelona-based artist, about the artist's attempt to create the terms of a dictionary of multiplicity. Their conversation ends:
"In 1997 I was asked to define my work in ten lines, and I realised that was impossible. So I said to myself, okay, let’s just make it one word! So that word was ‘edition’ and from there everything expanded and exploded as I realised my work was about the question of how you select things – what is a choice? And that is a really difficult question."




Robert Smithson's 'Broken Circle/Spiral Hill Revisited' (1971–2011) and The Land Art Contemporary programme

 
Land Art Contemporary year-long initiative showcases works of art located in the countryside of Drenthe, a province in the northeastern Netherlands, which will be complemented with an international events programme dealing with the contemporary aspects of Land art. Starting on 17 September 2011, the programme is linked to the 40th anniversary of the creation of Robert Smithson's film Broken Circle/Spiral Hill in Emmen for the exhibition Sonsbeek 1971.  

Coinciding with the anniversary, Land Art Contemporary kicks off with the exhibition 'Robert Smithson – Broken Circle/Spiral Hill Revisited', at the Centre for Visual Arts (CBK) in Emmen. The exhibition's star piece will be the recently completed film 'Breaking Ground: Broken Circle/Spiral Hill' (1971–2011), uncompleted due to Smithson's untimely death in 1973, which is now finally produced, following his instructions for direction and editing, by his widow Nancy Holt in collaboration with SKOR. The film will also be screened once on 22 September at the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. Holt will introduce the video.

Parallel to this major exhibition, SKOR is also organising The Ultraperiferic (17 September – 27 November 2011), an exhibition that will feature the work of Lara Almarcegui (ES/NL), Jorge Satorre (MX/NL) and Cyprien Gaillard (FR/DE), three artists with whom Latitudes has worked in the recent past and whose work will also be featured in Max Andrews' essay "'A Dark Spot of Exasperation: From Smithson to the Spime'" in the forthcoming publication 'Robert Smithson: Art in Continual Movement' (ISBN 9789081531481) to be published by Alauda Publications in early 2012. The essay and The Ultraperiferic both feature Jorge Satorre's 'The erratic. Measuring compensation' (2009) which was produced in the context of 'Portscapes' and recently featured in his exhibition at Labor, Mexico City.


The project will continue in 2012–13, with a series of 'assignments' to contemporary artists "a number of artists will be set the assignment of creating a work in the spirit of Smithson, whereby the landscape is viewed as a continual process that is constantly in a state of transformation due to the interaction between man and nature", to be curated by SKOR's curators Nils van Beek and Theo Tegelaers. + info...


Land Art Contemporary is an initiative of STICHTING LACDA, Drenthe, a foundation established in 2011 by the Sanders-Ten Holte family. The program has been made possible thanks to (content and financial) support from SKOR | Foundation for Art and Public Domain, Province of Drenthe, European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development: Europe Investing in Rural Areas (LEADER), Municipality of Coevorden, Municipality of Emmen, Cultuurfonds BNG and the Sanders-Ten Holte family.




'THE LAST JOURNAL' AVAILABLE NOW! #8 issue of the 10 Latitudes-edited newspapers for 'The Last Newspaper' exhibition, New Museum

Issue 8: 'The Last Journal'
(READ IT ON ISSUU)
 

24 November 2010

Cover:
Fernando Bryce, from the series L'Humanité (2009–2010)
Feature: 'L'Humanité', Yasmil Raymond on Fernando Bryce
Feature: 'Independent Gazette', Lorena Muñoz-Alonso reports from London on two newspaper-inspired exhibitions: 'The Independent' (Damián Ortega at The Curve, Barbican) and ‘Can Altay: The Church Street Partners' Gazette’, The Showroom. Plus Damián Ortega exchanges impressions with curator Alona Pardo on his show.
Media Habits: Ester Partegàs, TLN advertising department artist
Brazil Focus: 'The Imaginery Newspaper', Chris Dercon on Luciano Figueiredo & Ana Paula Cohen on 'Jornal 28b', the newspaper produced during the 28th Bienal de São Paulo.

Focus: 'Boetti e His Double', Christian Rattemeyer on TLN artist Alighiero e Boetti's Corriere Della Sera (1976)
The Next Newspaper (Profiling the organizations, projects, initiatives and individuals redefining ink-and-paper news):
CROWD-SOURCING – SPOT.US / EMPHAS.IS

Exclusive interview: 'The Days of This Society...', Desiree B. Ramos interviews TLN artist Rirkrit Tiravanija
Focus: 'Paper view'
Gwen Schwartz asked New Museum visitors about their experiences of TLN

Focus: 'What's CUP?' by Gwen Schwartz and Max Andrews
Picture Agent-Our singular picture agency: Adrià Julià
Focus: '29 Days Later', Sarah Wang on TLN work Untitled Green Screen Memory (2010) by Larry Johnson + 2009 California Fires by Collin Munn
Cartoon:
'The Woods' by Francesc Ruiz
Advertising Department:
Ester Partegàs













'THE DAYS OF THIS SOCIETY...'
New Museum curatorial fellow Desiree B. Ramos meets ‘The Last Newspaper’ artist Rirkrit Tiravanija

 

Above and below: Rirkrit Tiravanija, Untitled (the days of this society is numbered/September 15–October 12, 2008), 2010.
Acrylic and newspaper on linen. 13 parts, all measuring 86 1/8 x 84 1/8 x 1 inches each. Courtesy the artist and Gavin Brownʼs enterprise.


There I am; it’s 5pm sharp, and I have just arrived at Gavin Brown’s newly-expanded Meatpacking District art gallery. I’m checking out the new space while I wait for Rirkrit, who suddenly pulls up around the back door with a few groceries; turns out he’s cooking a paella dinner for a few friends. We walk around the space for a few minutes and before heading towards the kitchen in the back of the gallery. There I see a few art handlers setting up pots, tables, and chairs for Rirkrit’s guests. “We don’t have much time, fire away,” he says, looking at the recorder and the paper I am holding in my hands. We sit on a wooden bench and start our conversation. I have met with Rirkrit several times, and besides being a great artist he is really down to earth and approachable. Every time I talk to him it is quite a busy scenario all around.

Desiree B. Ramos: How did you become an artist?

Rirkrit Tiravanija: By accident! I actually wanted to be a photojournalist and then mistakenly took some art history classes and became curious about art. I left the university from the history department, and I went to art school and I went to talk to the counselor about the idea of studying art. So I had an appointment, I went to the meeting and I had to wait in this kind of lobby library. I was just standing there, looking around the shelf, and there was a book that stood out from the shelf from the Ontario College of Art, so I just pulled it out, took down the address and left. So it was kind of accidental.

DB: What was your first art piece?

RT: Umm, that’s a debate. It was actually an image that my father took of me; I made this plasticine sculpture on my ear, it was like an ear extension, so that I looked like a Vulcan. So I would say that was my first sculpture.


DB: Do you still have it, or a record of it?

RT: I have a picture that my father took, but I don’t have the actual plasticine. I guess I could always remake it.

DB: That would be fun...

RT: Yeah, that would be fun. Wow, you just gave me a new idea!

DB: What was your first political work?

RT: Well, it depends on what is political, you know, if personal is political. The first work I made in art school, officially made in art school, was about identity, about me being in the West and trying to figure out what that was. It was the first letter of the Thai alphabet drawn on cardboard, and then it had a Thai dictionary explanation with this alphabet in English. So in a way, that had a kind of cultural politics in it. I would say my work is always asking those kinds of personal political questions, I mean, about the self and about identity.

DB: What got you into cooking?

RT: It was the simplest thing I could do. I was working in Chicago on questions of, about, cultural artifacts. I worked on this conceptual work with the idea that these artifacts were displays, again, about identity also, and that they were missing; they were fragmented in a kind of gap, or there was a gap that I thought needed to be questioned.


DB: So it was natural for you to mix cooking with art?

RT: Exactly, because I was looking at pots, bowls and plates, and Buddha statues, and these were all objects of everyday use in my culture, so first I basically decided to just cook so that these things would always be in play and from that it became, well, it was always about the people. Of course these are things that were used everyday, which have been taken out of context, put onto display because they were valued in a different situation, and looked at through the Western eye as if they were somehow valuable in relation to the idea of culture. But for me it was really about the life around the object.

DB: What’s your favorite thing to cook?

RT: I don’t have a favorite thing to cook.

DB: Nothing that gets you more into the act of cooking and engaging with people?

RT: It’s not so much about the cooking, not about the food or any particular dish; it’s about the act and then ... I think it’s always more communal to cook a big pot of curry than to make a piece of steak. But I actually just recently cooked a lot of steak for 2,000 people so I’m actually wrong, I could cook steak for a lot of people but, of course, it’s about the activity of cooking. When we made this kind of barbecue grill, Argentinean style, the asado, it’s a communal activity in itself. So, it was just a matter of scale. People normally do it with families but here we extended it so we could involve even more people at the same moment, so it became something else.

DB: Where do you get your ideas from? Are you inspired by something in specific or do they randomly come to you? Do you get them from looking at things, reading, or conversing with people?

RT: I think it’s all of that. It’s an ongoing process that I have and I think many artists have, which is like you’re always thinking, looking and everything that you experience becomes a question or a possibility. It’s a combination; I’m looking at certain things that I’m interested in but, on the other hand, I’m always very receptive to what is happening around me, and that becomes a trigger for other things.


DB: I’m wondering how you go on varying so much in terms of media when it comes to your work. Is it difficult to maneuver all these different types of expression, ranging from cooking to investigations about architecture... ?

RT: I’m not interested in style, I’m interested in content and if all the elements make sense, they all have certain roots or they all certainly have a relation to each other. It could be an eight hour video or a ten hour cooking session, yet they all bring people to the same place.

DB: Do you consider your piece now on view in The Last Newspaper at the New Museum, Untitled (the days of this society are numbered/September 21, 2009), part of a series along with other text works you have recently produced?

RT: I consider them like signage, like stop signs, road signs. They form a series but they can make you pay attention to a certain place and a certain moment when you are confronted by them. I think about that layering of the newspaper, which is an activity I’m very interested in, and in the activity of information being gathered. There are just a lot of layers there for me, from the ads to the typeface of the newspaper itself. There’s a lot of coincidence – or accidents, or maybe even intentions – in the way that certain things get laid out on these pages. The sign makes you stop and pay attention to the other things happening behind it.

DB: Would you be able to explain further how that text in particular explores the social role of the artist?

RT: ‘The days of this society is numbered’ is attributed to the situation in 1968; obviously, at that time it was a provocation within the context of a manifestation against the society, or rather of society against a particular group of people, the institution, people in control. And I would say that, of course, those moments reoccur, those conditions can still exist.

DB: I’m sure everybody asks about the grammar…

RT: Yes, well, it’s a bad translation of French. The mistake makes people react.

 
DB: And the dates on the newspaper…

RT: Well some in the series do make a reference to, for example, the market crash of 2008, just at the end of George Bush’s presidency. It has all been a commentary about the Bush years and certainly in conjunction with the market crash.

DB: What will we see from you in the near future? What are you working on now?

RT: I’m working on a film which will be about a retired Thai farmer in the countryside, and I hope that people will get to see it, or that it’s good enough for people to see it.





Simon Fujiwara wins the 2010 Cartier Award

Rendering of 'Frozen'. Courtesy the artist and Frieze Foundation
Frieze Foundation has recently announced the 2010 Cartier Winner: Berlin-based British/Japanese artist Simon Fujiwara (1982). The prize is addressed to artists not living in the UK and covers coproduction costs of up to £10,000, a £1,000 artist’s fee, per diems, travel expenses and a studio residency at Gasworks in London from August to October 2010.

According to the press release "at Frieze Art Fair 2010 Fujiwara plans to present a new site-specific work, Frozen: an installation based on the fictive premise that an ancient lost city has been discovered beneath the site of the fair."

Installation of 'The Museum of Incest' during the 2009 Frieze. Courtesy of the artist. Photo: Latitudes | www.lttds.org

Fujiwara presented 'The Museum of Incest' during the 2009 Frieze in the newly inaugurated section FRAME (see Latitudes' post here) with Frankfurt–based gallery Galerie Neue Alte Brücke.

Before then, a version of the museum was presented at the Latitudes-curated exhibition 'Provenances' at Umberto di Marino, Naples, during which 'The Incest Museum: A Guided Tour' was published by Archive Books.


Installation of 'The Museum of Incest', Provenances, Umberto di Marino, Naples (14 May–14 September 2009).
Courtesy of the artist. Photo: Simon Fujiwara



Fujiwara will participate in the forthcoming 29th Bienal de Sao Paulo (25 September–12 December 2010), Manifesta 8 in Murcia (2 October 2010-9 January 2011), Performa, the 2011 edition of the New York performance biennial and a solo exhibition at TATE, St.Ives (2011).

The 2009 Cartier Award winner was Jordan Wolfson (New York, 1980) – see Latitudes' post here and an exhibition review by Max Andrews' from Latitudes here) and the 2008 winner was Cuban artist Wilfredo Prieto (1978) (see Latitudes' post here and artist profile here).




The Falmouth Convention, 20–23 May, Cornwall, UK

The Falmouth Convention took place last weekend (20–23 May) in and around Cornwall, UK. This three-day conference put "an emphasis on artists as participants and on exchange of views and experiences. Conceived as an international meeting of artists, curators and writers to explore the significance of time and place in relation to contemporary art and exhibition making, it will begin by examining its own locale, with field trips led by artists, curators and local experts, looking at particular geographies, histories and narratives in Cornwall." + info...

The programme opened with a keynote by renowned curator and writer Lucy Lippard titled 'Imagine Being Here Now: Towards a Multicentered Exhibition Process' and included field trips to the Gwennap Mining District
, walks along St Just, boat trips, visits to the St Ives artist colony legacy, screenings of experimental cinema, interviews, etc. + info...

On Saturday 22nd Max Andrews' of Latitudes, gave a presentation on the Rotterdam commission series 'Portscapes' to the Curatorial Practice MA students at the University College Falmouth (where he did art foundation studies in 1995).

Participating curators, writers and artists included:
Lucy R. Lippard; Max Andrews (
Latitudes); Bassam el Baroni (Alexandria Contemporary Art Forum and Manifesta 8); Xavier Douroux (Le Consortium and Nouveaux Commanditaires); Tom van Gestel (Foundation for Art and Public Space, SKOR); Hans Ulrich Obrist (Serpentine Gallery); Solveig Øvstebø (Bergen Kunsthall); Andrzej Przwyara (Foksal Gallery Foundation); Kitty Scott (Banff Centre for the Arts), Kader Attia, Adam Chodzko, Steven Claydon, Tacita Dean, Geoffrey Farmer, Simon Fujiwara, Lucy Gunning, Jeremy Millar, Paulina Olowska, Steven Rowell.

The Convention has been developed in response to a series of forums and conversations held in 2009 between artists, curators and writers based in Cornwall to consider a bid to host the international exhibition Manifesta in Cornwall in 2014. The Convention was convened by the independent curator Teresa Gleadowe, coordinated by ProjectBase, hosted by University College Falmouth and supported by Arts Council England, South West.

Photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org




Haegue Yang's 'Symmetric Inequality' (Desigualdad simétrica) exhibition catalogue, sala rekalde, Bilbao


The trilingual exhibition catalogue 'Symmetric Inequality' (Desigualdad simétrica), has just been published following the solo exhibition by Berlin-based artist Haegue Yang (1971, Seoul, Korea) which opened a year ago at sala rekalde, Bilbao (18.12.08–19.04.09 – see images of the exhibition on Latitudes' post from 20 December 2008). The catalogue is the second volume of a two-part publication project that began with the exhibition 'Asymmetric Equality: Haegue Yang', which took place at REDCAT, Los Angeles between 28 June and 24 August 2008.

This second volume documents the installation at sala rekalde and includes texts by Max Andrews of Latitudes; Prof. Jie-Hyun Lim, director of the Institute of Research in History and Comparative Culture of the University of Hanyang and a conversation between Melanie Ohnemus, curator of Portikus, Bart van der Heide, former curator of Cubitt, Pablo Lafuente, critic and editor of the journal Afterall, London/ Los Angeles, Asier Mendizábal, artist, Leire Vergara, former curator of sala rekalde and Haegue Yang.

'Haegue Yang. Symmetric Inequality'
Graphic Design: Katie Hanburger & Gail Swanlund
Publisher: sala rekalde, www.salarekalde.bizkaia.net
Distributor: AGD Libros, Bilbao, [email protected]
ISBN 978-84-88559-58-6 (sala rekalde), ISBN 0-9749831-9-5 (REDCAT)
352 pp., colour, softcover




London's Frieze Art Fair 2009 and Fia Backström's project 'Studies in Leadership - The Review'



On Sunday 18th October and as part of Frieze Projects, Max Andrews of Latitudes participated in Fia Backström's project 'Studies in Leadership - The Review' at invitation of Filipa Oliveira and Miguel Amado. Four art critics and writers – Amado, Michele Robecchi, J. J. Charlesworth and Andrews – worked with a professional voice coach to publicly read one of their recent exhibition reviews, and together consider the implications of performance and the author's 'voice'. See images above.



Above a selection of images of some of the exhibitions and events that took place during Frieze week – 'How it is' Miroslaw Balka's enormous steel chamber for Tate Modern's Turbine Hall, the Serpentine Gallery pavilion by Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa of SANAA pre-poetry marathon, Nils Norman and Dave Hullfish Bailey 'Surrounded by Squares' exhibition at Raven Row and of course Frieze Art Fair itself.

All images Latitudes | www.lttds.org




Catalogue essays: Henrik Håkansson, Museo Rufino Tamayo; Haegue Yang, Artsonje Center / samuso

Recent publications – catalogue essays by Latitudes' Max Andrews:

•‘Untitled (You Are Good For Me Because You Destroy Me)’, Henrik Håkansson: Novelas de la selva / The Jungle Novels, Museo Rufino Tamayo, Mexico City, 2009 (Spanish and English)

•‘Towards Haegue Yang’s ‘Blind Rooms’’, Haegue Yang, Artsonje Center / samuso, Seoul, 2009 (Korean) & forthcoming in Symmetric Inequality: Haegue Yang, Sala Rekalde, Bilbao, 2009 (Spanish, Basque and English)







Latitudes' 4th anniversary




This April marks four years since we started working as Latitudes. Coinciding with next year 5th anniversary, we will produce a small booklet comprising a selection the projects we've been involved in.

We would like to thank our families and friends for their ongoing support and for offering a spare room whenever needed ;-)

Max & Mariana





Latitudes reviews MACBA's 'Universal Archive', Frieze #121, March 2009


The forthcoming issue of Frieze magazine (Issue 121, March 2009) includes a review by Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna on MACBA's exhibition 'Universal Archive' (23 October 2008–6 January 2009). 

Below a short extract:

"Of the blockbuster cultural initiatives that have been inspired and hosted by the Catalan capital in 2008, no two could be further apart than Woody Allen’s dismaying Vicky Cristina Barcelona (2008) and the MACBA exhibition ‘Universal Archive: The Condition of the Document and the Modern Photographic Utopia’, a hugely ambitious genealogy of the documentary form of photography (co-produced and touring to the Museu Colecção Berardo-Arte Moderna e Contemporãnea, Lisbon). While Allen’s facile vision of Barcelona and the ‘flamboyant artist’ character of his male lead (played by Javier Bardem) demonstrated the ‘Olé!’ version of the city’s self-branding, ‘Universal Archive’ was difficult to digest by comparison. The exhibition, which comprised some 2,000 photographs, presented a tough and awkward depiction of the grittier sides of the city and uncompromisingly explored the often-unglamorous role of the artist–documentarian within it. 



The exhibition’s wonderfully unwieldy scale and its dizzying categorization refused benign consumption. Both its strength and its weakness lay in the fact that it was really three projects under one roof, covering a time span from 1850 to the present day. Even three visits did not truly do the show justice, but its exhausting extent nevertheless perfectly complemented the archival strategies it presented, as if its densely-installed two floors – encompassing legions of framed prints and closely-packed vitrines and several digital slideshows – were inspired by a labyrinthine Borgesian tale. For many visitors, the stamina required to experience it could have been off-putting. There are only so many images of shift workers, tract housing, farmland or grain silos that one can absorb. Yet, attempting to embrace such immense amounts of data – whether Timothy H. O’Sullivan’s territorial surveys of the USA in the 1860s and ’70s, August Sander’s collective portrait of the German people in the late 1920s, or the Mass-Observation movement in Britain from 1937 until the early 1950s – provided the exhilarating, if relentless, basis for the whole project."

...Continue reading on Frieze online.

[Image above: Cover of Frieze's issue 121; Image below: Pere Català Pic, 'Fotomuntatge sobre el Barri Gòtic per a la societat d'Atracció de Forasters de Barcelona', 1935. Arxiu Històric de la Ciutat de Barcelona – Arxiu Fotogràfic.]




Henrik Håkansson, 'The Jungle Novels', Museo Rufino Tamayo, Mexico City

 

Opening today, Håkansson's exhibition at the Museo Tamayo (until 20 September) is the outcome of recordings carried out at the Montes Azules, El Triunfo, and Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserves, and photographs and videos obtained over four weeks by twelve remote cameras placed by the artist in different spots throughout the southern Lacandon Rainforest, Mexico.

Curated by Tatiana Cuevas for the Tamayo, the catalogue features an extended essay by Latitudes' Max Andrews. See photos of the catalogue here.

Read about the show on ARTFORUM critics' picks.




Life On Mars: 55th Carnegie International, Pittsburgh



Our shots of the 55th installment of the Carnegie International, curated by Douglas Fogle, which was unveiled last Thursday 1st May and runs until January 11th 2009. Latitudes's Max Andrews contributed to the catalogue, designed by COMA, with texts on 20 of the 40 participating artists, including Carnegie prize winners Vija Celmins and Apichatpong Weerasethakul. There's more about the opening on Artforum Diary...

Update 27 August: Jorg Heiser's review on Frieze (Issue 117, September 2008)




Hans Schabus at the Barbican, London

Max Andrews of Latitudes gave a gallery talk in the context of the Hans Schabus's new commission 'Next Time I’m Here, I’ll Be There' last weekend at The Curve Gallery, Barbican, London. The exhibition runs until 1 June 2008.

Hans Schabus
Next Time I’m Here, I’ll be There, 2008
The Curve, Barbican Art Gallery
Courtesy of Barbican Art Gallery
Photo © Lyndon Douglas





DADDY No.3 Fleur du Mal: Kirstine Roepstorff

Daddy #3 cover

Max Andrews contributes with an essay called "Hold the front page gizmo: Kirstine Roepstorff’s Where the world wander – the Road to Excelsior" to the inaugural issue of Fleur du Mal, produced under the auspices of DADDY magazine.

Kirstine Roepstorff's work integrates a variety of content ranging from daily newspapers, scientific journals, political weeklys and other found imagery.
Fleur du Mal is a reference book for her source material co-opting the specific experience of reading a luxury women's magazine.

DADDY is available at Printed Matter, Inc. (New York), Art Metropole (Toronto), ICA Bookshop (London), Artwords Bookshop (London), a+m bookstore (Milan), The MOCA Store (Los Angeles), PRO QM (Berlin), and at Peres Projects, Los Angeles Berlin.

more...

9 June Update: Here is an-Issuu hosted version of the article







Review of the publication 'With/Without: Spatial Products, Practices and Politics in the Middle East'

Max Andrews's Frieze (Issue 110, October 2007) review of: 'With/Without: Spatial Products, Practices and Politics in the Middle East' edited by Shumon Basar, Antonia Carver and Markus Miessen and published by Bidoun and Moutamarat, Dubai, 2007.

Bidoun sub-site here.








Pyramid Power: Issue 3




Issue 3 of the sharp-suited Vancouver-based Art/Design/Literature Pyramid Power has just come out with an extended version of Max Andrews's interview with Revolver founder Christoph Keller, originally published in the Latitudes-edited UOVO issue 14. Here it is titled "Still Not a Hippie: Interview with Christoph Keller on the Future of the Book & Life on a Farm"

http://www.pyramidpower.ca/

Unfortunately the mind-blowing products from Herr Keller's
Stählemühle distillery can only be ordered within Germany.




'LAND, ART...' publication reviewed in Frieze



 Brian Dillon reviews LAND, ART: A Cultural Ecology Handbook in the summer issue (#108) of Frieze, devoted to ecology. Read the article online.

In that same issue, there is also a feature article by Latitudes' Max Andrews entitled 'The Whole Truth' featuring the work of Mierle Laderman Ukeles, Christina Hemauer & Roman Keller, Maria Thereza Alves, among others.





Photos of the launch of the publication 'LAND, ART: A Cultural Ecology Handbook' at the LCE, London

 All images: Latitudes | www.lttds.org




Photos of the publication 'LAND, ART: A Cultural Ecology Handbook' (RSA, 2006)

The 'LAND, ART: A Cultural Ecology Handbook' publication is finally real! Coming soon are images of the reception at the London School of Economics and Political Science last Tuesday. The book was launched by the UK's Culture Minister David Lammy during the No Way Back? conference that morning. 

You can purchase the book direct from the distributor's Cornerhouse here, or from amazon here.


All photos: Robert Justamante. Courtesy: Latitudes | www.lttds.org




'2006 Problems' exhibition and publication by John Kørner, Victoria Miro Gallery, London



'There are plenty of known knowns in what John Kørner has recently painted: ships and trees, men and women, crocodiles and birds, town and country—and most apparently in'2006 Problems', factories and bicycles. These are modern things that we know we know. And as this commandeered logic continues, we know there are some things we do not know (known unknowns), and still others we don't yet know we don't know (unknown unknowns). It's the known unknown phenomena that belong to the realm of Kørner's sustained symptomatology of problems. Visible in paint as coloured blot marks shaped like elongated eggs or dropped-in droppings, problems often line up in Kørner's works as if notes on a musical stave or blobs of clay on wobbly shelves, latent undifferentiated tissue that's waiting to become more specific. Of course how to paint a problem must have been in itself a problem. We may presently be dealing with the problems of this year, or equally, it could be that there is a host of two thousand and six of these quandaries. Kørner makes paintings and painted ceramics, while, as he insists, he is not really a 'proper' painter. His often vast canvases are foremost a way of communicating through a very direct means and are only paintings later, almost by coincidence. All of this is, needless to say, problematic.'

Extract taken from the catalogue essay of the publication '2006 Problems: John Kørner' by Latitudes' Max Andrews.

'2006 Problems' by John Kørner
Victoria Miro Gallery, London
25 November – 22 December 2006

Exhibition catalogue: Paperback, English, 44 pages, 30 x 23 x 0.6 cm
ISBN 978-0-9554564-0-4
Purchase here for ₤10. 
More photos here.


All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org
Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




Invitation card for the launch of the publication 'LAND, ART: A Cultural Ecology Handbook'



Edited by / Editor: Max Andrews
Published by / Publica: RSA in partnership with Arts Council England
 

Specs / Caracteríticas: 17 x 24 cm, 248 pages, colour throughout
ISBN 0 901469 57 2
Design by / Diseñado por: SMITH
Distributed by / Distribuidor: Cornerhouse Publications


| UK | 

Here is the invitation for the publication launch of 'LAND, ART: A Cultural Ecology Handbook' which will take place on the Monday 11 December, 6.15–8pm at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), coinciding with the RSA/LSE international enquiry 'No Way Back?' (11–12 Dec). 

The book is going to print in Italy in two weeks, so soon you will be able to see more on these pages.

| ES | 

Aquí tenéis la postal de la publicación en la que hemos trabajado a lo largo de este último año! Su presentación oficial se hará el 11 de Diciembre en Londres al final del primer día de la conferencia internacional organizada por la Royal Society of Arts (RSA) y la London School of Economics (LSE) titulada 'No Way Back?' (11-12 Dic). 

El libro se imprimirá en dos semanas en Italia, así que pronto podréis ver más información en estas páginas.
 
[Image on the book cover: Henrik Håkansson, Untitled (Khao Nor Chuchi), 2003, offset print on paper, 70 x 100 cm. Courtesy the artist; The Modern Institute, Glasgow; Galleria Franco Noero, Torino.]




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