Interview with Nicholas Mangan in Mousse Magazine #47, February–March 2015

The February–March 2015 issue of Mousse Magazine (#47) includes the interview 'What Lies Beneath' between Melbourne-based artist Nicholas Mangan (1979, Geelong) and Mariana Cánepa Luna of Latitudes.  

 Layout of the interview in English and Italian on the pages of Mousse Magazine.

The interview centers primarily on discussing the artists' methodologies through two of Mangan's recent works: 'A World Undone' – currently on view as part of Witte de With's show 'Art in The Age of...Energy' (23 January–3 May 2015) – and his film and sculptural work 'Nauru - Notes From A Cretaceous World' which will soon be featured as part of the New Museum's 2015 Triennial: Surround Audience curated by Lauren Cornell (Curator, 2015 Triennial, Digital Projects and Museum as Hub) and artist Ryan Trecartin.

Read the full review here. Following is an excerpt of the beginning of their conversation: 


'Dowiyogo’s Ancient Coral Coffee Table', 2010. Courtesy of the artist, Sutton gallery Melbourne and Hopkinson Mossman Auckland. 


MCL: Unearthing narratives embedded within matter has been at the very core of your practice for some time now. Your most recent sculptural and film works have inquired into natural materials, their transit and energy flow and how their transformation – be it human-induced or ecological – have a social, political and an economic dimension. I'm particularly thinking of your 2010 project 'Nauru: Notes from a Cretaceous World' – featured at the New Museum 2015 Triennial– which focuses on the story of the tiny Micronesian island Republic of Nauru and its financial collapse as a consequence of a century of corrosive colonial exploitation of its phosphate ore resources. Could you elaborate on how this notion of transformation is explored in your sculpture works (traditionally static) and films (moving image) and how you have come to interrelate the two in the spatial narrative of your installations? 

NM: As transformation is a process occurring in time, the necessity to explore duration has led me to test moving image as a sculptural possibility, to express not only the temporality of the assemblage, but also the forces and drives that produce such aggregations. In the video ‘Nauru: Notes from a Cretaceous World', narration sits over found footage and material that I shot myself, providing an account of Nauru’s material history as shaped by anthropogenic forces. The narration attempts to draw out the various histories that are embedded in material forms. In more recent projects, such as ‘A World Undone’ (2012)and ‘Progress In Action’ (2013), I have attempted to produce an intensified intersection between moving image and sculpture, enabling the materials to narrate themselves.
 
'Nauru - Between A Rock and A Hard Place' installation view at Art Gallery Of New South whales 2009. Courtesy of the artist, Sutton gallery in Melbourne and Hopkinson Mossman in Auckland. Photo: Carley Wright.

'Mined over matter', 2012. C-print on cotton paper, 69 x 103cm. 
Courtesy of the artist and LABOR Mexico.


'Matter over mined (for A World Undone)', 2012. C-print on cotton paper 69 x 103cm. 
Courtesy of the artist and LABOR, Mexico.


'A World Undone', 2012 (video Stills). HD colour, silent, 12min continuous loop. 
Courtesy of the artist and LABOR Mexico.

Mangan works with LABOR (México DF), Sutton Gallery (Melbourne) and Hopkinson Mossman (Auckland).

Related Content:

Visiting Curator Program, Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne, 12 May–7 June 2014 (28 April 2014).

'Nice to Meet You – Erick Beltrán. Some Fundamental Postulates' by Max Andrews on Mousse Magazine #31 (30 November 2011) 

Interview 'Free Forms' with Lauren Cornell part of Latitudes' 2012–13 long-term research #OpenCurating, released on April 2013 via Issuu.



This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
Work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




"Free Forms: An interview with Lauren Cornell", Curator, 2015 Triennial, Digital Projects and Museum as Hub, New Museum, New York. 9th in the #OpenCurating interview series.


"Free Forms: An interview with Lauren Cornell" is available on ISSUU to view on screen and is also downloadable. It is also available as pdf format via Latitudes' web.
 
After serving for seven years as Executive Director of new media non-profit Rhizome, in 2012 Lauren Cornell was appointed “Curator, 2015 Triennial, Digital Projects and Museum as Hub” of the New Museum, New York. During her tenure at Rhizome – a New Museum affiliate – Cornell initiated programmes including the annual Seven on Seven conference series, which bridges contemporary art and technology fields by pairing technological innovators with visual artists and challenging them to develop something over the course of a day. At the New Museum, Cornell was part of the curatorial team for The Generational: Younger Than Jesus (2009) and has curated exhibitions including Young-Hae Chang Heavy Industries’ Black on White Gray Ascending (2007), and Free (2010), a group show that examined “how the internet has changed our landscape of information and our notion of public space”. She is currently preparing the 2015 Triennial, the institution’s signature exhibition, which she will curate together with artist and filmmaker Ryan Trecartin.

Follow:
@LTTDS 
#OpenCurating 
@newmuseum
@lcornell
#MuseumAsHub

ABOUT #OPENCURATING

Drawing on the emerging practices of so-called 'Open Journalism' – which seek to better collaborate with and use the ability of anyone to publish and share#OpenCurating is a research project that investigates how contemporary art projects may function beyond the traditional format of exhibition-and-catalogue. #OpenCurating is concerned with new forms of interaction between publics – whether online followers or physical visitors – with artworks and their production, display and discursive context.

The project is articulated around a series of ten new interviews with curators, artists, writers and online strategists published as a free digital edition [read here the published ones so far], a Twitter discussion moderated around the hashtag #OpenCurating and an public conversation with Dia Art Foundation curator which took place at MACBA on the 19 February.

#OpenCurating is a research project by Latitudes produced through La Capella. BCN Producció 2012 of the Institut de Cultura de Barcelona. 










Content partners: Walker Art Center

 




Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




Latitudes participates in the fifth annual March Meeting organised by Sharjah Art Foundation, 17–19 March 2012, Dar Al Nadwa, Heritage Area, Sharjah


Latitudes' 3-month residency at the New Museum in 2010. Photo: Latitudes

 FGA month residency at the Maasvlakte in 2009. Photo: FGA

March Meeting, a three-day symposium featuring presentations by artists, art professionals and institutions on the production and dissemination of art. March Meeting 2012: Working With Artists and Audiences on Commissions and Residencies will take place March 17–19, in Sharjah's scenic Heritage Area.

Latitudes will present two case studies of commissions and residencies. Firstly, a Latitudes commission in the context of 'Portscapes' that was developed from their invitation to the Rotterdam-based artist and editorial duo Fucking Good Art (FGA). Based from a shipping container the extremity of Rotterdam port for a month, FGA initiated a temporary web radio and research station. And secondly, a commission addressed to Latitudes in the context of 'The Last Newspaper' in which the curatorial duo worked in the New Museum galleries for 3 months editing a weekly newspaper which became an incremental catalogue based on the micro-community of the exhibition. Both residencies explored editorial and curatorial approaches as well as formats of publishing or broadcasting and highlight how small organisation can operate flexibly and critically within a larger structure – whether a huge industrial infrastructure project or a museum exhibition.

Speakers of the three-day symposium include: Abed Al Ju'beh, Director, Khalil Sakakini Cultural Centre (KSCC) (Palestine); H.E. Abdul Rahman Al Owais, UAE Minister of Culture; Noura Al-Sayeh, Architect & Curator (Bahrain); Palmina D'Ascoli, Manager of Department of Residencies, Institut Français (France); Shezad Dawood, Artist; Peter Eleey, Curator, MoMA/PS1 (USA); Amal Khalaf, Edgware Road Project: Assistant Curator of Serpentine Gallery (UK); Yuko Hasegawa, Chief Curator, Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo (MOT) (Japan); Louise Hui-Juan Hsu, Curator, Museum of Contemporary Art Taipei (Taiwan); Danda J, Director, Kuona Trust Centre for Visual Arts (Kenya); Lu Jie, Founder & Director, Long March Space (China); Eungie Joo, Curator, New Museum (USA); Riyas Komu, Director of Programmes, Kochi-Muziris Biennale (India); James Lingwood, Co-Director, Artangel (UK); Salwa Mikdadi, Head of Arts & Cultural Program, Emirates Foundation (UAE); Ayeh Naraghi, Cultural Programmes Specialist, UNESCO Doha Office (Qatar); Susan Pfeffer, Curator, KW Institute for Contemporary Art (Berlin); Andrea Rose, Head of Visual Arts, British Council (UK); Beatrix Ruf, Director/Curator, Kunsthalle Zürich (Switzerland); Anri Sala, Artist; Ramin Salsali, Founder, Salsali Private Museum (UAE).

The March Meeting and related events are free and open to the public. Registration is recommended at [email protected] Read more here

March Meetings 2012
Dar Al Nadwa, Heritage Area
Sharjah
United Arab Emirates




Latitudes' 'The Last Newspaper' exhibition featured in the May issue of Shanghai-based magazine 'Art World Magazine'

In their May issue, Shanghai-based Art World Magazine featured 'The Last Newspaper' (New Museum, 6 October 2010–9 January 2011) exhibition focusing on Latitudes' 10-week-long editorial project and re-publishing and translating four articles originally published in issues: #2 The Last Gazette (focus article on Hans Haacke's "News" by Julienne Lorz), #5 The Last Monitor (an essay on paperweights and newsstands by Harley Spiller), #6 The Last Observer (interview with Wolfgang Tillmans by Lorena Muñoz-Alonso), #7 The Last Evening Sun (focus article on Luciano Fabro's 'Pavimento-Tautologia' by Simone Menegoi) and #8 The Last Journal (an interview with Rirkrit Tiravanija by Desiree B. Ramos).
  Thank you to Michelle Ding from Art World Magazine and to all the writers for giving permission to reprint in Chinese.

Photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org




'The Last Newspaper' available for purchase and distribution from Motto in Berlin

Image: Motto Distribution announcement.

'The Last Newspaper' exhibition catalogue is now available for purchase (€15, to buy email [email protected] ) as well as for distribution from Motto Berlin.

'The Last Newspaper' was a hybrid exhibition inspired by the ways artists approach the news and respond to the stories and images that command the headlines. Co-curated by Richard Flood and Benjamin Godsill, the exhibition was held at the New Museum, New York, from 6 October 2010 to 9 January 2011.

Alongside the exhibition, a number of partner organisations, including Latitudes, used on-site offices to present their research and stage public dialogues. ‘THE LAST POST’ / ‘THE LAST GAZETTE’ / ‘THE LAST REGISTER’… was an 12-page free weekly newspaper and an incremental exhibition catalogue edited during a 10 week editorial residency byLatitudes .

This published record, designed by Chad Kloepfer and Joel Stillman, is the surrogate catalogue of The Last Newspaper. Featuring over 100 contributors, including essays and interviews with participating artists, the compilation also brings together articles and special features around an expanded selection of work that addresses the news, the newspaper, and its evolving form and function.

Motto Berlin, a store dedicated to magazines, books and self published printed matter. Various presentations and publication launches take place every month.

Motto Berlin
Skalitzer Str. 68, im Hinterhof
10997 Berlin
U1 Schlesiches Tor
Ph: +49 (0)30 75442119
Fax: +49 (0)30 75442120

Open Monday – Saturday: 12h-20h

[email protected]





'The Last Newspaper' catalogue editions

Ten newspapers + 4pp supplement form 'The Last Newspaper' catalogue. Photo: Joel Stillman

Produced for ten consecutive weeks from a micro-newsroom in the galleries of the New Museum, #1 The Last Post; #2 The Last Gazette; #3 The Last Register; #4 The Last Star-Ledger; #5 The Last Monitor; #6 The Last Observer; #7 The Last Evening Sun; #8 The Last Journal; #9 The Last Times; #10 The Last Express comprise the catalogue accompanying the exhibition "The Last Newspaper", curated by Richard Flood and Benjamin Godsill. Featuring over 100 contributors, and including essays and interviews with participating artists, this compilation also brings together articles and special features around an expanded selection of work that addresses the news, the newspaper, and its evolving form and function. There are two versions of the catalogue:

Regular edition of 'The Last Newspaper'. Photo: Joel Stillman

– A 'regular edition' in a poly bag with sticker containing the 10 newspapers + a 4 page black-and-white supplement with editorial, contents page and index ($15, $13.50 museum members).

Special edition: silkscreened archive box. Photo: Latitudes

– A special edition: silkscreened archive box containing the regular edition
($50).

Both can be purchased from the
New Museum Store.

Further specs:


Edited by: Latitudes
Published by:
Latitudes, Barcelona & the New Museum, New York
Texts by: multiple authors
Graphic Design: Chad Kloepfer with Joel Stillman
Format: 10x 12pp two-colour newspapers, one 4pp black-and-white newspaper, 356 x 292 mm each / Regular edition in poly bag with sticker, special edition in screenprinted archive box
Language: English
Print-run: 1,000 (of which 400 are the final catalogue edition)
Printer: Linco Printing, Long Island
Date of Publication: October–December 2010




Selection of press coverage of Latitudes' weekly newspaper for 'The Last Newspaper' exhibition at the New Museum

Following is a selection of press reviews that has appeared in relation to 'The Last Newspaper' exhibition (New Museum, 6 October 2010–9 January 2011), in particular those who focused on Latitudes' edition of a weekly newspaper as catalogue-in-formation:

Holland Cotter, 'Art and News, Intersecting in the Digital Age', The New York Times, 7 October 2010:

"And at the behest of the
New Museum a print-savvy group called Latitudes from Barcelona is issuing another tabloid, this one weekly and edited from the third-floor gallery, that will double as an exhibition catalog. That publication would, of course, be the ideal place for the curators and participating artists to go on the record, at un-Twitterish length and polemical breadth, about the viability of analog journalism — and analog art — in the digital age. (...) Meanwhile the Latitudes news team — Max Andrews and Mariana Canepa Luna are the editors — has invited everybody and anybody, meaning you and me, to submit editorial suggestions and pitch stories, either in person or by e-mail ([email protected]). In the loosey-goosey spirit of the show, their paper will change names weekly, from the “The Last Post” to “The Last Gazette” to “The Last Register,” etc. But a genuinely “last newspaper” is still nowhere in sight. And you read that here."


Danielle Aronowitz, 'New Museum exhibit is black and white and read all over', Columbia Spectator, 8 October 2010:

(...) "A second group, Latitudes—a curatorial organization based in Barcelona, Spain—will compile, edit, and publish a weekly newspaper that will catalogue information about the exhibit and the contributing artist groups over the next 10 weeks. To emphasize its importance, [exhibition curator Richard] Flood referred to this publication as “the journal of the exhibition.”

Luc Sante, 'Disappearing Ink', The New York Review of Books's blog, 1 November 2010:

(...) and a tabloid, edited by the Barcelona-based curatorial office Latitudes, that has been variously called The Last Post, The Last Gazette, and The Last Register. (...) The tabloid, which focuses on newspapers, as well as on the show itself, is rather puckish. The Last Gazette includes, for example, a record of a quixotic attempt by Ines Schaber to approach the underground facility in western Pennsylvania where the photo agency Corbis keeps its archive of some 70 million pictures. The story evokes the cold-war espionage genre—an unremarkable setting masks a culture of such militant secrecy that the best the author could manage is a murkily distant photo of the facility’s parking lot. Its meandering text and bland snapshots, on the other hand, evoke the whimsical record-keeping of 1970s conceptual art, which is rather more in keeping with the spirit of the show.


Valerie Seckler, 'Hyper-local Newspaper as Museum Piece? Not exactly', The Urban Times, November 2010:

“How is a museum, such as New Museum, no longer (just) in the artwork display business?” asks an editorial in The Last Post. “Is it a producer, a publisher or a distributor? Should a museum or a newspaper be a community, a platform or a network, for example?” The newspapers themselves are hybrids: actual publications and art object. (...) The Last…” newspaper series comprises “final” editions with names like “The Last Observer,” “The Last Monitor,” and (the first edition) “The Last Post.” They are dedicated to illuminating “The Last Newspaper” fine art on exhibit. Some of the reportage ranges beyond it. (...) The Last Post” itself is an arch reference to the never-ending practice of posting 21st century news online. “The Last Post’s” Oct. 6th edition’s screaming front page headline makes the humorous proposition: “Ink vs Link.” Smaller decks stacked below it read: “Lippmann vs Dewey, Fact vs Interpretation, Editor vs Curator,” and conclude with the query: “How do you get your information?”

Adam Chadwick, 'Art and journalism …sometimes a fine line…', http://fittoprintfilm.wordpress.com, 1 December 2010:

This past Saturday members of the group Latitudes – an independent Barcelona-based curatorial office – hosted an event for the “Fit to Print” production team at the New Museum in the Bowery neighborhood of lower Manhattan. (...) I was too intrigued by the wall-to-wall displays of vintage newspaper front pages in one of the rooms. It was hard not to examine the way in which newspapers implemented multiple sub-headlines back in the early part of the twentieth century. In a way, many start-up news websites are creating similar sub-heads to draw reader attention in the vast wild west of search engine optimization. This would be a topic our guest speaker, Jason Fry, would speak about during our panel discussion.

[Read an edited transcription of the event here.]

This is tomorrow, 'The Last Newspaper', 5 December 2010:

Latitudes, the Barcelona-based curatorial office, and a diverse team lead by Joseph Grima and Kazys Varnelis/Netlab, are on site producing weekly newspapers.

'THE LAST POST' / 'THE LAST GAZETTE' / 'THE LAST REGISTER'... is the evolving-titled 12-page free weekly newspaper and an incremental exhibition catalogue edited during a 10 week editorial residency by Latitudes. Produced from a micro-newsroom placed on the third floor of the museum the tabloids will be an archive in formation companioning The Last Newspaper’s exhibition, artworks and events, as well as being a platform for critical reflection on the wider agency of art and artists with respect to concerns about how information is produced, managed, recorded, re-ordered, and disseminated.

With kind permission from Latitudes we are reproducing two selected text from their catalogue/newspapers, written by The Last Newspaper London correspondent and 'this is tomorrow' features editor Lorena Muñoz-Alonso (continue reading...)

Kristin M. Jones, 'Chronicles of a Medium in Crisis', The Wall Street Journal, 16 December 2010:

(...) Via a micronewsroom, Latitudes, a Barcelona-based curatorial team, produced a tabloid whose name changed each week. The spirited articles include stories on artists, filmmakers and topics ranging from ProPublica to the history of cast-iron newsstand paperweights; its issues will be bound together after the show ends in lieu of a catalog. The editors commissioned profiles and interviews related to the show but also solicited story ideas, headlines inspired by personal events and other information from the public.

Read more articles and reviews here.




'The Last Newspaper' exhibition catalogue available from the New Museum Store

Produced by Latitudes for ten consecutive weeks from a micro-newsroom placed in the third floor galleries of the New Museum, the compilation of The Last Post; The Last Gazette; The Last Register; The Last Star-Ledger; The Last Monitor; The Last Observer; The Last Evening Sun; The Last Journal; The Last Times and The Last Express comprise the catalogue accompanying the show The Last Newspaper (on view until 9 January 2011), curated by Richard Flood and Benjamin Godsill.

Featuring over 100 contibutors, and including essays and interviews with participating artists and organisations, this compilation also brings together articles and special features around an expanded selection of work that addresses the news, the newspaper, and its evolving form and function.


New Museum & Latitudes; 2010; 11.5" x 14"; 10 newspapers + 4 page supplement with final editorial, table of content and index
Price: $15 (New Museum members $13.50)
Or buy online from the New Museum Store





Night at the (New) Museum

Coinciding with the end of our New Museum editorial project we'd like to share these great shots of what has been our working space during the past 10 weeks at the New Museum: our micro-newsroom during the night.

The photos have been taken by New Museum night guard and photographer Steven Slawinski during the third week of our editorial residency – when 'The Last Register' (#3) was the newspaper of the week. We would like to thank Steven for sharing his archive, and to New Museum guard Carol Fassler for putting us in touch.



We would like to express our thanks to everyone at the New Museum. Thank you to Lisa Phillips, Toby Devan Lewis Director, and The Last Newspaper co-curators Richard Flood, Director of Special Projects and Curator at Large, and Benjamin Godsill, Curatorial Associate, for hosting us and inviting us to collaborate in this expansive and timely project. Our sincere gratitude and praise are due to Richard and Benjamin for their support and trust and for the brave exhibition whose works have become our local community.

Thank you to Joshua Edwards, Exhibitions Manager and Shannon Bowser, Chief Preparator for sharing expertise on producing Luciano Fabro’s Pavimiento-Tautologia. Praise is due to Desiree B. Ramos, Curatorial Fellow; Eungie Joo, Keith Haring Director & Curator of Education & Public Programs; Cris Scorza, Manager of Tours and Family Programs and Joseph Keehn II, Associate Educator; to Gabriel Einsohn, Communications Officer and Annie Wachnicki, Marketing Manager for their help in many ways. We are most grateful to each of the inspiring New Museum guards and guides for their support and interest in our weekly progress and for taking care of our working space.

We would like to express our gratitude to Marta Rincón and Eloisa Ferrari for securing the financial support offered by The State Corporation for Spanish Cultural Action Abroad (SEACEX), which has made it possible for us be in New York during these months.

The graphic design of the newspapers has been an absolutely critical element to the tone of the project and we salute Chad Kloepfer and Joel Stillman, who have been so generous with their time and incredible talent in establishing the visual identity of The Last... newspapers, and in giving up their weekends laying them out. Thank you to Daniel Thiem, Retail Operations Manager at the New Museum, for taking care of the afterlife of this print adventure, and to Tammy Lin at Linco Printing for making the printing and delivery run smoothly.

Sharing the third floor of the New Museum with the other partner organizations has been a memorable experience and we are particularly appreciative of Alan Rapp as well as Virginia Millington and Natalia Fidelholtz – our temporary neighbors at the New City Reader and StoryCorps respectively.

The project would also not have been possible without the assistance of our news team, who have been crucial in their dedication and good humor, and in toiling late hours, and while juggling other commitments, in writing sterling words. Kudos to Editor-at-Large Janine Armin, to Greg Barton, Irina Chernyakova, Collin Munn and Gwen Schwartz. We would also like to highlight the generous contributions of Adam Chadwick, Julienne Lorz, Andrew Losowsky and our London correspondent Lorena Muñoz-Alonso.

We have been pleased to have been able to involve an incredible network of writers, curators, artists and journalists that week after week have graced, and been splashed over, the pages of 'The Last...' Visual artist Francesc Ruiz, project cartoonist with his series ‘The Woods’, and our advertising department, artist Ester Partegàs, we thank especially for their amazing work and for their stamina in signing up to the weekly deadlines.

We are indebted to all of the participating artists and organizations as well as many other individuals for their efforts, for having trusted our editorial skills and for having given time and contributions pro bono – Ignasi Aballí; Lars Bang Larsen; Judith Bernstein; Dara Birnbaum; Pierre Bismuth; Andrea Bowers; Fernando Bryce; Luis Camnitzer; Sarah Charlesworth; Emily Cheeger; Doryun Chong; City-As-School class; Ana Paula Cohen; Scott Cole; Christine Cooper; Holly Coulis; Marc d'Andre; Chris Dercon; Patricia Esquivias; Jacob Fabricius; Luciano Figueiredo; Angela Freiberger; Jason Fry; Simon Fujiwara; Dora García; Martin Gran; Hans Haacke; Ilana Halperin; Rick Herron; Ridley Howard; Marcel Janco; Adrià Julià; Maria Loboda; Nate Lowman; Renzo Martens; Rob McKenzie; Simone Menegoi; Aleksandra Mir; Rodrigo Moura; Nick Mrozowski; Angel Nevarez & Valerie Tevere; Sophie O'Brien; Damián Ortega; Alona Pardo; Amalia Pica; Michalis Pichler; Ed Pierce; Peter Piller; William Pope L.; Michael Rakowitz; Christian Rattemeyer; Yasmil Raymond; Kolja Reichert; Mauro Restiffe; Kathleen Ritter; Kirstine Roepstroff; Julia Rometti & Victor Costales; David Salle; Mike Santisteven; Joe Saltzman; Ines Schaber; Paul Schmeltzer; Charity Scribner; Manuel Segade; Adam Shecter; Harley Spiller; Stephen Spretnjak; Alexandra Tarver; Mi Tijo; Wolfgang Tillmans; Rirkrit Tiravanija; Nicoline van Harskamp; Pablo Vargas Lugo; Sergio Vega; Marie Voignier; Mark von Schlegell; Haegue Yang; Carey Young; Sarah Wang; Warren Webster; and Jordan Wolfson. Thanks too the New Museum Facebook and Twitter contributors: aodt; Kristi Collom; Michele Corriel; djnron; Isadora Ficovic; A.J. Fries; Rachel Elise Greiner; Sioux Jordan; Eleanor Martineau; Acht Millimeter; Sofia Pontén; Jenny Pruden; Bonnie Severien; Kate Shafer; Liz Shores; Goso Tominaga; and Anne Wölk.

We would also like to thank those who have helped us obtain images or permission to reprint texts: Barbican Art Centre, London; Edoardo Bonaspetti, Mousse magazine; Bugada & Cargnel, Paris; Janine Iamunno, patch.com; Nick Hunt/PatrickMcMullan.com; Jeff Khonsary, Fillip; Lisa Middag at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; kurimanzutto; Michele Robecchi; Benoit Pailley; Peres Projects, Berlin; Katie Sokolor/Gothamist.

– Latitudes (Max Andrews & Mariana Cánepa Luna), December 2010.

Excerpted from 'FROM THE EDITORS’ DESK – Last words, clarifications, frequently asked questions, and thanks from Latitudes' originally published in 'The Last Newspaper' catalogue.




At Last...'The Last Newspaper' catalogue!

Latitudes' 10-week editorial residency at the New Museum has come to an end! Below photos of each of the 10 weekly newspapers we have published and that has been available every Wednesday from the museum galleries.

The Last Post (#1): See contents and learn about Dara Birnbaum's Media Habits here

The Last Gazette (#2): See contents and read a focus text by Julienne Lorz on Hans Haacke's News here

The Last Register (#3): See contents and read an exclusive interview with visual artist Francesc Ruiz here

The Last Star-Ledger (#4): See contents and read an exclusive interview with Portugal's newest newspaper's Creative Director, Nick Mrozowski here

The Last Monitor (#4): See contents and read an read about the history of newspapers' paperweights here

The Last Observer (#6): See contents and read an exclusive interview with Wolfgang Tillmans here

The Last Evening Sun (#7): Read contents and and a text on Luciano Fabro's work 'Pavimento–Tautologia' here
The Last Journal (#8): See contents and read an exclusive interview with Rirkrit Tiravanija here

The Last Times (#9): See contents and read Pablo Vargas Lugo's Picture Agent contribution here
 The Last Express (#10): See contents and read the report on the 27 November talk between filmmaker Adam Chadwick and web veteran Jason Fry here.

Each of 'The Last...' has been edited and freely distributed from a micro-newsroom on the New Museum's third floor gallery space.

Latitudes' newsroom on the third floor of the New Museum, New York. Photo: Greg Barton

The Last Post, The Last Gazette, The Last Register, The Last Star-Ledger, The Last Monitor, The Last Observer, The Last Evening Sun, The Last Journal, The Last Times
and The Last Express comprise the catalogue of The Last Newspaper exhibition, curated by Richard Flood and Benjamin Godsill.

The final catalogue compilation includes
over 100 contributorsarticles and exclusive interviews with participating artists as well as texts and special features concerning an expanded selection of individuals and organisations whose work addresses the news, the medium of the newspaper and their evolving form and function.

The catalogue will soon be available from the New Museum's Store for
$15. More details to follow on the European distribution – see update here. The exhibition continues at the New Museum until 9 January 2011.

Table of contents of the 10 issues:

Issue 1: The Last Post
October 6, 2010
Cover: ‘Ink vs Link’. Press Room of The Richmond Planet, c. 1899
Editorial: ‘Welcome to The Last Post, The Last Gazette, The Last Register...’ by Latitudes
Picture Agent (Our singular picture agency): Kirstine Roepstorff
Media Habits: Dara Birnbaum
Exclusive Interview: ‘Double Trouble’, Lorena Muñoz-Alonso interviews TLN artist Pierre Bismuth
Feature: ‘Lights, Camera...Banality’, Kolja Reichert on Marie Voignier’s Hearing the Shape of a Drum (2010)
‘Working with Utopians’ by Richard Flood and Benjamin Godsill
The Next Newspaper (Profiling the organizations, projects, initiatives and individuals redefining ink-and-paper news): ProPublica
Fit to Print: ‘The (L.A.) Times it is A-Changin’ by Adam Chadwick
100 Years Ago…: The Salt Lake Herald-Republican
Cartoon: ‘The Woods: Teen Balls’ by Francesc Ruiz
Advertising: Ester Partegàs with Rob McKenzie

Issue 2: The Last Gazette
October 13, 2010
Cover: ‘Sorry for the Metaphor’. Special cover by Amalia Pica (and page 3)
Editorial: ‘34 People Like This’ by Latitudes
Focus: ‘A system is not imagined, it is real’, Julienne Lorz on TLN artist Hans Haacke’s News (1969/2008)
Dirt Sheet: Janine Armin on the newspaper-as-catalogue
Picture Agent: Ilana Halperin
The Next Newspaper: Clay Shirky
Photo essay: ‘Picture Mining’ by Ines Schaber
Obituary: ‘Sorry we’re dead’, Andrew Losowsky on TLN artist Adam McEwen’s Untitled (Caster) (2010)
Fit to Print: Adam Chadwick on hyperlocal citizen journalism
100 Years Ago…: Daily Public Ledger
In Brief: ‘Sac Bee Cuts’
Media Habits: Luis Camnitzer
Infographic: ‘U.S. Gazettes: Average Circulation’ by Irina Chernyakova
Cartoon: ‘The Woods: Money’ by Francesc Ruiz
Advertising: Ester Partegàs

Issue 3: The Last Register
October 20, 2010
Cover: ‘Exhibit: Exposed!’. Installing TLN wall text
Report: ‘Reaction Distraction’: Gwen Schwartz on the TLN talk with participating artists Nate Lowman, Aleksandra Mir and Sarah Charlesworth
Focus: Doryun Chong on TLN artist Adrian Piper’s Vanilla Nightmares (1986)
Media Habits: Dora García
Dirt Sheet: Janine Armin on truth and fiction
Picture Agent: Sergio Vega
The Next Newspaper: Paul Schmelzer on the American Independent News Network
Feature: ‘Broadcasting’, Joe Salzman on the representation of the journalists on TV
Exclusive interview: Latitudes with TLN cartoonist Francesc Ruiz
‘Patricia Esquivias on...The French Revolution’
100 Years Ago…: New York Tribune
Feature: ‘Hyphen-ated’ by Stephen Spretnjak
Photo essay: ‘Behind the Scenes’, Installing ‘The Last Newspaper’
Cartoon: ‘The Woods: Scratch Lottery’ by Francesc Ruiz
Advertising: Ester Partegàs with Adam Shecter

Issue 4: The Last Star-Ledger
October 27, 2010
Cover & Picture Agent: Special cover by Haegue Yang (and page 12)
Exclusive interview: ‘Rank and File’, Latitudes interviews Ignasi Aballí
Focus: ‘A Newspaper is Never Complete, Because News is Never Complete’, Interview with Ed Pierce from the archive of TLN partner organization StoryCorps + ‘StoryCorps Key Facts’
Focus: ‘Execution, Ejaculation, Exhibition’, Collin Munn on TLN artist Dash Snow’s Untitled (2006)
The Next Newspaper: Latitudes interviews Nick Mrozowsky about i
Dirt Sheet: Janine Armin on TLN artist François Bucher
‘Patricia Esquivias on... Communism’
100 Years Ago…: The Tacoma Times
Media Habits: Nicoline van Harskamp
Cartoon: ‘The Woods: Specialization’ by Francesc Ruiz
Advertising : Ester Partegàs with Rob McKenzie

Issue 5: The Last Monitor
November 3, 2010
Cover: ‘Today & Yesterday’. Gustav Metzger, Eichmann and the Angel, 2005
Exclusive interview: ‘Eating the Wall Street Journal’, Janine Armin with TLN artist William Pope.L
Feature: ‘Today and Yesterday’, Sophie O’Brien on Gustav Metzger
Picture Agent: Jordan Wolfson
The Next Newspaper: The San Francisco Panorama by Irina Chernyakova
Fit to Print: Adam Chadwick on the digital divide
100 Years Ago…: The Bisbee Daily Review
Media Habits: Mark von Schlegell
Focus: ‘Who Framed Sarah Charleswoth?’, Marcel Janco on TLN artist Sarah Charlesworth
Readers’ Lives: ‘Paper-Weight Champion’ by Harley Spiller
Feature: ‘Heralding the Gizmo’, Max Andrews on Kirstine Roepstorff
Readers’ Lives: ‘My Name is Marc D’Andre and I’m a Newspaper Addict’
Infographic: Facebook poll: where do @NewMuseum followers get their news?
Cartoon: ‘The Woods: Tools’ by Francesc Ruiz
Advertising : Ester Partegàs with Holly Coulis and Ridley Howard

Issue 6: The Last Observer
November 10, 2010
Cover: ‘Truth Study?’. Installation view of Wolfgang Tillmans Truth Study Center (NY) (2010)
Exclusive interview: ‘Is this True or Not?’, Lorena Muñoz-Alonso with TLN artist Wolfgang Tillmans
Focus: ‘There’s not Enough Rage These Days’, Greg Barton & Collin Munn on TLN artist Judith Bernstein
Picture Agent: Renzo Martens
Media Habits: City-as-School Students
Feature: ‘Relationship Status’ by Manuel Segade
Focus: ‘‘Old News’ to me’ by Lars Bang Larsen + ‘Nothing New About Old News’
Feature: ‘Editorial Curatorial’ by Marcel Janco
The Next Newspaper: Patch. Andrew Losowsky interviews Warren Webster, company president
Report: Irina Chernyakova on the ‘Perpetual Peace Project’ of TLN partner the Slought Foundation
Fit to Print: Adam Chadwick on The Huffington Post
100 years Ago…: The News-Herald
Cartoon: ‘The Woods: Backcover’ by Francesc Ruiz
Advertising: Ester Partegàs

Issue 7: The Last Evening Sun
November 17, 2010
Cover: 'Without Rain Partial Nights Aerial Days'. Special cover by Julia Rometti & Victor Costales (and page 12)
Feature: ‘Translating Rubble’, Kathleen Ritter on Mark Manders
Focus: ‘Floor Tautology’, Simone Menegoi on TLN artist Luciano Fabro’s Pavimento–Tautologia (1967) + ‘Fabricating Fabro’ by Shannon Bowser
Special pull-out poster: Installation pictures, checklist of TLN + ‘Your week in Headlines’ by New Museum Facebook and Twitter followers
Feature: 'Thomas Hirschhorn ♥ Queens', Charity Scribner on TLN artist Thomas Hirschhorn
Feature: 'Red and black all over, again' Irina Chernyakova interviews The Last... newspapers’ designer Chad Kloepfer
Focus: TLN project Jeffrey Inaba/C-Lab’s Cloudy with a chance of Certainty (2010) + ‘C-What?’ by Greg Barton
Media Habits: Michael Rakowitz
The Next Newspaper: WikiLeaks
Dirt Sheet: Janine Armin at the Taipei and the Gwangju Biennials
Picture Agent: Maria Loboda
Cartoon: ‘The Woods: Flavor of the month’ by Francesc Ruiz
100 Years Ago…: Palestine Daily Herald
Advertising: Ester Partegàs

Issue 8: The Last Journal
November 24, 2010
Cover: ‘Le Petit Journal’. Fernando Bryce, from the series L'Humanité (2009–2010)
Feature: 'L'Humanité', Yasmil Raymond on Fernando Bryce
Report: 'Independent Gazette', Lorena Muñoz-Alonso on The Independent by Damián Ortega and Can Altay’s The Church Street Partners' Gazette + Damián Ortega talks with Alona Pardo
Media Habits: Ester Partegàs
Brazil Focus: 'The Imaginery Newspaper', Chris Dercon on Luciano Figueiredo + ‘Jornal da Cidade’, Ana Paula Cohen on 28b
Focus: 'Boetti e His Double', Christian Rattemeyer on TLN artist Alighiero e Boetti's Corriere Della Sera (1976)
The Next Newspaper: Crowd Sourcing – spot.us / emphas.is, by Irina Chernyakova
Exclusive interview: 'The Days of This Society...', Desiree B. Ramos interviews TLN artist Rirkrit Tiravanija
Focus: 'Paper view' Gwen Schwartz with New Museum visitors
Focus: 'What's CUP?', on TLN partner organization The Center for Urban Pedagogy, by Gwen Schwartz and Max Andrews
Picture Agent: Adrià Julià
Focus: '29 Days Later', Sarah Wang on Larry Johnson’s TLN work Untitled Green Screen Memory (2010) + ‘2009 California Fires’ by Collin Munn
Cartoon: 'The Woods: Creation' by Francesc Ruiz
100 Years Ago...: The Marion Daily Mirror
Advertising: Ester Partegàs

Issue 9: The Last Times
December 1, 2010
Cover: Peter Piller, Pfeile (Arrows), Archiv Peter Piller 2000-2006
Exclusive interview: ‘Bedeutungsflächen, In Löcher blicken, Ortsbesichtigungen...’, Julienne Lorz talks to Peter Piller
Focus: ‘Press Victim’, Collin Munn on TLN artist Mike Kelley's Timeless/Authorless Series (1995) + ‘Mike on Mike’, Mike Santistevan on Mike Kelley
Picture Agent: Pablo Vargas Lugo
100 Years Ago…: The Seattle Star
The Next Newspaper: Web aggregation, by Irina Chernyakova
Focus: ‘Sarah’s Sex Sport-Trait’, Lorena Muñoz-Alonso on Fat, Forty and Flab-ulous (1990) by TLN artist Sarah Lucas
Media Habits: Carey Young
Dirt Sheet: Janine Armin on Allen Ruppersberg’s TLN work Screamed from Life (1982)
Focus: 'Dutiful Scrivener', Angel Nevarez & Valerie Tevere on their work for TLN + Mark Twain’s ‘Amended Obituaries’ (1902)
Focus and exclusive interview: ‘Graphite Testimony’, Greg Barton on Andrea Bowers’ Eulogy to One and Another (2006) featured in TLN
Exclusive interview: ‘Having It All’, Latitudes talks with TLN co-curator Richard Flood about TLN artist Robert Gober
Cartoon: 'The Woods: Fahrenheit 451' by Francesc Ruiz
Advertising: Ester Partegàs

Issue 10: The Last Express
December 8, 2010
Cover: Hans Haacke, News (1969/2008)
Exclusive interview: ‘I’m still nostalgic vis-à-vis image making’, Rodrigo Moura interviews Mauro Restiffe
Dirt Sheet: Janine Armin on TLN participant Dexter Sinister’s The First/Last Newspaper (2009)
Report: 'Fit to Print?: The newsroom reinvented', Latitudes reports on the New Museum talk between Adam Chadwick and Jason Fry
100 Years Ago...: Los Angeles Herald
Focus: ‘Blu Dot: What?’, Gwen Schwartz and Mariana Cánepa Luna on TLN partner organization Blu Dot
The Next Newspaper: The Daily, by Irina Chernyakova
Focus: ‘Do you like milk and honey?’, Greg Barton on TLN artist Emily Jacir’s Sexy Semite (2000-2)
Picture Agent: Simon Fujiwara
Media Habits: Michalis Pichler
Feature: ‘Embrace the Ambiguity’, TLN co-curators Richard Flood and Benjamin Godsill reflect on the exhibition
Focus: ‘Reading the Reader’, Greg Barton and Irina Chernyakova on TLN partner organisation NetLab’s the New City Reader
Exclusive interview: ‘The Wires’, Janine Armin interviews TLN artist Hans Haacke
Cartoon: 'The Woods: The End' by Francesc Ruiz
Advertising: Ester Partegàs

New Museum
235 Bowery 
New York, NY 10002, USA
Wednesday 11-6 pm; Thursday 11-9
pm; Friday-Sunday 11-6 pm;
Monday and Tuesday closed
http://www.newmuseum.org


All images: Latitudes | www.lttds.org




Newsletter #28 - December 2010


ONGOING...
Latitudes' editorial residency as part of
'The Last Newspaper' exhibition at the New Museum has just concluded (see photos of the newspaper here + documentation archive here. The exhibition however, continues until 9 January 2011.

ALSO ONGOING...
'Vic Cambrils Barcelona...A Library Project' for Midway Contemporary Art, Minneapolis, on view until 23 December 2010. Photo gallery here

IN JANUARY 2011...
Curators of the exhibition 'Christina Hemauer & Roman Keller: United Alternative Energies', Aarhus Art Building, Arhus, Denmark, 22 January–3 April 2011.


IN FEBRUARY 2011...
Curators of the Laboratorio 987 2011 season: 'Amikejo' MUSAC, León. First exhibition: 'Amikejo: Pennacchio Argentato' (29 January–27 March 2011), opening on Saturday 29th together with
MUSAC's exhibitions: The Mission and the Missionaries by Georges Adéagbo, Desaparecidos by Gervasio Sánchez, The Uneasy Subject by Akram Zaatari, and Un modo de organización alrededor del vacío. Brumaria Works#3 Expanded Violences.

ALSO IN FEBRUARY 2011...
Professional Encounters, 'Curating Emerging Artists', ARCOMadrid 2011, 18 February.


Check Latitudes' web www.lttds.org for further info
Facebook page here
Twitter here
Flickr photosets here
Previous newsletter here
Youtube Latitudes Channel




'THE LAST EXPRESS' AVAILABLE NOW! #10 and final issue of the Latitudes-edited newspapers for 'The Last Newspaper' exhibition, New Museum

FINAL ISSUE! Issue 10: 'The Last Express'
(READ IT ON ISSUU)

Table of contents:


Cover:
Hans Haacke News (1968–2008)
Exclusive interview: Inhotim curator Rodrigo Moura talks to artist Mauro Restiffe

Dirt Sheet column: Janine Armin on TLN Dexter Sinister's 'The First/Last Newspaper (November 4–21, 2009)'
Report: 'Fit to Print?: The newsroom reinvented', conversation at the New Museum between ‘The Last...’ columnist Adam Chadwick and web veteran Jason Fry
100 years ago...: 'Los Angeles Herald' (Los Angeles, California) 1900-1911, December 8, 1910
Focus:
Blu Dot's self-assembly office furniture for the ‘The Last Newspaper’ partner organizations
The Next Newspaper (Profiling the organizations, projects, initiatives and individuals redefining ink-and-paper news): The Daily

Focus: 'Do you love milk and honey?', Greg Barton on Emily Jacir's TLN work 'SEXY SEMITE' (2000-02)
Picture Agent-Our singular picture agency: Simon Fujiwara
Media Habits: Michalis Pichler

'Embrace the Ambiguity', ‘The Last Newspaper’ curators Richard Flood and Benjamin Godsill reflect on the project’s journey.
Focus: 'Reading the Reader', Greg Barton and Irina Chernyakova on TLN partner organisation the 'New City Reader' 
Exclusive interview: 'The Wires', Janine Armin talks to TLN artist Hans Haacke
Cartoon: 'The Woods: The End' by Francesc Ruiz
Advertising Department:
Ester Partegàs

 

Video of issue 10 - videos of previous issues here

EXCLUSIVE CONTENT!

REPORT
'Fit to Print?: The newsroom reinvented'



27 November 2010: Public gathered for the talk on the 4th floor's 'Peace Arena'.

On November 27, Latitudes organized a conversation at the New Museum between ‘Fit to Print’ filmmaker (and ‘The Last...’ columnist) Adam Chadwick, and Jason Fry, an expert in the challenges faced by newspapers in the digital world. 

Jason Fry: I started at The Wall Street Journal in 1995, when they were a single free section and after thirteen years I had seen it become a full paper and go beyond its roots of being a financial paper to become a source of general news. It became a subscription site far ahead anyone else. One reason why so many jobs are disappearing in newspapers now, is that some top publishing executives do not understand the business they are in and are only slowly realizing that is suicide. They have become very confused between the mission of journalism and the business of journalism. The business is decaying, leaving the mission looking for new financial backing.


Jason Fry during the talk

Adam Chadwick: How did journalism come to this breaking point? It began in the early 1960s, starting with how television affected the newspaper industry as it became the media where most people got their information from. Newspapers started changing their priorities back then...



Adam Chadwick during the talk

JF: Newspapers were mostly family-owned operations, others were true public servants. Soon after some became owned by corporations and that changed the calculus for the business and how they made money. They were depending on performance and shareholders. Even in the 1990s newspapers were making a profit margin of 30% year after year, without really understanding the business they were in. Television has certainly created a star mentality amongst reporters which is not entirely working to the benefit of journalism. Newspapers have been historically successful because publishers essentially had a localized monopoly on printing and distribution. Retail stores would communicate their products by placing ads in a newspaper – the publishers owned a distribution mechanisms. In the last ten to fifteen years that has changed, as advertising has moved to the internet – everything from furniture to job listings. Advertising was the business that funded journalism – the financial underpinnings have been knocked down.

AC: 80% of the content that is broadcast on National Public Radio comes from newspapers. It’s the same with CBS News – Russell Mitchell for instance has told me they are pulling content from The New York Times and The Washington Post. So the erosion of the newspaper is also hugely affecting TV.


Public watching the trailer of 'Fit to print' screened at the beginning for the talk.

JF: Newspapers used to compete with whoever started a new one locally; now they try to compete with the entire world. There is way too much content out there. How many thousands of movie reviews can you find online of the latest Harry Potter movie? And how many do we actually need?

AC: Is the web an echo-chamber of news, particularly with search engine optimization and ‘content farms’ dragging traffic? Or, if you boil it down, is it all only coming from The New York Times or The Washington Post? What is being lost now that the business model is broken? Investigative reporting?

JF: I’m not worried about journalism, I am worried about newspapers. We cannot confuse the two. The web has been wonderful to open up voices and to demystify reporting while letting a lot more people use their own expertise. But yes, investigative journalism is missing and it takes a long time and it’s very expensive. If the The New York Times wants to cover a story on the dodgy doings of an organization, they will continue doing it, even if the organization goes into battle with lawyers, they won’t be intimidated. But that won’t happen if you are blogger or freelancer no matter how smart or committed you are. I wonder if that kind of reporting has to be done institutionally though.



Public gathered for the talk on the 4th floor's 'Peace Arena'.

AC: ProPublica is one of the only models, they are a non-profit for investigative reporting organisation with about thirty reporters and editors. [See The Last Post, page 9] They have deep pockets which enable them to pay competitive salaries. Other smaller examples are Investigative Voice from Baltimore led by Stephen Janis, who started it with Alan Forman, a former Baltimore Sun journalist. It focuses on crime and corruption in west Baltimore, which if you’ve seen The Wire you’ll know about. They don’t compete with the Baltimore Sun, as they cover stories they wouldn’t. They also operate thanks to donations, but don’t know for how much longer they can continue working like this. How sustainable this model is, nobody knows. Even with grant organisations like the Knight Foundation there is only so much money they can throw in. Carmen, what is your experience at The Trenton Times?

Carmen Cusido: I’m a full-time reporter now, we have five members in the staff – it used to be more than twenty. It does get tougher because we don’t have the resources to cover investigative stories. I have to pull out the resources on my own. I cover education, county news, and immigration news because I’m the only Spanish speaking reporter. When we were a larger organisation, we used to have lunch breaks and discuss things as a group, but now you really need to prioritise. It’s hugely difficult as you have to take work home with you and there are no boundaries with your private life; it’s a 24/7 job. Before you could go out and talk to people, get their trust and understand their perspective. Now I cannot even leave the desk, as I have to cover three stories and have to do everything over the telephone.



Carmen Cusido during the talk

Question: Do people really want hard news anymore? Do newspapers understand their readers?

JF: Take the recent health care discussion: a hugely complex issue to follow and one that matters to all of us. Newspapers would cover the most recent political victory, but never show the bones of the story. This isn’t easy stuff. To the shock of newspaper editors, a lot of people read Wikipedia to understand complex situations as you get a straight forward recitation of what’s going on. That’s a model newspapers haven’t done as they continue to follow a telegraph system for getting news out. It’s not satisfying readers’ needs.

AC: Most people I’ve spoken to want the hard news, the meat and potatoes of good journalism. Readers have stopped trusting newspapers for various reasons, some felt they were not catering a certain demographic of people or literally because news organizations have removed the newspaper dispenser boxes from poorer communities, to reach out to richer ones that would potentially advertise with them.

Question from the audience: What is your view on paywalls?

JF: News organisations should realize they are competing with the web. The success of the The Wall Street Journal’s paywall, has been in that it is targeted mostly at business readers, yet The New York Times covers everything. You pay for something therefore you think it’s valuable. Paywalls are getting in trouble in two ways: the hassle of entering a password, finding a reliable payment method. It’s not very immediate. Secondly, in the way they are implemented. If you are seeing nothing of the content you are about to buy you’re taking a blind leap of faith in paying for something you are likely going to read only once.

AC: It’s not cheap to produce content for the iPad either. If you put up a paywall you are no longer part of the linking culture such as The Huffington Post.

IF: You cannot create a walled garden that nobody can get into. You have to tease readers and let them share.

 
Question from the audience
: Is hyper-local journalism the way to go? Or to be more brutal, what will ultimately save journalism?

AC: Paying reporters and establishing a sustainable business model. Does non-profit model work? It does right now – but for how long?

– Transcribed by Mariana Cánepa Luna


All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org




'THE LAST TIMES' AVAILABLE NOW! #9 issue of the 10 Latitudes-edited newspapers for 'The Last Newspaper' exhibition, New Museum

Issue 9: 'The Last Times'
(READ IT ON ISSUU)
  
1 December 2010

Cover:
Peter Piller, Pfeile (Arrows), Archiv Peter Piller 2000-2006.
Exclusive interview:
‘Bedeutungsflächen, In Löcher blicken, Ortsbesichtigungen...’, Julienne Lorz talks to Peter Piller
Focus: ‘Press Victim’, Collin Munn on TLN artist Mike Kelley's Timeless/Authorless Series (1995) + ‘Mike on Mike’, New Museum Guard & Tour Guide Mike Santistevan on Mike Kelleys's work
Picture Agent: Pablo Vargas Lugo
100 Years Ago…: The Seattle Star (Seattle, Washington) 1899-1947, December 1, 1910

Next newspaper: Web aggregation
Focus: Sarah Sex Sport-Trait’, Lorena Muñoz-Alonso on TLN work Fat, Forty and Flab-ulous (1990) by TLN artist Sarah Lucas
Media Habits
: Carey Young

Dirt Sheet: Janine Armin on Allen Ruppersberg‘s TLN work Screamed from Life (1982)
Focus: 'Dutiful Scrivener' by TLN artists Angel Nevarez & Valerie Tevere + Mark Twain’s ‘Amended Obituaries’ (1902)
Focus and exclusive interview: ‘Graphite Testimony’, Greg Barton on Andrea Bowers’ work Eulogy to One and Another (2006) featured in TLN
Exclusive interview:
‘Having It All’, Latitudes talks with TLN co-curator Richard Flood about TLN artist Robert Gober’s work Newspaper (1992)
Cartoon:
'The Woods: Fahrenheit 451' by Francesc Ruiz
Advertising:
Ester Partegàs

 



EXCLUSIVE CONTENT!

Picture Agent: Our Singular Picture Agency
Pablo Vargas Lugo, artist


In 1996, NASA released images of the probable remains of extraterrestrial life in a meteorite of Martian origin found in Antarctica. Back then I quickly latched on to the enthusiasm caused by this news, and rather opportunistically used this image as part of an ambitious newspaper project. However, shortly afterwards, scientists disputed the authenticity of these supposedly fossilized bacteria, citing the possibility of an inorganic origin. Obviously the said newspaper project lost its edge once the findings were disproved, and was shamefully filed at the end of my portfolio.

Last year the original scientific team found traces of organically produced materials on their treasured meteorite, using more potent microscopes; but the cheers didn’t last for long, as their evidence was contradicted by another group working in a lab across the hall, and headed by the brother of the leader of the first team. As questions on the urgent matter of extraterrestrial life are appropriately resolved between siblings in close quarters, and hoping for further validation of the original findings, I file this picture in this other newspaper project, as a personal reminder of the troubled relationship between art, trustworthiness and whatever we choose to call news.





'The Last Newspaper' Discussion Event – 'Fit to Print?: The newsroom reinvented', 27 November 2010, New Museum


'The Last Newspaper' Discussion Event
'Fit to Print?: The newsroom reinvented'

Saturday 27 November 2010, 3pm

4th floor, New Museum, 235 Bowery

Free with general admission ticket.

In the context of 'The Last Newspaper' exhibition, partner organization Latitudes has organised a conversation about 'the next newspaper' between
Adam Chadwick and Jason Fry, both leading experts in the field of the probable fate of the traditional newspaper, and the possible future of journalism online. The conversation will take place in the 4th floor of the museum. 


Adam Chadwick is a scriptwriter, producer, filmmaker – and former copy-editor at The New York Times – who is currently working on 'Fit to Print', a documentary about the current upheaval in the U.S. newspaper industry. He has previously been a contributing blogger for IFC.com, IndieProducer.net and CityLightsMedia.com. He graduated from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 2005 with a degree in film. http://fittoprintfilm.com and his blog http://fittoprintfilm.wordpress.com/


Jason Fry is a Web veteran exploring the challenges faced by newspapers in the digital world. He spent nearly 13 years at The Wall Street Journal Online, where he was a columnist, editor and projects guy. Since leaving the Journal, Fry has consulted with leading news organizations working for EidosMedia, an innovative maker of cross-media editing-and-publishing software. http://jasonfry.wordpress.com/ and http://www.reinventingthenewsroom.com/

UPDATE

Jason Fry
and Adam Chadwick were joined by Carmen Cusido, a staff reporter for The Trenton Times and a recent graduate of Columbia Universities Graduate School for Journalism.

A report of the talk is published in 'The Last Express', available between 8–12 December 2010 from the New Museum galleries. 'The Last Express' will be the final weekly newspaper edited by Latitudes as part of their contribution to the 'The Last Newspaper' exhibition.

 


All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org 




'THE LAST JOURNAL' AVAILABLE NOW! #8 issue of the 10 Latitudes-edited newspapers for 'The Last Newspaper' exhibition, New Museum

Issue 8: 'The Last Journal'
(READ IT ON ISSUU)
 

24 November 2010

Cover:
Fernando Bryce, from the series L'Humanité (2009–2010)
Feature: 'L'Humanité', Yasmil Raymond on Fernando Bryce
Feature: 'Independent Gazette', Lorena Muñoz-Alonso reports from London on two newspaper-inspired exhibitions: 'The Independent' (Damián Ortega at The Curve, Barbican) and ‘Can Altay: The Church Street Partners' Gazette’, The Showroom. Plus Damián Ortega exchanges impressions with curator Alona Pardo on his show.
Media Habits: Ester Partegàs, TLN advertising department artist
Brazil Focus: 'The Imaginery Newspaper', Chris Dercon on Luciano Figueiredo & Ana Paula Cohen on 'Jornal 28b', the newspaper produced during the 28th Bienal de São Paulo.

Focus: 'Boetti e His Double', Christian Rattemeyer on TLN artist Alighiero e Boetti's Corriere Della Sera (1976)
The Next Newspaper (Profiling the organizations, projects, initiatives and individuals redefining ink-and-paper news):
CROWD-SOURCING – SPOT.US / EMPHAS.IS

Exclusive interview: 'The Days of This Society...', Desiree B. Ramos interviews TLN artist Rirkrit Tiravanija
Focus: 'Paper view'
Gwen Schwartz asked New Museum visitors about their experiences of TLN

Focus: 'What's CUP?' by Gwen Schwartz and Max Andrews
Picture Agent-Our singular picture agency: Adrià Julià
Focus: '29 Days Later', Sarah Wang on TLN work Untitled Green Screen Memory (2010) by Larry Johnson + 2009 California Fires by Collin Munn
Cartoon:
'The Woods' by Francesc Ruiz
Advertising Department:
Ester Partegàs













'THE DAYS OF THIS SOCIETY...'
New Museum curatorial fellow Desiree B. Ramos meets ‘The Last Newspaper’ artist Rirkrit Tiravanija

 

Above and below: Rirkrit Tiravanija, Untitled (the days of this society is numbered/September 15–October 12, 2008), 2010.
Acrylic and newspaper on linen. 13 parts, all measuring 86 1/8 x 84 1/8 x 1 inches each. Courtesy the artist and Gavin Brownʼs enterprise.


There I am; it’s 5pm sharp, and I have just arrived at Gavin Brown’s newly-expanded Meatpacking District art gallery. I’m checking out the new space while I wait for Rirkrit, who suddenly pulls up around the back door with a few groceries; turns out he’s cooking a paella dinner for a few friends. We walk around the space for a few minutes and before heading towards the kitchen in the back of the gallery. There I see a few art handlers setting up pots, tables, and chairs for Rirkrit’s guests. “We don’t have much time, fire away,” he says, looking at the recorder and the paper I am holding in my hands. We sit on a wooden bench and start our conversation. I have met with Rirkrit several times, and besides being a great artist he is really down to earth and approachable. Every time I talk to him it is quite a busy scenario all around.

Desiree B. Ramos: How did you become an artist?

Rirkrit Tiravanija: By accident! I actually wanted to be a photojournalist and then mistakenly took some art history classes and became curious about art. I left the university from the history department, and I went to art school and I went to talk to the counselor about the idea of studying art. So I had an appointment, I went to the meeting and I had to wait in this kind of lobby library. I was just standing there, looking around the shelf, and there was a book that stood out from the shelf from the Ontario College of Art, so I just pulled it out, took down the address and left. So it was kind of accidental.

DB: What was your first art piece?

RT: Umm, that’s a debate. It was actually an image that my father took of me; I made this plasticine sculpture on my ear, it was like an ear extension, so that I looked like a Vulcan. So I would say that was my first sculpture.


DB: Do you still have it, or a record of it?

RT: I have a picture that my father took, but I don’t have the actual plasticine. I guess I could always remake it.

DB: That would be fun...

RT: Yeah, that would be fun. Wow, you just gave me a new idea!

DB: What was your first political work?

RT: Well, it depends on what is political, you know, if personal is political. The first work I made in art school, officially made in art school, was about identity, about me being in the West and trying to figure out what that was. It was the first letter of the Thai alphabet drawn on cardboard, and then it had a Thai dictionary explanation with this alphabet in English. So in a way, that had a kind of cultural politics in it. I would say my work is always asking those kinds of personal political questions, I mean, about the self and about identity.

DB: What got you into cooking?

RT: It was the simplest thing I could do. I was working in Chicago on questions of, about, cultural artifacts. I worked on this conceptual work with the idea that these artifacts were displays, again, about identity also, and that they were missing; they were fragmented in a kind of gap, or there was a gap that I thought needed to be questioned.


DB: So it was natural for you to mix cooking with art?

RT: Exactly, because I was looking at pots, bowls and plates, and Buddha statues, and these were all objects of everyday use in my culture, so first I basically decided to just cook so that these things would always be in play and from that it became, well, it was always about the people. Of course these are things that were used everyday, which have been taken out of context, put onto display because they were valued in a different situation, and looked at through the Western eye as if they were somehow valuable in relation to the idea of culture. But for me it was really about the life around the object.

DB: What’s your favorite thing to cook?

RT: I don’t have a favorite thing to cook.

DB: Nothing that gets you more into the act of cooking and engaging with people?

RT: It’s not so much about the cooking, not about the food or any particular dish; it’s about the act and then ... I think it’s always more communal to cook a big pot of curry than to make a piece of steak. But I actually just recently cooked a lot of steak for 2,000 people so I’m actually wrong, I could cook steak for a lot of people but, of course, it’s about the activity of cooking. When we made this kind of barbecue grill, Argentinean style, the asado, it’s a communal activity in itself. So, it was just a matter of scale. People normally do it with families but here we extended it so we could involve even more people at the same moment, so it became something else.

DB: Where do you get your ideas from? Are you inspired by something in specific or do they randomly come to you? Do you get them from looking at things, reading, or conversing with people?

RT: I think it’s all of that. It’s an ongoing process that I have and I think many artists have, which is like you’re always thinking, looking and everything that you experience becomes a question or a possibility. It’s a combination; I’m looking at certain things that I’m interested in but, on the other hand, I’m always very receptive to what is happening around me, and that becomes a trigger for other things.


DB: I’m wondering how you go on varying so much in terms of media when it comes to your work. Is it difficult to maneuver all these different types of expression, ranging from cooking to investigations about architecture... ?

RT: I’m not interested in style, I’m interested in content and if all the elements make sense, they all have certain roots or they all certainly have a relation to each other. It could be an eight hour video or a ten hour cooking session, yet they all bring people to the same place.

DB: Do you consider your piece now on view in The Last Newspaper at the New Museum, Untitled (the days of this society are numbered/September 21, 2009), part of a series along with other text works you have recently produced?

RT: I consider them like signage, like stop signs, road signs. They form a series but they can make you pay attention to a certain place and a certain moment when you are confronted by them. I think about that layering of the newspaper, which is an activity I’m very interested in, and in the activity of information being gathered. There are just a lot of layers there for me, from the ads to the typeface of the newspaper itself. There’s a lot of coincidence – or accidents, or maybe even intentions – in the way that certain things get laid out on these pages. The sign makes you stop and pay attention to the other things happening behind it.

DB: Would you be able to explain further how that text in particular explores the social role of the artist?

RT: ‘The days of this society is numbered’ is attributed to the situation in 1968; obviously, at that time it was a provocation within the context of a manifestation against the society, or rather of society against a particular group of people, the institution, people in control. And I would say that, of course, those moments reoccur, those conditions can still exist.

DB: I’m sure everybody asks about the grammar…

RT: Yes, well, it’s a bad translation of French. The mistake makes people react.

 
DB: And the dates on the newspaper…

RT: Well some in the series do make a reference to, for example, the market crash of 2008, just at the end of George Bush’s presidency. It has all been a commentary about the Bush years and certainly in conjunction with the market crash.

DB: What will we see from you in the near future? What are you working on now?

RT: I’m working on a film which will be about a retired Thai farmer in the countryside, and I hope that people will get to see it, or that it’s good enough for people to see it.





'THE LAST EVENING SUN' AVAILABLE NOW! #7 issue of the 10 Latitudes-edited newspapers for 'The Last Newspaper' exhibition, New Museum

Issue 7: 'The Last Evening Sun'
(READ IT ON ISSUU)

Table of contents:

Cover:
'Without Rain Partial Nights Aerial Days', a special cover by Julia Rometti & Victor Costales (continues page 12)
Feature: Artist and writer Kathleen Ritter misreads the incomprehensible newspapers of Mark Manders
Focus: Simone Menegoi on Pavimento, Tautologia (1967) by Luciano Fabro; plus notes on 'Fabricating Fabro' by the New Museum Chief Preparator, Shannon Bowser
Special pull-out poster: Installation pictures and a checklist of 'The Last Newspaper' and New Museum's Facebook fans and Twitter followers reporting a sentence of personal news
Feature: 'Thomas Hirschhorn ♥ Queens' Charity Scribner on Thomas Hirschhorn
Feature: 'Red and black all over, again' Irina Chernyakova follows the design and production of 'The Last Evening Sun'
Focus: Inaba/C-Lab's 'Cloudy with a chance of Certainty'
Media Habits: Michael Rakowitz
The Next Newspaper (Profiling the organizations, projects, initiatives and individuals redefining ink-and-paper news):
WikiLeaks
Dirt Sheet column:
Janine Armin at the Taipei and the Gwangju Biennials
Picture Agent-Our singular picture agency: Maria Loboda 

100 years Ago…: 'Palestine Daily Herald' (Palestine, Texas) 1902-1949, November 17, 1910
Cartoon:
'The Woods: Flavor of the month' by Francesc Ruiz
'Advertising Department':
Ester Partegàs







EXCLUSIVE CONTENT!



Joshua Edwards, Exhibitions Manager at the New Museum, mops the floor and lays the previous day’s New York Times
to create Fabro’s Pavimento, Tautologia (1967). Photos: Latitudes


FLOOR TAUTOLOGY 
Curator and writer Simone Menegoi on Luciano Fabro’s ‘Pavimento–Tautologia’, the earliest work in ‘The Last Newspaper’

My grandfather had a sports car, a Lancia Fulvia coupé. He always kept it polished and would only use it on certain occasions. He was so afraid of getting it dirty that he never took off the plastic wrapping that covered the seats when he bought it, even after years of use. His zeal was not particularly unusual in Italy those years (the 1970s), as many people left on the protective plastic film that brand new sofas or chairs would have when purchased. This habit came from two decades earlier, when memories of war and poverty were still lurking. The first consumer goods purchases were the result of laborious saving, so things had to last for as long as possible.

Pavimento–Tautologia (Floor–Tautology) by Luciano Fabro is based on the same logic that drove people like my grandfather to keep the car seats wrapped: a logic that gave up the pleasure of being able to touch the leather or the fabric of the seat in exchange for the satisfaction of knowing that, beneath the protective plastic, the surface was kept intact. In Fabro’s work, a portion of the floor (sometimes an entire surface) is cleaned, polished with wax and then covered with newspapers. Beyond the ephemeral protection of paper – “a cheap and lightweight Carl Andre” as Jörg Heiser has written – the floor disappears, we cannot appreciate its lustre, but we know it’s being kept immaculate, and we know this will be preserved, even if we walk on the papers.

In 1978, a decade after presenting the work for the first time in Turin, Fabro wrote "in my town... the floor is cleaned and then covered, at least for the first day, with papers, newspapers or rags to avoid getting it dirty... on that first day, in those two or three days that it was covered with paper, no one saw the floor clean. This particular way of accounting for the labour and its preservation, not for ostentation but as a private affair, seeks to ensure that the effort made doesn’t end up in anything too quick.”


Newspaper placed on top of the mopped floor. Photo: Latitudes

The comparison between the newspapers on the floor and plastic on the new car seats, however, applies only within certain constraints. There is a fundamental difference between the work required for you to buy a car and the work involved in cleaning the floor. In Italy, in those years, the second had a clear gender dimension: it was a domestic job regarded as part of the housewife’s duties. Fabro was fully aware of this and it is no accident that he presented Pavimento for the first time in a gallery inside a private apartment, a space that preserved a domestic environment. Fabro was also aware of the position he was adopting as a male artist presenting it as a piece. The sculptor sided with the housewife, with her modest and under appreciated task that was repeated daily. "We experience seeing our work destroyed daily" Carla Lonzi, a friend and admirer of Fabro, wrote in 1970 in the Manifesto di rivolta femminile (Manifesto of feminist revolt), a key text of Italian feminism.

Forty years onwards, what is the effect of Pavimento in the context of an American museum, one so different from when the work was presented for the first time? Is it still effective? The vernacular appearance of the work, its provincial and quotidian dimension is probably hard to grasp today, particularly outside Italy. The political aspect – gender politics – is certainly less visible now than it was in the late 1960s, although its historical importance cannot be questioned. Pavimento remains current with the idea of "care", caring as an essential dimension of the relationship with a work. Pavimento consists only of this: in taking care. "Every experience related to this handmade piece is linked to maintenance," Fabro wrote in 1967. A piece that is not to be contemplated, but to be done. Its only legitimate spectator is the one who realised it and looked after it. In short, perhaps it is its only spectator. (Since to the rest of us, the polished floor remains invisible.) Fabro referred to caring in a material sense, as a symbol of all the other ‘cures’ that a piece would require: of a critical or political kind, for instance. In this sense, Pavimento was for him a sort of manifesto, as he stated that a work can never be taken for granted, but must be constantly redefined, reiterated, and defended. In its ‘infrathin’ layer of paper and floor wax, Pavimento–Tautologia guards a surprising depth of meaning.

– Translated from Italian by Mariana Cánepa Luna


(sidebar) FABRICATING FABRO


Installation view of Luciano Fabro's Pavimento-Tautologia (1967) on the 4th floor of the New Museum.
Courtesy of the Luciano Fabro Estate. Photo courtesy: Katie Sokolor / Gothamist.

Shannon Bowser: "I've been installing the piece every weekday since the exhibition opened in October. The layout uses all the pages of an issue yet the arrangement can be a little haphazard. We can lay the pages facing different directions and it doesn't need to be too precise or follow a set dimension, even though the barriers that surround the piece help as a guide to square it up to the wall. I throw down extra sheets here and there but it usually works out to be the same size each day overall no matter how many pages there were in the previous day's issue.

We have a specific subscription for the New York Times for this piece. Every morning I pick up a copy to keep it for the following day and I have with me the one from yesterday ready to go. I find myself reading the news while installing the work and so sometimes I have to pause to read properly, and I end up finding out about stuff that I would normally wouldn't. I wish I had time to read the New York Times every day, because there are so many good articles. Sometimes I flip through pages when I'm laying them down, so if there's an annoying full page with glaring women facing upwards I can choose to turn it around. It's really interesting to see yesterday's newspaper all laid out on the floor and realize the actual physical size of it, because you cannot really read the New York Times on the subway for example, because it's so big – it's so impractical!

Doing it definitely adds time to my morning routine so I've been coming in early every morning to be able to install the Fabro and then get everything else sorted as all these shows require a lot of maintenance. But it has been really interesting, I definitely feel like I'm participating in an artwork."

Watch a 'making of' video of the piece here.

Shannon Bowser (Chief Preparator) installs Pavimento–Tautologia on Wednesdays, Thursday and Fridays.
Victoria Manning (Registrar) takes charge on Saturdays and Joshua Edwards (Exhibition Manager) on Sundays.




'THE LAST OBSERVER' AVAILABLE NOW! #6 issue of the 10 Latitudes-edited newspapers for 'The Last Newspaper' exhibition, New Museum

Issue 6: 'The Last Observer'
(READ IT ON ISSUU)

Table of contents:

Cover: '
Truth Study?', Wolfgang Tillmans' 'Truth Study Center (NY)', 2010
Feature:
London correspondent Lorena Muñoz-Alonso meets Wolfgang Tillmans whose table top installation 'Truth Study Center' is featured in 'The Last Newspaper'
Focus:
Greg Barton & Collin Munn pay a visit to Judith Bernstein, who presents 'The Last Newspaper' visitors with two works from 1967
Picture Agent - Our singular picture agency:
Renzo Martens
Media Habits:
City-as-School Students
Feature:
Curator and writer Manuel Segade – who opened his Facebook account four years ago and now has 872 friends– comments on the profile of the 'click self'
Feature:
Art Historian and curator Lars Bang Larsen went to high school with Jacob Fabricius, the fellow Dane behind the non-profit free newspaper 'Old News', featured in 'The Last Newspaper'
Feature:
Editorial Curatorial. ‘The Last Post’, ‘The Last Gazette’, ‘The Last Register’, ‘The Last Star-Ledger’, ‘The Last Monitor’ and now ‘The Last Observer’ have set out in part to address the role of the curator versus the role of the editor. Our Cluj-Napoca correspondent Marcel Janco takes up the story.
The Next Newspaper:
Patch. Andrew Losowsky interviews Warren Webster, company president
Focus:
Irina Chernyakova on the 'Perpetual Peace Project’ of ‘The Last Newspaper’ partner organization the Slought Foundation.
Fit to Print:
Adam Chadwick attempts to get in touch with 'The Huffington Post' founder for his documentary film about the news industry.
100 years Ago…:
'The News-Herald' (Hillsboro, Highland Co., Ohio) 1886-1973 (changed title to 'The Hillsboro Press Gazette' (1973-1985), November 10, 1910. 

Cartoon: ‘The Woods: Backcover’ by Francesc Ruiz
‘Advertising Department’:
Ester Partegàs












IS THIS TRUE OR NOT?

‘The Last Observer’ London correspondent Lorena Muñoz-Alonso meets Wolfgang Tillmans, whose table top installation ‘Truth Study center’ is featured in ‘The Last Newspaper’.


Installation view of Wolfgang Tillmans’, Truth Study Center (NY), 2010.
Wood, glass, and mixed media. Courtesy the artist and Andrea Rosen Gallery,
© Wolfgang Tillmans. Photo: Benoit Pailley. Courtesy New Museum.

A door buzzer is activated on a busy street of East London on a rainy Saturday evening; I push and find myself in Between Bridges, the non-profit gallery space Wolfgang Tillmans opened in 2006 to show artists that “are overlooked in the London scene”. (The current exhibition is by Gerd Arntz, a fairly unknown German artist and activist of the Weimar era.) I climb the spiral staircase to the studio and Tillmans welcomes me upstairs and offers me tea. He is tired but talkative, having just returned from Nottingham, where he has been installing his works for the British Art Show 7. His studio is a huge open space, full of desks and wooden tables, where newspapers and magazines pile under the neon lights. “Last year at the Venice Biennale I had four table works. And I had a whole room table installation (Space, Food, Religion, 2010) at the Serpentine Gallery show. But having The Last Newspaper and the Nottingham show opening in the space of three weeks has reactivated the Truth Study center project in a very significant way”, he says while pointing to the build up of world-wide printed media that towers on every surface of the studio.

Lorena Muñoz-Alonso: What is or are the origins of your Truth Study Center works?

Wolfgang Tillmans: The project started in 2005 with a show in London at Maureen Paley which coincided with the publication of my third book for Taschen, also titled Truth Study center. It was a contradiction, somehow, because the contents of the book had nothing to do with the tables. That first show included sixteen tables. Then, in 2006, I had a big mid–career survey in the U.S., a show that toured between Chicago, Los Angeles and Mexico City which included a twenty-four-table installation. In 2007 I had a show at the Kestner-Gesellschaft in Hannover where I showed thirty tables, which then become part of the exhibition at the Hamburger Bahnhof in Berlin. So there have been two very big installations so far. The U.S. installation was altered from city to city; I was adding and adapting the contents depending on the context.

LM-A: So the way you can work on the tables is quite quick and reactive?

WT: Yes, pretty much. The tour was a year and a half long, and they were heady times in the American political arena, so it was interesting being able to incorporate all that to the work. There was a particular piece that was then published in The Guardian called ‘Ten easy steps for a fascist America’ by Naomi Wolf – a very heavy statement indeed. It was very striking and beautifully illustrated, so I made a table incorporating that on the spot. That table piece is again in The Last Newspaper exhibition. Americans don’t really like foreigners to criticise them. They are good at self-criticism, but the moment it’s a foreigner who does it, they can get defensive. But Wolf is American, so that couldn’t be accused of coming from European prejudices.


Detail of Truth Study Center (NY), 2010. Wood, glass, and mixed media.
Courtesy the artist and Andrea Rosen Gallery, © Wolfgang Tillmans. Photo: Latitudes


LM-A: How did you begin the process of incorporating the table as a new element in the vocabulary of your practice?

WT: It actually started in 1995 with a show at Portikus in Frankfurt where I used five flat cabinets to show images I had published in magazines. Also in the Turner Prize show in 2000 I used the same idea of laying out elements on a flat horizontal surface, so it was already settling within my practice then. While I was editing the Truth Study center book I came to this really obvious realisation that all my work happens on a table. A table provides a space for a loose arrangement, where things are laid out in a certain way, but can be easily rearranged. On a wall you have to pin or tape the stuff, but a table is more fluid. There is clarity and complete contingency at the same time.

LM-A: And why did you start using newspapers as raw material in your work?

WT: I had worked with found newspapers before, in the ‘Soldiers’ series (1999). I have to confess I am a bit of a newspaper junkie and have collected them since childhood. I often think that a day’s newspaper contains the essence of the whole world. But I guess that around 2002–2004, the years post 9/11, a clearer picture of the world we live in emerged – all the insanity that surrounded us – after what had seemed like the less politically charged 1990s. I was enraged and concerned and spending a lot of time reading media and thinking about all these different claims to the truth, ‘the big truth’ which was the ultimate justification behind all that violence and those wars. I realised that all the problems that the world faces right now arise from men claiming to possess absolute truths.


Detail of Truth Study Center (NY), 2010. Wood, glass, and mixed media.
Courtesy the artist and Andrea Rosen Gallery, © Wolfgang Tillmans. Photo: Latitudes

LM-A:
So hence the name…

WT: Of course it would be very desirable to have a completely neutral ‘Truth Study center’, but that will never be possible. So even though it has this big title, it is not claiming to be delivering truth, but rather looking at all these different, opposed truths. But it is not at all saying that everything is relative or subjective. I do think there are certain truths that are not negotiable, that some events and attitudes are wrong, and I am straightforward about in the work, which I think is precisely what makes it interesting. It takes a moral stand on the one hand, but on the other is always aware of its absurdity and of its extreme limitations. So it presents all these issues, like the impact of AIDS denial in Africa or the question of the existence or not of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq – the whole war came about from a single question: is this true or not?

LM-A: Are the tables fixed in their arrangements and subjects?

WT: The tables are, or can be, pieces in their own right. They do not always have to come in the same installations. But it’s the same as with a wall installation, when I think a grouping really works, I try to maintain it. But the working process is quite flexible and not set in stone.


LM-A: So you color–photocopy all the newspaper that are on the tables, which is already a process of translation in itself…

WT: Very much so. That is the essential part of the visual composition, because we have been talking a lot about content but of course if the table works were not interesting to look at, they wouldn’t have an artistic justification. I use the color photocopy because of aesthetic reasons, but also because the color copy is amazingly permanent, as opposed to newspaper. I couldn’t use the original newspaper cause it wouldn’t look good after a year. But media-wise there are also real things, like a lottery ticket, a bus ticket, a vegetable wrapper…



Installation view of the Truth Study Center (NY), 2010. Wood, glass, and mixed media.
Courtesy the artist and Andrea Rosen Gallery, © Wolfgang Tillmans. Photo: Latitudes

LM-A: You have a very strong relationship to printed matter. You have even said: “Everything I do happens on paper”, which I think is a simple but very meaningful realisation, with a lot of implications...

WT: I have a double interest in The Last Newspaper show. Not only do I use newspapers and magazines as material, but also my work is heavily featured in printed media and I use media as both generator and distributor of my work.

LM-A: What are the main subjects of your tables are in The Last Newspaper?

WT: There is one table about soldiers and war, one about religion, another about the depiction of war, games and violence on the internet. I also have some images of airlines and the experience of flying and there is one about Americans’ attitudes to food. There are a lot of critical messages there, but you could find all of them in very mainstream publications. Information and criticality is there for everyone, which is also one of issues I want to highlight in this work.

LM-A: Is this series your outlet for political expression?

WT: There is definitely a bit of that. I use these works to make statements on subjects that I feel very strongly about but that I can’t or don’t want to tackle in my photographs. At the same time, though, the reason why I started to work with images from the very beginning was because I wanted to be involved with what was going on the world. Questions of taste or of beauty have always been politically charged for me. Do you find two men kissing disgusting or beautiful? That is a question of aesthetics but also of politics. I’ve always had this very strong awareness that every freedom that I enjoy as a gay person has been hard fought for by many people before me, and that gave me a great sense of public responsibility. I think every person counts. I might be very traditional in that sense, but I really think it does matter.





'THE LAST MONITOR' AVAILABLE NOW! #5 issue of the 10 Latitudes-edited newspapers for 'The Last Newspaper' exhibition, New Museum


Issue 5: The Last Monitor
(READ IT ON ISSUU)
 
November 3, 2010


Cover: ‘Today & Yesterday’. Gustav Metzger, Eichmann and the Angel, 2005.
Exclusive interview: Janine Armin on 'The Last Newspaper's work 'Eating the Wall Street Journal' by William Pope L.
Cover Story: Sophie O’Brien on Gustav Metzger
‘Picture Agent: Our singular picture agency’: Jordan Wolfson, artist
The Next Newspaper: Irina Chernyakova on ‘The San Francisco Panorama’
Fit to Print: Adam Chadwick on the digital divide
100 Years Ago…: ‘The Bisbee Daily Review’, 1901–1971, November 3, 1910
Media Habits: Mark von Schlegell, science fiction novelist and art essayist
Focus: Marcel Janco on Sarah Charlesworth
‘Readers’ Lives’: 'Paper-Weight Champion', Inveterate collector Harley Spiller – who recently completed a masters thesis, ‘On Newsstands Now! A History of Paperweights and Newsstand Advertising’ – weighs up the ‘pisapapeles’, ‘Papierbeschwere’, and 鎮紙 of the world.
Feature: ‘Heralding the Gizmo’ Max Andrews on Kirstine Roepstorff
‘Readers’ Lives’ by Marc D’Andre
Infographic: Facebook poll: where does the New Museum's audience get their information?
Cartoon: ‘The Woods: Tools’ by Francesc Ruiz
‘Advertising Department’: Ester Partegàs with Holly Coulis and Ridley Howard

Watch this and other 'The Last...' issues on Latitudes' Youtube Channel


EXCLUSIVE CONTENT!

All images courtesy Harley Spiller. Photos: Micki Spiller

PAPER -WEIGHT CHAMPION
Inveterate collector Harley Spiller – who recently completed a masters thesis, ‘On Newsstands Now! A History of Paperweights and Newsstand Advertising’ – weighs up the ‘pisapapeles’, ‘Papierbeschwere’, and 鎮紙 of the world.


Newsstand paperweights – the usually cast-iron weights that saw their heyday in the 1950s on newsstands across the world – bear the insignia of newspapers and magazines like the New York Times, Toronto Star, Saturday Evening Post, Time, Life, and Newsweek. The Mortimer Spiller Company, Inc., my parents’ advertising and sales promotion business, manufactured and sold these weights from the late 1940s through the mid 1980s. A century of their concerted collecting and documentation efforts has resulted in an archive of 151 unique international newsstand weights, plus the original carved mahogany prototypes, news-dealer aprons and caps, business correspondence, photographs, almost 1,000 news clippings, and more.


Advertising and the media have always been linked. The nation’s first mass-market newspapers and magazines arrived in the 1890s and 1900s, their very existence made possible by advertising fees collected from large corporations and retailers. The first weights to hold down newspapers may have been well-worn horseshoes, which were readily available at the onset of the 20th century, about the time automobiles started replacing horses. Paperweights forged expressly for newsstand use started appearing shortly thereafter, and by mid-century they were a fixture on the urban scene.

In the 1950s and 1960s, some of the thousands of weights Spiller was making were shipped overseas by Life, Time, and the Herald Tribune. These weights were deployed on the handful of major newsstands that sold international publications in London, Paris, and other European capitals. Of the 45 total weights my father collected overseas, from the 1970s until 2005, there are 37 in languages other than English.

The weights Spiller collected on Barcelona’s Las Ramblas, where throngs of people go to shop, sit in public, people-watch, and while away the time, run the gamut from a rudimentary and well-used bent-steel ingot with its painted name La Visión, almost completely obliterated, to gorgeous heavily lacquered enamel and polished metal specimens from periodicals like ABC and El Mundo.

One of the heaviest weights in the collection is a 3 1/4 pound (1.5 kg) metal and plastic rectangle for the German weekly newsmagazine Der Spiegel, its colors reminiscent of Germany’s national flag. Less sophisticated weights made from blocks of wood in countries like Thailand and Venezuela reflect these nations’ less-industrialized position in the world, yet the New York Times has also used wooden weights, and other American publications, such as The National and BackStage have found it cost-effective to produce low-end particle board models.

In the late 20th century people in the United States bought, according to Thomas C. Leonard, “less than half as many newspapers per capita than the Japanese, the Finns, and the Swedes; the British and the Germans also were better customers”. According to the United Nations Development Programme’s 2009 Human Development Report, these six nationalities have the same 99% adult literacy rate, but New York City, perhaps because it is a great city for walking, seems to have the most newsstands and weights per capita in the world. Literacy is but one crucial factor in the sale of print media. Three other important factors in the prominence of newsstands and weights are a well-established culture of media advertising; locations within swarming transportation hubs where people have time to kill, or near heavily trafficked pedestrian areas (or in the case of Los Angeles, near slow-moving traffic jams); and a lively competition among an abundant array of publications. Despite the fact that Cubans are voracious consumers of news and boast an adult literacy tied for first in the world at 99.8 per cent, for example, politics on La Isla are such that news dealers are few and far between. One scantily stocked Havana news shanty opens on Sunday mornings only. Its lines are long, its newspapers are much in demand.

In Japan, newspapers and magazines are commonly sold at train stations and other relatively wind-free indoor or semi-sheltered locations. Publications are ordinarily kept in pristine condition until they are handed over to the customer. Outdoor newsstands are uncommon but some Japanese dealers put their publications in outdoor wire racks especially designed to obviate the need for weights.
The paperweight for The China Press (which goes by the name ‘Overseas Chinese Newspaper’ in Chinese) claims its “rich content” can “heal the homesickness of overseas Chinese” by allowing readers to “contact the feeling” of the mainland. No matter where they are published or distributed, newspapers and magazines provide a link to their land of origin.
Back in Manhattan, for many years, the place to find print journalism from near and far was Hotalings, also known as the Out of Town Newspaper Agency. Hotalings was often the only link between people in New York and their lands of birth. For many others it was the best place to look for jobs and news from outside Gotham. Its huge selection meant customers could find everything from Pravda to Paris Match to Polish Engineering. Founded in 1905, Hotalings newsstands were located over the years in various parts of Times Square, from teeming street corners to the former New York Times Building to a tourist information kiosk on Broadway and 46th Street. New York City’s ever-shifting demographics have long been paralleled by Hotalings’ clientele. “We don't get the crowds from the theater district anymore. People don't roam in Times Square like they used to. It used to be mostly Western Europeans or people interested in Europe,” said Arthur Hotaling, the founder’s grandson, in 1988. “Now we get a lot more people from Latin America and the third world.” Despite efforts in the 1990s to spruce up the store and expand its offerings, the 105-year-old business is today a wholesale-only operation.

The pageantry of print media is in flux. Single-copy sales are down and impulse purchases are more sporadic. Will newspapers and magazines go the way of buggy whips and coin-operated telephones? No one knows, but one thing’s certain – the cast-iron cameos known as newsstand paperweights will last a long time.

Submit your story by emailing ‘The Last Monitor’: [email protected]




'THE LAST STAR-LEDGER' AVAILABLE NOW! #4 issue of the 10 Latitudes-edited newspapers for 'The Last Newspaper' exhibition, New Museum

'The Last Star-Leger' – Issue #4
(READ IT ON ISSUU)

Table of contents:

Picture Agent - Our singular picture agency:
Haegue Yang (cover)
Media Habits:
Nicoline van Harskamp
Focus:
Collin Munn on 'The Last Newspaper's work 'Untitled' (2006) by Dash Snow
Feature: Latitudes on the
'The Last Newspaper's partner organisation StoryCorps & archive interview between journalist Ed Pierce and his grandson Scott Cole
Interview:
'Rank & File' Ignasi Aballí on his 'Lists' series

The Next Newspaper: Latitudes interview with Nick Mrozowski Creative Director of Portugal's newest newspaper 'i'
1989 Patricia Esquivias on…:
Communism
'Dirt Sheet':
Janine Armin's column
100 Years Ago...:
'The Tacoma Times' (Tacoma, Washington) 1903–1949, October 27, 1910.
Weekly cartoon strip: Francesc Ruiz
Advertising department:
Ester Partegàs with Rob McKenzie



EXCLUSIVE CONTENT!

Nick Mrozowski during his visit to 'The Last Newspaper' exhibition holding a copy of that days' New York Times. Photo: Latitudes.


THE NEXT NEWSPAPER: i


Fresh from putting together a 40-page on-site weekend newspaper for the Society of News Designers conference in Denver – Michigan native Nick Mrozowski, the Creative Director of Portugal's newest newspaper, simply called 'i', stopped by 'The Last Star-Ledger' newsroom.

 
The Last Star-Ledger:
Tell us about the origins of i [pronounced ‘ee’] – was there a lot of research done into what people wanted from a newspaper in 2009? Was it independently started?


Nick Mrozowski:
The guys who launched the paper are seasoned pros in the Portuguese market. They've been directors of other newspapers so they're well-versed in the economy and business. i was started by a public-works construction company in Portugal. They happen to have a publishing branch – they publish regional newspapers – and wanted a national newspaper. Innovation Media Consulting, started in Spain, consulted on the editorial ideas and design before it launched. Even more than their knowledge or research of the market, they tried to create a newspaper based on their instincts and ideas that was totally different to anything else. The staff we hired is very young and capable of serious journalism, but with a lot of spirit, energy, and humor. That naturally found its way into the newspaper and because of that our audience is even younger than we initially thought.
The newspaper has about 55 or 60 people in the newsroom now. I'm the sole art director, though I didn't design the initial project. The graphic model was done by Javier Errea, who is the most famous Spanish newspaper designer now. He just won the Society for News Design's Lifetime Achievement Award at forty-three years old! In the last fifteen years that his studio has been going, they've probably been involved with most of the newspapers in Spain and Portugal.

Cover i, 7 October 2010

TLS-L: The design is obviously a critical part of the newspaper. To what degree did the staff have either design or press backgrounds which came together in its visual journalism?

NM: We have reporters and designers of different functions. My degree is in journalism, but I focused on design. In all the newspapers I have worked on, I've been asked as much to be an editor as a designer. Our newsroom at i is a total open-plan. We work in the same room without cubicles or dividers with zones designed for communication. In the center are the top editors and then spiraling out are the various news desks, designers, and photographers.


TLS-L: Is there a typical way an article is put together?


NM: An editor or reporter decides there is going to be a story about something. They would then come and speak to one of the designers about what they're going to have for the page. We have our own jargon for types of stories or design elements to make it faster. That's pretty standard. The thing we do that's a little bit different is how we start a page. Throughout the course of a day we change it a million times, not only because an article comes in longer or shorter, we change it because somebody has a new idea. There are five designers, one design editor, and myself for the design portion.

Cover i, 26 July 2010

TLS-L: And you have 4 sections which are not at all based on traditional newspapers...

NM: i is 25 x 35 cm (9 8/10” x 13 8/10”) x with 48, 56 or 64 pages. It starts with ‘Opinion’ on the first four pages to get you thinking. The following short section ‘Radar’ is all the news you need to know from the last 24 hours in different formats: a few briefs, a portion of quotations, a photo that tells a story by itself, an info-graphic that has no text accompanying it. The big ‘Zoom’ section is more in depth, more analytical, with longer format, bigger stories, mostly two-page spreads. At the end we have a section called ‘Mais’ (meaning 'more') which has culture, sports, and lifestyle. We don't have this feeling that we need a 'national' or 'international' section with a set number of pages or stories with a certain length, the editing is much more fluid. Although we have developed some habits over time, nothing is set in stone. It changes from one hour to the next, making it harder to work but producing a better result. For some newspapers, it’s a way forward: to be more aggressive, not just in reporting, but in the way we think about how we report.

TLS-L: You must hear people talking about the decline of the traditional newspaper all the time?

NM: I see what's happening but I don't believe it. I think there are a lot more to come. They're going to change, they have to change, but it's good change. Obviously the internet is not going anywhere. We talk about it a lot in the industry. Everybody has different points of view and every couple of months there is a prevailing strategy, idea, or criticism. News used to be a printed newspaper – it's not anymore – but a newspaper isn't necessarily an online thing. I read the online version of the New York Times all the time in Lisbon because you can't buy it (you can only get the International Herald Tribune), so I read it in the morning before I go into work, I read it during the day.

Cover i, 19 June 2010

TLS-L: Yet in a traditional newspaper you find things you wouldn't otherwise read.

NM: When I go online I read a lot of stories because there's little investment in clicking a link, if a headline caught my eye, or an illustration. Funnily enough, now that I’ve been reading the New York Times on printed format here these last days, I find it really strange to navigate as an object.


TLS-L: Can you give our news team any advice?


NM: A good newspaper should have texture and a feeling of some immediacy. Try to highlight the liveness of it. Save yourself one part each time and only do it in the last thirty minutes so you have no idea what it's going to be. Desperation is a reality of newspapers!

 
– Interview by Latitudes. Edited by Greg Barton.

 
+ images of i covers here.




Introducing 'The Last...' team

We would like to introduce the team behind 'The Last...' newspaper project, part of 'The Last Newspaper' exhibition at the New Museum on view until 9 January 2011. During 10 weeks, editors-in-chief Latitudes are producing and publishing ten 12-page weekly hyper-local newspapers 'The Last...' (Post, Gazette, Register, Star-Ledger...) from the third gallery floor at the New Museum. Latitudes is closely collaborating with the following individuals...

'The Last...' News Team:

Janine Armin's art writing and book reviews appear in The International Herald Tribune, Bookforum, Artforum.com, Saatchi Online, Artslant, The Architect's Journal, and The Globe and Mail among others. She is New York editor for fiction/non-fiction hub Joyland.ca, and an M.A. 2012 candidate at the Bard Center for Curatorial Studies.


Greg Barton is currently helping with the New Museum's Public Programs archive in addition to assisting Triple Candie in Harlem. Previously he worked for Independent Curators International as well as the National Gallery of Art in D.C.

Irina Chernyakova is currently part of the news team for 'The Last...' project. In May she earned her Bachelor of Architecture from Cornell University. Most recently, she worked as a teaching associate for an introductory architecture program.


Collin Munn is currently a student at the Gallatin School of Individualized Study, concentrating in 'Critical Curating'. His interests lie primarily within curating and critiquing contemporary art, specifically work that addresses broader social and cultural issues. In addition to working with Latitudes during the fall, Collin is also a founding member of the Makeshift Collective, and is working on several curatorial ventures of his own.


Gwen Schwartz is an artist and writer who is based in New York City. She grew up on an island in Maine where her talents flourished, however it wasn't until she came to New York City four years ago to get her BFA in Fine Arts that she began to fully realize them. Now, nearing her graduation, Gwen has a new goal in life: to be a rock star.

'The Last...' Graphic Design team:


Chad Kloepfer is a New York-based graphic designer. He was Senior Graphic Designer at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, for seven years where he worked on projects including exhibition publications ('The Quick and the Dead' (2009); 'House of Oracles, A Huang Yong Ping Retrospective' (2005); 'How Latitudes Become Forms: Art in a Global Age' (2003)) as well as various print materials, and the Walker Expanded identity. He is currently Art Director of Artforum magazine. superserious.net


Joel Stillman is a Graphic Designer and an independent publisher living in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. He is currently 27 years old. His practice examines linguistic definition. http://www.normalnumber.com/
 
'The Last...' 'Advertising Department':
Ester Partegàs is a Spanish-born visual artist living and working in Brooklyn, New York. Partegàs is the 'Advertising Department' of 'The Last…' newspaper project, for which she collaborates with other artists in the production of weekly (anti)adverts. Partegàs currently has a solo show at Foxy Production, New York (on view until 27 November 2010) and in 2011 will participate in a group show at the Whitechapel, London. www.esterpartegas.com
 'The Last...' weekly cartoon:
Francesc Ruiz is a visual artist based in Barcelona, Spain. Ruiz is 'The Last…' newspaper project weekly cartoonist. He recently participated in the Philagrafika show at Temple Gallery, Philadelphia (2010) and is currently exhibiting 'The Paper Trail' at the Contemporary Image Collective, Cairo (on view until 20 November 2010). Ruiz is currently preparing 'Gasworks Yaoi', his first solo show in London.

+ info:
Photo tour of 'The Last Newspaper' exhibition here
Read reviews and press release here




'THE LAST REGISTER' AVAILABLE NOW! #3 issue of the 10 Latitudes-edited newspapers for 'The Last Newspaper' exhibition, New Museum

Issue 3: The Last Register
(READ IT ON ISSUU)

October 20, 2010


Cover: ‘Exhibit: Exposed!’. Installing 'The Last Newspaper' wall text
Report: ‘Reaction Distraction’: Gwen Schwartz on the TLN talk with participating artists Nate Lowman, Aleksandra Mir and Sarah Charlesworth
Focus: Doryun Chong on TLN artist Adrian Piper’s Vanilla Nightmares (1986)
Media Habits: Dora García
Dirt Sheet: Janine Armin on truth and fiction
Picture Agent: Sergio Vega
The Next Newspaper: Paul Schmelzer on the American Independent News Network
Feature: ‘Broadcasting’, Joe Salzman on the representation of the journalists on TV
Exclusive interview: Latitudes with TLN cartoonist Francesc Ruiz
‘Patricia Esquivias on...The French Revolution’
100 Years Ago…: New York Tribune
Feature: ‘Hyphen-ated’ by Stephen Spretnjak
Photo essay: ‘Behind the Scenes’, Installing ‘The Last Newspaper’
Cartoon: ‘The Woods: Scratch Lottery’ by Francesc Ruiz
Advertising: Ester Partegàs with Adam Shecter



This Week's Headlines
 

Philadelphia Newsstand (2010), installation at Temple Gallery, Philadelphia.
Courtesy the artist and Galeria Estrany-de la Mota, Barcelona.

“Before the internet, newsstands were the closest thing we had to web browsing”

Barcelona-based artist Francesc Ruiz is creating ‘The Woods’, a specially-commissioned cartoon strip for the back cover of each of ‘The Last...’ newspapers. The Editors-in-Chief of ‘The Last Register’ caught up with him as he prepared for an exhibition in Cairo.


Latitudes
: Is 'The Woods' a family, or is it a place?

Francesc Ruiz:
They're kind of a family or a community, as well as a place. The name was inspired by the last part of François Truffaut’s 1966 film based on Ray Bradbury’s 1953 novel Fahrenheit 451. It’s set in a totalitarian society in which books have been made illegal and are being burned. A group of people go into hiding in the woods and decide to memorize great works of literature. They create a community that transmits books orally from generation to generation. Each of them incorporates a different book: there are five ‘Moby Dick’s, four ‘Don Quixote’s, and so on. It talks about the power of human knowledge to adapt to difficult and new situations, which is something that – although under a completely different perspective – is happening right now with the threat to printed matter and the adaptation of content to new formats. In ‘The Woods’ I'm using the city newsstand, magazines and newspapers, as a way of talking about different lifestyles, about specialization and ideology. I want to create a kind of masquerade ball in which everybody is represented or at least plays a role in the social architecture, something also very related to web 2.0 and platforms such as Facebook.

L: Where if anywhere do you draw the lines between art and design, or artists and designers?

FR: It’s all about self-consciousness and a critical perspective. As long as cultural object producers (which is what I consider both artists and designers to be) look at their work as something critically produced, to me it makes no sense to establish differences. Looking at it from a slightly different angle, someone asked me recently if I’d ever produced a ‘mainstream’ comic. I think comic books and design can be understood in different ways, just as both experimental cinema and popular cinema coexist. I try to work on the experimental side, but whether this work is read as art or not depends entirely on the context in which it’s received.

 
L: Can our readers follow the cartoon strip as an ongoing narrative?  

FR: No it doesn't follow a linear narrative – each issue shows a situation. The whole cartoon strip creates a series of scenes which build on my recent experiences working with a newsstand scenario before in Philadelphia, and now in Cairo. I did consider creating something more narrative led using characters that keep reappearing, but decided against it.
 
Cairo Newsstand (2010), installation at the Contemporary Image Collective, Cairo.
Courtesy the artist and Galeria Estrany-de la Mota, Barcelona.

L: Specialist magazines target a public that has already been identified, yet they can also create new and perhaps unexpected followings. How does the newsstand feature in this relationship?

FR: Before the internet, newsstands were the closest thing we had to a web browsing experience. You could go there, buy specialist papers and magazines, check out the contacts sections, the classified ads, and see all the niches you could initiate yourself into. Through the printed press you were able to discover new things, it was the main knowledge distribution channel. With most of this now moving online the fetishistic element is not the same. Although there are some web-based attempts to create a similar interface to the newsstand, its visual power of the newsstand is unique.
For me a newsstand is a form of information architecture, a superstructure or a special building with inhabitants that change periodically. It’s an amazing tool with which to analyse the world and contemporary society. The matter of what will happen to newsstands as printed material begins disappears is something that is already visible: they're converting into lottery card retail points, as well as beverage and snack stands. But maybe they will have a different use in the future? I'm thinking of creating ‘The Newsstand Museum’, a museum with different newsstands from different countries and periods. Every stand will show the content exactly as it was in a specific time and place. For example September 10, 2001.

L: Can you tell us more about the Philadelphia project you mentioned, made for the Philagrafika 2010?

FR: I presented a newsstand for which I created all the printed content: a magazine formed by 120 covers and a newspaper which reproduced 12 different front pages. With these two publications I was able to build the ‘skin’ of the newsstand. I added speech bubbles to the covers, and recreated some important characters of the city mixed in with references to different neighborhoods, institutions, shops and bars. My idea was to create an analogy of the city and my experiences, initial reactions and perhaps prejudices about Philly after having been there for just a short residency period. I added a narrative layer around three main subjects: the city as the place where graffiti culture started, the city through which the AIDS crisis was imagined in the 1993 film Philadelphia, and finally the city’s Mural Arts Program, a (successful to some) anti-graffiti initiative. Through the different layers of newsstand I attempted to approximate the complexities of the city, as well as race, gender and class issues. I'm now creating a new newsstand for the Contemporary Image Collective in Cairo and it will take the form of a typical Egyptian street newsstand, only it will be made with newspapers covers that I've modified with a dialogue between the stones that are used as paperweights.

Cairo Newsstand (2010), installation at the Contemporary Image Collective, Cairo.
Courtesy the artist and Galeria Estrany-de la Mota, Barcelona.

L: What difficulties and luxuries has this very particular format of the serial cartoon strip present to you as an artist?

FR: I made a comic strip series with artist Pauline Fondevila in which we explored the bars of a city nearby Barcelona. Basically it was an autobiographical comic strip in wich we drew ourselves getting drunk and having adventures. We published forty different comic strips and they were published daily, the problem was that after a while the energy and the inspiration weren't there any more – and we had very bad hangovers! On the one hand it was very nice and a special format to play with in order to recreate worlds, but on the other you end up feeling a little like a slave to the daily production process.
This ten week trial for ‘The Last Newspaper’ is a great period to develop another small universe – that's essentially what I'm trying to do. The weekly frequency is fine compared to a daily routine. I recently showed a daily comic strip for Creative Time Comics, but all of these projects need a lot of commitment.  

L: Is there a particular newspaper cartoon you admire or took inspiration from?

FR: I don’t think Tales of the Beanworld by Larry Marder was ever published in a newspaper. I'm a big fan of George Herriman’s Krazy & Ignatz originally published daily in the New York Evening Journal, and that has always has been a source of inspiration to me. The genre ambiguity, the bricks, the accent of the characters and those amazing landscapes, I love it all! Of course there are now a lot of people working on digital comic books and digital comic strips. It's interesting to see how scrolling works very well when reading linear narratives, actually better than the page-by-page structure. Scott McCloud is for me first author who successfully started to explore the potential of the comic book medium. But my favourite author is Kang Full, the Korean Manhwa webcomic artist. The funny thing is that he later prints his comics in paper format which entails a very interesting re-adaptation. And this seems a very apposite process for this period in between two regimes, the page-based former one and the web-based new one.

– Interview by Latitudes, October 2010





'THE LAST GAZETTE' AVAILABLE NOW! #2 issue of the 10 Latitudes-edited newspapers for 'The Last Newspaper' exhibition, New Museum

'The Last Gazette' – Issue #2
(Read it on ISSUU)
 Table of contents:

Cover: ‘Sorry for the Metaphor’. Special cover by Amalia Pica (and page 3)
Editorial: ‘34 People Like This’ by Latitudes
Focus: ‘A system is not imagined, it is real’, Julienne Lorz on TLN artist Hans Haacke’s News (1969/2008)
Dirt Sheet: Janine Armin on the newspaper-as-catalogue
Picture Agent: Ilana Halperin
The Next Newspaper: Clay Shirky
Photo essay: ‘Picture Mining’ by Ines Schaber
Obituary: ‘Sorry we’re dead’, Andrew Losowsky on TLN artist Adam McEwen’s Untitled (Caster) (2010)
Fit to Print: Adam Chadwick on hyperlocal citizen journalism
100 Years Ago…: Daily Public Ledger
In Brief: ‘Sac Bee Cuts’
Media Habits: Luis Camnitzer
Infographic: ‘U.S. Gazettes: Average Circulation’ by Irina Chernyakova
Cartoon: ‘The Woods: Money’ by Francesc Ruiz
Advertising: Ester Partegàs



Video of issue 2 - more videos here


This week's headlines

EXCLUSIVE CONTENT!

Hans Haacke, News (1969/2008),
RSS newsfeed, paper and printer, dimensions variable.
Image courtesy Gothamist, Photo by Katie Sokolor.


Detail of 'News'. Photo: Latitudes

Detail of 'News'. Photo: Latitudes

'A system is not imagined, it is real'

Julienne Lorz – Curator, Haus der Kunst, Munich – on Hans Haacke's News (1969/2008), one of the featured artworks presented in The Last Newspaper.

“Concorde breaks sound barrier” – “GDR celebrates 20th anniversary” – “Anti-Apartheid Protesters disrupt Frankfurt book fair”. Such headlines and their corresponding stories could be read by visitors to the exhibition Prospect '69 at the Düsseldorf Kunsthalle in 1969. There, Hans Haacke had installed his work News (1969) consisting of a telex machine that printed out all current news items transmitted by the German news agency DPA. Initially Haacke collated these printouts, as well as those from his solo show at the Howard Wise Gallery in New York, where the work was shown a couple of months later, preserving and dating them in see-through plastic boxes. For the legendary exhibition Software. Information Technology: Its New Meaning (1970) at the Jewish Museum in New York, however, he dismissed this idea so as to avoid turning these paper messages into valued objects. Instead, the telex machines printed out reams of paper which curled in ever growing heaps onto the floor and after the show the once up-to-date information was discarded. The headlines during the Software... show recorded events which took place between 16th September and 8th November 1970, such as “Civil war breaks out in Jordan” – “Rock legend Hendrix dies after party” – “Soviet probe collects moon rock”, which had become yesterday’s disposable news.


Haacke has continued to update the technology used in News. Today it is a dot matrix printer linked up to a RSS newsfeed. But in an age where computers are ubiquitous and in spite of the – so far – non-existent paperless office, the impression of news being received and printed out is somewhat outmoded. Yet, the changing formal and technological aspects of News are not the main aspects of the work. Rather, it is the concept of dissolving the boundaries between two worlds: the exhibition within the context of a gallery or museum and everyday life existing outside of this sphere. News items in all their brutal reality and without the extra filter of a newspaper, TV or radio editor, perpetrate this hermetic space, where the noise of traffic and city life is rarely heard and where windowless white cubes supposedly create complete neutrality.


For Haacke the exterior elements influencing an artwork or a space are crucial, as he stated in Lucy Lippard's publication Six Years: The dematerialization of the Art Object from 1966 to 1972: “A ‘sculpture’ that physically reacts to its environment is no longer to be regarded as an object. The range of outside factors affecting it, as well as its own radius of action, reaches beyond the space it materially occupies. It thus merges with the environment in a relationship that is better understood as a ‘system’ of interdependent processes. These processes evolve without the viewer’s empathy. He becomes a witness. A system is not imagined, it is real.”


Bringing the two domains together through News was particularly apposite when Haacke first began exhibiting the work: the Vietnam War was still raging, the aftermath of the tumultuous events in 1968 were still being felt and the Red Army Faction in Germany was just starting its reign of terror. But News is, of course, always current whenever it is being exhibited, while simultaneously affecting the past, as Haacke put it in a conversation with Kathleen MacQueen: “New information constantly overlays the old and influences how we understand what we heard and read the previous day”.





'THE LAST POST' AVAILABLE NOW! First issue of the 10 Latitudes-edited newspapers for 'The Last Newspaper' exhibition, New Museum

'The Last Post' – Issue 1 
(Read it on ISSUU)

Table of contents:
Cover:
‘Ink vs Link’. Press Room of The Richmond Planet, c. 1899
Editorial: ‘Welcome to The Last Post, The Last Gazette, The Last Register...’ by Latitudes
Picture Agent (Our singular picture agency): Kirstine Roepstorff
Media Habits: Dara Birnbaum
Exclusive Interview: ‘Double Trouble’, Lorena Muñoz-Alonso interviews TLN artist Pierre Bismuth
Feature: ‘Lights, Camera...Banality’, Kolja Reichert on Marie Voignier’s Hearing the Shape of a Drum (2010)
‘Working with Utopians’ by Richard Flood and Benjamin Godsill
The Next Newspaper (Profiling the organizations, projects, initiatives and individuals redefining ink-and-paper news): ProPublica
Fit to Print: ‘The (L.A.) Times it is A-Changin’ by Adam Chadwick
100 Years Ago…: The Salt Lake Herald-Republican
Cartoon: ‘The Woods: Teen Balls’ by Francesc
Ruiz
Advertising: Ester Partegàs with Rob McKenzie




EXCLUSIVE CONTENT!


Below is the first interview of the series 'Media Habits' in which readers get to know how, where and from what artists, curators, journalists, etc. get their information and news. For the first one, we invited
the New York artist Dara Birnbaum whose work has addressed the medium of television since the late 1970s.

Self-portrait of Dara Birnbaum. Courtesy the artist.
Newspapers
I have basically stopped reading newspapers, except when traveling. Then I read the International Herald Tribune. I will look through the Sunday New York Times, as it is available once a neighbor has discarded it. Basically I scan The New York Times news and read the ‘Arts & Leisure’ section, etc. I will pick up free papers and look through them, such as The Village Voice.

Magazines

I use magazines mainly for listings, such as New York magazine and Time Out New York. For New York magazine I also do the crossword puzzle. News is gleaned through TV and the radio. There are only very few magazines I subscribe to, such as Astronomy, that of the Natural History Museum and the Audubon Society. I used to read National Geographic, but recently stopped it as I found I wasn’t reading it thoroughly enough. All are read at home, mostly late at night when it is quiet.

Online

I do spend considerable time on-line daily, mostly for research and communication. I use YouTube mostly for great archival footage – and that is my entertainment as well – concerts, interviews, etc. I use Facebook marginally. Mostly I answer when someone wants to be a friend or posts a message to me. Basically I am consumed by keeping up with email, mostly for work.


Television

As for television, I can barely watch it. However, I am addicted to Criminal Minds, which I find is well written and well acted. It reminds me of a favorite film: The Silence of the Lambs. I haven’t exactly analyzed why. I can watch some public television, such as Mystery and sometimes watch films on TV, or the Late Late Show on CBS. Most television simply annoys me.


Radio

I listen to radio constantly, mostly Wyoming National Public Radio on my computer. Then there are just two stations I listen to on my regular radio by my bed – the two public broadcast stations that we have in New York City.


Books

I read constantly, but I skip around a lot – not very concentrated. However, I just finished Little Bee by Chris Cleave and Don DeLillo’s Falling Man and his Point Omega.




Installation process of 'The Last Newspaper', New Museum



'The Last Newspaper', New Museum, 3rd, 4th and 5th floors, New York
6 October 2010–9 January 2011

Tuesday 5 October 2010
VIP Preview: 7–8pm
Opening Reception: 8–10pm

Artists in the exhibition: Alighiero e Boetti; Judith Bernstein; Pierre Bismuth; Andrea Bowers; Francois Bucher; Sarah Charlesworth; Luciano Fabro; Robert Gober; Hans Haacke; Karl Haendel; Rachel Harrison; Thomas Hirschhorn; Emily Jacir; Larry Johnson; Mike Kelley; Nate Lowman; Sarah Lucas; Adam McEwen; Aleksandra Mir; Adrian Piper; William Pope.L; Allen Ruppersberg; Dexter Sinister; Dash Snow; Rikrit Tiravanija; Wolfgang Tillmans; and Kelley Walker.

Partner organisations: Center for Urban Pedagogy; StoryCorps; Latitudes; The Slought Foundation; INABA, Columbia University’s C-Lab; Joseph Grima and Kazys Varnelis/Netlab; and Angel Nevarez and Valerie Tevere.

All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org




Latitudes/New Museum recruiting New York interns for the Museum’s fall exhibition 'The Last Newspaper'

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
Position: Volunteer internships (editorial/curatorial/journalism/design)
Requirement: Minimum 2 full days per week, 7 hours per day. Based in New York.
Desired dates: 27 September–14 December 2010
Deadline: Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis until all positions are filled
–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

As a partner organization in the New Museum’s fall exhibition 'The Last Newspaper' (6 October 2010–9 January 2011), the Barcelona-based curatorial duo Latitudes (www.LTTDS.org) is editing a weekly in-house newspaper.

Latitudes is seeking multi-talented and motivated people to form the newspaper team to join them in working as art news and feature writers, interviewers, content producers, photographers and/or graphic designers.

During the exhibition a mini-newsroom will be set up and operated on site and, in place of a traditional catalogue, this free 12-page newspaper will be compiled and made available freely from the museum each week for 10 weeks. This opportunity allows interns to get real-world experience in an editorial and curatorial environment and to be an integral part of a unique project. More information here: http://www.lttds.org/projects/current/lastnewspaper/lastnewspaper.html

Eligibility

All interested individuals eighteen years of age and older are eligible to apply for an internship. Candidates with a strong knowledge of 20th-century art history and contemporary art (or have a background in galleries, journalism, art magazines, curating, critical writing and studio art or art education) are welcome to apply. International candidates may apply, but please note that we cannot provide visas, travel or accommodation. When considering whether or not to apply, please keep in mind these are unpaid internships.

Responsibilities

Each member of the team will be required to assist and collaborate in all aspects of editorial planning with accuracy and good-humor. Work will include producing both short and long-form writing to tight deadlines under the direction of the editor-curators as well as copy-editing, administrative support and research.

Job requirements

  • A track-record in writing and editorial tasks, compiling textual and pictorial material with an eye for detail
  • Ability to work to agreed deadlines and prioritize
  • Proven ability to organize and manage work flow
  • Interpersonal skills and ability to work effectively as part of a team as well as independently
Days and Hours
Interns must be able to work a minimum of 2 full days per week, 7 hours per day, ideally for the full run of the project (27 September–14 December 2010). The exact schedule will be determined in conjunction with the New Museum.

Application Procedure

Please apply by e-mail (see below) with:
  • a letter of interest of a maximum of 500 words,
  • a resume outlining your educational background and recent work experience,
  • a letter of recommendation from a previous employer or professor/tutor,
  • a maximum of 3 samples of relevant writing, journalism, or design work while indicating your main areas of interest and skills within respect to the roles and opportunities offered by this project.
Please send all the documents in one email to: [email protected] , with subject 'Internship The Last Newspaper'.

Please note that only accepted candidates will be notified.

For general terms about internships at the New Museum, please see conditions here.




Newsletter #25 - September 2010


THIS MONTH
Publication
'Mataró Chauffeur Service', a project by Martí Anson – Now Available! (online from October)
+
profile texts on the artists
Jordi Mitjà, Jorge Satorre and Wilfredo Prieto for the exhibition catalogue 'Before everything' (CA2M, Móstoles)

IN PREPARATION

Partner organisation in the exhibition 'The Last Newspaper', New Museum, New York, (6 October 2010–9 January 2011) and 'Vic Cambrils Barcelona...A Library Project' for Midway Contemporary Art, Minneapolis (Talk: 21 October, 7pm)


FORTHCOMING IN 2011

Curators of the exhibition 'Christina Hemauer & Roman Keller: United Alternative Energies', Aarhus Art Building, Arhus, Denmark, 22 January–3 April 2011


LATITUDES ON THE PRESS

Latitudes on the press:
'Otras Latitudes' by Juan Palomo, El Cultural (Spanish, online), 31 July 2010 and interview 'The curator is a piece in the artworlds' ecosystem', Arteinformado (Spanish, online), 30 August


Check Latitudes' web www.lttds.org for further info
Facebook page here
Twitter here
Flickr photosets here
Previous newsletter here
Youtube Latitudes Channel




Forthcoming project: Partner organisation in 'The Last Newspaper', 3rd, 4th and 5th floors, New Museum, New York, 6 October 2010–9 January 2011


Photo: New Museum/Dean Kaufman

| ENG |

(...) The first people we approached to participate were Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna, who are partners in Latitudes, a curatorial office based in Barcelona. They have a wonderful flexibility in their projects, which include overseeing public commissions, organizing conferences, as well as initiating multidisciplinary research and editorial programs. Our preliminary conversations led quickly to the notion of a weekly newspaper produced in the New Museum over the course of a residency. From this point, we moved pretty quickly into a landscape of organizational residencies that will animate the social aspects of the exhibition. – Richard Flood, interview with Benjamin Godsill about the exhibition, fall 2010.

 
The Last Newspaper will be a hybrid exhibition inspired by the ways artists approach the news and respond to the stories and images that command the headlines. Alongside the exhibition, a number of partner organisations (see list below) will use on-site offices to present their research, engage in rapid prototyping, and stage public dialogues, opening up the galleries as spaces of intellectual production as well as display.

'THE LAST POST' / 'THE LAST GAZETTE' / 'THE LAST REGISTER'... will be an evolving-titled 12-page free weekly newspaper and an incremental exhibition catalogue edited by Latitudes and produced and disseminated from the museum every week for 10 weeks.


The tabloids, design directed by Chad Kloepfer, will be conceived by a specially-assembled editorial team and contributors who are giving their time and skills pro bono. The published record of the enterprise will be bound at the conclusion to form a surrogate catalogue of The Last Newspaper.


Artists in the exhibition:
Alighiero e Boetti; Judith Bernstein; Pierre Bismuth; Andrea Bowers; Francois Bucher; Sarah Charlesworth; Luciano Fabro; Robert Gober; Hans Haacke; Karl Haendel; Rachel Harrison; Thomas Hirschhorn; Emily Jacir; Larry Johnson; Mike Kelley; Nate Lowman; Sarah Lucas; Adam McEwen; Aleksandra Mir; Adrian Piper; William Pope.L; Allen Ruppersberg; Dexter Sinister; Dash Snow; Rikrit Tiravanija; Wolfgang Tillmans; and Kelley Walker.Partner organisations: Center for Urban Pedagogy; StoryCorps; Latitudes; The Slought Foundation; INABA, Columbia University’s C-Lab; Joseph Grima and Kazys Varnelis/Netlab; and Angel Nevarez and Valerie Tevere.

Exhibition co-curated by Richard Flood, Chief Curator of the
New Museum and Benjamin Godsill, Curatorial Associate.

 
| ESP |


Hans Haacke, News, 1969/2008, RSS newsfeed, paper, and printer, dimensions variable.

"La primera persona que invitamos a participar fue Max Andrews y Mariana Cánepa Luna, socios de Latitudes, una oficina curatorial con base en Barcelona. Tienen una maravillosa flexibilidad en sus proyectos, que incluyen la supervisión de comisiones públicas, la organización de conferencias, así como iniciar programas de investigación multidisciplinaria y de índole editorial. Nuestras conversaciones preliminares nos llevaron rápidamente hacia la idea de realizar un periodico semanal producido en el New Museum en el transcurso de una residencia. – Richard Flood, entrevista con Benjamin Godsill entorno a la exposición, otoño 2010

'The Last Newspaper' será una exposición híbrida que explorará el modo en que los artistas responden a las noticias, imágenes y titulares y al tiempo analizará cómo se genera, gestiona, registra, ordena y distribuye la información. Un número de organizaciones asociadas han sido invitadas a 'desplazar' sus oficinas al terreno museístico para presentar su trabajo, participar en la creación de propotipos y diálogos públicos, convirtiendo las galerías del museo en espacios de exhibición y discurso.

'THE LAST POST' / 'THE LAST GAZETTE' / 'THE LAST REGISTER'... será un tabloide semanal de 12 páginas editado por Latitudes durante 10 semanas ‘en directo’ desde una sala de redacción instalada en el espacio expositivo. El periódico será una publicación episódica gratuita que cambiará su título semanalmente e investigará el frágil momento del periódico como medio de comunicación así como los comportamientos comunes entre la labor editorial y la curatorial.

Los tabloides, cuyo diseño será dirigido por Chad Kloepfer, serán un documento en continua formación que registrará la exposición. Al concluir ésta, se encuadernarán como un único volumen formando el catálogo sustituto de 'The Last Newspaper'.


Artistas en la exposición:
Alighiero e Boetti; Judith Bernstein; Pierre Bismuth; Andrea Bowers; Francois Bucher; Sarah Charlesworth; Luciano Fabro; Robert Gober; Hans Haacke; Karl Haendel; Rachel Harrison; Thomas Hirschhorn; Emily Jacir; Larry Johnson; Mike Kelley; Nate Lowman; Sarah Lucas; Adam McEwen; Aleksandra Mir; Adrian Piper; William Pope.L; Allen Ruppersberg; Dexter Sinister; Dash Snow; Rikrit Tiravanija; Wolfgang Tillmans; and Kelley Walker.

Organizaciones asociadas:
Center for Urban Pedagogy; StoryCorps; Latitudes; The Slought Foundation; INABA, Columbia University’s C-Lab; Joseph Grima y Kazys Varnelis/Netlab; y Angel Nevarez y Valerie Tevere.


Exposición comisariada por Richard Flood, Comisario jefe del New Museum y Benjamin Godsill, Comisario asociado.


New Museum
235 Bowery
New York, NY 10002
USA




Newsletter #24 – Summer 2010/Verano 2010

Newsletter in English | Newsletter en Español

THIS MONTH
Vena (por la) and Latitudes present:
Talk and catalogue launch by curator Direlia Lazo, 'I'm not here. An exhibition without Francis Alÿs', Wednesday 14 July, 7pm, La Central c/ Elisabets, 6, Barcelona (talk will be in Spanish)

FORTHCOMING

Participating in the exhibition 'The Last Newspaper', New Museum, New York, (3 October 2010 – 9 January 2011) and organising 'Vic Cambrils Barcelona...A Library Project' for Midway Contemporary Art, Minneapolis (October 2010) and
joining Hangar's Programming Committee 2010-12

RECENTLY
Latitudes on the press: 'The creative landscape of independent curators', The New York Times, 15 June and 'Palabra de comisario', El Cultural, 29 June


Check Latitudes' web www.lttds.org for further info
Facebook page here
Flickr photosets here
Previous newsletters click here
Youtube Latitudes Channel




Newsletter #22 – April 2010

 
Newsletter in English | Newsletter en Español

This month, Latitudes celebrates its 5 year anniversary! Together with Archive Books (Turin/Berlin) they are preparing a small publication gathering documentation from a selection of projects produced since 2005 (release date TBA).


CURRENT
 

Text 'Under Construction' on Lara Almarcegui's practice on the April–May issue of Milan-based magazine Mousse #23.

FORTHCOMING


Latitudes invited Martí Anson to create
Latitudes’ temporary office-encampment for their participation in 'NO SOUL FOR SALE – A Festival of Independents', taking place at Tate Modern's Turbine Hall, 14–16 May, London, UK + info...

Participation of Latitudes' Max Andrews in 'The Falmouth Convention', 20–23 May, Cornwall, UK + info...

Collaboration in the
exhibition 'The Last Newspaper' at the New Museum, New York, October 2010–January 2011 + info...
 

LAST CHANCE

Portscapes exhibition of the ten public commissions that took place throughout 2009 in the port of Rotterdam, on view until 25 April at the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
+ info...






Check Latitudes' web www.lttds.org for further info and project updates
Facebook fan page here.
Flickr photosets here

Newsletters archive here




Older Posts / Entradas antiguas