Latitudes' "out of office": wrap up of the 2018–2019 season

Seen in Malasaña, Madrid. Photo: @marianacanepaluna

This is our tenth ‘Out of Office’ post, a tradition which started with this 2008-9 post in pre-Facebook, pre-Twitter, pre-Instagram days. We’ve come a long way, but remain faithful to the idea of sharing behind-the-scenes moments. Below we share a selection of the art we’ve seen, the trips we had a chance to take, the conversations we began, the meals we shared, and (oh, we particularly love these) installation scenes. Subverting the institutional convention of the year-end report, our ‘out of office’ mixes official and unofficial photos, screengrabs and we-fies, even! Revision, reflection, remembrance, re-ignition. Create or die!

September 1, 2018: New season, new month, and new cover story on the Harald Szeemann exhibition in Bern (cover story archive here).
September 5, 2018: Launch of a new dispatch of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ from Buenos Aires, Argentina. In this eighth episode, Móvil co-founder and curator Alejandra Aguado followed the itinerary devised by the artist Diego Bianchi around the self-regulated community Velatropa, the buzzing commercial area of Once, identifying human and non-human flows and interactions. This became an entry point for discussing Bianchi’s interests in how, as consumers, we define a particular zeitgeist and appropriate trends that enable us to affirm our identities.

Each of the 20 photographs is augmented by one or more extra assets – a brief commentary, a sound or a caption – accessed by clicking the words overlaying the images. 

‘Incidents (of Travel)’ is an ongoing editorial project edited by Latitudes and produced by KADIST. Earlier offline conversations have taken place in Chicago (USA), Jinja (Uganda), Suzhou (China), Lisbon (Portugal), Terengganu (Malaysia) and Yerevan (Armenia).


September 11–15, 2018: Installation and opening of the exhibition ‘Cream Cheese and Pretty Ribbons!’ at Martin Janda Gallery, Vienna.

Installation process of ‘Cream Cheese and Pretty Ribbons!’. Photo: Martin Janda Gallery.

Exhibition file with correspondence, floor plan, artist's CVs, checklist, price list, technicians notes, etc. Above and following photos: Latitudes.

Mariana installing David Bestué’s ‘Trencadissa’ (2013).

(Left) Eulàlia Rovira and Adrian Schindler’s ‘Els peus fixats al terra delatant cap impaciència’ [THE FEET FIXED TO THE GROUND BETRAY NO IMPATIENCE] (2016) and (right) photograph series by Sean Lynch, part of the installation ‘A BLOW BY BLOW ACCOUNT OF STONE CARVING IN OXFORD’, (2013-14).
With Sean, Eulàlia and Adrian. Unanimously decided Adrian’s arm was the longest and therefore would perform better as a ‘we-fie’ stick. 


September 14, 2018: The day after the opening Eulàlia and Adrian presented “One motif says to another ‘I can't take my eyes off you’” a new performance produced for the occasion at the gallery (focus of the October Cover Story), and Sean Lynch performed the lecture ‘A Blow by Blow Account of Stonecarving in Oxford’, parrots and owls! More photos.
October 2018 cover story. Archived here.

September 2—18, 2018: Intermittent installation of Joan Morey’s exhibition ‘COLLAPSE’ at the Centre d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona — Fabra i Coats.


Deciding among the two options for the façade banners. Italics or not?

Last-minute proofreading of exhibition captions and panels.
Planning the next steps during the installation with technician guru Alberto Calvete.
A heads up to visitors.
Listing the contents in each vitrine.
Wall labels, exhibition guide, essay and remote controls.

September 19, 2018: Opening of Morey’s exhibition ‘COLLAPSE’, Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona – Fabra i Coats. 


 Opening photos: Eva Carasol. 

September 27, 2018: First reenactment of Joan Morey’s performance ‘POSTMORTEM. Pour en finir avec le jugement de Dieu’ [POSTMORTEM. To have done with the judgment of God] (2006–2007) interpreted by Sònia Gómez, in the context of the exhibition ‘Desiring machine, Working machine’ at the Contemporary Art Centre of Barcelona – Fabra i Coats.

‘POSTMORTEM. Pour en finir avec le jugement de Dieu’ [POSTMORTEM. To have done with the judgment of God] (2006–2007) published in frieze magazine Instagram.

September 28–October 7, 2018: Research trips to London  during Frieze art week (blog post here, art-agenda round-up here) and Liverpool for the Liverpool biennial (photo report here). 


While in London we met with Valentina Ravaglia, Assistant Curator, to donate Lawrence Weiner's limited edition tote bag, designed in 2015 to commemorate Latitudes’ 10th anniversary. Shortly after, the tote was included in Tate's ‘ARTIST ROOMS: Lawrence Weiner’ exhibition, on view from November 2, 2018, at The McManus Museum and Galleries in Dundee, Scotland, until February 17, 2019.

(Above and below) View of ‘Lawrence Weiner. ARTIST ROOMS’, National Galleries of Scotland and Tate. ©Lawrence Weiner. 

October 11, 2018: Second reenactment of Joan Morey’s performance within the exhibition ‘Desiring machine, Working machine’ at the Contemporary Art Centre of Barcelona – Fabra i Coats. ‘LLETANÍA APÒRIMA’ [APORIC LITANY] (2009) was interpreted by Jordi Vall-lamora.

Joan Morey. LLETANIA APÒRIMA (2009). Performance reenactment within the frame of the exhibition ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring MKachine, Working Machine’ (2018–2019). Photo: Noemi Jariod. Courtesy the artist.

October 12, 2018: art-agenda.com publishes Mariana Cánepa Luna’s Frieze Roundup review. Read it here.


October 12–14, 2018: Train to Arlès to visit the exhibition ‘Picture Industry: A Provisional History of the Technical Image’ at LUMA Arlès (Max Andrews’s review was published in December).

Frank Gehry’s building under construction. 
 A large exhibition devoted to Gilbert & George works. 
Saturday morning reception at LUMA.
Before the morning reception, a quick walkthrough Arlès busy Saturday market. 

October 19, 2018: (Secret) Site-visit to La Modelo prison with Joan Morey (artist) and Esther Doblas (Executive production) to check the spaces, discuss script possibilities (plan A, B, C, D...), identify mobility issues, etc. At this point in time, nobody knew the location of the event which was only disclosed the very same evening of the performance.

Salvador Puig Antich, the last political activist executed by Franco’s dictatorial regime, was jailed in this wing, in the cell 443. He was garroted in March 1974 in a room where parcels were delivered to the prison.
 Advanced tangle wiring techniques.
 Central space. Morey makes notes on his map of all the access, exits, gallery numbering, etc.
 Exit to the largest prison yard.
 Cisterns placed outside the cells in cages to avoid prisoners hiding anything in them.

 Joan taking further notes nearby the room where prisoners were given methadone.

Joan, Esther and Mariana discuss options in the Panopticon-inspired central space (this cabin is not the original structure).

October 25, 2018: Fifth reenactment of Joan Morey’s performance within the exhibition ‘Desiring machine, Working machine’ at the Contemporary Art Centre of Barcelona – Fabra i Coats. ‘GRITOS Y SUSURROS. Conflicte dramàtic cinquè (amb l’obra d’art)’ [CRIES & WHISPERS. Fifth Dramatic Conflict (with the Work of Art)] (2009) was interpreted by Carme Callol and Tatin Revenga.

Carme Callol and Tatin Revenga rehearsal. Photo: Joan Morey.

Joan Morey, ‘GRITOS Y SUSURROS. Conflicte dramatic cinquè (ambos l’obra d’art)’ [CRIES & WHISPERS. Fifth Dramatic Conflict (with the Work of Art)], 2009. Interpreted by Carme Callol and Tatin Revenga. Performance reenactment within the frame of the exhibition ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring Machine, Working Machine’ (2018–2019). Photo: Noemi Jariod. Courtesy the artist.

October 26–27, 2018: Attending the opening of ‘Te toca a tí’ in Espai d'art contemporani de Castelló (EACC). Mariana’s review of the exhibition would be published on
 January 7, 2019, in art-agenda


Teresa Lanceta’s work, exhibition view of ‘Te toca a tí’ in Espai d’art contemporani de Castelló (EACC). 

November 1, 2018: Morey’s first performance of the series is this months’ focus on Latitudes’s home page. 
November 13, 2018: frieze.com publishes the review of Pere Llobera show at Bombon Projects and SIS galería by Max Andrews. Read the review here. Also included in the January-February 2019, issue #200, page 242.

November 15, 2018: Fourth reenactment of Joan Morey’s performance within the exhibition ‘Desiring machine, Working machine’ at the Contemporary Art Centre of Barcelona – Fabra i Coats. ‘BAREBACK. Fenomenología de la comunión’ [BAREBACK. Phenomenology of Communion], (2010) was interpreted by Manuel Segade.

Preparation of Manuel Segade’s outfit before the reenactment of the performance ‘BAREBACK. Fenomenología de la comunión’ [BAREBACK. Phenomenology of Communion], (2010) by Joan Morey. Photo: Noemi Jariod. Courtesy the artist.

Portrait of Manuel Segade at the end of his performance ‘BAREBACK. Fenomenología de la comunión’ [BAREBACK. Phenomenology of Communion], (2010) on Max Andrews’s Instagram.

November 18–22 Vienna Art Week; November 22-25 Amsterdam Art Weekend: This blog post documents the exhibitions and studios visited during our trip to Vienna, hosted by the Vienna Art Week. As part of the programme, Latitudes participated in a panel discussion on ‘Some Current Positions of Curating’ at das weisse haus.


(Above and below) Photos by eSeL.


November 22, 19:30h: Unfortunately due to our earlier engagement to attend the Vienna Art Week and a sudden change of dates, we were unable to attend the opening of Joan Morey’s ‘COS SOCIAL’ at Centre d’Art Tecla Sala, the second chapter of ‘COLLAPSE’. Below some install shots when the works arrived from Lleida’s La Panera.


Morey striking a pose on the façade of Tecla Sala. Photos: Latitudes.

November 22-25, 2018: Amsterdam Art Week. Visited De Appel, Rijksakademie OPEN Studios, Andriesse, Oude Kerk, RongWrong, Stedelijk museum, Ellen de Bruijne, Fons Welters, tegenboschvanvreden, andriesse eyck, a.o. Photo report here (with photos from the Vienna Art Week, too).November 29, 2018: Fifth reenactment of Joan Morey’s performance within the exhibition ‘Desiring machine, Working machine’ at the Contemporary Art Centre of Barcelona – Fabra i Coats. ‘IL LINGUAGGIO DEL CORPO. Prólogo’ [IL LINGUAGGIO DEL CORPO. Prologue] (2015–2016) was interpreted by Catalina Carrasco and Gaspar Morey.

The final shot of ‘IL LINGUAGGIO DEL CORPO’ published on Max Andrews' Instagram (later deleted by Instagram due "not following their community guidelines on nudity").

December 1, 2018: Following on our recent trip to Vienna’s Kunsthistorisches Museum to see their historic Brueghel exhibition, we decided to dedicate December’s cover story to another of their current shows: ‘Spitzmaus Mummy in a Coffin and Other Treasures’ conceived by filmmaker Wes Anderson and his partner Juman Malouf. 
December 2018 cover story on www.lttds.org

December 2–4, 2018: Short research trip to Madrid to visit exhibitions: group show ‘Querer parecer noche’ at the Centro de Arte 2 de Mayo in Móstoles; Lúa Coderch’s ‘La vida de O.’ at CentroCentro; comprehensive solo shows by Luigi Ghirri, Luis Camnitzer, Dorothea Tanning, and Dierk Schmidt at Museo Reina Sofia; Lina Bo Bardi at Fundación March; works by Portuguese artists Alexandre Estrela and João Maria Gusmão + Pedro Paiva at La Casa Encendida; and a few solo exhibitions in commercial galleries such as David Goldblatt at Elba Benítez; Alejandro Cesarco in Parra & Romero; Eva Fàbregas at garcía galería; Enric Farrés Duran at NoguerasBlanchard and Daniel Jacoby at Maisterravalbuena. We also had time to squeeze in a visit to the Museo Geominero, a place we’ve long wanted to visit and never managed to find time for. And it didn’t disappoint. Highly recommended to everyone not only into minerals and stones but also nerds (as we are) on exhibition display and cabinets.

Lúa Coderch’s ‘La vida de O.’ at CentroCentro.
Alejandro Cesarco at ParraRomero, Madrid.

Above and below: Museo Geominero, Madrid.


Group exhibition ‘Querer parecer noche’ at the Centro de Arte 2 de Mayo (CA2M) in Móstoles.


Dierk Schmidt at Museo Reina Sofia’s Palacio Velázquez.

December 13, 2018: Sixth and final reenactment of Joan Morey’s performance within the exhibition ‘Desiring machine, Working machine’ at the Contemporary Art Centre of Barcelona – Fabra i Coats. ‘TOUR DE FORCE. El cos utòpic’ [TOUR DE FORCE. The Utopian Body] (2017) was interpreted by Eduard Escoffet.


Backstage makeup and application of fake tattoos – in the hurry the ‘Memento Mori’ tattoo on one on Escoffet’s arm was upside down. No big deal. 


December 20, 2018: frieze.com publishes Max’s review on the exhibition ‘Picture Industry: A Provisional History of the Technical Image’, a survey exhibition at LUMA Arlès captures the history of mechanically-reproduced imagery from the 19th century to the present. Read the review here.
January 7, 2019: art-agenda.com publishes Mariana’s review of the group exhibition ‘Te toca a tí [It's your turn]’ at Espai d'art contemporani de Castelló (EACC). Read the review here.
The review is also the focus of our January’s Monthly Cover Story on Latitudes home page (archived here).
January 8–10, 2019: Set up for the performance ‘Schizophrenic Machine’ by Joan Morey, the closing event of the three-part project ‘COLLAPSE’. Both exhibitions at the Centre d’art contemporani de Barcelona – Fabra i Coats and Centre d’art Tecla Sala close on January 13, 2019. 



January 10, 2019, at 7pm: Performance ‘COLLAPSE. Schizophrenic Machine’ by Joan Morey. Performance structured in a prologue and five acts inside Barcelona’s La Model prison. A group of people was driven by coach to the location from each of the two art centres that hosted the first two parts of ‘COLLAPSE’. The performance was integrated into the architecture and the memory of the building, creating an imposing immersive experience. Public restricted by capacity to 113 spectators. Attendance had to be requested in advance and was subject to prior selection and the acceptance of specific rules and a strict dress code. More here.

‘COLLAPSE. Schizophrenic Machine’ by Joan Morey.© 2019. All documentation photographs by Noemi Jariod. Courtesy of the artist.

January 14, 2019: frieze.com publishes’s' fan letter on ‘Frank Zappa’s Genre-Defying ‘Civilization Phaze III’’. Published in Issue 200, January - February 2019. Read the text here.
February 1, 2019: New cover story focusing on Morey’s closing performance ‘COLLAPSE. Schizophrenic Machine’ at La Model prison in Barcelona.
February 8, 2019: Launch of a new ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ dispatch from Reykjavík (and cover story on Latitudes’s home page between March-April 2019). In this new itinerary, Canadian curator Becky Forsythe and Icelandic artist Þorgerður Ólafsdóttir navigate Reykjavík’s surroundings considering Þorgerður’s “current interest in Icelandic Spar (a form of transparent calcite), its double refraction and light-polarizing properties. In a race with daylight, they travel between sites, collecting moments and considering the ways in which geologic time surfaces in the context of human time.”

Each of the 27 photographs is augmented by one or more extra assets – a brief commentary, a sound or a caption – accessed by clicking the words overlaying the images.


‘Incidents (of Travel)’ is an editorial project that began in Spring 2016. It’s edited by Latitudes and produced by KADIST as part of their online projects. Earlier offline conversations have taken place in Chicago (USA), Jinja (Uganda), Suzhou (China), Lisbon (Portugal), Terengganu (Malaysia), Yerevan (Armenia) and Buenos Aires (Argentina).





February 20, 2019: After a few weeks facing the screen and months mining hard disks, we finally upload Latitudes’ redesigned portfolio, available to download for desktop/laptop/tablet view (83pp, 30.9 MB), for mobile (164pp,15.8 MB) or for print (164pp, 155.3 MB).




February 26–March 1, 2019: Three intensive days navigating ARCOmadrid events. We enjoyed Reina Sofía’s exhibitions dedicated to Chicago-based artist H. C. Westermann (later reviewed by Mariana for L’Officiel Art International) and Mapa Teatro’s site-specific installation as part of the Fisuras programme; David Bestué’s solo show at García Galería; Catalina Lozano’s exhibition ‘Winning by Losing’ at CentroCentro; Charlotte Moth’s subtle play with three works from CA2M’s collection in Móstoles, and Armando Andrade Tudela also at CA2M.



Above and below: David Bestué solo show at García Galería, Madrid.

(Above and below): Following on from Joao Laia’s earlier exhibition ‘Transmissions from the Etherspace’ in the same institution, his latest exhibition ‘Drowning in a sea of data’ —despite the ubiquity of the topic of the incessant presence of technology and algorithms in our daily lives — included great works such as Clemens von Wedemeyer’s film and Tomasz Kowalski’s small canvases


Downstairs the highlights of this year’s Generación 2019 were Susanna Inglada and Lucía P. Moreno.

 Catalina Lozano’s group exhibition ‘Winning by Losing’ at CentroCentro. Above: work by Patricia Esquivias. Below: Work by Asier Mendizábal and (next images) Jorge Satorre and Xavier Salaberría.
(Above and below) Bravo to Charlotte Moth’s subtle play with three pieces in CA2M’s collection in dialogue with some of her work. A highlight was the two-part theatre backdrop painted by Leonor Fini in the 1950s and commissioned by Antonio el Bailarín for the 1956 International Festival of Granada.


March 13, 2019: Max’s review on ‘Domènec. Y la tierra será el paraíso’ exhibition at adn galería, Barcelona, published on frieze.com (also included in frieze, issue 202, April 2019).
23 March–16 April 2019: Montevideo (family trip) and Buenos Aires (work trip). Read a fully documented report of our week in Buenos Aires here.

Max Andrews and Lara Marmor conversation ‘First Things First: Making Exhibitions for a General Audience’ covered the contradictions for curatorial and artistic strategies addressing larger audiences. Photo: Art Basel.



In ‘Beyond the Museum: New Institutional Frames for Art’ Mariana Cánepa Luna and Solana Molina Viamonte discussed some of the current transformations institutions undergo, as well as identifying forthcoming challenges. Photo: Art Basel.




April 2019: Two articles were published this month. Latitudes wrote a 14-page feature on Joan Morey for THE SEEN—Chicago’s International Online Journal of Contemporary and Modern Art, and Mariana wrote a review of H. C. Westermann’s retrospective ‘Goin’ Home’ (Volver a casa) exhibition at the Museo Reina Sofía in Madrid, published in L’Officiel Art International’s issue #29. More on our writing archive.


The first page of the 14-page feature on Joan Morey’s performative practice published on THE SEEN—Chicago’s International Online Journal of Contemporary and Modern Art.

Views of the H. C. Westermann's retrospective "Volver a casa" exhibition at the Museo Reina Sofía in Madrid. Photo: Latitudes.

Additionally, a third text appeared this month: the essay ‘Thinking like a drainage basin’ for the exhibition catalogue ‘Lara Almarcegui. Béton’ published by Silvana Editoriale, accompanying her solo exhibition at CAIRN centre d’art in Digne-les-Bains in southern France.


In 2011 Latitudes-edited the monograph ‘Lara Almarcegui. Projects 1995–2010’ published by Archive Books.


(Two above) IVAM’s new sculpture park under construction.



(Two above) Views from their current permanent collection display ‘TIEMPOS CONVULSOS. Historias y microhistorias en la colección del IVAM’.

(Above and below) Views from the exhibition ‘Ice and Earth: The Shimmering Abstractions’ by Anna-Eva Bergman at Bombas Gens, Valencia. Read here.


May 2–4, 2019: Trip to Valencia to research for an article on the Valencia art scene in the framework of IVAM’s 30th anniversary (to be published in October 2019 in frieze magazine).

May 6-31, 2019: Intense jury duty selecting Barcelona Producció awardees of the 2019-2020 season. Three long weeks reading 259 applications, debating with the rest of the jury, and interviewing 32 shortlisted candidates in order to award 15 production grants, an initiative of La Capella



On June 3, winners are announced. Latitudes will tutor three of the fifteen awarded projects: ‘Joc d'infants’ [Children’s game] by Lola Lasurt (solo exhibition, June-October 2020, dates TBC), the offsite project ‘La Balena del Prat al Prat’ [The El Prat Whale to El Prat] by Consol Llupià, and the research ‘Nombrar, poseer. Crítica de la práctica taxonómica’ [To name, to own. Critique of taxonomic practice] by Agustín Ortiz Herrera.
May 29, 2019: Frieze published Max’s review ‘Ice and Earth: The Shimmering Abstractions’ on Anna-Eva Bergman’s retrospective of the terrestrial geographies at Bombas Gens, Valencia.

Exhibition catalogue ‘Lara Almarcegui. Béton published by Silvana Editoriale.

June 4, 2019: We received copies of the publication ‘Lara Almarcegui. Beton’ (Silvana Editoriale, April 2019), which includes Latitudes' essay ‘Thinking like a drainage basin’. 


One of the cleverest interventions: (Theresa) ‘May you live in interesting times’, Venice Biennale 2019.

June 10–14, 2019: Visiting the Venice Biennale. Highlights: Jannis Kounellis at the Fondazione Prada; in the biennale enjoyed works by Khalil Joseph, Ed Atkins, Gabriel Rico, Hito Steyerl, Otobong Nkanga, Haris Epaminonda, Ulrike Müller, Michael Armitage, Gauri Gill (a highlight of Documenta14), Cyprien Gaillard, Jimmie Durham and Lara Favaretto, et. al. The group show at Punta della Dogana (always impeccably installed) had great pieces by Hicham Berrada, Charbel Joseph H. Boutros, Stéphane Saade, and Ari Benjamin; Christopher Kulendran Thomas at V-A-C; mixed feelings about Luc Tuymans at Palazzo Grassi; visited the empty Lithuanian (performances were only on Saturdays, Wednesdays has now been added to the schedule). In the Giardini, we enjoyed the presentations in France, Brazil, Belgium and Switzerland, and elsewhere Ghana, Cyprus, Wales, France, Madagascar, Dineo Seshee Bopape's work in the South African, the maze-like Italy and Hong Kong. Future Generations is always good to visit, though we'd be grateful if they could provide a leaflet or sheet with information on the exhibited works and artists. We enjoyed the presentations by Toyin Ojih Odutola, Jakob Kudsk Steensen, Daniel Turner and Gala Porras-Kim and had time to swing by Victoria Miro which presented great paintings by Njideka Akunyili Crosby. Others photographed below.


Detail from Cathy Wilkes’s work at the British Pavilion, Venice Biennale 2019.

Ingela Ihman’s work at the Nordic Pavilion, Venice Biennale 2019.

 Sergio Prego’s sculptures at the back of the Spanish Pavilion, Venice Biennale 2019.

Yu Ji sculptures in the Central Pavilion, Giardini, Venice Biennale 2019

Jimmie Durham’s ‘Black Serpentine’ in the Central Pavilion, Giardini, Venice Biennale 2019.

Lara Favaretto's ‘Thinking Head’ in the Central Pavilion, Giardini, Venice Biennale 2019.

Haris Epaminonda in the Arsenale, Venice Biennale 2019.

Joël Andrianomearisoa at the Madagascar Pavilion, CorderieVenice Biennale 2019.

Lynette Yiadom-Boakye’s paintings at the Ghana Pavilion, Corderie, Venice Biennale 2019.

 Irish pavilion with work by Eva Rothschild, Corderie, Venice Biennale 2019.

Welsh Pavilion presented work by Sean EdwardsVenice Biennale 2019.

July 1, 2019: New cover story rewinding 10 years to Francesc Ruiz's (visionary?) participation in the group show ‘Sequelism, part 3: Possible, Probable and Preferable Futures’ in Arnolfini, Bristol.
July 11, 2019: Conversation with Lara Almarcegui at the Institut Valencià d’Art Modern (IVAM) in the context of her new exhibition ‘Lara Almarcegui. Agras volcano. Mining rights

Photo © Institut Valencià d'Art Modern (IVAM).

July 16, 2019: Website update with a new page on our forthcoming participation in PUBLICS’s ‘Today Is Our Tomorrow’ art festival taking place in early September in Helsinki. Running parallel during the same week (9–15 September), Frame Contemporary Art Finland is organising ‘Gathering for Rehearsing Hospitalities’, a six-day gathering in which artists, curators, researchers and other critical minds ‘are invited to rehearse and debate hospitality towards diverse ways of knowing and challenging of dominant knowledges’.
July 19, 2019: As a board member of the Fundació Privada AAVC governing HANGAR since 2015, Mariana attends the last HANGAR board meeting before the Summer break. This is a longer than usual session as 2018 accounts have to be approved. Enjoying the blue sky and bright colours before entering spreadsheet world.



Nearby building to HANGAR on c. Marroc / Espronceda.


July 22, 2019: We learn Joan Morey is one of the eight beneficiaries of the 27th edition of the Botín Foundation’s International Visual Arts Grants. Yey! 

July 26-28, 2019: Trip to Madrid to catch a few exhibitions before they finished and the August exodus. Henrik Olesen, David Wojnarowicz, Miriam Cahn, Sara Ramo and Rogelio López Cuenca at the Museo Reina Sofía; Inéditos 2019 at La Casa Encendida; Eva Fàbregas and Aimée Zito Lema at CentroCentro; the recently inaugurated Paloma Polo at CA2M in Móstoles; Joël Andrianomearisoa (at Galería Sabrina Amrani) and Darío Villalba at Sala Alcalá 31, two shows ending this weekend.


 Joël Andrianomearisoa at Galería Sabrina Amrani.

 Above and below: Darío Villalba at Sala Alcalá 31

 Eva Fàbregas ‘Gut feeling’ at CentroCentro.

  Paloma Polo, ‘A Fleeting Moment of Dissidence Becomes Fossilised and Lifeless After The Moment Has Passed’ 2014, at CA2M in Móstoles.

 Henrik Olesen, ‘SOME GAY-LESBIAN ARTISTS AND/OR ARTISTS RELEVANT TO HOMO-SOCIAL CULTURE BORN BETWEEN C. 1300–1870’ (2007) at Museo Reina Sofía.

David Wojnarowicz's photograph ‘What Is This Little Guy’s Job in the World’ (1990) at the Museo Reina Sofía


The 2019–2020 season will kick off on 9–15 September. We'll be in Helsinki participating in two events. Firstly the art festival ‘Today Is Our Tomorrow’, a three-day event (12, 13 and 14 September) initiated by PUBLICS presenting a collaboratively curated program of temporary public art commissions, live performance, music, dance, theatre, literature and symposia, local and international organisations. Latitudes’ has invited Mercedes Azpilicueta to present the performance ‘Yegua-yeta-yuta’ (2015) at Club Kaiku, an underground music venue renowned for hosting an innovative lineup of DJs. 


Skype conversation with the artist Mercedes Azpilicueta and Paul O'Neill from PUBLICS.

And secondly, we'll be part of Frame Contemporary Art Finland's ‘Gathering for Rehearsing Hospitalities’, a week composed of a series of talks, performative dialogues, interventions and screenings developed in collaboration with a number of local partners.

A few days later, we'll be participating in the 2019 EXPO CHICAGO/Red Bull Arts Global Curatorial Initiative visiting a range of institutions and artists in Chicago (17–21 September) and Detroit (21–23 September).





Selección de reseñas, videos y entrevistas sobre el proyecto COLAPSO de Joan Morey


Natàlia Farré, ‘Sumisión y frío en la Modelo’, El Periódico, 15 de enero 2019.
Maria Palau, ‘Angoixats a la Model’, El Punt Avui, 13 de enero 2019, pág 23.

Conxita Oliver, ‘El món performatiu de Joan Morey, a revisió’, eltemps.cat, 13 desembre 2018 (Catalán).


Pía Cordero, "COL·LAPSE, o l’avenir il·limitat de l’obscenitat", núvol.com, 6 desembre 2018 (Catalán).



María Muñoz, ‘Sobre el poder, la performance y el deseo’, Metal magazine, 4 diciembre 2018 (Castellano).




"Joan Morey presenta "Col·lapse. Cos social", programa Taquilla Inversa, L'H digital Mitjans de Comunicació de L'Hospitalet, 29 novembre 2018 (4'57'', Catalán).


Entrevista ‘Joan Morey, artista i performer mallorquí’ con Tania Adam, programa ‘Terrícoles’, canal betevé, 13 novembre 2018 (27', Catalán).
Vanessa Graell, ‘Anatomía de la ‘performance’’, El Mundo, 27 septiembre 2018 (Castellano).
Maria Palau, ‘Contra l'abús de poder’, El Punt Avui, 23 setiembre 2018 (Catalán).
Núria Juanico, ‘L’entrada a l’univers sinistre de Joan Morey’, Ara.cat, 25 setiembre 2018 (Catalán).


CONTENIDO RELACIONADO:
  • Proceso de inscripción para asistir a la performance ‘Máquina esquizofrénica’ de Joan Morey 11 Diciembre 2018
  • December 13, 2018, 7 pm: Performance reenactment of "TOUR DE FORCE. El cos utòpic" (2017) by Joan Morey 10 December 2018
  • November 29, 2018, 5–8pm: Performance reenactment of "IL LINGUAGGIO DEL CORPO. Pròleg" (2015-16) by Joan Morey 26 November 2018
  • November 15, 2018, 7 pm: Performance reenactment of "BAREBACK. Fenomenología de la comunión" (2010) by Joan Morey 12 November 2018
  • October 25, 7pm: Performance reenactment of "GRITOS Y SUSURROS" (2009) by Joan Morey 22 October 2018
  • October 11, 2018, 7pm: Performance reenactment of ‘LLETANIA APÒRIMA’ [APORIC LITANY] (2009) by Joan Morey 8 October 2018
  • Wakelet archive of social media content




Mariana Cánepa Luna reviews ‘Te toca a tí! [It's Your Turn!]’ for art-agenda



‘Te toca a tí’ [It's Your Turn]
Espai d'art contemporani de Castelló, Castelló de la Plana
October 26, 2018—February 17, 2019


"Two pairs of hands play a game of cat’s cradle, forming a star from a loop of string; viewers may imagine one person pulling the string while the other interprets their instructions. This photograph, which appears on the cover of the booklet accompanying the group exhibition “Te toca a tí” [It’s your turn] at the Espai d’art contemporani de Castelló (EACC), epitomizes the exhibition’s conceptual framework. Curated by Laura Vallés Vílchez and including works by ten artists, the show asks whether a gallery can become a site of negotiation, and if so, in what ways it can be re-signified."

—> Continue reading here.

Text originally published in art-agenda on January 7, 2019.



Teresa Lanceta, selection of tapestries and sewn fabrics, 2003-2018. Variable dimensions. Courtesy of the artist and Galería Espacio Mínimo. Photo by Ester Pegueroles.


Luca Frei, ‘Simone Forti's See-Saw’, 2015. Variable dimensions. Performance with plywood see-saw. Courtesy of the artist and The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Committee on Media and Performance Funds, 2018. Photo by Luca Frei.


Céline Condorelli, ‘Models for a Qualitative Society’, 2016. Variable dimensions. Painted blackwood acacia, steel. 84 x 119 cm, Inkjet prints. Courtesy of the artist. Photo by Ester Pegueroles.

RELATED CONTENT:






    Cover Story—January 2019: “Seesaw”

    Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org

    The January 2019 Monthly Cover Story “Seesaw” is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org


    “The exhibition “Te toca a tí” (It’s your turn) continues at Espai d’art contemporani de Castelló, Castellón de la Plana, until February 17th. Curated by Laura Vallés Vílchez (editor of the journal Concreta) it includes works by ten artists within a conceptual framework that asks how a gallery space can become a site of negotiation, process, reciprocity, and empathy. Mariana Cánepa Luna’s review of this optimistic show was recently published in Art Agenda.”

    —> Continue reading
    —> After December it will be archived here.


    Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.


    RELATED CONTENT:

    • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
    • Writing archive – exhibition reviews, artists' profiles, opinion columns, interviews, and catalogue essays written by Latitudes since 2005.
    • Cover Story—December 2018: "Treasures! exhibitionism! showmanship!" 1 December 2018
    • Cover Story—November 2018: "Joan Morey—postmortem judgement reenactment" 1 November 2018
    • Cover Story–October 2018: "I can’t take my eyes off you: Eulàlia Rovira and Adrian Schindler" 1 October 2018
    • Cover Story–September 2018: Harald Szeemann’s travel sculpture, 10 September 2018
    • Cover Story–August 2018: Askeaton Joyride, 2 August 2018
    • Cover Story–July 2018: No Burgers for Sale 2 July 2018
    • Save the date: 13 September, 6–9pm. Latitudes-curated exhibition ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’, Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna, 21 June 2018
    • Cover Story—June 2018: Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group, 4 June 2018
    • Cover Story – May 2018: Shadowing Roman Ondák, 7 May 2018 




    Max Andrews reviews in frieze: ‘A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’ (LUMA Foundation, Arlès) and Pere Llobera's ‘Acció’ (Bombon Projects, Barcelona) and ‘Kill Your Darlings’ (Sis Galería, Sabadell)

    Max Andrews, co-founder of Latitudes and contributing editor to frieze, recently reviewed the group exhibition ‘A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’ at LUMA Foundation in Arlès. The exhibition is curated by artist Walead Beshty and is on view until January 6, 2019. Published on frieze.com, 20 December 2018.
    Frank Gehry's LUMA building under construction, as of October 12, 2018. Above and following photos by Latitudes. 

    Views from the exhibition ‘A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’.

    "Le Fusil Photographique" by Étienne-Jules Marey. 

    Works by Wolfgang Tillmans (vitrines) and Christopher Williams (wall).

    Hans-Peter Feldmann's "9-12 Front Page", 2001. 


    ‘PICTURE INDUSTRY: A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’, curated by Walead Beshty. Exhibition views, les Forges, Luma Arles, Parc des Ateliers, Arles, France, 2018. © Marc Domage.

    ‘PICTURE INDUSTRY: A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’, curated by Walead Beshty. Exhibition views, les Forges, Luma Arles, Parc des Ateliers, Arles, France, 2018. © Marc Domage.

    ‘PICTURE INDUSTRY: A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’, curated by Walead Beshty. Exhibition views, les Forges, Luma Arles, Parc des Ateliers, Arles, France, 2018. © Marc Domage.


    ‘PICTURE INDUSTRY: A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’, curated by Walead Beshty. Exhibition views, les Forges, Luma Arles, Parc des Ateliers, Arles, France, 2018. © Marc Domage.


    Also for frieze, Max Andrews reviewed two concurrent exhibitions by Pere Llobera: Acció’ at Bombon Projects (Barcelona) and ‘Kill Your Darlings’ at Sis Galería (in nearby Sabadell), ‘exploring the artist’s ever-changing styles and painterly references.’ Published online on 13 November 2018, and included in January-February 2019 print issue #200.

    “As if tormented by his own cursed hand, Llobera’s darkly fugitive shtick is his alarm at its ability to paint so adeptly so easily, despite his mind’s suspicion of painters painting to be admired.” 


     Views from Pere Llobera's exhibition ‘Acció’ at Bombon Projects, Barcelona. Courtesy the artist. Above and photos below: Roberto Ruiz.



    RELATED CONTENT:
    • Writing archive on Latitudes' website (since 2005);
    • Max Andrews reviews Lúa Coderch; "Crash Test. The Molecular Turn" and Julia Spínola for frieze 9 April 2018
    • "The Kørner problem” essay by Max Andrews in the monograph "John Kørner" published by Roulette Russe, 19 February 2018
    • Max Andrews essay on Christopher Knowles for NoguerasBlanchard at Liste 2017, 21 July 2017
    • Cover Story – January 2017: How open are open calls? 4 January 2017
    • Cover Story – December 2016: Ten years ago – Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook, 5 December 2016
    • January 2016 Monthly Cover Story: Kasper Akhøj's Eileen Gray’s E.1027, 4 January 2016
    • Review of the exhibition "What cannot be used is forgotten" in the May issue of frieze magazine, 29 April 2015
    • Review of Maria Thereza Alves' exhibition at CAAC Sevilla published in frieze magazine 9 March 2015




    Mariana Cánepa Luna reviews Frieze week 2018 for art-agenda.com

    Advertising in Pimlico. Above and below photos by Latitudes.

    London Roundup
    Various locations, London
    October 12, 2018


    Just as Frieze Art Fair opened last Wednesday, Prime Minister Theresa May gave her keynote speech—and dared to dance again—at the Conservative Party Conference in Birmingham. She announced that freedom of movement would be terminated “once and for all” by limiting access to “highly skilled workers” (in short, migrants earning over 30,000 British pounds per year). Countless art professionals earn much less (including entry-level curatorial staff at Tate, and yours truly), as well as doubtless many of the myriad gallery and museum folks involved in the city-wide jamboree of Frieze week. How do we imagine London’s contemporary art ecology post-Brexit, a scene that has grown exponentially since Tate Modern’s opening in 2000 and the first Frieze Art Fair in 2003? The question of how the 2019 edition of the fair is going to be affected was the elephant in the tent. Most people I asked shrugged: negotiations are still ongoing, consequences are yet to be seen. “It’ll be fiiiiine,” a London museum director told me. “Maybe we’ll visit a smaller fair, like the first editions—remember those days?” opined a British gallerist friend working in New York. Although one could put this upbeat denial down to the cliché of dark British humor and the spirit of “muddling through,” I nevertheless left worried that something more troubling lay behind it.

    If Frieze might have triggered the relocation of many contemporary art galleries from the East to the West of the city, two recent institutional openings are enforcing a southern axis. The new Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art in New Cross, housed in a listed Victorian bathhouse refurbished by 2015 Turner Prize winners Assemble, kicked off with a sparkling survey show of Mika Rottenberg’s absurdist film installations offering grotesque parodies of current labor conditions. The second home of the South London Gallery at Peckham Road Fire Station, elegantly renovated by 6a architects, opened with “Knock Knock,” a group show about the uses of humor—from political satire to visual puns—in contemporary art. The addition of these spaces will surely benefit Gasworks, a short bus ride away in nearby Vauxhall, whose truly international program of residencies and exhibitions over the last two decades has been a vital antidote to the dangers of isolationism in the British art scene.


    —> Continue reading here.

    Text originally published in Art-agenda on October 12, 2018.



    Lucy Dodd at Sprüth Magers, London.

    Façade of the new Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art in New Cross.
    Detail of Mika Rottenberg's show at Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art in New Cross.
    Part of Tania Bruguera’s 2018 Hyundai Commission at Tate Modern. 
    Visitor's comments on the Turner Prize 2018 board.
    Installation from Atelier E.B's show at the Serpentine Sackler Galleries, London.
    Detail from Cayetano Ferrer's solo exhibition “Demaster” at Southard Reid, London.
    Martine Syms at Sadie Coles HQ, London. 
    Judith Kopf's "Flock of Sheep" (2017) at the South London Gallery.
    Cornelia Parker Transitional "Object" (PsychoBarn) at the Royal Academy.
     Johanna Unzueta at Proyectos Ultravioleta, Focus section, Frieze Art Fair.
     (Above + below) Sam Lewitt, "Core (the "Work")", BMW Open Work commission, Frieze Art Fair.
     Ian Law at RODEO, Frieze Art Fair.
    (Above and below) Oscar Humphries' "Sèvres and Japonism" at Frieze Masters, London. 

    (Above and below) Chris Burden at Gagosian, London.  

    Lawrence Abu Hamdan at Chisenhale, London.
    Daniel Silver at Frith Street Gallery, London.
    Kemang Wa Lahulere at Marian Goodman Gallery, London.
     Alicja Kwade's work in the "Space Shifters" exhibition, Hayward Gallery, London.
     (Above and below) Elmgreen and Dragset, "This is how we bite our tongue", Whitechapel, London.
    Amy Sillman at Camden Art Center, London.

    RELATED CONTENT: 




    Max Andrews reviews Lúa Coderch; "Crash Test. The Molecular Turn" and Julia Spínola for frieze

    Review ‘The Molecular Turn’: While Social Media Flourishes Ecological Systems are Collapsing. At La Panacée, Montpellier, Nicolas Bourriaud’s manifesto for a new movement and attempt to demarcate an artistic peer group." on frieze magazine.

    Max Andrews, co-founder of Latitudes and contributing editor to frieze, has recently reviewed the group exhibition ‘Crash Test. The Molecular Turn’ (at La Panacée, Montpellier, until May 6, 2018) as well as Lúa Coderch's solo exhibition ‘The girl with no door on her mouth’ (àngels barcelona, on view until April 13, 2018) for friezeBoth texts are available online and are included in print in the April issue.

    —> Video of Lúa Coderch presenting her work (Spanish with English subtitles).

    Review "The Girl with No Door on Her Mouth: Lúa Coderch's Acts of Making Noise. The artist explores the politics of the female voice that speaks out or is shut up, at àngels barcelona, Spain." on frieze magazine.

    A review on Julia Spínola's solo show "Lubricán" at the Centro de Arte 2 de Mayo (Móstoles, Madrid), has also just been published online and will also be included in the forthcoming May 2018 issue.

    —> Video of Julia Spínola presenting the show (in Spanish).

    Review "Julia Spínola: Twilight. At Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo, Móstoles, a crepuscular glow lends acute poignancy to simple forms and materials" on frieze magazine.


    RELATED CONTENT:
    • Writing archive on Latitudes' website (since 2005);
    • "The Kørner problem” essay by Max Andrews in the monograph "John Kørner" published by Roulette Russe, 19 February 2018
    • Max Andrews essay on Christopher Knowles for NoguerasBlanchard at Liste 2017, 21 July 2017
    • Cover Story – January 2017: How open are open calls?, 4 January 2017
    • Cover Story – December 2016: Ten years ago – Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook, 5 December 2016
    • January 2016 Monthly Cover Story: Kasper Akhøj's Eileen Gray’s E.1027, 4 January 2016
    • Symposium participation, "The Shock of Victory", Glasgow, 25 September 2015
    • Review of the exhibition "What cannot be used is forgotten" in the May issue of frieze magazine, 29 April 2015
    • Review of Maria Thereza Alves' exhibition at CAAC Sevilla published in frieze magazine 9 March 2015




    Mariana Cánepa Luna reviews ‘Allora & Calzadilla’ exhibition for art-agenda.com


    Allora & Calzadilla. ‘Stop, Repair, Prepare: Variations on Ode to Joy, No.3’ (2008). Modifyed Piano Bechstein © Photo: Roberto Ruiz © Fundació Antoni Tàpies, Barcelona, 2018. 

    Jennifer Allora and Guillermo Calzadilla’s “Allora & Calzadilla
    Fundació Antoni Tàpies, Barcelona
    February 6—May 20, 2018

    by Mariana Cánepa Luna


    "A piercing whistle punctuates the blaring of a trumpet. But in the columned central space of the Fundació Antoni Tàpies, the only visible instrument is a grand piano. For three days a week throughout the course of the exhibition, the instrument is played—and, one could say, worn—by a pianist who stands in a hole cut into its center. Leaning over the rim of the piano to strike the keys, the performer energetically interprets the fourth movement of Ludwig van Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 (1824), while slowly pushing the wheeled instrument around the space. The building has become a musical box, the exhibition orchestrated such that one movement flows into the other, spilling through the gallery’s spaces to create a dissonant soundscape."


    —> Continue reading...

    Originally published in art-agenda.com on March 19, 2018.



    Allora & Calzadilla. ‘Stop, Repair, Prepare: Variations on Ode to Joy, No.3’ (2008). Modifyed Piano Bechstein © Photo: Roberto Ruiz © Fundació Antoni Tàpies, Barcelona, 2018.

    Allora & Calzadilla. ‘Stop, Repair, Prepare: Variations on Ode to Joy, No.3’ (2008). Modifyed Piano Bechstein © Photo: Roberto Ruiz © Fundació Antoni Tàpies, Barcelona, 2018.

    Allora & Calzadilla. ‘Hope Hippo’ (2005). © Photo: Roberto Ruiz © Fundació Antoni Tàpies, Barcelona, 2018.

    Allora & Calzadilla. ‘Lifespan’ (2014) © Foto: Roberto Ruiz © Fundació Antoni Tàpies, Barcelona, 2018.

    Allora & Calzadilla, ‘Sweat Glands, Sweat Lands’ (2006). Video SD, color, sound. Duration: 2 minutes, 21 seconds. Courtesy Galerie Chantal Crousel. Photo: Roberto Ruiz. © Fundació Antoni Tàpies, 2018.

    Allora & Calzadilla, ‘A Man Screaming is Not a Dancing Bear’ (2008). 16 mm film, color, sound. Duration: 11 minutes, 15 seconds. Courtesy Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary (TBA21). Photo: Roberto Ruiz. © Fundació Antoni Tàpies. 

    Allora & Calzadilla, ‘Apotomē’ (2013). 16 mm film transferred to HD, colour, sound. Duration: 23 minutes, 9 seconds. Courtesy Galerie Chantal Crousel. Photo: Roberto Ruiz. © Fundació Antoni Tàpies, 2018. 

    RELATED CONTENT





    Reviews of the exhibition "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" at the CAPC musée, Bordeaux

    As the ‘4.543 billion. The matter of matter’ exhibition concluded on January 7, 2018, at the CAPC musée in Bordeaux, we finished archiving all the social media posts visitors, the museum and ourselves have published – see our Wakelet feed below – since research phase to the exhibition itself, and below share the most relevant print and online reviews.
    Wakelet collection of the "4.543 billion" exhibition.

    December 8, 2017: Tom Jeffreys highlighted the exhibition in his "Looking Back: Paris" roundup for frieze magazine – illustrated with two works included in the show by Nicholas Mangan and Alexandra Navratil.

    "A little less academic, but no less rigorous, was ‘4,543 milliards’ (4,543 billion), curated by the Barcelona-based Latitudes (co-founded by frieze contributing editor Max Andrews) at CAPC, Bordeaux. Subtitled ‘The matter of matter’, the exhibition provided a material, geological and political response to the building’s former life as a warehouse for colonial commodities and, by extension, the complex entanglement of culture, money, politics and ecological impact. Marble from Trump Tower (Amie Siegel’s "Strata", 2017) was exhibited alongside partially-burnt documents rescued from a fire at the Bordeaux municipal archives and a 1939 mock invitation to the ‘Museum of Standard Oil’, actually MoMA’s new building, issued by the then-publications director, Frances Collins (unsurprisingly fired soon after). Combining archival materials with work by 30 artists, big ideas with specificity and nuance, this was exactly the kind of exhibition I would want to return to again and again. If the selection of the next artistic director the Venice Biennale were a democratic process, I’d be voting for Latitudes."


    November 28, 2017Frank Browning, Paris-based Contributor to the Huffington Post author, and former NPR Correspondent, reviewed the recently opened retrospective of Beatriz González and concluded his article with a short mention:

    "Meanwhile, around the corner at CAPC there’s an intriguing assembly of stones, papers, paintings, photographs and projections that unite geo-physics, sculpture, and art history, including the conversion of the building itself from a one-time commodities warehouse into its current life as a museum.

    Entitled “The Matter of Matter,” [missing "4.543 billion" years, the age of the Earth, and the first part of the exhibition title] it includes the work of 30 artists, assembled and mounted by a Spanish team, Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna. They call themselves Latitudes [wrongly published with two "T"]; they aim to excavate the world we inhabit daily, be it through the history indigo mining in Mexico and southern France (vital for fine pottery and coloring bluejeans) or oil extraction in Venezuela, gas infused sculptures or open pit diamond mining in southern Africa. All that we do, all that we eat, all that we create derives from one form of excavation or another. Simple truism as it may seem, Latitudes takes us into the intimacies of our relation with this earth and calls us to meditate on our physical and aesthetic relation to the steadily warming round rock that is our home."




    September 20, 2017: Emmanuel Labails of RCF Radio did a 9-minute interview with Pedro Jiménez Morras, Head of Press of CAPC, who discussed the premises of the exhibition and some of its works. (Listen between minute 4:39 and 13:36).

    August 19, 2017: Bea Espejo's ‘Cambio de tiempo’, on the Spanish national cultural supplement Babelia, in El País newspaper begins:

    ˝A ese pensamiento geológico del tiempo conduce la exposición 4.543 millones. La cuestión de la materia en el CAPC de Burdeos. La muestra aborda obras de arte, colecciones e historias culturales con relación a procesos ecológicos y la escala geológica del tiempo. En total, más de 35 artistas que dan valor a las discontinuidades, a las derivas y a las ausencias. La muestra almacena el tiempo como una batería almacena la energía. Y lo hace en varias capas de lectura. Una de ellas es el tiempo que lleva Latitudes, la oficina curatorial de Mariana Cánepa Luna y Max Andrews, trabajando en este proyecto, seguramente el más complejo y ambicioso, aunque esta investigación en torno a las complejas relaciones entre la ecología y el arte contemporáneo está en la base de todos sus proyectos desde 2005. Aquí no pueden ser más rotundos. Abordan la cuestión de la materia desde el lado más inmaterial, que es la memoria. Para ello, estudiaron a fondo el contexto de la ciudad bajo un programa de residencias del museo. Hablamos, pues, de un proyecto de investigación, algo que se traduce en cada pequeño gesto que recoge la muestra, y que lo expande todo. De ahí las relaciones de algunas obras con el departamento de zoología de la universidad (Ilana Halperin), el Museo de Bellas Artes (Stuart Whipps, o el préstamo de Alfred Roll), así como los muchos documentos y objetos que se incluyen de los archivos Métropole, de la Gironde y la colección geológica de la UFR Sciences de la Terre et de la Mer, de la Universidad de Burdeos.˝




    July 12, 2017: Catherine Darfay's ‘Le CAPC remonte le temps’ on the local newspaper "Sudouest", was the first feature. The article was illustrated with a with an image showing Amy Balkin's ‘Today’s CO2 Spot Price’ (2009) chartering the daily price of carbon dioxide emissions allowances in the world’s largest carbon market —a changing value documented in this blog post.


    RELATED CONTENT:
    • 4.543 billion. The Matter of Matter” exhibition
    • Archive of social networks posts related to "4.543 billion"
    • Photo gallery of the exhibition 
    • CAPC website (French, English, Spanish) http://www.capc-bordeaux.fr/programme/4543-milliards
    • Cover Story—December 2017: "Tabet's Tapline trajectory" 4 December 2017
    • Alfred Roll's 1878 "The Old Quarryman" exchanged with Alfred Smith's "The Grave Docks" (1884) in the exhibition "4.543 billion" at the CAPC musée 3 November 2017
    • Cover Story—November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth" 1 November 2017 
    • 15 November 2017, 4:30–8pm: 'The Return of the Earth. Ecologising art history in the Anthropocene' study day at the CAPC musée, Bordeaux 24 October 201
    • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
    • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
    • SAVE THE DATE: 29 June, 19h. Private view of the exhibition "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" at the CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux 30 May 2017
    • Cover Story – May 2016: Material histories – spilling the beans at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux 10 May 2016.
    • Second research trip to Bordeaux 16 July 2016




    Mariana Cánepa Luna reviews Ana Jotta’s “Abans que me n’oblidi (Before I forget)” exhibition in art-agenda

    Installation view of the exhibition "Ana Jotta: Abans que me n'oblidi (Antes de que me olvide / Before I Forget)", 2016, ProjecteSD, Barcelona. Photo: ©Roberto Ruiz 

    Ana Jotta’s “Abans que me n’oblidi (Before I forget)
    PROJECTESD, Barcelona
    September 30–November 26, 2016
     

    by Mariana Cánepa Luna

    "While it has been widely exhibited in her native Portugal, Ana Jotta’s work hasn’t been presented in depth to the Barcelona public since the early 1990s.(1) So this mini-survey of her production from 1980 to the present, framed as part of the Barcelona Gallery Weekend, is overdue. “Abans que me n’oblidi (Before I forget)” begins (or ends) at the intermediary patio space that one crosses before entering the main exhibition space at ProjecteSD. Part of a curved wall is covered with irregular patches of light gray and pale pink paint, as if emulating swatch tests for a redecoration. This playful gesture sets the tone for the exhibition inside, a somber and subtle palette of delicate intonations and provisional arrangements."  


    Continue reading...
     

    Originally published in art-agenda.com on November 8, 2016.

    Ana Jotta, "Cloud", 2013. Painted steel, 90 x 200 x 4 cm. Photo: ©Roberto Ruiz.

    Installation view of the exhibition "Ana Jotta: Abans que me n'oblidi (Antes de que me olvide / Before I Forget)", 2016, ProjecteSD, Barcelona. Photo: ©Roberto Ruiz.


    Ana Jotta, "Footnote #1", 2016. Mixed media. Variable dimensions. Photo: ©Roberto Ruiz.



    Ana Jotta, "Un Printemps 2008", 2008, Acrylic and felt pen on screen, 160 x 129 x 16 cm. Photo: ©Roberto Ruiz.


    Installation view of the exhibition "Ana Jotta: Abans que me n'oblidi (Antes de que me olvide / Before I Forget)", 2016, ProjecteSD, Barcelona. Photo: ©Roberto Ruiz.


    Ana Jotta, "Que Sais-Je?", 2011. Marker pen on tape roll, 2,5 x 14,3 diam. cm. Photo: ©Roberto Ruiz.



     Detail of several "Footnote" pieces. Photo: Latitudes.

     Detail of several "Footnote" pieces. Photo: Latitudes.

    Ana Jotta, "Sem título", 2016. Paint on wall. Variable dimensions. Photo: Latitudes.

    RELATED CONTENT:





    Reseñas sobre la exposición "No temeré mal alguno" de José Antonio Hernández-Díez en el MACBA

    A una semana de concluirse la exposición de José Antonio Hernández-Díez en el MACBA (finaliza el 26 de junio), hacemos revisión de la cobertura de prensa más relevante que ha recibido (por orden cronológico) y que encontraréis bajo la pestaña "Contenidos relacionados" en la sección final de ésta y en todas nuestras páginas, espacio desde donde también compartimos entradas al blog.

    Compartimos una vez más el registro fotográfico de la exposición y el archivo de redes sociales (reseñas, instagrams, tweets) que diferentes usuarios han ido publicando a lo largo de los tres meses que ha durado la exposición. 

    Recordad que quedan dos activides más: el 22 de junio, 19h, se proyectará "Vampyr" de Carl Theodor Dreyer (1932, Francia y Alemania, 75 min, b/n, sin sonido) dentro del ciclo "Sombras y silencios o los fantasmas que vuelven como la primera vez" que comisaría el cineasta Andrés Duque para la exposición y el sábado 25 de junio, 19h, Nieve Fuga realizará un concierto en vivo en la sala de exposiciones en el contexto de la programación #MACBAesviu, un collage sonoro inspirado en las obras de la exposición
     
    “Las obras de José Antonio Hernández-Díez toman el MACBA”, eldiario.com, 17 marzo 2016.


    “El MACBA acull una exposició amb instal·lacions experimentals de José Antonio Hernández-Díez”, Vilaweb.com, 17 març 2016.

    Núvol, video by Ester Roig, 17 març 2016.
     

    Sonia Ávila, "José Antonio Hernández-Díez mira a su pasado”, El Periódico, 17 marzo 2016.

    Carlos Sala “Cuando el video era el rey”, La Razón, 18 marzo 2016.
     

    Griselda Oliver, "Viu o mort. El gos d’Antonio Hernández-Díez", Núvol.com, 19 març 2016.


    Eugènia Sendra, “Com recuperar la fe perduda”, revista Time Out, 23 març 2016.

    Javier Díaz-Guardiola, “La obsolescencia artística programada también existe”, ABC Cultural, 25 marzo 2016.
    Antoni Ribas Tur, "Nova iconografia religiosa i un gos sant, al Macba”, www.ara.cat 29 març 2016.

    Jaume Vidal Oliveras, "Hernández-Díez, líbranos de todo mal", El Cultural, El Mundo, 1 abril 2016.

    Maria Palau, "Art, vida i mort", El Punt/AVUI, 7 abril 2016.

    Roberta Bosco, "Arqueología contemporánea", El País (Catalunya),17 abril 2016.

    Contenido relacionado:




    Mariana Cánepa Luna review on Francesc Ruiz's 'Correos' exhibition for art-agenda

    View of Francesc Ruiz, “Correos,” garcía galería, Madrid, 2016. All images courtesy of garcía galería, Madrid. Photos by Roberto Ruiz.

    Francesc Ruiz’s “Correos”
    garcía galería, Madrid   
    January 16–March 5, 2016


    by Mariana Cánepa Luna

    Francesc Ruiz’s second solo show at Madrid’s garcía galería delves into the visual communication of one of Spain’s most iconic institutions, the Sociedad Estatal Correos y Telégrafos—the national postal service, commonly known as Correos—whose graphic identity was created in 1977 by Spanish designer and artist José María Cruz Novillo (b. 1936). Ruiz’s interest is not limited to Cruz Novillo’s pervasive design, but more broadly includes Correos as an agent of distribution as well as the various commercial guises that come into play in this public service. Ruiz’s choice to focus this exhibition on the postal system, the pre-eminent pre-internet network, is not casual: through his characteristic strategy of “expanded comics” he has long been concerned with the potential of distribution and official versus alternative forms of circulation.

    —> Continue reading...

    Originally published on art-agenda.com on 25 February 2016.


     View of Francesc Ruiz, “Correos,” garcía galería, Madrid, 2016.
      View of Francesc Ruiz, “Correos,” garcía galería, Madrid, 2016.
     Francesc Ruiz, Correos IV (Carton), 2015.
     Francesc Ruiz, Correos IV (Carton), 2015.
     Francesc Ruiz, Correos I (Bufanda), 2015.
     Francesc Ruiz, THE MIDAS TOUCH, 2015.
     Francesc Ruiz, MARCAR (6549/6567/6574/6547), 2015.
      Francesc Ruiz, Correos III (Caja), 2015.

    RELATED CONTENT:





    Review of the exhibition "What cannot be used is forgotten" in the May issue of frieze


    Entrance to the group exhibition "Ce qui ne sert pas s'oublie".

    As reported earlier in this channel, at the end of last January we visited the exhibition 'Ce qui ne sert pas s’oublie' (What Cannot be Used is Forgotten)' (on view until 3 May 2015) at CAPC musée d'art coontemporain in Bordeaux.

    Curated by Mexico-based Colombian-born curator Catalina Lozano, the exhibition presents the work of Mathieu K. Abonnenc, Sven Augustijnen, Mariana Castillo Deball, Sean Lynch, Pauline M’Barek, Museo Comunitario del Valle de Xico, Wendelien van Oldenborgh, Uriel Orlow, Beatriz Santiago Muñoz and Jorge Satorre.

    Below is a fragment of Max Andrews' frieze review, published in the May 2015 issue of frieze magazine (#171):

    ‘What cannot be used is forgotten’ proposed a biographical approach to objects and the histories and allegiances they can constitute. With an emphasis on eroding the legacy of colonial-era ethnography and archaeology, the exhibition comprised the contributions of ten artists who emphasized the accrual and dispersal of objects' meaning over time. Objects were broken apart, animated, revered, rumored, memorized, melted; or – as in Pauline M’Barek’s sculptures mimicking display stands for imagined wooden masks – missing altogether. Sometimes, objects were not comfortably objects at all, but textiles or techniques. Occasionally they were alibis employed to provoke historical revision and necessitate textual commentary. In Uriel Orlow’s A Very Fine Cast (110 years) (2007), works ingested past traces of such commentary (captions taken from European museums’ descriptions of the Benin Bronzes robbed by the British punitive Benin Expedition of 1897).

    – Max Andrews


      Installation view of Sean Lynch's 'A blog-by-blow account of stone-carving in Oxford' (2014).

    General view of the exhibition. (Right wall) Museo Comunitario del Valle de Xico (Community Museum of the Xico Valley).

    Related content:

    Report from Bordeaux: Visit to CAPC/Musée d'Art Contemporain's shows of Franz Ehrard Walther and the group show "Ce qui ne sert pas s'oublie" (27 January 2015)

    Review of Maria Thereza Alves' exhibition at CAAC Sevilla published in frieze magazine (9 March 2015) 

    art-agenda review on Andrea Büttner show "Tische", at NoguerasBlanchard, Barcelona  (21 July 2014)


    This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
    All photos:
    Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
    Work is licensed under a
    Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.





    Review of Maria Thereza Alves' exhibition at CAAC Sevilla published in frieze magazine

     View of the exhibition "The Long Road to Xico (1991–2014) at CAAC, Sevilla. Courtesy the artist and CAAC, Sevilla.

    The April issue of frieze magazine includes a review by Max Andrews' of Latitudes on Maria Thereza Alves' solo exhibition "The Long Road to Xico (1991–2014) at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Sevilla. 

    Curated by Los Angeles-based Spanish curator Pedro de Llano, this is a long-overdue midcareer retrospective comprising over a dozen works by an artist whose practice is little exhibited in Spain, and it's also very pertinent as it's hosted within the former Monasterio de Santa María de las Cuevas – from where Cristóbal Colón (Christopher Columbus) planned his second voyage of 1493. 

    Most importantly though is the connection to northern Spain with Alves' long-term research on Xico: "a town outside Mexico City, on the shores of one of the lakes that in the late 19th century, Íñigo Noriega, a Spanish immigrant from Asturias, drained the lake completing a cycle of environmental destruction and social marginalization that began with the arrival of Hernán Cortés and his soldiers." (from CAAC website) "This one man-made disaster in Chalco continues to have adverse effects that still plague the region with floods, contaminated water, land subsidence and the resulting destruction to infrastructure such as sewage pipes, large cracks which damage hundreds of houses, lack of drinking water and most recently earthquakes." (from the exhibition walltext)

      View of the installation The Return of a Lake, dOCUMENTA (13), Kassel, 2012.

    Excerpt of Max Andrews' frieze review:

    "Since the early 1990s, Maria Thereza Alves has addressed the devastating effects of Portuguese imperialism on the indigenous peoples of her native Brazil and of the Spanish conquest in the Americas. Hosted by the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo (CAAC), this long-overdue survey was in part a pre-history of her extensive project for Documenta 13, The Return of a Lake (2012). Extended in Seville, this room-sized installation centered on tabletop models that related the disastrous effects of the 1908 desiccation of Lake Chalco in Mexico City by Spanish businessman Íñigo Noriega Laso, and the ongoing injustices suffered by those who live in nearby Xico. Bookended by the earliest work in the exhibition, NoWhere (1991), in which overpainted photographs from Amazonas address European delusions of city planning in ‘empty’ territory, The Long Road to Xico (1991–2014) illuminates the ecological assault and epistemological violence ushered by colonialism. Given the city’s past as the main port for Spanish trade with the New World, the context of Seville granted particular acuity to the ethical armature of Alves’s decolonizing art. Moreover, CAAC’s home is the former Monasterio de Santa María de las Cuevas, from where Cristóbal Colón (Christopher Columbus) planned his second voyage of 1493 and where his remains were once interred."  


    RELATED CONTENT:


    The work of Maria Thereza Alves has been featured in several of Latitudes' projects, starting in 2006 with her contribution alongside Jimmy Durham for the publication "LAND, ART: A Cultural Ecology Handbook" (RSA/Arts Council England). In 2008 her film "The Sun" (2006, 5'03'') was presented in the group exhibition ‘Greenwashing. Ambiente: Pericoli, Promesse e Perplessità’ (Greenwashing. Environment: Perils, Promises and Perplexities), at the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin, Italy (29 February–18 May 2008) and later that year it was presented as part of the film programme "A Stake in the Mud, A Hole in the Reel. Land Art’s Expanded Field 1968–2008", premiered at the Museo Tamayo, Mexico City in April 2008 (toured to another seven venues in Europe between April and October that year).

    Latitudes to facilitate the Nature Addicts Fund Travelling Academy, 11–15 September, organised within the Maybe Education and Public Programs of dOCUMENTA (13), Kassel (9 September 2012)

    dOCUMENTA (13) artists and Latitudes (24 August 2012)

    Premiere del ciclo de video 'Una estaca en el lodo, un hoyo en la cinta. El campo expandido del Land Art, 1968-2008' en el Museo Tamayo, México DF (25 March 2008)



    This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
    All photos:
    Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
    Work is licensed under a
    Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




    Latitudes "Out of office", 2013–2014 season

    This is the sixth consecutive year [see 2008-9, 2009-10, 2010-11, 2011-12 and 2012–13] that we wave goodbye to the season as many of us say 'hello, holidays' by sharing what has become something of a Latitudes' tradition. Our yearly 'out of office' includes some unseen and 'behind the scenes' moments from the last season. This casual yearly report has always been a welcome opportunity to revise the many photographs that have been buried on hard drives, to reflect on the past year, the fantastic people we met, enriching things we have seen, and to recharge for future challenges. 

    This post heralds a short period of deceleration of our online activity (that is tending to our inbox, as well as this blog, Facebook and Twitter). We'll take a short break during August, but will be back in September with renewed energy. Until then, have a great summer break/Feliz verano dear readers!   

    11–16 October 2013: 'Agora', Athens Biennial 4, Greece. Read full report here


    Beautiful Acropolis floor.
    Afternoon light over the façade of the National Archaeological Museum.

    An astonishing exhibition presenting severely-eroded antiquities recovered from the legendary shipwreck off the islet of Antikythera, south of the Peloponnese. (Hello, Matthew Monahan and Thomas Houseago!)

    21–28 October 2013: As part of the Young Curators Invitational programme (YCI) coinciding with FIAC, we were invited to visit several institutions, gallery spaces and studios in Paris – Click here to read the full report of that week, or here for the archive of our tweets


    Group photo of the Young Curators Invitational programme (YCI) 2013 participants nearby one of the massive and over-the-top fountains at Versailles. Some 1980s (or maybe 1880s?) dance moves going on for some reason.


    We were looking forward to visiting this particular 18th-Century cabinet of curiosities, but only managed to take this one photo before we were told off. It's the Cabinet de Curiosités de Joseph Bonnier de La Mosson, at the Médiathèque of the Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle at the Jardin des Plantes. Quite a lot of fluff has been written about Cabinets de Curosités and exhibition making, and some terrible art made in its name, but this slice of history is quite extraordinary, beautiful and shocking and 'very much of its time' to put it mildly. See some better photos here

    16 November 2013: Seminar for "Curating the present. Theory and practice of the contemporary art exhibition", organised by Tania Pardo, Sergio Rubira and Alberto Sánchez Balmisawith  La Casa Encendida, Madrid.


    About to begin our lecture... 

    During our Madrid visit, we visited Roman Ondák's intervention at Palacio de Cristal (above) which got a short mention in our Roman Ondák lecture in Glasgow a few days after.

    20 November 2013: At the kind invitation of the wonderful The Common Guild in Glasgow, on 21 November we gave a lecture about the work of Roman Ondák – read text here. We also took the opportunity to do some studio visits – see full Report from Glasgow (posted on 4 December) – including Lucy Skaer's exhibition at Tramway; see Max's Frieze review.




    27 November 2013: Mariana Cánepa Luna gave an afternoon seminar on a range of Latitudes' projects for the course 'On Mediation – Theory and Curatorial Practice in Global Art’ at the Universitat de Barcelona.



    25 January 2014: Opening of "The Margins of the Factory" a solo show by Rotterdam-based Iratxe Jaio and Klaas van Gorkum, at ADN Platform in Sant Cugat (Barcelona). Photos of the show here, reviews and exhibition leaflet here and all the social media posts archived here.
    Photo via Facebook of Miguel Ángel Sánchez, posted with the caption: "Curators backing up the artist! Awesome outcome of this team effort at ADN Platform. On view from Saturday 25th".


     Klaas installing the series of photos that form part of Producing time in between other things (2011).

    Exhibition guide designed and produced by Latitudes includes texts on each piece and an A3 sized fold out poster. Download in English and in Spanish
    Nathaniel Mann's opening performance included his singing the Basque popular song “Oi Peio Peio” – a dialogue between a woman worker and her cruel boss, who insists that she carries on working throughout the night. Watch video of the performance here. Photo: Joan Morey

     Photo published by Amanda Bernal in her exhibition preview at Tot Sant Cugat.

    19–22 February 2013: Since November 2013, Latitudes had been guest Tweeting from @ARCOmeetings, advancing content and profiling the +70 participants of the seven Professional Meetings that took place during ARCOmadrid art fair. During the fair, we live-Tweeted each session as well as the 'III Meeting of Museums of European and Iberoamerica'. Our reportage and commentary spanned over 1200 Tweets – they're archived here.


    Welcoming words by Joao Fernandes, Deputy Director of the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, before kicking off the 'III Meeting of Museums of European and Iberoamerica'.

    The "Biennials at the Periphery" session was masterfully moderated by the SITE Santa Fe team.

    18 March 2014: Max in conversation with Dutch artist Remco Torenbosch at the Fundació Antoni Tàpies, Barcelona, in the context of his exhibition at NoguerasBlanchard.
    Photo by @priscilaclementti.
    12 May–7 June: Visiting Curator Programme of Gertrude Contemporary in Melbourne, Australia, in partnership with MADA: Monash School of Art Design and Architecture. Our month-long residency is documented in this Storify thread.


    Central Melbourne.

    On May 14, we gave a lecture and an afternoon seminar with PhD candidates in Curatorial Practice at MADA | Monash University in Melbourne, focusing on the 2012–13 research project #OpenCurating, and in particular the published interviews with the web team from the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis; with Badlands Unlimited in New York; with research curator Steven ten Thije of the Van Abbemuseum in Eindhoven and with Dia Art Foundation Curator, Yasmil Raymond.


    Photo: Courtesy MADA.

    During our Melbourne residency we made more than thirty studio visits, and also met curators, graphic designers, writers, editors and University professors. We also paid visits to galleries (Neon Parc, Sarah Scout, Sutton Gallery, Utopian Slumps, Tolarno Gallery, Anna Schwartz Gallery...), bookstores (the jewel-box that is World Food Books), non-profits, curator-led projects and artist-run-spaces (West Space, Slopes) and of course museums such MUMA at Monash, the Ian Potter Museum, the National Gallery Victoria, or the fantastic Heide Museum, which hosted a solo show of Emily Floyd (pictured below).


     
    On May 23rd we shadowed a site visit to the fascinating Living Museum of the West (photo below) in Maribyrnong, a social history museum and former industrial site which will be the focus a forthcoming project by West Space with artists Susan Jacobs and Geoff Robinson, among others. Below their analogue archive over interviews, with plenty of cassettes, binders and filing cabinets.

    We had one day to explore the stunning Great Ocean Road. We saw a couple of wild koalas as well as local-specialty bird life including Rufous Bristlebird and Hooded Dotterel, plus many surfers awaiting for the perfect wave, before driving back to the city.

    26–31 May 2014: Visit to Sydney and the 19th Biennale of Sydney.


     A great welcome to Sydney sunset by the Opera House.


    Bianca Hester's 'fashioning discontinuities', 2013–14, at Cockotoo Island was one of the (frankly very few) highlights of the 2014 edition of the Sydney Biennale.


    One of the best things we saw in Sydney was a one-room show dedicated to 'Tehching Hsieh: One year performance 1980–1981' at Carriageworks.

     Entrance to the artist-run space Alaska Projects, whose creative base camp is level 2 of Kings Cross Car Park.

    1 June 2014: Short trip to Hobart in Tasmania to pay a visit to professional gambler and philanthropist David Walsh's extravaganza, the Museum of Old and New Art (MoNA). Despite the tech-geek owner and the 'O' device (iPod devices which functions as extended audio guides, digital captions and location trackers), photography is not officially allowed inside the galleries, although you can in fact find plenty of shots on social media. Here instead are some views from the museum while waiting for the Bond-villain ferry to take us back to Hobart.



    11–14 June 2014: Singapore Curating Lab 2014 begins! This 9-month programme began with a 3h morning lecture by Latitudes, followed by an afternoon workshop in which we asked participants to imagine an institution by defining a succinct "about us" paragraph for three imaginary institutions. Following the root of word "institution" (to establish, to set up), the task involved considering what practices were to be initiated, how programmes were to be established, and for what publics. Read more here. Below the Tweets published, explaining each group's task.
     

    14 June 2014: Symposium "When does an exhibition begin and end?", National Library of Singapore. With the participation of Shabbir Hussain Mustafa (Curator, National Gallery Singapore), Charles Lim (artist); Anca Rujoiu and Vera Mey (Curators, CCA — Centre for Contemporary Art, Singapore) and artist Shubigi Rao.


    Curatorial Intensive participants live-tweeting, mapping concepts discussed during talks, photo-documenting and taking notes for future posts on Curating Lab blog. Photo: @nusmuseum.

    Symposium moderators taking notes during the conference. Photo via @hemanchong

    16–20 June 2014: Curating Lab 2004 Overseas Field Trip to Hong Kong, where participants were introduced to the programme and spaces of Spring Workshop, Asia Art Archive, Para/Site and M+. The many tweets published by ourselves and the participants are archived here.


    Afternoon discussion at Spring Workshop.


    Christodoulous Panayiotou and Philip Wiegard's exhibition at Spring Workshop. 


    Curating Lab 2014 group photo in Hong Kong airport before boarding to Singapore.
     
    31 July 2014: Master Class for the 2014 Open Set Summer School at Witte de With, Rotterdam. After a lecture on the tour as artistic/curatorial format, participants work towards developing prototype guided tours for Rotterdam. More photos here.



    Also great to finally be able to visit "The Part In The Story Where A Part Becomes A Part Of Something Else" exhibition curated by Heman Chong and Samuel Saelemakers at Witte de With, the epilogue to Moderation(s). Here interacting with Haegue Yang's 'Sonic Nickel Dance' (2013).

     Photo: @ymessen.

    The night before the workshop, a great catch up picnic with 'Portscapes' collaborators (Liesbeth Bik & Jos van der Pol, better known as Bik van der Pol, Lara Almarcegui, Nienke Terpsma and Rob Hamelijnck of Fucking Good Art and graphic designer Samira Ben Laloua). Ahh good memories!



    During the past weeks we've been proofreading layouts with documentation of our 2013 residency and four "Incidents of Travel" tours we realised in Hong Kong, our contribution to the forthcoming publication "Terms & Conditions" published by Witte de With, Rotterdam as part of the Moderation(s) project steered by Heman Chong.

    In the past months, Max Andrews has published the following texts in frieze magazine: Exhibition review of Pablo Helguera's ‘Librería Donceles’ (Donceles Bookshop, 2013) at Kent Fine Art, New York, issue 160, January–February 2014;
    Review of Lucy Skaer's solo show at Glasgow's Tramway, issue 161, March 2014; Postcard "On a Shoestring. Institutions in Catalonia", issue 158, October 2013; and a Focus, Iratxe Jaio and Klaas van Gorkum, Issue 157, September 2013. Max has also contributed to the publication that will accompany the forthcoming Frieze Art Fair, London (out in October 2014).



    In January 2014, Mariana wrote a text on Time/Bank for the digital catalogue of the exhibition "7.000.000.000" curated by Arlandis/Marroquí for the Espai d'art Contemporani Castelló (EACC).

    17 July 2014: Jointly published an art-agenda review on Andrea Buttner's "Tische" show at NoguerasBlanchard, Barcelona. 

    View of Andrea Büttner, Tische, NoguerasBlanchard, Barcelona, 2014. Courtesy of NoguerasBlanchard, Barcelona. All photos by Roberto Ruiz.

    One of the most widely-read blog posts of the year has been the analysis of the 2013 report that the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports dedicated to the state of culture in Spain (La cultura en España (2a parte): estadísticas, cifras y porcentajes del 2013, a follow up to the 2012 analysis), quite symptomatic of what has been another difficult year for the cultural sector.

    Related posts:

    Latitudes' "out of office" photo album 2008-9, 30 July 2009
    Latitudes 'out of office' photo album 2009–10 season, 30 July 2010
    Latitudes 'out of office' photo album 2010–11 season, 1 August 2011
    Latitudes' "out of office" photo album 2011–2012, 31 July 2012
    Latitudes' "out of office" photo album, 2012–2013 season, 31 July 2013



    This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
    All photos:
    Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




    art-agenda review on Andrea Büttner show "Tische", at NoguerasBlanchard, Barcelona

    View of Andrea Büttner, “Tische,” NoguerasBlanchard, Barcelona, 2014. All images courtesy of NoguerasBlanchard, Barcelona. All photos by Roberto Ruiz.

    Andrea Büttner’s “Tische”
    NoguerasBlanchard, Barcelona   
    May 30–July 11, 2014


    Published on art-agenda on 17 July 2014.

    Pursuing a clearly spiritual approach within a Christian cultural and ethical context, Andrea Büttner is one of the few contemporary artists who could plausibly cite St. Francis of Assisi, the twelfth-century Catholic friar who committed himself to a life of poverty, as a key influence. Her work Tische [Tables] (2013), which addresses notions of the “blessed poor” (those who disavow material possessions as a way of being closer to God) and the prehistory of farm-to-table dining, is a carefully constructed homily on what art can bring to the table on poverty, without ever lapsing into austerity chic. Büttner’s meager solo presentation at Barcelona’s NoguerasBlanchard forms part of a year-long exhibition series entitled “The Story Behind,” organized by in-house curator Direlia Lazo. In it, the artist exhibits four out of the original thirteen tabletop compositions she created for a dinner held at the Museum für Moderne Kunst Zollamt in Frankfurt last year. At Büttner’s invitation, five talks were given at dinner and recorded. Entitled Tischreden [Dinner speeches] (2013), the resulting extended audio recordings of the speeches and the ebb and flow of dinner conversation now serve as prime stimulants for the discursive appetites of the Barcelona gallery’s visitors.

    Büttner’s four dining tables—and their blue, green, red, and yellow linens—are not simply performance relics or dining assemblages à la Hong Kong and Taipei-based artist Lee Kit or Swiss Nouveau Réalist Daniel Spoerri, but rather something between gambling baize (typically found covering poker tables) and altar cloths. These intensely precise, high-stakes surfaces allow for unusual symbolic investment. Accordingly, what at first could be mistaken for dun-colored gaming counters are actually zebra droppings and straw that were collected at the Frankfurt Zoo and cast in bronze. These metal objects (Tischschmuck [Table decorations], 2013) not only connect alchemy with fecal value—placed as they are atop a single table covered in the same colored paper that German banks use to wrap Euro coins—but they also have a perverse resemblance to earthy tubers and clusters of Paleolithic potato chips. Büttner assembles such materials in an elusive manner, giving them a just-on-the-tip-of-the-tongue quality, and she then juxtaposes the objects with images, which function like pictorial hyperlinks that are either readily apparent, or just one Google search away. These include reproductions of Realist and early modernist works, including Gustave Courbet’s The Stone Breakers (1850), Vincent van Gogh’s dismal The Potato Eaters (1885), and Ernst Barlach’s Veiled Beggar Woman (1919), as well as more recent pieces, like Sigmar Polke’s Cologne Beggars (1972), and what appears to be a photographic portrait of Austrian-British philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein.

    Although Büttner’s amalgamations undoubtedly have intuitive affinities with German art historian Aby Warburg’s Mnemosyne Atlas (1924–29), she does not necessarily generate new theoretical principles in terms of art’s consideration of poverty. Listening to the recordings of Büttner’s dinner becomes more like consuming thoughtful fiber while ruminating on its conceptually peristaltic menu. Documenta 13’s artistic director Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev deliberately offered no new insights in her talk on the figures she identifies as Arte Povera’s “dropouts,” yet their very rejection of novel production was precisely her point. In addition, speeches by scholar of German literature Liliane Weissberg, organizer of the artist-rights group Working Artists and the Greater Economy (W.A.G.E.) Lise Soskolne, and Chicago-based artist and writer Claire Pentecost similarly focused on duty, humility, and justice. The overall effect of her guests’ fibrous discussion addresses what might be described as our symbolic health and serves as a kind of relief from the intellectual constipation that the intersection of morality and contemporary art can induce.

    Büttner’s interest in poverty stems from her recently completed doctoral research on art and shame at the Royal College of Art. And she herself chooses to avoid the limelight by withdrawing as a visible protagonist from her own work. By giving the floor to her dinner guests, Büttner subtly avoids what might otherwise have come across as a kind of evangelical relational aesthetics. Over the course of their speeches, we not only learn about tzedakah (the Jewish conception of charity without pity), but also some non-profit art institutions’ shameful failure to pay honorariums to their artists. In cultural theorist Franco “Bifo” Berardi’s talk (delivered by artist Adrian Williams)—in which we encounter his term “Un-growth,” which describes a form of politics without capitalist expectations—we are familiarized with a “frugal way of being happy with the richness that we have.” We also learn in the recording about Wall Street’s orchestration of the deregulated food futures markets that emerged in the 1990s and the expropriation of subsistence farmers from their ancestral lands.

    Nevertheless, given the reality of Spain’s persistent unemployment, austerity measures, and corruption scandals, many of these well-intended words begged for local specificity. Given the monastic tone of Büttner’s work, polemical Benedictine nun and Catalan social activist Teresa Forcades, for example, would have made a fascinating, if improbable, contribution to a discussion especially tailored for the issues that concern contemporary Barcelona. Much like having to imagine Pentecost’s dinner menu—which included bone marrow, beetroot, and potatoes, among other dishes—instead of actually being able to savor it ourselves, we were left hungry for a more hearty presentation of Büttner’s project in a city with a starkly different economic context from that in which her work was first conceived.

    – Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna are Co-directors of the curatorial office Latitudes in Barcelona.


     

    This is the blog of independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
    All photos:
    Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




    'The Margins of the Factory' on Artforum's Critics' Picks

     
    If you can't read it correctly, click this link to the review by Miguel Amado.

    The exhibition 'The Margins of the Factory' by Iratxe Jaio and Klaas van Gorkum is on view until 30 April at ADN Platform. There will be a breakfast and guided visit on Saturday 12 April at 10:30am. If you would like to join please contact Jordi Vernis <[email protected]>

    La exposición 'Los márgenes de la fábrica' de Iratxe Jaio y Klaas van Gorkum permanecerá abierta hasta el 30 de abril en ADN Platform. El sábado 12 de abril a las 10:30am habrá un desayuno y visita guiada, si estáis interesados en asistir, por favor poneros en contacto con Jordi Vernis <[email protected]>


    Related posts:
    – 

    This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
    All photos:
    Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




    Max Andrews' review of Julia Montilla's exhibition 'El "cuadro" de la "calleja"', Espai 13, Fundació Joan Miró, Barcelona

    Below Max Andrews' review of Julia Montilla's exhibition, 'El "cuadro" de la "calleja"', presented between February and April 2013 at the Espai 13 of the Fundació Joan Miró in Barcelona. Text was first published in the Issue 156 of frieze.
    View of the exhibition at Espai 13. Courtesy of the artist and Fundació Miró.

    Julia Montilla’s exhibition documented a minor miracle: between 1961 and 1965, in the tiny Cantabrian village of Garabandal, four young girls allegedly received repeated supernatural visitations from the Virgin Mary and were entrusted with her prophesies. However, the so-called Garabandal apparitions are not recognized by the Vatican, though they continue to be championed by a sprawling network of international enthusiasts. Montilla documented the visions – or, rather, documented their documentation – stressing how the beholding of physical testimony can access a vast surplus of politics and patriarchy, belief and body language.

    Montilla was not primarily concerned with debunking the girls’ visionary experiences. Instead, the exhibition’s four annotated display cases (La construcción de una aparición, The Construction of an Apparition, all works 2012–13) – containing books, magazines, proselytising pamphlets, religious journals, collectors’ postcards, slide-lecture packs sold by ‘Garabandalist’ organizations, and so on – contextualized them with a forensic attention to how they were produced and publicized through photography. The girls’ theophanies and trances could be understood, it was proposed, as site-specific performances in a post-Lourdes tradition of remote ‘scheduled apparitions’. A monitor looped a 1971 television documentary, while an overhead projector beamed a 1994 newspaper article reporting that Hollywood were set to dramatize the autobiography of Conchita, the most precocious of the ‘seers’ (three of whom left Spain for the US in the 1970s) and that Luciano Pavarotti would sing the theme. Two slideshows entitled Soportes vivientes para la fabricación de un mito (Living Supports for the Fabrication of a Myth) were accompanied by Montilla’s commentary and, along with Garabandalistas, a new publication edited by the artist, compiled dozens of archival shots of the girls’ ecstatic night-time walks, taken by various amateur and professional photographers. Staring fixedly up into the beyond, offering crucifixes and rosaries, conversing with the divine, or open-mouthed to receive invisible communion, the girls are portrayed clasping their hands together or individually writhing on the ground, stupefied by Marian divinity, and all the while seemingly oblivious to the crowds, microphones and lenses around them.

     View of the exhibition at Espai 13. Courtesy of the artist and Fundació Miró. 
     
    Tracking the emergence of ‘trance photography’ as a cult genre, Montilla considered how the documentary materials themselves have acquired venerated status as certificates of veracity. The quirk that some of the projected archival images had been noticeably pixelated in their to-and-fro from print to analogue display seemed like a confession of sorts, of Montilla’s own evident hand in their ongoing dramaturgy, here in an artistic context.

    In the visionary events’ shift of emphasis from the small street where the first apparition was said to have appeared, to embrace the ‘epiphanic landscape’ and pious tourism throughout the entire context of the village, Montilla’s voice-over and captions proposed how the performances conformed to the expectations of naive and spiritually pure rural life, where hoax or conspiracy would be unthinkable. Through astute bibliographic research and juxtaposition of source materials with commentary, the apparitions’ enthusiastic casting as an apocalyptic warning was shown in its entanglement with the Franco dictatorship’s demonization of Communism and the left. Furthermore, as a sign that Spain’s peasantry had been chosen as spokespeople of God without the middlemen, Montilla articulated how the folkloric fervour of the apparitions’ thronged crescendo in 1965 would have spurned the concurrent doctrinal reforms of the Second Vatican Council.

    From "Soportes vivientes para la fabricación de un mito" (2013). Courtesy of the artist.
     
    Yet, Montilla’s bravest and most calibrated area of enquiry intimated how the moving imagery of the girls’ rapture established a legendary motif for the performing or occupied female body as an index of radical obedience, even to the extent of self-harm. Correspondingly, the two screens of El contagio visionario (The Visionary Contagion) and Ídolos y ídolitos (Idols and Lesser Idols) showed fragments of a 1961 film of the entranced girls alongside a video shot by the artist in Garabandal in 2012, showing a muttering woman devotee supposedly in a trance herself. In urging feminist questions about Garabandalism seemingly as a form of infectious hysteria, Montilla echoes Elaine Showalter’s 1997 study Hystories: Hysterical Epidemics and Modern Culture in which alien abduction and – more controversially among other case studies – Gulf War syndrome, are interpreted as fictional epidemics propagated through support groups, popular magazines, talk shows and the Internet. Whether the seers and believers of the apparitions reflect extreme symptoms of cultural anxieties and traumas, as Showalter would argue, or represent exultant communiqués from the Blessed Virgin, Montilla carefully beseeches that we must still pay attention to what they continue to tell us. 

    – Max Andrews

    This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter
    All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).  
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




    Max Andrews reviews 'Utopia is possible' in frieze magazine's October 2012 issue

    Below Max Andrews' frieze review on the exhibition 'Utopia is possible. ICSID. Eivissa, 1971' currently on show (on view until 20 January 2013) at the Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA)An interesting follow up is Ethel Baraona Pohl's review on Domus (published 15 October 2012) which is accompanied by a lot more photodocumentation presented in the exhibition.

     Instant City, 1971. Col·lecció MACBA. Centre d'Estudis i Documentació. Fons Xavier Miserachs

    ‘This will be an ICSID Congress only 10 metres from the sea,’ read the welcoming Bulletin of the Seventh Congress of the International Council of Societies of Industrial Design in 1971. ‘The environment, the climate and the sea bathing will act as a stimulant to the general business of the Congress.’ As 1,500 delegates registered at the ziggurat-like hotel venue in northern Ibiza, the more adventurous made their way to
     Instant City, an inflatable camp below on Sant Miquel bay. Three days of meetings, debates, performances and partying were to follow –a professional design conference that was also a beach-side experiment in leisure and the creative potential of industrial plastic. The exhibition ‘Utopia is Possible’ was not only significant as an exercise in advocating the pioneering importance of an interdisciplinary festival that predated the better-known Encuentros de Pamplona’ (Pamplona Meetings) the following year – both all the more astonishing as Spain remained under the grip of dictatorship until 1975 – but also (and following a sprawling exhibition about the latter at Madrid’s Museo Reina Sofía in 2009) as a corollary of the emergence of curatorial and exhibition history as legitimate fields of study, as exhibition.

    ‘Utopia is Possible’ remembered and celebrated an event that evoked a meltdown of academia, inflatable architecture, cinema, Catalan artistic vanguardism and countercultural ceremonies – part ‘Exploding Plastic Inevitable’, part technology enthusiast craft convention. Through teeming type and handwritten correspondence arranged in vitrines, hundreds of photographs, technical notes and newspaper reports – as well as four projections showing archival footage and a dozen monitors presenting newsreels and newly-made interviews with those involved – it revealed a project that clearly had a life-changing impact on those who experienced it. ICSID 1971 championed liberal social innovation and user-generated content. ‘This is an “open” congress’, declared its introductory statement, ‘a new experience […] for the first time the congress members will be able to participate to the utmost […] this is YOUR congress.’ The proceedings in the hotel comprised ‘Speaking Rooms’ with themes proposed by delegates, 65 talks including ‘The House Style of the Netherlands railway’,‘What We Are Doing in the Belgrade School of Design’, and ‘Basic Design with Computers’ – the latter led by the pioneering Centro de Cálculo (Computing Centre), a collaboration between Madrid’s Complutense University and IBM.

    Down by the beach, meanwhile, the participation was of a somewhat different order – kinetic sculptural events with air, water, fire and food. Josep Ponsatí collaborated with members of the Grup Obert de Disseny Urquinaona (Urquinaona Open Design Group), who themselves collaborated in the pop-style signage of the congress, which was replicated in the show’s exhibition design. They tethered together 12 pairs of huge air-filled white plastic pillows that floated out over and on the bay like a giant flower. Vacuflex-3 (1971) by Antoni Muntadas and Gonzalo Mezza is a portable sculpture in the form of a 150-metre flexible plastic pipe which, with teamwork, can be variously carried around, used to spell out words on the sand (‘LOVE’, ‘LAND’, ‘HERE’) or floated on the sea. The opening dinner took the form of a multi-colour ritual orchestrated by Antoni Miralda, Jaume Xifra and Dorothée Selz; masked performers and diners wore green, red, blue and yellow cloaks, and feasted on similarly coloured paella and wine.

    Yet Instant City took such multi-coloured experiences to architectonic dimensions, and it remains the ideological and pictorial emblem of the congress. Architecture students Carlos Ferrater and Fernando Bendito had persuaded architecture professor José Miguel de Prada Poole to transform their idea of inflatable student accommodation into reality. What resulted was a global manifesto for a new way of living intended to embrace the ‘nomadic and mobile’ values of impermanence and flexibility. Following publicity in colleges and magazines around the world, scores of volunteers came in the weeks before the congress to collaborate in stapling together a pop-up plastic community. Instant City was the backdrop to some of the exhibition’s most striking images, of bemused locals in traditional dress watching bearded design hippies building something between Hélio Oiticica’s ‘Penetrables’ and Maurice Agis’s ill-fated Dreamspace V (an inflatable environment that killed two women when it broke free from moorings in 2006). And although the taste of Utopian living was evidently challenged by the whiff of residing in sweltering polytunnel tentacles with too few toilets, it also inspired some soaring prog rock poetry that, perhaps more succinctly than any other words in the exhibition, gave a blast ofthe elaborate techno-paganism which must have blown minds at this extraordinary Congress. ‘Green cornfields alongside Instant City / Awaken to Ibizan sunrise’, read a typewritten sheet alongside module construction diagrams. ‘We are children of the future / Born into the paleo-cybernetic age / our minds extended electrically through the video sphere.’ 

    ‘Utopia is Possible’ offered a timely pre-history of participatory practice from a Spanish perspective and, against the backdrop of contemporary funding cuts, an object lesson in artistic solidarity and internationalism against the odds. 

    – Max Andrews

     (Originally published in Frieze, October 2012, Issue 150)  


     Antoni Muntadas and Gonzalo Mezza Ceremonial and Vacuflex-3, 1971.  


    Related materials:
    • Video where participants' discuss their experience here 
    • Tour of the exhibition by exhibition co-curator Teresa Grandas, here (both in Catalan)
    • Latitudes' writing archive




    Latitudes reviews MACBA's 'Universal Archive', Frieze #121, March 2009


    The forthcoming issue of Frieze magazine (Issue 121, March 2009) includes a review by Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna on MACBA's exhibition 'Universal Archive' (23 October 2008–6 January 2009). 

    Below a short extract:

    "Of the blockbuster cultural initiatives that have been inspired and hosted by the Catalan capital in 2008, no two could be further apart than Woody Allen’s dismaying Vicky Cristina Barcelona (2008) and the MACBA exhibition ‘Universal Archive: The Condition of the Document and the Modern Photographic Utopia’, a hugely ambitious genealogy of the documentary form of photography (co-produced and touring to the Museu Colecção Berardo-Arte Moderna e Contemporãnea, Lisbon). While Allen’s facile vision of Barcelona and the ‘flamboyant artist’ character of his male lead (played by Javier Bardem) demonstrated the ‘Olé!’ version of the city’s self-branding, ‘Universal Archive’ was difficult to digest by comparison. The exhibition, which comprised some 2,000 photographs, presented a tough and awkward depiction of the grittier sides of the city and uncompromisingly explored the often-unglamorous role of the artist–documentarian within it. 



    The exhibition’s wonderfully unwieldy scale and its dizzying categorization refused benign consumption. Both its strength and its weakness lay in the fact that it was really three projects under one roof, covering a time span from 1850 to the present day. Even three visits did not truly do the show justice, but its exhausting extent nevertheless perfectly complemented the archival strategies it presented, as if its densely-installed two floors – encompassing legions of framed prints and closely-packed vitrines and several digital slideshows – were inspired by a labyrinthine Borgesian tale. For many visitors, the stamina required to experience it could have been off-putting. There are only so many images of shift workers, tract housing, farmland or grain silos that one can absorb. Yet, attempting to embrace such immense amounts of data – whether Timothy H. O’Sullivan’s territorial surveys of the USA in the 1860s and ’70s, August Sander’s collective portrait of the German people in the late 1920s, or the Mass-Observation movement in Britain from 1937 until the early 1950s – provided the exhilarating, if relentless, basis for the whole project."

    ...Continue reading on Frieze online.

    [Image above: Cover of Frieze's issue 121; Image below: Pere Català Pic, 'Fotomuntatge sobre el Barri Gòtic per a la societat d'Atracció de Forasters de Barcelona', 1935. Arxiu Històric de la Ciutat de Barcelona – Arxiu Fotogràfic.]




    'Greenwashing' reviewed in summer issue of Artforum


    Eva Scharrer reviews 'Greenwashing' in the current issue of Artforum, Summer 2008, on p. 456. There is a printable pdf version on our Greenwashing archive along with other critical responses to the exhibition including from El Mundo, La Stampa and Artforum.com




    Sharjah Biennial (y Latitudes) en El País

    Reportaje de la Sharjah Biennial 8 por Ángela Molina publicado en el Babelia de El País: ‘Una mentira cómoda’, 21 Abril 2007, pp.16-17.





    Older Posts / Entradas antiguas