Cover Story–December 2018: "Treasures! exhibitionism! showmanship!"

Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org

The December 2018 Monthly Cover Story "Treasures! exhibitionism! showmanship!" is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org


"A clutch of shows in Vienna (where Latitudes was recently a guest of Art Week) and Amsterdam (which just held its Art Weekend) offer a distinctive take on curatorial liberty and creative exhibition display.

—> Continue reading
—> After December it will be archived here.


Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.

RELATED CONTENT:

  • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
  • Cover Story—November 2018: "Joan Morey—postmortem judgement reenactment" 1 November 2018
  • Cover Story–October 2018: "I can’t take my eyes off you: Eulàlia Rovira and Adrian Schindler" 1 October 2018
  • Cover Story–September 2018: Harald Szeemann’s travel sculpture, 10 September 2018
  • Cover Story–August 2018: Askeaton Joyride, 2 August 2018
  • Cover Story–July 2018: No Burgers for Sale 2 July 2018
  • Save the date: 13 September, 6–9pm. Latitudes-curated exhibition ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’, Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna, 21 June 2018
  • Cover Story—June 2018: Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group, 4 June 2018
  • Cover Story – May 2018: Shadowing Roman Ondák, 7 May 2018 




Cover Story—October 2018: "I can’t take my eyes off you: Eulàlia Rovira and Adrian Schindler"

Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org

The October 2018 Monthly Cover Story "I can’t take my eyes off you: Eulàlia Rovira and Adrian Schindler" is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org


"Eulàlia Rovira and Adrian Schindler’s new performance, "One motif says to the other: I can’t take my eyes off you" took place on 14th September as part of the Latitudes-curated Cream cheese and pretty ribbons! at Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna, an exhibition that also features the talents of David Bestué, Sean Lynch, and Batia Suter. The exclamatory title of the exhibition (which continues until 13 October as part of the curated_by festival synthesises two of the satirist Karl Kraus’s similes for what, writing in 1910, he considered the cultural polarity of monotonous functionality on the one hand and frivolous adornment on the other. Kraus lampooned both the sobriety of Germanic culture and the good taste of Romance culture, yet judged an even greater taboo was to be found in Vienna’s dressing up of the former with the latter." 

—> Continue reading
—> After October it will be archived here.



Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.


RELATED CONTENT:

  • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
  • Performance “One motif says to the other: I can’t take my eyes off you” by Eulàlia Rovira and Adrian Schindler in the exhibition ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’, 17 September 2018
  • Cover Story–September 2018: Harald Szeemann’s travel sculpture, 10 September 2018
  • Cover Story–August 2018: Askeaton Joyride, 2 August 2018
  • Cover Story–July 2018: No Burgers for Sale 2 July 2018
  • Save the date: 13 September, 6–9pm. Latitudes-curated exhibition ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’, Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna, 21 June 2018
  • Cover Story—June 2018: Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group, 4 June 2018
  • Cover Story – May 2018: Shadowing Roman Ondák, 7 May 2018 




Cover Story–September 2018: Harald Szeemann’s travel sculpture

Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org


The September 2018 Monthly Cover Story "Harald Szeemann's travel sculpture" is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org

"Summer vacations have a habit of turning into busman’s holidays in Latitudes' agenda. Undoubtedly the Swiss curator phenomenon Harald Szeemann (1933–2005) also often sensed or engineered, that trips for pleasure and travel for research and work would inevitably dovetail. Museum of Obsessions, a fascinating but flawed exhibition dedicated to his life and work has just closed at Kunsthalle Bern (it will tour to Kunsthalle Düsseldorf, Castello di Rivoli, and the Swiss Institute, New York)."

—> Continue reading
—> After September it will be archived here.

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.



RELATED CONTENT:


  • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
  • 1 Diciembre, 20:30h: Latitudes introducirá el documental italiano "Harald Szeemann. Appunti sulla vita di un sognatore" (2016) 27 noviembre 2017
  • Cover Story–August 2018: Askeaton Joyride 2 August 2018
  • Cover Story–July 2018: No Burgers for Sale 2 July 2018
  • Cover Story—June 2018: Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group 4 June 2018
  • Cover Story – May 2018: "Shadowing Roman Ondák" 7 May 2018 
  • Cover Story – April 2018: "Cover Story—April 2018: Dates, 700 BC to the present: Michael Rakowitz" 3 April 2018
  • Cover Story – March 2018: "Armenia's ghost galleries" 6 March 2018
  • Cover Story – February 2018: Paradise, promises and perplexities 5 February 2018
  • Cover Story – January 2018: I'll be there for you, 2 January 2018




Iratxe Jaio and Klaas van Gorkum's installation ‘Work in Progress’ in the process of being acquired by ARTIUM, Vitoria-Gasteiz


Above and below: Installation views of "Work in progress" in the exhibition "The Margins of the Factory", ADN Platform, 25 January–30 April 2014. Video (14’ 22”), 739 polyurethane sculptures, and 47 moulds. Produced with support from the Eremuak program of the Basque Government and from Centrum Beeldende Kunst Rotterdam. Courtesy of the artists. Photos: Roberto Ruiz.






We are very happy to know that Iratxe Jaio and Klaas van Gorkum's installation ‘Work in Progress’ (2013) is in the process of being acquired by ARTIUM, Centro Museo Vasco de Arte Contemporáneo in Vitoria-Gasteiz, Basque Country. The piece is on display as part of the exhibition ‘ARTres. El museo como deba ser’ (March 2–August 26, 2018).

Work in Progress’ was one of the two works included in their solo exhibition "The Margins of the Factory" presented at ADN Platform in January 2014, and curated by Latitudes.






Work in Progress’ immerses itself in the manufacturing industry of Markina-Xemein, the rural Basque village where Jaio comes from. A video documents the mass-production of rubber car parts, following the pieces from the assembly line in a worker-owned factory to subcontracted workshops where informal workers finish them by hand.

Several of these workers are employed by the artists to cast hundreds of replicas of small modernist sculptures. These are displayed on mass-produced shelving to evoke the “Chalk Laboratory” of Basque sculptor Jorge Oteiza (1908–2003), a fierce critic of the commodification of art. 

 Exhibition leaflet. Pdf downloadable here.

Latitudes previously collaborated with Jaio and van Gorkum in the exhibition cycle ‘Amikejo’ presented throughout 2011 in MUSAC, León, when they exhibited ‘Producing time between other things’ (2011), a work specially produced for the occasion, and also included in the above-mentioned show "The Margins of the Factory" in 2014.

—> Photographs of the exhibition.
—> Exhibition leaflet (pdf).
—> Exhibition reviews.
—> Video on ‘Producing time between other things’ (2011)



RELATED CONTENT:




Jurado y tutores de Barcelona Producció – Anuncio de los proyectos ganadores temporada 2017–2018

Fotos de Pep Herrero para Barcelona Producció/La Capella.

Después de una intensísima semana de lectura de las 230 solicitudes recibidas, otra semana de debate entre los miembros del jurado y una tercera semana entrevistando a los 31 candidatos pre-seleccionados, el jurado de la temporada 2017–2018 de Barcelona Producció formado por David Armengol, Alexandra Laudo, Mónica Bello, Joan Caselles, Mireia Sallarès y Latitudes junto a Oriol Gual, director de La Capella (con voz, sin voto), ha decidido seleccionar los siguientes 17 proyectos para su producción y presentación a lo largo de la temporada:

Sala Grande – Exposición individual

  • "Synthesis" de David Mutiloa
  • "Talk trouble" de Claudia Pagès
  • "El Gafe i la Revolució" de Dani Montlleó
Sala pequeña – Exposición individual
  • "Remover con una vara de madera" de Matteo Guidi
  • "ARTENGO2000" de Camille Orny y Magda Vaz
  • "SSSSSSSilex" de Paco Chanivet
Sala Gran – Comisariado
  • "A break can be what we are aiming for" de Irina Mutt
Sala pequeña – Comisariado
(Modalidad desierta)

Proyectos deslocalizados

  • "Són els microorganismes els que tindran l’última paraula" de la Associació Cultural Nyamnyam
  • "En frontera" de Marco Noris
Investigación
  • "El Peso de mis Vecinas - La Poesía y el Cante como Dispositivos Estratégicos" de Christina Schultz
  • "El mal alumne. Pedagogia crítica per a intel·ligències artificials" de Taller Estampa
Publicación
  • "The Drowned Giant" de Anna Moreno
Acción en vivo
  • "Chroma" de Quim Pujol
  • "The Reading Room #3 presenta: Aparatos del habla – Materialismo histórico" de Eliana Beltrán
  • "Fine Cherry" de Victoria Macarte
Entornos digitales
  • "Eixams" de Alex Muñoz
  • "Notes on a novel (that I am not going to write), or the swimming pool, or the hair, the herb and the bread or the tomato plant" de Irene Solà
Latitudes tutorizará los proyectos de David Mutiloa (Sala Grande, 18 julio– 25 septiembre 2017), Anna Moreno (Proyecto de publicación, noviembre 2017) y Magda Vaz y Camille Orny (Sala pequeña, 23 enero–1 abril 2018).

La undécima convocatoria introduce varias novedades: se han doblado el número de categorías pasando de nueve a dieciocho y se suman tres nuevos tutores (las comisarias Alexandra Laudo y Mónica Bello, y el artista Joan Casellas). La otra novedad es que el "Espai Cub" desaparece para transformarse en una sala más amplia con paredes blancas de 4×8m situado a la entrada de La Capella ("sala pequeña").

Las nuevas líneas que se han introducido se destinan a la producción de un proyecto curatorial para la sala pequeña para formatos reducidos o de archivo (1 proyecto), edición de una publicación (1 proyecto), proyectos en entornos digitales (2 proyectos), proyectos en vivo (3 proyectos), y se ha recuperado la añorada beca de investigación (2 proyectos).

El calendario preliminar de exhibición será en siguiente:

18 de julio–25 de septiembre 2017
Sala Gran (individual 1) + Sala Petita (individual 1)

11 de octubre–7 de enero 2017
Sala Gran (individual 2) + Sala Petita (individual 2)

23 de enero 2017–1 de abril 2018
Sala Gran (individual 3) + Sala Petita (individual 3)

27 de abril–24 de junio 2018
Sala Gran (comisariado) + Sala Petita (comisariado)

Los proyectos deslocalizados, de edición, de acción en vivo, digitales y de investigación se producirán y presentarán a lo largo de la temporada.



Barcelona producció es una convocatoria anual dirigida a la comunidad artística de Barcelona y su área de influencia. Es una iniciativa del Institut de Cultura de Barcelona (ICUB) del Ajuntament de Barcelona.

CONTENIDO RELACIONADO:





Exposición y actividades programadas durante la exposición "La disidencia nostálgica" comisariada por Joana Hurtado Matheu en La Capella

(Arriba y abajo) Vista de la instalación con obra de Richard McGuire. 
Todas las fotografías: Pep Herrero/La Capella–BCN Producció 2016.


"La disidencia nostálgica"
3 marzo–30 abril 2017
Comisariada por Joana Hurtado Matheu

Con la participación de Francesco Arena, The Atlas Group / Walid Raad, Lúa Coderch, Roger Guaus, Marine Hugonnier, Odó Hurtado, Ange Leccia, Richard McGuire, Deimantas Narkevičius, Aimar Pérez Galí, Suzanne Perrottet, Julien Prévieux, Anri Sala, Adrian Schindler y Danh Vō.

En una sociedad obsesionada por la memoria –por el archivo, el monumento y el testimonio–, la nostalgia se ha convertido en un fenómeno público, un síntoma, incluso, de la cultura contemporánea.

No obstante, existen muchos tipos de nostalgia. La más omnipresente en la actualidad es una nostalgia regresiva y comercial, adoptada por las políticas conservadoras para establecer símbolos en honor a un pasado que se pretende heroico e inmutable, o convertida por la industria cultural en un objeto de consumo sin consciencia histórica. Pero existe otra nostalgia, una que va en sentido opuesto, que es disruptiva porque no conmemora ni banaliza el pasado, una nostalgia que aprovecha la perspectiva para reflexionar sobre la historia y, a través de este desfase físico y temporal, reconoce la interdependencia entre lo individual y lo colectivo, y puede recuperar así el vínculo entre la memoria y la utopía.

Hoy, contra la nostalgia absolutista o mercantilizada, contra el revival nacional y el souvenir neutral, se abre paso una nostalgia disidente, que explora las ambivalencias de experimentar distintos tiempos y espacios al mismo tiempo. Esta nostalgia que encontramos en la literatura y el cine modernos, de William Faulkner a Samuel Beckett, de Jean-Luc Godard a Chris Marker, también es motivo de creación en el arte contemporáneo. 


  Vista de la exposición "La disidencia nostálgica".

"La disidencia nostálgica" propone un recorrido por la obra de artistas que trabajan con el pasado como un espacio de resistencia y posibilidad creativa. Por un lado, reivindican una distancia crítica para visibilizar el peso del poder político en la interpretación de la historia, y por el otro, reconocen el poder afectivo como un saber personal y colectivo, que puede ser vivido, transmitido o soñado. 

Esta aproximación a la disidencia nostálgica se sitúa en un contexto más amplio, complejo y conflictivo: el de la lectura de la historia y la representación de la memoria. Es un tema de actualidad fuera de la exposición, ya que últimamente, en un intento por detectar faltas y reconstruir anhelos, hemos visto cómo el pasado vuelve –ya sea el 1714 o la Constitución española– a la hora de pensar futuros alternativos. ¿Pero en nombre de quién, cómo y para qué miramos atrás? 

– Joana Hurtado Matheu


Proyecto ganador de la convocatoria BCN Producció'16 en la categoría de comisariado. Tutorizado por Latitudes.

Joana Hurtado Matheu es escritora, comisaria e investigadora independiente, especializada en las relaciones entre prácticas artísticas, fotografía y cine. Coordina el programa de artes visuales de Can Felipa del Ayuntamiento de Barcelona y ha comisariado proyectos expositivos y cinematográficos como Heretgies (LOOP, 2016-2017), Catedrals a la capella (capella de Sant Roc, Valls, 2011-2013), Pop Up. Veure és afegir (CaixaForum, 2011), Efecte cinema (Can Felipa, 2009) o Cinergies (CCCB, 2008-2009). Profesora invitada en varias universidades y actual vicepresidenta de la Associació Catalana de Crítics d’Art, ha colaborado en el suplemento “Cultura/s” de La Vanguardia durante más de diez años, así como en varias revistas de arte y cine, catálogos y libros colectivos.

Con el apoyo de: Goethe Institut, Galeria Nogueras Blanchard, Filmoteca de Cataluña, CA2M y Fundación ARCO, Zumzeig, Boyberry, Hangar, Cafè Schilling.


Con la colaboración de: Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo, Galerie Chantal Crousel, Galeria Fortes D’Aloia & Gabriel, Galeria NoguerasBlanchard, Galerie Martel.


Agradecimientos: Elisabet Albareda, Latitudes, Juan Diego Valera, Èlia Llach, Eva Sòria, Alex Nogueras, Oriol Fontdevila, Aleix Plademunt, Eulàlia Rovira, Gemma Alberich, Manuel Segade. Y a mi familia –la que conozco, la que imagino y la que sueño–.



 ACTIVIDADES PROGRAMADAS:

Francesco Arena, Mare della tranquillità, 2013. Metal, madera, 500 x 178 x 75 cm y acción. Foto: Martin Argyroglo / Cortesia Galleria Raffaella Cortese, Milano, y NoguerasBlanchard, Barcelona/Madrid.

Superficie con linea, de Francesco Arena.
Cada día en horario de apertura de la sala.
Inscripciones individuales o por grupos de dos o tres personas en el punto de información de la sala y en: [email protected]
  
Una vieja mesa de madera sacada del comedor familiar, ha sido cortada en cuatro partes para hacer las esquinas de una nueva mesa mucho más grande. Ampliada con piezas de metal, sus medidas evocan la mesa donde, el 7 de mayo de 1945, se firmó la rendición alemana que pondría fin a la Segunda Guerra Mundial. La obra se acompaña de una acción –en esta ocasión, abierta a la participación– que consiste en caminar sobre la mesa un total de 155 km, la longitud del muro de Berlín. Con unos zapatos que no han pisado nunca el suelo y un contador en la mano, cada día, durante los dos meses que dura la exposición, alguien recorrerá la mesa de punta a punta 596 veces. Las decisiones que se toman alrededor de una mesa afectan el futuro a pequeña y gran escalera.

Aimar Pérez Galí, The Touching Community / Greenberg_1992, 2017. Acción. Cortesia del artista. 


Aimar Pérez Galí, The Touching Community / Correspondencia, 2017. Impresiones y tinta sobre papel y linóleo. Cortesia del artista. 

 The Touching Community / Greenberg_1992, de Aimar Pérez Galí 
Texto: Jon Greenberg. 
Acción: Óscar Dasí y Aimar Pérez Galí. 
Sonido: Tirso Orive
Sábado 25 de marzo, 12h en Boyberry (c/ Calàbria, 96)
Duración: 60 minutos 
Mayores de 18 años.
Plazas limitadas. Inscripción gratuita hasta competar aforo.
Reservas: [email protected] 
En colaboración con Boyberry. 

Aimar Pérez Galí investiga sobre el impacto que tuvo la epidemia del sida en el contexto de la danza española y latinoamericana. The Touching Community es un trabajo íntimo y afectivo que a través de un diálogo con los fantasmas da visibilidad a una época y una comunidad. La acción que acompaña la instalación en sala, se apropia del Contact Improvisation, práctica de danza en la cual el movimiento se improvisa a partir del contacto físico entre dos cuerpos y que contrasta con las políticas de inmunidad que aparecieron con el VIH. Un trabajo sobre la memoria, silenciada o transmitida, y sobre el tacto y el contacto como herramienta de supervivencia. 



Instalación de Lúa Coderch, "Nit en blanc abans", 2017. Vídeo digital, 4:3, monocanal, color, sonido, 11' 17". Cortesia de la artista y Galeria Àngels, Barcelona. 


Un viatge d’anada i tornada [Un viaje de ida y vuelta], de Lúa Coderch
Sábado 1 de abril, 10h en Moll de les Drassanes

Duración: 1h
Plazas limitadas. Inscripciones en: [email protected]
*Esta actividad puede resultar afectada por causas meteorológicas. 


La artista barcelonesa ha reciclado los muebles de casa para hacer una tarima, plegable y portátil, como una maleta, que acoge el vídeo de un relato escrito durante una noche en blanco. Los recuerdos son la base de nuestros sueños, cuando dormimos o cuando esperamos despiertos uno mañana que no llega. Sobre las distracciones y las distancias ganadas durante este “tiempo perdido” trata también la actividad que nos propone: un viaje de ida y retorno. Nieta de abuelos nacionales durante la Guerra Civil Española, su obra más nostálgicamente contestataria, donde aprende a cantar las canciones del bando republicano, sonará cada noche a la calle Hospital.

 Adrian Schindler, "3400 g - 1,100 °C", 2017. Instalación y vídeo. Cortesía del artista.

Der Rüstungsfluss / El riu armadura, de Adrian Schindler
Sábado 29 de abril, 18h en La Capella (c/ Hospital 56)
Plazas limitadas. Inscripciones en:
[email protected]
En colaboración con el Goethe Institut.

A través de la proyección de documentos históricos y fotografías personales, Adrian Schindler narra la historia y el papel estratégico de un puente sobre el Rin, construido cerca del pueblo de donde proviene su familia materna. Un puente que une la historia europea y la familiar en base de sombras y fragmentos, que nos traen desde las fronteras del imperio romano hasta los años de ocupación de los aliados, pasando por las guerras religiosas francesas y el Tercer Reich.

Vista de la exposición – performance de Francesco Arena. Foto: Pep Herrero/La Capella–BCN Producció 2016.

Ciclo de cine:

En la Filmoteca de Catalunya
Jean-Marie Straub y Danièle Huillet, "En rachâchant". 7 min, 1982.
Eric Baudelaire, "The Anabasis of May and Fusako Shigenobu, Masao Adachi and 27 Years Without Images". 66 min, 2011.
4 de abril, 21h.

Deimantas Narkevičius, "The Role of a Lifetime". 16 min, 2003.
Patricio Guzmán, "Nostalgia de la luz". 90 min, 2010.
5 de abril, 21h.

Sandra Ruesga, "Haciendo Memoria. Entre el dictador y yo". 10 min, 2005.
Michel Haneke, Caché. 118 min, 2006.
6 de abril, 21h.

En el Zumzeig Cinema
30 de marzo y 13, 20 y 27 de abril.

Consultar cartelera.

Vista de la exposición – fotografía de Marine Hugonnier "Towards Tomorrow (International Date Line, Alaska)", 2001 

Vista de la exposición – obra de Roger Guaus. Foto: Pep Herrero/La Capella–BCN Producció 2016.

Visitas comentadas:

Visitas comentadas a cargo de la comisaria
Joana Hurtado Matheu
14 de marzo y 25 de abril, a las 18 h.

Visitas por la disidencia nostálgica de la exposición y de La Capella a cargo de Núria Miret y Judith López.
Cada sábado, a las 18 h.


  RELACIONADO:




Documentación de la exposición "El Misterio de Caviria" de Antoni Hervàs en La Capella

 Todas las fotos: Pep Herrero y La Capella/BCN Producció’16.


La exposición "El Misterio de Caviria" de Antoni Hervàs dibuja los escenarios para un espectáculo visual estilo copla-terror donde, siguiendo los rastros de la Barcelona canalla de los años 60–80, colisionan dos mitologías: la del cabaret barcelonés y la Grecia clásica. Una invocación a los Dioses del subsuelo siguiendo la tradición del rito cabirio en el que el fuego, la sangre y la ridiculización de lo masculino son los ingredientes esenciales que permiten conocer una historia local que es a la vez universal. Sigue leyendo...

A finales de enero se presentará una publicación conjuntamente editada por The Flames, el Ajuntament de Barcelona y La Capella que incluirá una entrevista entre el artista y Latitudes, tutores del proyecto, así como documentación fotográfica de la exposición y de las actividades programadas. 

La exposición "El misterio de caviria" se puede visitar en La Capella (c/ Hospital 56, 08001 Barcelona) hasta el 13 de noviembre 2016. El proyecto se enmarca dentro de la temporada BCN Producció'16.

Fotos: Pep Herrero/La Capella-BCNProducció'16.

Antoni Hervàs (Barcelona, 1981) estudió Bellas Artes en la Universitat de Barcelona (2006) y realizó un ciclo en grabado y estampación en Escola Llotja. Entre sus recientes exposiciones individuales destacan “Hércules en la luna”, Espai Cultural Caja Madrid, Barcelona (2012); “Kakanoures i kitschades”, galería SIS, Sabadell (2015) y “Agón”, Galería ETHall, Barcelona (2016). Hervàs ha participado en numerosas colectivas entre las cuales se incluyen “Capítulo II. Huidas. La ficción como rigor” dentro del ciclo “El texto: Principios y Salidas”, Fabra i Coats Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona (2014); “PUNK. Sus rastros en el arte contemporáneo”, Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona (2016) y “Deshaciendo el texto”, La Casa Encendida (2016). Como parte de su práctica artística Hervàs ha dirigido “Fénix” (2013–16), el programa educativo del centro Sant Andreu Contemporani involucrando a diversos artistas de la ciudad en sus varias fases. Además ha realizado numerosos proyectos editoriales autogestionados como “Grapandmopotheper” (2009), “Tributo a Ray Harryhausen”, DeGénero Ediciones (2014) o “La trama” para Mataró Art Contemporani (2015). Asimismo ha comisariado exposiciones periódicas como “Doméstica” junto a Ariadna Parreu (desde 2009) y eventos performáticos como “Mercuri Splash” junto a David Bestué para la Fundació Miró (2015). En el 2010 recibió el Premio INJUVE a la Creación en la categoría de ilustración.

Contenidos relacionados:




'Compositions' a programme of five artists' interventions for the second Barcelona Gallery Weekend, 29 September–2 October 2016


Compositions presents five artistic interventions in unique sites across the neighbourhoods of the city of Barcelona. Each of the commissioned artists is represented by a gallery participating in the second edition of the Barcelona Gallery Weekend.

Curated by Latitudes for the second time (see 2015 edition), the project further explores Barcelona as a rich fabric of the historic and the contemporary, the unfamiliar and the conspicuous. Resisting an overall theme, and instead developing from the artists’ responses to the specificity of each context—people as well as places—the five art projects form a temporary thread that links evocative locations and public space, running parallel to the Weekend’s exhibitions in galleries and museums. 

In its second edition, Composiciones will present interventions by Lúa Coderch (Club Billar Barcelona); Regina Giménez (Antigua Fábrica de Can Trinxet, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat); Lola Lasurt (Biblioteca Pública Arús); Robert Llimós (connecting all the participating galleries) and Wilfredo Prieto (Unitat Muntada de la Guàrdia Urbana de Barcelona). Their projects will offer moments of intermission, intimacy and bewilderment throughout the weekend, highlighting some lesser-known aspects of the city’s cultural heritage and municipal life.

Interior of the Club Billar Barcelona. Photo: Courtesy Club Billar Barcelona.
 Zoom in a map here.

Intervention by Lúa Coderch Club Billar Barcelona
Gran Via de les Corts Catalanes, 595-599
08007 Barcelona

Public transport:
Metro: Passeig de Gràcia (L2, L3, L4)
Bus: 7, 50, 54, 67, 68, H12

Opening hours:
Thursday 29 September: 5–9pm
Friday 30 September, Saturday 1 and Sunday 2 October: 11am–7pm 

Lúa Coderch’s project for the Compositions programme brings a mysterious and improbable apparition to life in the home of the Club de Billar Barcelona. Beneath the Teatre Coliseum in Gran Vía there is a rainbow. Coderch guides sunlight and a spectrum of colours down into the underground gaming space with a series of precisely positioned mirrors and prisms, as if evoking the mechanics, geometry and artistry involved in billiards. Accompanying the rainbow is a turntable and a transparent vinyl record that can be used to play an audio recording of a female voice. This voice narrates and interprets what can be seen in front of us, and the process that led to its appearance. The title of her intervention, The Rainbow Statement” (2016), refers to one of the verbal tricks used by fortune-tellers and clairvoyants in ‘cold reading’ an individual’s life or personality. Suggestively nebulous assertions maximize the chance of apparently specific and meaningful paranormal insights hitting the mark. The Rainbow Statement” is either an experiment of the imagination or a phenomenon of optical science with which Coderch seems to have invented a form of psychic meteorology, or spectral physics.

Sunday 2 October, 12am: 
Free guided visit by the Lúa Coderch and Latitudes at the Club Billar Barcelona, Gran Via de les Corts Catalanes, 595-599.

Interior of the Biblioteca Pública Arús.
Zoom in a map here.

Intervention by Lola Lasurt  –  Biblioteca Pública Arús
Passeig de Sant Joan, 26
08010 Barcelona

Opening hours:
Thursday 29 September: 5–9pm;
Friday 30 September: 11am–7pm;
Saturday 1 October: 11am–2pm;
Sunday 2
October: CLOSED;
Monday 3
October: 11am–6pm;
Tuesday 4
October: 11am–6pm.
 
Public transport:
Metro: Arc de Triomf (L1)
Rodalies: R1, R3, R4 Arc de Triomf
Bus: 19, 51, 55, B20, B25, N4, N11


For her intervention for the Compositions programme, Lola Lasurt has collaborated with the Biblioteca Pública Arús, a study centre founded in 1895 with an outstanding collections related to the labour movement, anarchism, Freemasonry and Sherlock Holmes. The project centres on a series of grisaille paintings that form a pictorial frieze that hangs from the balcony above a presentation of books in the Arús’s display cases. Under the title Donació” (Donation), 2016, Lasurt departs from 135 publications that once formed the personal library of Assumpta Corbera Santanach that were gifted in 2010 to the Arús after her death. Corbera Santanach identified as a feminist and a Freemason; she was not a public figure. Yet the impulse of Lasurt’s project is not primarily biographic or historiographic, but bibliographic and pictorial. Accordingly, Donació” attempts to narrate changes in social and cultural attitudes through the selection and redrafting of images that appear on the pages of the bibliographic bequest. Treating the publications as an intimate accumulation of ‘alternative’ knowledge and a representation of a self-education, Lasurt is interested in the portrayal of a private political imagination in the midst of what is now a public collection. – Latitudes

Thursday 29 September, 6pm: 
Free guided visit by Lola Lasurt and Latitudes at the Biblioteca Pública Arús, Passeig de Sant Joan, 26.

 Interior of Can Trinxet factory in L'Hospitalet de Llobregat.
 Zoom in a map here.
Intervention by Regina Giménez will take place at the Antigua fábrica textil Can Trinxet
c/ Santa Eulàlia 182–212
08902 L’Hospitalet de Llobregat (Barcelona)

Opening hours:
Thursday 29 September: 5–8pm

Friday 30 September, Saturday 1 and Sunday 2 October: 11am–7pm

Public transport:
Metro: Santa Eulàlia o Torrassa (L1)
Bus: L16, L52, L82, L85, LH1, N13

The manufacturing and printing of textiles formed the basis of the industrial revolution in Catalunya. Beyond the actual fabric, it is the machinery of its production and the people who operated it—especially women—that underpins Regina Giménez’s presentation of her graphic works as part of the Compositions programme. Taking place in one of the buildings that comprises Can Trinxet, a former textile factory complex that once employed the largest workforce in L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, Giménez’s intervention comprises painted compositions that are derived from schematic representations of machines and their components. Her abstractions have been applied on transparent panels that lean against a scarred factory wall, becoming devices that reanimate the marks and memories embedded in the building. An accompanying poster evokes the clamour that once would have filled the workshop in typographic form. Giménez has titled her project "La Constancia" (2016) in tribute to the labor union that called a general strike in 1913 to protest the conditions of the female and child workers who undertook the textile industry’s most monotonous and arduous tasks. – Latitudes

Friday 30 September, 12am:
Free guided visit by Regina Giménez and Latitudes at Can Trinxet, c/ Santa Eulàlia 182–212, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat.

Zoom in map here.

Robert Llimós' intervention will connect all the participating galleries of the Barcelona Gallery Weekend. 

Hours:
Thursday 29 September: 5–9pm
Friday 30 September, Saturday 1 and Sunday 2 October: 11am–7pm

Robert Llimós presents a new version of an action that was originally created in the summer of 1972. One of the very few performative works of an artist primarily known for his paintings and sculptures, "Los Corredores" (The Runners) was first realized as part of the legendary avant-garde art festival known as Los Encuentros de Pamplona (The Pamplona Encounters). On that occasion, three people dressed in identical running gear speed-walked throughout the city, connecting the various venues of the festival. As his project for the Composiciones programme, Llimós’s Los Corredores is now restaged on the streets of Barcelona. Three athletes criss-cross the city, seemingly rushing to see every venue of the Gallery Weekend. As in Pamplona, the white sports kits have been adorned by Llimós with black diagonal brushstrokes that symbolize the idea of painting. At times the speed-walking trio carry flowers, or have their ankles joined with elastic ribbon—a painting-as-workout that has left the studio for the street with decoration, discipline, and a dynamic sense of urgency. – Latitudes 

Friday 30 September, 5pm:  
Free guided visit by Robert Llimós and Latitudes. Meeting point: BlueProject Foundation, c/Princesa 57.
Façade of the Unitat Muntada de la Guàrdia Urbana de Barcelona in Parc de la Ciutadella.
Location of the Unitat Muntada in the southeastern part of the Parc de la Ciutadella. Zoom in a map here.

The intervention by Wilfredo Prieto will take place at the Unitat Muntada de la Guàrdia Urbana de Barcelona (Barcelona City Police Stables)
c/ Wellington s/n 
08018 Barcelona

Public transport:
Metro: Vil·la Olímpica (L4)  
Tram: Ciutadella–Vil·la Olímpica (just opposite)
Bus: 36, 59, 92, N0, V21, V27

Opening hours:
Thursday 29 September: CLOSED
Friday 30
September, Saturday 1 and Sunday 2 October: 11–12am*
[*] Doors open daily at 10:30am. Kindly note that a photo ID (DNI or passport) is required to enter.]
  
Conceived by Wilfredo Prieto as his project for the Composiciones programme, "Pantalones rotos" (Torn Jeans), 2012, is realised by the horses of the Guàrdia Urbana de Barcelona. The action-sculpture takes place at the Mounted Unit’s stables, a historic venue next to the city zoo that is not normally open to the public and whose exercise paddock is overlooked by the twin towers of the Torre Mapfre and Hotel Arts. In his work Prieto makes reference to an image which appears on the tag of every pair of classic Levi’s denim jeans—two horses trying in vain to break a pair of the reinforced trousers. Since their invention in 1873, Levi Strauss & Co.’s famous copper-riveted denim has become synonymous with the working people of the western United States—cowboys, lumberjacks, and railroad workers. Yet in "Pantalones rotos", this symbol of the American frontier myth has been already torn apart with bathos as two harnessed horses each drag one half of a torn pair of jeans. – Latitudes  

Saturday 1 October, 12am:
Free guided visit by Latitudes at the Unitat Muntada de la Guàrdia Urbana. Meeting point: c/ Wellington s/n. (Opposite the tram stop Ciutadella–Vil·la Olímpica) 

Follow + Share: 
@Barcelona_Gallery_Weekend
#BarcelonaGalleryWeekend
#Composiciones2016
#LosCorredores1972   
@LTTDS 
#LatitudesBarcelona  



The Barcelona Gallery Weekend is an initiative of the de Art Barcelona and is supported by the Ajuntament de Barcelona (ICUB), the Generalitat de Catalunya (ICEC), the Ajuntament de L’Hospitalet de Llobregat and Acción Cultural Española (AC/E), as well as by private sponsors and individual patrons. http://www.barcelonagalleryweekend.com/


Related content:

  • Composiciones 2015 commissions;
  • Storify – 2015 social media archive;
  • Instagram of the Barcelona Gallery Weekend;
  • PRESS RELEASE: Latitudes curates "Composiciones", a series of five artists' commissions for the first Barcelona Gallery Weekend, 1–4 October 2015; 
  • NOTA DE PRENSA: Comisariado de "Composiciones", cinco intervenciones artísticas para el primer Barcelona Gallery Weekend, 1–4 Octubre 2015;




A report from the symposium 'How Institutions Think' organised by the LUMA Foundation and CCS Bard College, Arles, 24–27 February 2016

All photographs: Latitudes.

[The following text was originally published on Frieze Blog on 9 March 2016].

Co-presented by the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College with the LUMA Foundation, the four-day symposium ‘How Institutions Think’ [pdf of the programme] met to reconsider the habits and rhetorics of contemporary art institutions and curatorial practice. The event, held at the Parc des Ateliers, Arles, from 24–27 February, was developed in partnership with a long list of collaborators (Valand Academy of Arts, Gothenburg, Sweden; Afterall Books and the Exhibition Histories programme at Saint Martins, London, UK; Goldsmiths, London; the V-A-C Foundation, Moscow; and de Appel art centre, Amsterdam).

Taking its title from the 1986 book by British anthropologist Mary Douglas, the symposium played out on the site of the future LUMA Arles, a 20-acre former railway yard that includes a new building designed by Frank Gehry scheduled to open in summer 2018 as exhibitions spaces, archives, residency and study facilities, as well as a restaurant, hotel and park. Introduced by CCS Bard’s Paul O’Neill and LUMA founder Maja Hoffmann, the presentations were hosted in the recently-restored L’Atelier des Forges spaces in the middle of this construction site. O’Neill took the work-in-progress status outside as an invitation for the more than 30 speakers and around 150 delegates to debate not only what the future of art institutions in general might be, but more immediately, how new ways of operating could underpin this nascent institution in the south of France. 

LUMA Arles is located in the former railway yards of Arles and includes a new building designed by Frank Gehry and the renovation of the industrial buildings on the Parc des Ateliers by Selldorf Architects.

Yet what transpired was something far more pervasive. An amplification of the noun ‘institution’ and the verb ‘instituting’ soon engulfed not only a discussion of art and academic establishments, but law, governance, and the psyche of the French state, post-November 2015 Paris attacks. The grim predicament of a Europe in the depths of the refugee crisis – as the symposium took place, at the other end of the country, Calais’s ‘Jungle’ camp was being dismantled – became the lens for considering nothing less than the spectral institution that is Western European colonial imperialism. In the first evening’s fragmented keynote by Zahia Rahmani, the writer and historian gave an account of the ‘Made in Algeria’ exhibition of colonial cartography she has curated for the MuCEM museum in Marseilles. She argued that we cannot plausibly think about the future of any institution without confronting the terrible failures and opprobrious injustices of the past, most glaringly what she characterised as the ‘toxicity’ of Western Europe’s colonial system. 


Céline Condorelli's 'All our tomorrows' (2015) hanging curtain.

‘Is institution building still desirable?’ wondered artist Céline Condorelli in her presentation the following day as she evoked All our tomorrows (2015), her installation that humbly corralled the symposium’s setting, comprised a large hanging curtain inspired by the ‘poor architecture’ of Lina Bo Bardi’s SESC Pompéia, the social and cultural centre established in São Paulo. 

Reflecting on his own transformative experiences made while directing the 2014 edition of the São Paulo Biennial, Charles Esche – Director of the Van Abbemuseum in Eindhoven, Netherlands – astutely articulated both the decisiveness of Western Imperialism’s poisonous effect on the rest of the world, and the nervousness about whether anyone can even venture to be hopeful about the future. Esche persuasively argued that Western museums must make decolonialisation fundamental to their missions and no longer a marginal issue by analysing the entrails of neoliberalism’s ‘dogged persistence’ and, soothsayer-like, intuitively sensing the ‘weak signals’ of a more just politics.
 
 Question from Mick Wilson, artist, educator and Head of the Valand Academy of Arts, University of Gothernburg, Sweden, and moderatior of one of the sessions.  

Attendees gather outside the symposium venue at the Parc des Ateliers.

Sociologists Luc Boltanski and Arnaud Esquerre spoke of France’s deep investment in what they termed the ‘economy of enrichment’ in observations that were particularly prickly given the art-destination place-making unfolding on the very site of the symposium. They submitted that the luxury brands that dominate the image of the country abroad enjoy a close but officially-unacknowledged complicity with heritage and culture. They argue that this compound myth of the French art de vivre accounts for the country consistently being the globe’s most visited tourist destination, yet also that, less innocuously, France’s defiance of normative economic rules about price and value make it both a haven for inequality as well as unusually susceptible to instability. Put candidly, the presence of refugee and terrorists is not conducive to tourism and handbag sales. Later, speaking about ‘turbo-fascism’ and a transition to ‘necropolitics’ (a term coined by philosopher Achille Mbembe regarding the politics of sovereignty over life and death), philosopher Marina Gržinić contended that we are living in a time of war in which our institutions battle to preserve this ‘good life’ at any cost. 

Céline Condorelli, Artist, Professor at Nuova Accademia di Belle Arti, Milan, and Founding Co-Director Eastside Projects, in conversation with Helena Reckitt, Senior Lecturer in Curating at Goldsmiths, University of London.  
 Clémentine Deliss, Independent Curator and Fellow of the Institute of Advanced Study (Wissenschaftskolleg).

Turning more specifically to art’s institutions, independent curator and editor Nataša Petrešin-Bachelez argued that they are so often so deeply implicated in an economy of precarity that they spawn new toothless art forms of ‘safe participation’ and ‘soft interactivity’. ‘Stubborn’ institutions thus appeared to be both the problem and the solution. Accordingly, Clémentine Deliss – recently dismissed as the Director of the Weltkulturen Museum in Frankfurt – delivered a scorching critique of the racism and intransigence persisting in ethnographic museums founded in the 19th century, particularly in Germany and France. She characterised how the hundreds of thousands of objects ‘salvaged’ from the frontline of the colonial project are now trapped in a legislative embargo, reduced to little more than dormant entries on databases. Access to these hoards of material culture and their restitution is critical she asserted, yet young curators are too afraid to deal with them – contemporary art offers an easier ride. 

In the context her work directing the SBG Gallery in Montréal, Canada, curator Pip Day discussed Canada’s settler-colonialist legacy, the evasions allowed by conceiving of decolonization as merely a metaphor, and her advocacy of the work of First Nation artists such as Maria Hupfield. Bassam El Baroni, an independent curator based in Alexandria, Egypt, later presented a paper that threaded a bewilderingly dense route through a tangle of cognitive philosophy and ‘prometheanism’. Yet Day’s case studies, as well as those discussed by Mélaine Bouteloup, curator of Paris’s Bétonsalon, regarding the recently opened Villa Vassilieff which is now the second site of that institution, helped to link such abstraction to more practical curatorial and artistic thinking-in-action that addresses the past while creating new knowledge. 

Gehry’s LUMA building will comprise presentation and exhibition spaces, archive, library, offices, seminar rooms, artist-in-residence facilities, café-restaurant and hotel and is due to open in summer 2018.

Yet it was through the presentations by writer Dave Beech and especially architect Keller Easterling that the symposium actually approached something resembling a strategy to address what had been almost uniformly painted as the shameful, broken state of the contemporary institution. According to both Beech and Easterling, we should be paying keener attention to infrastructure rather than institution per se. Following her book Extrastatecraft: The Power of Infrastructure Space (2014) Easterling’s bruising and exhilarating contention was that an enveloping urban medium (including preposterous towers, mall sprawl, special-trade-zone legal lacunae) defies consideration as a thing and is better thought of as a global operating system, a ‘disposition’ that thrives on saying one thing and doing quite another. 

Ljublijanan philosopher, theoretician and artist Marina Gržinić; writer and professor Dave Beech and curator and theorist Simon Sheikh.

At the start of the symposium artist Liam Gillick – one of LUMA’s luminary consultants alongside Tom Eccles, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Philippe Parreno and Beatrix Ruf – had asked somewhat rhetorically, ‘can an institution be thought collectively on this scale?’ It was clearly not only Charles Esche who looked out at the spine of what will be a 24,000 square metre Frank Gehry-designed tower and noticed that the institution’s die was cast already – and thanks to an architect long synonymous with the art museum as an importunate form of trophy. Following Keller’s strategic spatial repertoire of ‘counterbalances’, ‘interplays’, ‘toggles’, ‘incentives’ and ‘ratchets’, as well as her talk of heeding the dynamics of joke-telling or dough-tending, she implied that if we are going to formulate a resilient future for art institutions, we had better start feeling our way – and get a whole lot more canny. 


Max Andrews is a contributing editor of frieze and, with Mariana Cánepa Luna, runs Latitudes, an independent curatorial office based in Barcelona, Spain.
– 

 LUMA Foundation spaces under construction.

Related content:




Latitudes contribution to Kadist Art Foundation's 'One Sentence Exhibition'


To visit the exhibition,
please check ose.kadist.org

Recognizing that not everyone can visit Kadist Art Foundation venues in Paris or San Francisco, Kadist recently inaugurated a series of online projects with artists and curators around the world.

First of these initiatives is the One Sentence Exhibition (OSE), for which the foundation invites curators to write or choose a single sentence, making each word in the sentence a hyperlink to an image, video, text or website. As a result, the One Sentence Exhibition becomes a compact architecture, accompanying the reader as they explore far-reaching corners of the internet. 

Following on from the contributions by Rudolf Frieling (Media Arts Curator at SFMOMA) and Nato Thompson (Chief Curator at Creative Time) to OSE series, Latitudes has chosen the statement "A CLOTH OF COTTON WRAPPED AROUND A HORSESHOE OF IRON TOSSED UPON THE CREST OF A WAVE" by Lawrence Weiner in English, Spanish and Catalan, commissioned for his 2008 solo exhibition THE CREST OF A WAVE at the Fundació Suñol in Barcelona.

Sugar packets where freely distributed during the duration of the exhibition around Barcelona. Photo: Pierre-Jean Moulis.

Originally distributed as a free ephemeral sculpture on 300,000 sugar sachets and presented on the wall of the exhibition space, Weiner’s striking typographic rendition of the statement triggers a chronicle of mercantile, maritime and equestrian power, of trade and occupation, of spheres of influence and change, a memory of matter and of language.
 
Lawrence Weiner tote bag. Available from http://www.lttds.org/totes/weiner/

The statement is also silkscreened on the commemorative limited edition tote bag that celebrated Latitudes' 10th anniversary in Spring 2015.

As elaborated by Latitudes in the exhibition guide, "A CLOTH OF COTTON WRAPPED AROUND A HORSESHOE OF IRON TOSSED UPON THE CREST OF A WAVE indicates an object record of early human technologies (woven textiles, reusable protection for the hooves of working animals) and a marine setting. Weiner’s phrase facilitates a richly ambiguous material and symbolic universe. Why is the horseshoe wrapped? What story, personal or historical, might account for the event that is described? The artist’s statement leaves such questions open for us to consider. It is known that muslin and calico was brought to Spain by the Arab traders in the 1st Century. After the Conquest of Hispania during the 7th Century, facilitated by the Muslim cavalry’s more agile horses, cotton was cultivated by the Moors in Spain. Barcelona’s industrialization in the late 1700s and early 1800s was driven by the printing of calico and later the spinning and weaving of cotton. [1]


Poster of the exhibition at Fundació Suñol's Nivell Zero space, Barcelona.

In the manner of a biography of substances, such as Mark Kurlansky’s books Cod and Salt, A CLOTH OF COTTON... thus triggers a chronicle of mercantile, maritime and equestrian power, of trade and occupation, of spheres of influence and change, a memory of matter and of language. [2]" (...) 

(...) The statement is distributed on a sugar packet throughout a selection of Barcelona bars and cafés during the city's Mercè Festival and for the duration of the exhibition – a sweet gift to accompany one’s café con leche,
cortado, carajillo, or conversation. Printed on hundreds of thousands of standard 7 gram white sugar sachets – sugar production technology too was spread into Spain by Moorish occupation – Weiner’s striking typographic rendition of the phrase in red and yellow (the colours of both the Catalan and the Spanish flag) is accompanied by an emblem which evokes the trajectory of a certain horseshoe over a wave in diagrammatic form.


View of Lawrence Weiner's piece at the patio space of Fundació Suñol, Barcelona.

(...) On the five metre-high wall of the exterior space [of  Fundació Suñol’s Nivell Zero] we read A CLOTH OF COTTON WRAPPED AROUND A HORSESHOE OF IRON TOSSED UPON THE CREST OF A WAVE painted in Catalan, Spanish and English. The use of the same stencil font as the sugar packet layout suggests a method of functional and clear application which reinforces the fact that Weiner is dealing with the language in terms of modification and use. [3] The word for a company which produces typefaces – a foundry – neatly preserves a link to a time when type was cast from metal, in much the same way as horseshoes are made from iron."

Ceremony of the 2008 ACCA (Art Critics Association) awards which granted Fundació Suñol the best art programme of the year – a season that included two projects curated by Latitudes.

[1] See J.K.J. Thomson, A Distinctive Industrialization: Cotton in Barcelona 1728-1832, Cambridge University
Press, 2003.

[2] Salt: A World History, Walker and Co., 2001; Cod: A Biography of the Fish That Changed the World, Walker
and Co., 1997.

[3] The font is FF Offline Regular, designed by Roelof Mulder in 1988.

This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
Work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




Workshop for Curating Lab 2014: Imagining an institution

After a morning lecture introducing a range of our projects to the 11 participants of Curating Lab 2014, we proposed a challenging exercise: to define a succinct "about us" paragraph for three imaginary institutions. (Named after the first three Pacific hurricanes of the 2014 season, no less.) Following the root of word "institution" (to establish, to set up), the task was not an architectural challenge nor a branding exercise, but one that first asked what practices are imagined to be initiated, how programmes are established and for whom are they set up.

Participants took into account the parameters we described for each of three art-institution typologies – a residency/studio programme; an annual festival and acommissioning body. After a one hour brainstorm within each group, participants came up with a paragraph that concisely communicated the "vision and values" of the new entities, responding to "what we do, how do we do it and why we do it that way".

The task wasn't oriented towards building a "business plan", though an integral part involved consideration of funding models, and who or what has a stake in the imagined organisation – city/state, philanthropists/donors, users/members/tickets, prizes/open calls, etc. We didn't expect job descriptions, but participants were encouraged to consider what kind of roles the staff within the imaginary institution might take up – would it have a core full-time team or occasional collaborators? What skills or roles would be taken up across curating, producing, publishing, researching, hosting, leadership, and so on?

The exercise was not to come up with a pitch to potential supporters (i.e. in future tense), but to exercise imagination in the present and to define what an organisation stands for and actually does in a succinct way. The aim was to think holistically about their "pet" organisation, its different programme strands and its relation to its local/international network.
  
1. CRISTINA – A residency/studio programme.
"Cristina provides residential, and studio facilities for national and international artists. It is based in several live/work spaces and as yet undefined rooms in a former school building in a small town on a remote island in an area of outstanding natural beauty. It is a day's travel to the nearest city. The local community of 800 people are mostly involved in fishing and farming."

2. AMANDA – An annual festival.
"Amanda is an event-based format and is based in a major densely-populated prosperous city with a strong corporate and media culture as well as several world-renowned museums,  contemporary art centres and universities. The events take place in a specific block of time and involve organised, extended presentations and places for viewing them."
 
3. BORIS A commissioning body.

"Boris invites artists to make temporary artworks in public spaces and locations that are not galleries or museums. It is based in a provincial port city that used to have a thriving economy based on heavy industry. The city is suffering from high unemployment, there are many abandoned buildings and wastelands."



This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




Photoreport and storify of the symposium "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?", National Library of Singapore, 14 May 2014

 During the presentation of Shabbir Hussain Mustafa and Charles Lim. Photo: Latitudes.

The public symposium "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" (14 May 2014) was part of this year Curating Lab 2014 programme organised by NUS Museum. The event, convened and moderated by Heman Chong and Latitudes, counted with the participation of Shabbir Hussain Mustafa (Curator, National Gallery Singapore), Charles Lim (artist); Anca Rujoiu and Vera Mey (Curators, CCA — Centre for Contemporary Art, Singapore) and artist Shubigi Rao.

Addressing the format of the exhibition in terms of duration and process, the public symposium "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" consisted of two complimentary sessions that reflected on exhibitions' capacity to articulate its own making and incorporate its own history. In the same way that the Internet has untethered television from fixed schedules and newspapers from print deadlines, the symposium will further ponder on how the exhibition and today's art institutions are undergoing similar transformations. Should exhibitions embrace or resist becoming more like broadcasting or live-publishing? "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" considered how exhibitions produce knowledge through the format of conversations between curators and artists. 

First panel with Shabbir Hussain Mustafa and Charles Lim. Photo: Luca E.C.

Charles Lim and Shabbir Hussain Mustafa during the Q&A. Photo: Luca E.C.


 Audience. Photo: Luca E.C.

 Vera Mey, Anca Rajoiu and Shubigi Rao during the Q&A. Photo: Luca E.C.

The event was an occasion to reflect on the role of a symposium and its public within curatorial practice, and counted with the engagement of Curatorial-Intensive participants who live-tweeted proceedings, a second group mapped concepts of the discussions (see photos below), and a final group will soon publish a blog post documenting and reporting the day for those not physically present.

 Curatorial Intensive participants live-tweeting the proceedings. Photo: Luca E.C.
Group working on the mapping of concepts throughout the symposium. Photo: Luca E.C.
 Map 1 by Curatorial Intensive participants. Photo: Latitudes.
Map 2 by Curatorial Intensive participants. Photo: Latitudes.
Below archive of all the tweets produced during the presentations - via Storify.



 
Related links:

Workshop for Curating Lab 2014: Imagining an institution, 1 July 2014.

"Hauntological trajectories in “When Does An Exhibition Begin And End?”" by Amanda Lee Koe on Art Asia Pacific's blog, 23 July 2014.

"Curating Lab: When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" by Bruce Quek on Radian, 18 August 2014.



This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




Public Symposium "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" on 14 June 2014 at the National Library, Singapore



"When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?"
A public symposium part of Curating Lab 2014
Saturday 14 June 2014
3–5pm 
Level 5 - Possibility, National Library Building, Singapore 
Free admission with registration, please write to [email protected]

Addressing the format of the exhibition in terms of duration and process, the public symposium "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" on June 14th, will consist of two complimentary sessions with the participation of curators and artists who will reflect on exhibitions' capacity to articulate its own making and incorporate its own history. In the same way that the Internet has untethered television from fixed schedules and newspapers from print deadlines, the symposium will further ponder on how the exhibition and today's art institutions are undergoing similar transformations.

Is an ongoing production of discourse and research accountability increasingly expected of curators? Are artists engaging differently with new channels for the documentation and distribution of their work and what contextualises it? Should exhibitions embrace or resist becoming more like broadcasting or live-publishing? "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" will consider how exhibitions produce knowledge through the format of conversations between curators and artists.


In the first session Shabbir Hussain Mustafa (Curator, National Gallery Singapore) and artist Charles Lim will talk about their ongoing professional collaboration including Lim's long-term SEA STATE project and the related solo exhibition In Search of Raffles’ Light (NUS Museum, 24 October 2013–27 April 2014). Mustafa and Lim will address these projects' engagement with the maritime history of Singapore in its intersection with the present while speculating about their approach to future exhibitions, including their forthcoming collaboration for the Singapore Pavilion at the 2015 Venice Biennale.

In the second session Anca Rujoiu and Vera Mey (Curators,
CCA — Centre for Contemporary Art, Singapore) will discuss their recent project "The Disappearance" (CCA, 5–6 April 2013), which took place during the dismantling of a previous exhibition "as a durational event unfolding over two days including a continuous series of manifestations". Rujoiu and May will be joined by participating artist Shubigi Rao to discuss her project "Visual snow" (2014), presented during "The Disappearance" as an ongoing part of her biographical study of "the reclusive S. Raoul".

Within the context of Curating Lab 2014, "When Does An Exhibition Begin and End?" will be treated as an occasion to reflect on the role of a symposium and its public within curatorial practice. It will count on the engagement of Curatorial-Intensive participants who will be live-tweeting proceedings, mapping concepts of the discussions, and devising an approach to documenting and reporting the day for those not physically present.

The symposium is convened and moderated by artist, curator and writer Heman Chong and Barcelona-based curatorial office Latitudes (Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna).

Organised by: NUS Museum
Institutional Partner: Centre for Contemporary Art, Singapore
Supported by: National Arts Council
Venue Sponsor: National Library Board, Singapore
 



This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
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Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




Lead Facilitators, Curating Lab 2014–Curatorial Intensive, National University of Singapore (11–14 June), symposium (14 June, 15–17h) and field trip to Hong Kong (16–20 June)

Curating Lab 2012. Courtesy: NUS Museum.

Alongside artist, curator and writer Heman Chong, Latitudes will lead the first phase of Curating Lab 2014 (11–14 June), a curatorial intensive in which 15 participants engage with the practice of exhibition-making through lectures and tutorials concluding with a field trip to Hong Kong (16–20 June).

Curating Lab 2014 is an eight month-long programme offering final year students, recent graduates and young curators exposure into contemporary curatorial perspectives and practices. Organised by NUS Museum with support from Singapore's National Arts Council, participants are firstly involved in a week-long curatorial intensive completed with an overseas field trip to Hong Kong. This first phase is followed by internship assignments to contemporary art spaces in the city (July–December 2014), and concludes with a final exhibition project in January 2015.


Courtesy: NUS Museum.

Curating Lab 2014 will focus on contemporary art and curatorial practices that engage with the exhibition as a site of knowledge production; one that is multifarious, relational and participatory providing scopes for intents and slippages, opened to interpretative articulations and re-articulations, subjected to varying contexts of exhibition-making and the very audiences that perform and shapes its production. Lectures and workshops will be led by Heman Chong and Latitudes to explore concepts of knowledge production in the realms of art, fiction, journalism, theory and other possibilities. 

As part of Curating Lab 2014's curatorial-intensive, the public symposium "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" on 14 June (3–5pm, Level 5 of the National Library Building), will bring together Singapore-based artists and curators Shabbir Hussain Mustafa (Curator, National Gallery Singapore), artist Charles Lim; Anca Rujoiu and Vera Mey (Curators, CCA — Centre for Contemporary Art, Singapore) and artist Shubigi Rao, to discuss their recent and ongoing projects. Addressing the format of the exhibition in terms of duration and process, the symposium will consist of two complimentary sessions that will reflect on the exhibition's capacity to articulate its own making and incorporate its own history. In the same way that the Internet has untethered television from fixed schedules and newspapers from print deadlines, the symposium will further ponder on how the exhibition and today's art institutions are undergoing similar transformations.

"When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" will count on the engagement of Curating Lab 2014 participants who will be live-tweeting proceedings, mapping concepts of the discussions, and devising an approach to documenting and reporting the day for those not physically present.

The symposium is convened and moderated by Heman Chong and Latitudes.

The Asia Art Archive (AAA) library. Courtesy: Asia Art Archive.








Following on the Curatorial-Intensive, the overseas Field Trip to Hong Kong (16–20 June) aims to expose participants to international curatorial practices and situate their curatorial processes within the region. Participants will be visiting a range of private and public spaces such as Spring Workshop, Asia Art Archive, Para/Site and M+ Museum.

Follow:
#CuratingLab2014



This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




(Part 1/3) The 55th Venice Biennale: "The Encyclopedic Palace" in pictures and as seen by the critics, 1 June–24 November 2013

 Poster announcing the biennale nearby the Accademia.

Following previous years reports (2009, 2011 biennale posts and 2007 photo album 1 and 2) we'd like to share our photo-documentation alongside some articles and interviews related to this year's biennale that we have been reading before, during and after our Venice trip. 

Bit first a bit of recent history. Massimiliano Gioni (Busto Arsizio, 1973), currently Associate Director and Director of Exhibitions at the New Museum as well as Artistic Director of the Fondazione Nicola Trussardi in Milan, was appointed Director of the 55th International Exhibition of the Venice Biennale at the end of January 2012. In October 2012 he announced the title and overall concept of "The Encyclopedic Palace" (Il Palazzo Enciclopedico) and in March 2013, he announced his artist list (over 150 artists from 38 countries, map of the venues here). A real tour de force.


 IL ENCICLOPEDICO PALAZZO DEL MONDO (The Encyclopedic Palace of the World) Marino Auriti (1891–1980), Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, c. 1950. Wood, plastic, glass, metal, hair combs, and model kit parts. American Folk Art Museum, gift of Colette Auriti Firmani in memory of Marino Auriti, 2002.35.1. 

Both frieze magazine and Artforum had published interviews previous to the exhibition's opening. The former with Milan-based art critic Barbara Casavecchia and the latter with the Artistic Director of the 2003 Venice Biennale, Francesco Bonami. A third interesting article to give some background if you're planning a trip to Venice is by Carol Vogel in the New York Times, narrating the previous weeks to the opening.

In the above mentioned interview with Bonami, Gioni describes Il Palazzo Enciclopedico as an attempt "to conceive of the biennial as a temporary museum more than simply as a show that captures the supposed zeitgeist." (...) The title comes from the self-taught Italian- American artist Marino Auriti, who conceived of his own impossible, imaginary museum: a building that would house all the knowledge in the world. Obviously his was a dream that remains only a model, a failed project. By using this title, and by looking at the figure of Auriti, I also hoped to connect to the history of Venice, because it’s the oldest biennial; founded in 1895, it has its roots in the format of the world’s fair, going back to the Great Exhibition of 1851. I wanted to acknowledge the link to the tradition of the universal exposition but also to suggest the failure of that model right from the beginning."

29 May 2013, 9.45am. VIPs and Press gather in front of the door.

On the spirit of the biennial, its zeitgeist and the oft-heard ‘It’s a museum show, not a biennale’, Dan Fox of frieze writes: "During the opening week, I wondered why I felt like giving little more than a shrug of the shoulders whenever I heard the criticism that ‘It’s a museum show, not a biennale’. Long gone are the days when a show such as this – or for example the Sao Paulo Bienal, or the Whitney Biennial – would be the one of the few opportunities one would have to be brought up to speed on the latest art being made in various parts of the world."

With regards to the exhibition design and parcour, Paddy Johnson of Art F City rightly notes that "the grandeur of the Arsenale was greatly diminished through near-obsessive wall building. That decision kept the architecture from overwhelming the work, a godsend to the biennale, which has historically been burdened by relying on spectacle to compete with the architecture." New York-based architect Annabelle Selldorf reconfigured the space into a museum-like suite of  white cube galleries projecting large walls that covered almost entirely the populated columns in the Arsenale, hidding its (rather charming) crumbling walls. This made the visitor focus on the many paintings, drawings and vitrines on display.
Room 1, Arsenale: Auriti's model welcomes visitors in the first room of the Arsenale. Behind one can observe the high walls built to 'block' the grandeur of the Corderie spaces.

Room 1, Arsenale: J. D. 'Okhai Ojeikere's black and white photos of Nigerian women's hairstyles and head wrappings accompanies Auriti's architectural model.

Vincenzo Latronico introduces the linearity of the exhibition: "Gioni’s exhibition focuses on the encyclopedia as an idiosyncratic struggle—the impossible, yet nonetheless deeply human attempt at knowing the structures of the world. The part of the exhibition taking place in the Arsenale is linear and suggests a possible evolution of the way this structure has been imagined. It opens with the Palazzo Enciclopedico, a utopian architectural model for a museum of all human knowledge, patented in 1955 by Marino Auriti, a retired car mechanic. It closes with a sequence of chaotic and overcrowded video works (most notably Stan VanDerBeek’s immersive 1968 Movie Mural), offering a stark rendition of how such encyclopedias have been approximated by the Internet."
 

Room 13, Arsenale: Stan VanDerBeek’s 1968 Movie Mural closes the linear section in the Arsenale (though strictly speaking the show finishes with Walter de Maria's 'Apollo's Ecstasy' (below, Room 16) from 1990, a loan from the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam). More photos of De Maria's piece via Contemporary Art Daily.


Centering on the much-discussed inclusion of "professional/insider" and "outsider" artists, Holland Cotter argues that the "The outsider art concept is tired by now, even ethically suspect, the equivalent of “primitive art” from decades ago. Mr. Gioni finesses the problem without really addressing it by integrating outsider-ish-looking inside art (there’s more and more of this around) so the two designations get blurred." 

Cotter continues "with a blend of insider-outsider and art-nonart components, it could have been stimulating. But the objects had little to say to one another. I feel a lack of surprise in Mr. Gioni’s show for the opposite reason: Its pairings — spiritualists paintings by af Klint and Emma Kunz, digital-printer abstractions by Alice Channer and Wade Guyton — are too neat and museumy. Yet at the same time, the show’s curatorial line is so firm, its choice of artists so strong and its pacing so expert that you are carried along, and ultimately rewarded."   

In an interview with Francesco Bonami, artistic director of the 2003 biennale, wittily argues that "crossing the line between insiders and outsiders is a very dangerous one" (...) "a lot of these artist—outsiders—were presented in a standard label, describing their pathologies, but I think it would have been interesting going a little farther (...) if you want to describe art through the pathology, it should have been presented as all artists are freaks. Like, Bruce Nauman, this guy is a freak that lives in Galisteo, [New Mexico], or Walter De Maria is a freak that lives in a power station in Manhattan, in a small space with a space heater. I mean, that would be, maybe, a fair thing to do, but it would not have been allowed, probably, as an insider artist. So I think that is the only critique that I can bring, that the outsider artists at the end they are presented, but also taken advantage of."
   Room 3, Central Pavilion: Hilma af Klint (wall) and Roger Hiorns (floor) "atomised" altar from and English church. [See profile of the artists]

 
 
Room 12, Arsenale: Alice Channer's digitally stretched images anchored at the floor by slabs of marble.


During a recent Q&A with Gioni at the ICA in London in March 2013, an interesting question arose from a member of the public about interpretative materials, and how the wonderful history that each work encapsulates was going to be received by the viewer. Gioni responed that he was inspired by a show he saw curated by Roger Buergel where the captions created a parallel narrative rather than utilising a more didactic tone, and he has since been writing "extended captions" in collaboration with artist and writer Chris Wiley.

The choice of the works by more contemporary artists often has a outsider "look" that is often played-up by these captions. Such is the case with Eva Kotátková (video here), whose rather beautiful "Asylum" (2013) installation is described as a piece in which she "collaborated with patients at the Bohnice pshychiatric hospital outside Prague, resulting in an installation based on the social hierarchies and modes of communication envisioned by the patients" (Exhibition Guide, text by Rachel Wetzler).

 Room 21, Central Pavilion: Eva Kotátková's "Asylum" (2013), shares room with Anna Zemánková's drawings (wall).

To this much-debated insider-outsider wrangle, Dan Fox of frieze adds: "perhaps Gioni did stack the number of artists expressing dense personal cosmologies rather high in places throughout the show – at points it was a little like going to a party where every guest wishes to corner you and talk intensely about their definition of the universe rather than ask you how you’re doing – but I was never short of something to discover, think about, learn from, agree with or push against."


 Room 7, Central Pavilion: Oliver Croy and Oliver Elser's The 387 Houses of Peter Fritz (1976–1992).

Adrian Searle writes humourously about the exhibition's megalomaniac ambitions: "You expect Gioni to leap out of Auriti's tiered architectural cake of a building yelling: "Today we curate the biennale! Tomorrow, the world!"" He then continues, "throughout Gioni's exhibition, we are asked where meaning lies. So many artists here seem to be speaking private languages only they can understand: here is a Theosophist, there is a Shaker, and over there are some horrible occult tarot drawings by Aleister Crowley, the satanist once described as the most evil man in the world... What unites this vast rag-bag of sculptures, tantric blobs, errant modernists with esoteric beliefs, and outsiders who fill drawing after drawing with lurching interior worlds, is a sense that everyone here is trying to make sense of the incomprehensible. Much of the time, they just add to it."


 Room 10, Central Pavilion: Enrico David's recent work with distended figures, totemic sculptures and patterned tapestries. More views via Contemporary Art Daily.

An important question is raised by Bonami in the interview: "How to avoid geographic flattening, in which everything from everywhere is thrown in? But then how do you avoid that kind of flattening with respect to history? How do you achieve historical specificity? That is the challenge if you are adopting a Wunderkammer, or encyclopedic, approach." To which Gioni responds "well, it might resemble digital Wunderkammer, or computer desktops." Something to keep in mind...

Room 5, Central Pavilion: (Vitrine) Ron Nagle's moon-rock formations and coral-like spires; (Walls) Anonymous Tantric Paintings produced between the 1960s-2004.

Starting with the Central Pavilion (previously called the "Padiglione Italia"), Vincenzo Latronico
writes in Art Agenda that "one of the Giardini’s most delicate rooms, for instance, displayed French Surrealist Roger Caillois’s collection of over a hundred rare geodes—their flamboyantly colored geometrical patterns and crystalline structures arranged in progressions, suggesting both a museum of natural history and the visionary maps of an alien landscape."


Room 14, Central Pavilion: Collection of Roger Caillois rocks from the Musée National d'Histoire Naturelle in Paris. Caillois shares room with Guo Fengyi, whose ballpoint pen, pencil and ink drawings she created to alleviate her acute arthritis.

Vincenzo Latronico also highlights another central piece: Peter Fischli and David Weiss’s Plötzlich diese Übersicht (1981–), "a collection of over a hundred small clay sculptures offering a depiction of the world through an arbitrary selection of significant minor events. From Einstein’s parents staged at the moment after the conception of their son, to Jacques Lacan first seeing himself in a mirror at age two; from a group of potatoes (asking how they ever got to Europe) to Jagger and Jones going home satisfied after writing “I can’t get no satisfaction” it is an ironic and yet oddly sensitive encyclopedia of banal mysteries and everyday epiphanies. The display, however, is particularly significant. In 2008, when Gioni showed the piece in a Fischli and Weiss retrospective he curated in Milan, he arranged the sculptures’ individual plinths in a linear sequence of groups, suggesting both an intrinsic order and a path the viewer could follow to obtain a complete experience of the work. In the Biennale, however, these are scattered around the room, giving the labyrinthine feeling of a mass of knowledge that could never be fully apprehended."

Room 13 (upper level), Central Pavilion: Peter Fischli & David Weiss, 'Suddenly This Overview' (1981–2012).

Another absorbing piece in the Central Pavilion is Kohei Yoshiyuki series of black-and-white infrared film photographs “The Park” (1971–1979) in which the artist photographed unaware couples having sex in parks at night. An interesting piece of context is that the pictures where originally presented in a dark gallery, offering the possibility of recreating the gloom depicted and making viewers complicit in the act.


Room 17, Central Pavilion: Kohei Yoshiyuki, “The Park” (1971–1979).

Writing about this years's Golden Lion awardees, Amy Sherlock points out that music features heavily in the encyclopedic video Grosse Fatigue (2013) by French artist Camille Henrot in which "computer windows showing photographs, video clips and morphing Wikipedia pages flicker and accumulate to a pulsing baseline whose steady tempo links a primitive, cardiac rhythm with the heady erotic charge of the dancefloor."


Room 3, Arsenale: Still of Grosse Fatigue (2013) by Camille Henrot.

"Tino Seghal picked up a Golden Lion as best participant in the main pavilion for his piece in which performers sit on the floor, beatboxing, singing and humming in a shifting melody of voice and rhythm."


Room 2, Central Pavilion: Tino Sehgal shared room with Rudolf Steiner's blackboards filled with coloured chalk (background).

Also in the Central Pavilion, Italian Marisa Merz and Austrian Maria Lassnig, Golden Lions for Lifetime Achievement of the 55th International Art Exhibition, share room 24. See video of the award cerimony. [More photos of Marisa Merz via Contemporary Art Daily.]



In the above-mentioned interview with Bonami, Gioni described that "a few artists in the show will use theatrical stagings or, simply, live actors. But I think of these less as performances than as living sculptures. Tino Sehgal is making a new piece, comprising a mise-en-scène with other works in the main pavilion. It’s on a smaller scale than his most recent works, but it is going to be quite intense. (...) John Bock is creating an installation that will include actors speaking in imaginary languages and what he calls a “house of maggots."
(Above) John Bock's 'Above the Point of Glowing Silence', a 2013 work commissioned by the Biennale at the Giardino delle Vergini. More views of his installation via Contemporary Art Daily.

Sam Thorne: "The Arsenale – the stronger half of the exhibition, I think – is episodic, even insistently narrativizing in its form. It tracks a kind of evolutionary process. The beginning, for example, is pointedly about beginnings of different kinds – Stefan Bertalan’s drawings of the life cycle of a sunflower or the whole of R. Crumb’s illustrated Book of Genesis. Indeed, the refrain of a great new film by Camille Henrot is ‘In the beginning…’ These early stages are also filled with animals and evocations of the natural world: Eliot Porter’s exquisite 1950s photos of birds in flight, Christopher Williams’ forensic photos of Harvard’s collection of glass flowers (1989)."   



Room 2, Arsenale: Christopher Williams, Angola to Vietnam* (1989). A suite of 28 gelatin silver prints of glass flowers from Harvard's Ware Collection portraying the hyperrrealistic glass specimens made by Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka. 


Room 6, Arsenale: R. Crumb's 207 pages of 'The Book of Genesis' (2009).

Having not seen Gioni's much-celebrated '10,000 Lives', 8th Gwangju Biennial (2010), we asked to those who had seen it for their impressions. Back then, Gioni also described it as an exhibition that dealt with ‘our obsession with images’ and has referred to 'The Encyclopedic Palace' as a continuation of this exhibition model proposed in 2010. In Gwangju, Gioni also included several of the works also exhibited in Venice: Shinro Ohtake's scrapbooks (1983); Paul McCarthy’s Children’s Anatomical Educational Figure (1980); Eliot Porter’s colour dye-transfer prints of birds caught in flight; and repeated numerous participating artists such as Dahn Vo, Bruce Nauman, Carl Andre, Stan VanDerBeek, Fischli & Weiss, Aurélien Froment, Morton Bartlett, Dieter Roth, Ryan Trecartin, Christopher Williams, James Lee Byars, Matt Mullican, João Maria Gusmão and Pedro Paiva, Henrik Olesen, Hito Steyerl, Maria Lassnig, Emma Kunz, Mark Leckey, Pawel Althamer, Tino Sehgal and Cindy Sherman, amongst others (see Gwangju images here).

Room 13 (lower level), Central pavilion: Shinro Ohtake's obsessive scrapbooks produced since 1977.
Room 8, Arsenale: Aurélien Froment's new work "Camillo's Idea" (2013), a film featuring a mnemonist in the Teatro Olimpico in Vicenza who demonstrates her own feats of memory and recites the history of mnemonics from teh system devised by Greek lyric poet Simonides of Ceos to Giulio Camillo's Fifteenth-century "Theater of Memory". (Exhibition guide, Text by Chris Wiley)

Room 5, Arsenale: Danh Vo installation with an imported colonial-era Catholic Church from Vietnam. [More photos of his installation via Contemporary Art Daily.]

Room 9, Arsenale: Pawel Althamer's 90 "sci-fi" sculptures with masks of Venetian citizens and plastic bodies are one of the downers of the Arsenale. As Adrian Searle warned "watch out for Pawel Althamer's room of flayed figures, and avoid them if you can."

It would seem that Gwangju's "unauthorized, partial reconstruction and unannounced tribute" of Mike Kelley's 1993 'The Uncanny' exhibition is in Venice echoed with the invitation extended to Cindy Sherman, who curated an excellent show-within-a-show in the Arsenale (Room 10). Sam Thorne describes it as a space with "figures of all shapes and sizes: signature pieces by Charles Ray, Duane Hanson and George Condo, some slightly more surprising inclusions like John Outterbridge and Jimmie Durham, through to Haitian vodou flags and even Sherman’s personal collection of photo albums. It’s quite a coup."    


Vitrines with Shermans' collection of photo albums.


Other highlights (unfortunately not all with photo-documentation to accompany): Tamar Guimarães and Kasper Akhøj's 16mm film examining a map created by a member of Brazil's Spiritists community, one of the few intimate moments in the Arsenale; João Maria Gusmão and Pedro Paiva's immersive room with 16mm projectors presenting a new repertoire of films shot in Mozambique; Eduard Spelterini's black and white 1890s photographs of his ballooning expeditions; Sharon Hayes' video [see interview here] inspired by Pier Paolo Passolini's 1965 documentary Comizi D'amore, in which the artist interviews American women students, executives, artists, poets about their sexuality; Rossella Biscotti's minimal sculptures produced in compost created in collaboration with the inmates of the women's prison in the Guidecca island, accompanied by an hour-long sound piece where the women describe their dreams [see interview here]; and Michael Schmidt's Lebensmitten [Food] (2006–10) photo series for which the artist spent four years documenting all aspects of industrial food production in Europe.

 Room 3, Arsenale: Eduard Spelterini's black and white 1890s photographs of his ballooning expeditions.

 Room 8, Arsenale: Michael Schidt's Lebensmitten [Food] (2006–10).

 Room 8, Arsenale: Sharon Hayes, 'Richerche: three', 2013. 23'

Hito Steyerl's tucked-away video in the Giardini delle Vergini, was certainly one of the best pieces in Gioni's exhibition. Michael Connor of Rhizome has written about the 14 min. video, describing it as an "instructional video informing viewers how to remain invisible in an age of image proliferation". (...) "In the context of the Venice Biennale, which explores the theme of human knowledge and its limits, this discussion brings up fundamental questions about how much of our knowledge is derived through representations of the world, through images and data, and the limits of such knowledge." [Read full text here]

Hito Steyerl, How Not to be Seen: A Fucking Didactic Educational .MOV File (2013).

 Erik van Lieshout's new work Healing (2013), an outdoor drive-in movie installation with a 5 meter LED screen, involves the artist' micro-cosmos: the work and ideals of his family members.

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All photos: Latitudes (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)




Report from the 2013 congress of the International Association of Curators of Contemporary Art (IKT) in Madrid, 18–21 April

The programme of the 2013 congress of IKT, the International Association of Curators of Contemporary Art, included meetings at the Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo in Móstoles as well as at Centro Cultural Matadero Madrid and the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, where the IKT Members Forum, Symposium and General Assembly were held.

"Curating Value", the topic of this year's symposium organised by Brussels-based independent curator Zoë Gray, included the participation of Barnabás Bencsik (the recently forced-out director of the Ludwig Museum in Budapest), French artist Pierre Bismuth, Spanish curator and consultant María de Corral, London-based curator and theorist Dr. Simon Sheikh and Greek artist and Athens Biennial co-director, Poka-Yio

Following is our photo diary documenting a few moments of these five days in Madrid alongside the organisers' schedule, starting the Pre-Congress programme on Thursday afternoon with a first meeting at Espacio Trapézio at the Mercado de San Antón and ending on Monday morning with the Post-Congress programme which included studio visits to Fernando Sánchez Castillo and Cristina Lucas.

Friday, 19th April 2013
 
Buses depart from Plaza del Emperador Carlos V/ Atocha (opposite the renowned El Brillante bar) for Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo (CA2M) in Móstoles. 



IKT Members Forum. Opening of the congress, welcome and greetings.


Each of the +/- 120 members and guests had 90 seconds to introduce themselves to the rest and quickly explain what projects they were currently developing.

Exhibition visits: Pop Politics: Activismos a 33 revoluciones curated by Iván López Munuera and Hailil Altindere curated by CA2M Director, Ferran Barenblit.

Lyota Yagi, Vinyl (2005) plays the melodies of Debussy's “Clair de Lune” and “Moon River” by Johnny Mercer and Henry Mancini on a record player from a record made of ice created with a silicon mould.


Lunch offered by CA2M at the Terrace.

Buses depart for Fundación Banco Santander (Boadilla del Monte) to visit the exhibition "Out of the House. Contemporary Art Cranford Collection", curated by Anne Pontégnie and Muriel Salem.


 Sci-Fi-like building of the Fundación Banco Santander in the Ciudad Financiera, Boadilla del Monte.


The exhibition space holds a collection of Spanish currency. Here, the last pesetas notes that used to circulate before 2002.


 View of the galleries presenting London's Cranford Collection. Holdings include mostly British art (Sarah Lucas, Rachel Whiteread, Damien Hirst, Phil Collins, Paul Noble, Eva Rothschild, Rebecca Warren, Gillian Wearing), but also pieces by Franz West, Albert Oehlen, Martin Kippenberger, Pierre Huyghe and Thomas Schütte. 
You can also visit it virtually.


 More blue chip works, by Damien Hirst (Something or Nothing, 2004).


 Our Love Is Like the Flowers, the Rain, the Sea and the Hours, 2002 by Martin Boyce.

 (Foreground) Jim Lambie's Sweet Exorcist, 2005.

 (Foreground) Rebeca Warren, Log Lady, 2003.

Franz West, Appartment (2001)

Buses depart for Ivory Press. Exhibition visit: Ilya & Emilia Kabakov.


 Tour through Ivory Press' artist books production with heavy weights like Noguchi, Chillida, Kapoor, Kiefer, Bacon...


...and of course Damien Hirst (again). Here The Holy Trinity explained in percentages, a part of a much larger sculptural/archive piece produced by Ivory Press.

View of Ilya & Emilia Kabakov's show Vertical Paintings and Other Worlds.

Walk to Galería Liebre. Exhibition visit: Ideas y presupuestos. Curator: Martí Manen. 


Ideas and budgets for possible artworks by artists Sebastian Beyro, Black Tulip, Bonus Extra, Kalle Brolin, Priscila Fernandes, Guillem Juan Sancho, Sandra Paula Fernández, Ana García Pineda, Luis Pérez Calvo, Iratxe Jaio & Klaas van Gorkum, Laramascoto, Connie Mendoza, Carlos Motta, Carl Palm, Pepo Salazar, Yes.
 

Visit to the Tabacalera Espacio Promoción del Arte. Exhibition visit: José Manuel Ballester “Bosques de Luz”. Curators: María de Corral and Lorena Martínez de Corral.


Entrance to Tabacalera, Espacio Promoción de Arte.


Tabacalera also shares spaces with La Tabacalera Centro Social Autogestionado (follow @latabacalera), where over 30 organisations self-manage their own spaces sharing, garden areas, storage, a stage, bar facilities, etc.


Saturday, 20th April 2013

Caixaforum. Exhibition: 'Maestros del Caos. Artistas y Chamanes'.

Walk to Medialab Prado, Calle Alameda 15, which officially opened its doors a day before our visit.




Walk to La Casa Encendida, Ronda de Valencia 2.
Exhibitions: Generaciones 2013. Proyectos de Arte Caja Madrid.
Albert Oehlen, Moderne Farbkonzepte. Curator: Christian Domínguez.
 

Lunch offered by La Casa Encendida in their terrace.
 


Buses depart for Matadero Madrid, Plaza de Legazpi 1, 28045 Madrid. 


Manuela Villa, Head of Contents at Matadero introduces the different areas of the 80,000m2 of the former slaughterhouse and its programmes, including the Programa de Pensamiento Matadero Madrid; Intermediae Laboratory for the production of projects and social innovation and Archivo de Creadores (Documentation of 150 Madrid-based contemporary artists).


   Fernando García-Dory of Campo Adentro working at Matadero Madrid.

Archivo de Creadores de Madrid, offering "physical and online documentation on 150 young artists or collectives of 17 different nationalities with links to the city of Madrid."


 IKT Symposium “Curating Value” at the Cineteca.  

"Curating Value" symposium at the Cineteca, Matadero Madrid. 
Left to right: Zoë Gray, Pierre Bismuth, Dr. Simon Sheikh Poka-Yio, Maria de Corral and Barnabás Bencsik.

Exhibition visits. Abierto x Obras: Candela. Los Carpinteros . Curator: Manuela Villa; and Arqueológica, curated by Virginia Torrente. Followed by a dinner and party offered by Matadero Madrid.


Candela, site-specific work by Los Carpinteros at the Abierto x Obras space.


 Pedro Barateiro's piece The Negative Reader, 2012-13, included in the group exhibition Arqueológica in Nave 16.

  Mariana Castillo Deball, five dance costumes produced by artisans in Yautepec in Morelos, used to perform the Brinco de los Chinelos dance during the Carnival. Part of the group exhibition Arqueológica in Nave 16.

Sunday, 21th April 2013

IKT General Assembly in the Auditorio 200, Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía (MNCARS).  



One of the issues to discuss during the General Assembly was to decide on the next venue/city to host the IKT Congress 2014 and 2015. The members voted that CCA Derry-Londonderry would host the 2014 event (the bid included visiting the biennial Eva International in Limerick) and that Vienna's Kunsthalle Wien to host the following year.

Here Johan Lundh co-director of CCA Derry-Londonderry during his presentation for Derry-Londonderry to host the 2014 IKT Congress.

Exhibition visits: Colección I. 1900-1945; Colección II. 1945-1968; Colección III. 1962-1982; Cristina Iglesias; Robert Adams. el lugar donde vivimos. Una selección retrospectiva de fotografías; La invención concreta. Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros; and Azucena Vieites. (Programa Fisuras).


 Favourite Gego mobile, "Reticularea" (1973–76), in the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros. 

 Favourite Jesús Soto, "Pre-penetrable" from 1957 in the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros. 
 
Wonderful 1967 Tropicália by Hélio Oiticica in the "Colección III, 1962-1982" (above and below).

 
(End of congress & beginning of Post-Congress)
 

Afternoon gallery visits around c/ Doctor Fourquet:
 

NoguerasBlanchard, with the exhibition "Can’t Hear My Eyes" curated by Niekolaas Johannes Lekkerkerk.
 

MaisterraValbuena, with the exhibition "Entre lo fugitivo y lo infinito" curated by Anja Isabel Schneider.


Isidoro Valcárcel–Medina, Conducto, 2013. From the press release: "On the occasion of this exhibition project, Isidoro Valcárcel Medina proposes a site-specific intervention on the floor in the gallery’s entrance zone. With a critical, at times provocative stance towards the art market, voiced among others in Ley del Arte - Ley reguladora del ejercicio, disfrute y comercialización del Arte (1992), Valcárcel Medina’s work sees art and life interrelated, inviting the spectator above all to an experience."

García Galería with the exhibition "En la zona gris" curated by Virginia Torrente.


Joaquín García of García Galería introducing the meteorite piece by Belén Rodríguez González

Moisés Pérez Albéniz with an exhibition of Antoni Muntadas (below).
 


Helga de Alvear with an exhibition of works by Prudencio Irazabal.

Fúcares, with the exhibition "Escópico-Esconder(se)-Escaparcurated" by Juan Francisco Rueda.
 

Visit to artists studios at Rampa in the Carabanchel neighbourhood, Madrid.

Found photograph in the former car repair shop that existed before Rampa.
IKT members listening to Rampa's presentation and questions on curating and the artist-curator relationship.

Bus departs for Colección Inelcom at the Ciudad de la Imagen, Pozuelo de Alarcón, Madrid. Artistic direction of the collection: Vicente Todolí.



The circa 3,000m2 headquarters at Ciudad de la Imagen, hold 72 works by 24 artists, including Pavel Büchler, Anthony McCall, Markus Schinwald, Ernesto Neto, Sophie Calle, Kader Attia, Candice Breitz, Ceal Floyer, Fiona Tan and Fernando Bryce's 'Work in Progress' (2006) a suite of 80 ink drawings (below).


 
Monday, 22th April 2013 

Visit artists studios: Fernando Sánchez Castillo and Cristina Lucas.


How many curators can you fit in an artist studio?

Espacio Valverde group show included a work by Antonio R. Montesinos, one of the members of Rampa.


AVE back to Barcelona... end of journey.

All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)

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"Digression(s), Entry Point(s): An interview with Heman Chong", Singapore-based artist, curator and writer. Eighth in the #OpenCurating research series

 Cover of the interview. Photo: Joan Kee.


Interview available for download as a pdf or readable on ISSUU via Latitudes' web.

Heman Chong’s art practice is comprised of “an investigation into the philosophies, reasons and methods of individuals and communities imagining the future”. His ongoing project, The Lonely Ones, looks at the representation of solitude and the “last man on earth” genre in art, film and literature, and is the basis for a forthcoming novel entitled Prospectus. Chong’s recent solo exhibitions include LEM 1, Rossi & Rossi, London (2012), Calendars (2020–2096), NUSMuseum, Singapore (2011) and The Sole Proprietor and other Stories, Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou (2007). He has participated in numerous group exhibitions including the Asia Pacific Triennale 7 (2012), Performa 11 (2011), Momentum 6 (2011), Manifesta 8 (2010), Busan Biennale (2004), and the 50th Venice Biennale (2003) representing Singapore. Amonograph of his work entitled "The Part In The Story Where We Lost Count Of The Days", edited by Pauline J. Yao, will be published in June 2013 by ArtAsiaPacific

The interview was initiated at Spring Workshop, Hong Kong, in the context of Chong’s invitation to Latitudes to make a curatorial residency as part of Moderation(s), a year-long series of programming between Spring and Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam. "Digression(s), Entry Point(s): An interview with Heman Chong" also includes a guest spot with Gotherburg-based artist and writer Anthony Marcellini.

Follow:
@LTTDS 
#OpenCurating 
@HemanChong
#Moderations

ABOUT #OPENCURATING

Drawing on the emerging practices of so-called 'Open Journalism' – which seek to better collaborate with and use the ability of anyone to publish and share#OpenCurating is a research project that investigates how contemporary art projects may function beyond the traditional format of exhibition-and-catalogue. #OpenCurating is concerned with new forms of interaction between publics – whether online followers or physical visitors – with artworks and their production, display and discursive context.

The project is articulated around a series of ten new interviews with curators, artists, writers and online strategists published as a free digital edition [read here the published ones so far], a Twitter discussion moderated around the hashtag #OpenCurating and an public conversation with Dia Art Foundation curator which took place at MACBA on the 19 February.

#OpenCurating is a research project by Latitudes produced through La Capella. BCN Producció 2012 of the Institut de Cultura de Barcelona. 










Content partners: Walker Art Center

 



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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




#OpenCurating: "Latitudes in conversation with Yasmil Raymond", Curator, Dia Art Foundation, New York. Tuesday 19 February, 19:30h. Auditori MACBA, Barcelona

Dia Art Foundation curator, Yasmil Raymond. Photo: Lina Bertucci

| ENG |
 
"Latitudes in conversation with Yasmil Raymond" 

Tuesday 19 February 2013, 19:30h
Auditori MACBA, Barcelona
Free admission. Limited seating. With simultaneous translation.

This event is part of Latitudes' ongoing #OpenCurating research, which analyses the implications of Web 2.0, participation and transparency for contemporary art production and programming. The core of #OpenCurating is formed through a series of interviews, freely available online, most recently with Steven ten Thije (Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven), Sònia López and Anna Ramos (MACBA, Barcelona), and Badlands Unlimited (New York).

The conversation with Dia Art Foundation's curator Yasmil Raymond will address Dia's historical identity, the evolving role of the curator, and Raymond's vision in commissioning and preserving art projects. The dialogue will be later transcribed and published as the seventh interview of the #OpenCurating research series.

The evening will incorporate "crowd-sourced" questions by the public previously solicited via Twitter (hashtag #OpenCurating) and Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/LTTDS).

Yasmil Raymond has been Curator at the Dia Art Foundation since 2009, where she has organized exhibitions and projects with artists such as Jean-Luc Moulène (2012); Yvonne Rainer (2011-12); Koo Jeong A (2010-11); Franz Erhard Walther (2010-2012); and Trisha Brown (2009-10). Prior to joining Dia, Raymond worked at the Walker Art Center (2004–2009) in Minneapolis where she organized solo exhibitions with Tomás Saraceno (2009), Tino Sehgal (2007) and group exhibitions including Abstract Resistance (2010); Brave New Worlds (2007, co-curated with Doryun Chong). Raymond studied at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago (1999) and the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College (2004).

As a non-profit institution founded in 1974, the Dia Art Foundation is renowned for initiating, supporting, presenting, and preserving art projects. Between 1987 and 2004, the Dia Center for the Arts in Chelsea, New York, saw presented site-specific exhibitions and projects including those by Robert Gober, Jenny Holzer, Jorge Pardo and Pierre Huyghe. Dia:Beacon opened in 2003 in upstate New York, as the home for Dia’s distinguished collection of art from the 1960s to the present. Dia Art Foundation maintains long-term, site-specific projects including Walter De Maria’s The New York Earth Room (1977) and The Broken Kilometer (1979), Max Neuhaus’s Times Square (1977), Joseph Beuys’s 7000 Eichen (7000 Oaks) (1988), and Dan Flavin’s untitled (1996), all in Manhattan; the Dan Flavin Art Institute in Bridgehampton, New York; De Maria’s The Vertical Earth Kilometer (1977) in Kassel, Germany; Robert Smithson’s Spiral Jetty (1970) in the Great Salt Lake, Utah; and De Maria’s The Lightning Field (1977) in Quemado, New Mexico. Currently Dia is developing a project space on West 22nd Street in New York City.


#OpenCurating is a research project by Latitudes produced through BCN Producció 2012. La Capella, Barcelona City Council.   


 






Content partner: Walker Art Center, Minneapolis / walkerart.org





Related posts:
"Host and Ambassador: A Conversation with Yasmil Raymond" Curator of Dia Art Foundation, New York. Seventh in the #OpenCurating research series (7 March 2013)


| ES |

"Latitudes conversa con Yasmil Raymond"

Martes 19 de febrero, 19:30h
Auditori MACBA, BarcelonaEntrada gratuita. Aforo limitado. Con traducción simultánea.  

Este evento es parte del proyecto de investigación #OpenCurating de Latitudes, enfocado en el análisis de las implicaciones de la web 2.0, así como la expectación de participación y transparencia, en la producción y programación de arte contemporáneo. El núcleo de #OpenCurating consiste en una serie de diez entrevistas, disponibles en línea y gratuitas, con artistas, comisarios y escritores tales como Steven ten Thije (Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven), Sònia López and Anna Ramos (MACBA, Barcelona), y Badlands Unlimited (Nueva York).  

La conversación con la comisaria del Dia Art Foundation, Yasmil Raymond se centrará en la identidad histórica del Dia, la evolución del rol del comisario y la visión de Raymond en el encargo y el comisariado de proyectos artísticos. La charla será posteriormente transcrita y se publicará como la séptima entrevista en la serie #OpenCurating .

La sesión incorporará preguntas previamente enviadas por el público a través de Twitter (@LTTDS con hashtag #OpenCurating) y Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/LTTDS).

Yasmil Raymond ha sido Comisaria del Dia Art Foundation en Nueva York desde el 2009, donde ha organizado exposiciones y proyectos de artistas como Jean-Luc Moulène (2012); Yvonne Rainer (2011–12); Ian Wilson (2011–13); Robert Whitman (2011); Koo Jeong A (2010-11) (2010-11); Franz Erhard Walther (2010-2012); y Trisha Brown (2009–10). Anteriormente Raymond trabajó en el Walker Art Center en Minneapolis, donde organizó exposiciones individuals de Tomás Saraceno (2009), Tino Sehgal (2007) y exposiciones colectivas como Abstract Resistance (2010); Statements: Beuys, Flavin, Judd (2008); y Brave New Worlds (2007, co-comisariada con Doryun Chong). Raymond estudió en The School of the Art Institute of Chicago (1999) y cursó un máster en el Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College (2004).

Como institución sin ánimo de lucro fundada en el año 1974, el Dia Art Foundation es conocida por haber iniciado, apoyado, presentado y preservado proyectos artísticos. Entre 1987 y 2004, el Dia Center for the Arts en Chelsea, Nueva York, presentó exposiciones y proyectos site-specific de Robert Gober, Jenny Holzer, Jorge Pardo y Pierre Huyghe, entre otros. Dia: Beacon abrió sus puertas en 2003 en el norte del estado de Nueva York, como sede de la distinguida colección de arte desde la década de 1960 hasta la actualidad. Dia Art Foundation mantiene proyectos a largo plazo en sitios específicos tales como The New York Earth Room (1977) y The Broken Kilometer (1979) ambos de Walter De Maria; Times Square (1977) de Max Neuhaus, 7000 Eichen (7000 Oaks) (1988) de Joseph Beuys; untitled (1996) de Dan Flavin, todos en Manhattan; el Dan Flavin Art Institute in Bridgehampton, Nueva York; The Vertical Earth Kilometer (1977) de Walter De Maria en Kassel, Alemania; Spiral Jetty (1970) de Robert Smithson en Great Salt Lake, Utah; y The Lightning Field (1977) Walter De Maria  en Quemado, Nuevo Mexico. En la actualidad, Dia está desarrollando un espacio para proyectos en la calle West 22nd de Nueva York. 

#OpenCurating es un proyecto de investigación de Latitudes producido por La Capella. BCN Producció 2012 del Institut de Cultura de Barcelona. 


 







Content partner: Walker Art Center, Minneapolis / walkerart.org





Contenido relacionado:"Host and Ambassador: A Conversation with Yasmil Raymond" Curator of Dia Art Foundation, New York. Seventh in the #OpenCurating research series (7 de marzo 2013)




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Interview with Steven ten Thije, Research Curator, Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, sixth in the #OpenCurating research series

Play Van Abbe, Part 2: Time Machine (10 April–24 September 2010). Curated by Steven ten Thije (guest curator) and Diana Franssen, Curator and Head of Research. Exhibition view of: Raum der Gegenwart, (1930) 2009 scale 1:1, various materials. Installation: 430 x 860 x 610 cm. Collection Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, The Netherlands. Photo: Peter Cox, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.

As Research Curator at the Van Abbemuseum, in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, Steven ten Thije is part of the team of one the first public museums for contemporary art to be established in Europe. Under the directorship of Charles Esche since 2004, the museum has defined itself through "an experimental approach towards art’s role in society", where "openness, hospitality and knowledge exchange are important". Ten Thije is also a lecturer and researcher at the University of Hildesheim, Germany, where he is studying for a doctorate in the genealogical analysis of the exhibition curator. He was co-curator of the Spirits of Internationalism (Van Abbemuseum, 2012), and alongside Esche, with curators Christiane Berndes, Annie Fletcher, and Diana Franssen, he was guest curator of Play Van Abbe (2011). Subtitled The museum in the 21st Century, this was a four-part multifaceted programme of exhibitions, research and events in which the Van Abbemuseum reflected on the meaning and role of the art museum. Using its collection to articulate questions about the public's reaction to art and its contexts, the Van Abbemuseum probed its own history and purpose alongside how cultural production has reflected the social and political dynamics of the last twenty years.





ABOUT #OPENCURATING

Drawing on the emerging practices of so-called 'Open Journalism' – which seek to better collaborate with and use the ability of anyone to publish and share#OpenCurating is a research project that investigates how contemporary art projects may function beyond the traditional format of exhibition-and-catalogue. #OpenCurating is concerned with new forms of interaction between publics – whether online followers or physical visitors – with artworks and their production, display and discursive context.

The project is articulated around a series of ten new interviews with curators, artists, writers and online strategists published as a free digital edition [read here the published ones so far], a Twitter discussion moderated around the hashtag #OpenCurating and a finissage event in Barcelona (date TBA).

#OpenCurating is a research project by Latitudes produced through La Capella. BCN Producció 2012 of the Institut de Cultura de Barcelona. 










Content partners: Walker Art Center

 




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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




Gustav Metzger's RAF / Reduce Art Flights campaign initiative changes URL to www.reduceartflights.lttds.org


The website established for RAF / Reduce Art Flights in conjunction with the Latitudes-curated group exhibition 'Greenwashing. Environment: Perils, Promises and Perplexities' can now be found at a sub-domain of our site www.reduceartflights.lttds.org. The previous URL (reduceartflights.com) is no longer in operation.

The content is the same however, the main feature being a 12 minute interview with Gustav Metzger, initiator of the campaign, conducted by Emma Ridgway (now curator at RSA Arts & Ecology) as well the catalogue entry text by Max Andrews of Latitudes.



Page of the exhibition catalogue. Purchase the book via Motto.




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