Photo report: Trip to Vienna Art Week and Amsterdam Art Weekend

A snowy Belvederegarten. All photos (unless stated otherwise): Latitudes.

As part of this year’s VIENNA ART WEEK, Latitudes was invited to get to know Vienna's art scene over the course of three days (19–21 November). On Tuesday 19 November, the visiting group of curators and artists participated in the panel ‘Some Current Positions of Curating’ at das weisse haus. The panel, chaired by Alexandra Gausman of das weisse haus, briefly introduced recent projects by Argentinian artists Guillermo Faivovich & Nicolás Goldberg; soon-to-be Paris-based curator Claire Hoffmann (Centre Culturel Suisse de Paris); artists and curators FICTILIS from San Francisco; Avi Lubin (Faculty at Jerusalem’s Beit Berl College); and Stephanie Weber (Curator of Contemporary Art at Lembachhaus in München).

Above and below photos: eSeL.

Grand staircase of the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna.

(Above and nine below) Views from the exhibition ‘Spitzmaus Mummy in a Coffin and other Treasures’ guest curated by filmmaker Wes Anderson and writer and illustrator Juman Malouf, in collaboration with Jasper Sharp (Kunsthistorisches Museum) and Mario Mainetti (Fondazione Prada). ‘Anderson and Malouf have assembled more than 400 objects drawn from all fourteen of the museum’s historical collections. Among them are Egyptian, Greek and Roman antiquities, Old Master paintings, selections from the Kunstkammer and the Imperial Treasury, items from the Imperial Armoury, Coin Collection, and Collection of Historic Musical Instruments, as well as pieces from the Theatermuseum, the Weltmuseum, the Imperial Carriage Museum, and Schloss Ambras Innsbruck. A handful of special guests from the Natural History Museum are also included. Particular attention was given to the museum’s storage: more than 350 of the objects have been brought from depots, with many of them on public display for the very first time. (...) The gathering and arrangement of these treasures – from the earliest, a necklace of ceramic beads strung together in Ancient Egypt, to the most recent, a wooden monkey carved in Indonesia almost 5,000 years later – suggest the spectacular breadth, depth, history and complexity of the Kunsthistorisches Museum’s collections.’ (from the venue website)


(Above and below) Donna Huanca exhibition ˝Piedra quemada˝ at the Lower Belvedere.

 (Above and two below) One of the rooms at the Naturhistorisches Museum (NHM). Below Faivovich and Goldberg intervention ˝In Search of Mesón de Fierro˝, part of their long-term research on meteorites at El Chaco region in northern Argentina. For the exhibition, they presented a 19-gram fragment in a meteorite in the collection of the NHM Vienna, which they were able to trace quite convincingly to Mesón de Fierro.

(Above and three below) On our own time, we arranged a visit to the artist-run-space Guimarães. Hugo Canoilas, one of the artists that run it alongside Nicola Pecoraro and Christoph Meier, gave us a detailed tour of the show which explored the concept of excessive sentimentality. ‘SCHMALTZ’ showcased unique editions, amusing finds, objects that accompany artists in their studio, as well as artworks by over 50 artists. 
A special edition of Luisa Gardini's photos. 

(Above and four below) Views from ‘55 dates. Highlights of the MUMOK collection’, presenting 55 works with an exhibition design by (Portscapes artist) Hans Schabus.
(Above and below) Also at MUMOK, "a photographic journey through Austrian history from 1918 to the present" was the focus of ‘Photo/Politics/Austria’ this time with exhibition design by Markus Schinwald.

 (Above and two below) Views from Asier Mendizábal's solo exhibition at Galerie Martin Janda.

 At the nearby Kunsthalle Wien, Vanessa Joan Müller and Nicolas Schafhausen curated ‘Antarctica. An Exhibition on Alienation’, showing works by Viltė Bražiūnaitė / Tomas Sinkevičius, Burak Delier, Buck Ellison, Isabella Fürnkäs, Eva Giolo, Thibaut Henz, Jan Hoeft, Hanne Lippard, Joanna Piotrowska, Jeroen de Rijke / Willem de Rooij, Jana Schulz, Andrzej Steinbach, Ingel Vaikla, Peter Wächtler, Ian Wallace and Tobias Zielony. ˝The exhibition explores how the term “alienation” functions in our world today. In doing so, it also addresses the following question: What other forms of relationship to the self and to the world do we need? Before we can even begin to create something like a space supportive of self-determination and self-realization?" (from the venue website)

 One of the nine studio visits at Prater Ateliers. Here with Christian Kosmas Mayer. 
Studio visit with Judith Fegerl at Prater Ateliers.

 Tour by curator Moritz Stipsicz of Tomás Saraceno's intervention in the baroque Karlskirche in Karlsplatz. 
 Views of Karlsplatz and Vienna skyline from the cupola.

 (Above and three below) Ed Ruscha's ‘Double Americanisms’ at Secession
(Above) Detail from Philipp Timischl's ‘Artworks For All Age Groups’ in the downstairs galleries of Secession.
(Above) View of Kris Lemsalu's ‘Keys Open Doors’ in the upper Secession gallery.

On November 22, we took off to Amsterdam taking advantage of the Amsterdam Art Week events which included the Rijksakademie open, the opening of two exhibitions at Stedelijk Museum (a solo show by Raquel van Haver and the biannual group exhibition presenting Amsterdam’s Municipal Art Acquisitions, ‘Freedom of Movement’). We also visited De Appel, kunstverein, Rongwrong, a few galleries that opened jointly.


(Above and below) De Appel exhibited Ben Russel's film ‘Good luck’ (2017) premiered during documenta 13. ‘Accompanying the installation, the artist created a sculptural analogue to process and portraiture, Good Luck (Echo) that turns a sheet of copper into a resonant, speaking subject.’ (from the venue website)


 Mr Peanut exhibition at kunstverein Amsterdam, gathering material from Vincent Trasov who became Mr. Peanut in 1971. In 1974 he ran for mayor of Vancouver. ‘The exhibition traces the history of Trasov’s revolutionary alias and includes historical documents, publications, correspondence, video footage as well as more recent drawings of Mr. Peanut and paintings by Vincent Trasov. A major retrospective on Image Bank will follow in the summer of 2019 at Kunst-Werke in Berlin.’


 (Above and below) Works by Cees Mogami de Haas.

 (Above and below) Works by Riet Wijnen.

 (Above and below) Works by Marieke Zwart.

 (Above and below) Works by Morgan Courtois.

  (Above and below) Works by Marina Xenofontos.

 (Above and below) Works by Mire Lee.

  (Above and below) Works by Omar A. Chowdhury.

 (Above and below) Works by Maurice van Es.

  (Above and below) Works by Isabelle Andriessen.


  (Above and below) Works by Omar Vega Macotela.

   (Above and below) A film by Tyna Adebowale.

 (Above and below) Works by Josse Pyl. 

  (Above and below) Works by Gaëlle Choisne.

  (Above and below) Works by Dan Zhu.

  (Above and below) Works by Danielle Dean.

 (Above and below) Works by Polina Kani.

  (Above and below) Works by Femke Herregraven.

  (Above and below) Works by Kévin Bray.

  (Above and below) Library display initiated by Anna Dasovic. 

(Above) Exhibition by Paul Kooiker at the tegenboschvanvreden gallery.

 Gabriel Lester exhibition at Fons Welters, Amsterdam. 

 Lara Almarcegui's video at Ellen de Bruijne. 
 Rory Pilgrim exhibition at andriesse eyck.

 Talk with Janet Cardiff at Oude Kerk. Below her work, with Georges Bures Miller, an intervened mellotron ‘The Instrument of Troubled Dreams˝ (2018), with 72 keys each of them programmed with a sound effect, a vocal track or a musical fragment.


(Above and four below) Stedelijk Collection in the basement of the museum. 

 (Above and two below) Metahaven exhibition at the Stedelijk Museum.

Merlin Carpenter exhibition at Rongwrong.


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Photo report: Trip to London and Oxford


 (Above and four below) Cinthia Marcelle's "The Family in Disorder" (2018) at Museum and Modern Art Oxford.


(Above and below) The magnificent main hall of the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford.

 An example of Micronesian currency – we're reminded of our extended conversation with Melbourne-based artist Nicholas Mangan published in his 2016 Sternberg Press publication "Limits to growth" (and also during Chisenhale's live conversation and while chasing Ancient Lights).


(Above and below) These column capitals are the main reasons we visited Oxford. They were carved for the Oxford Museum of Natural History in 1859-60 by Irish brothers James and John O'Shea, along with their nephew Edward Whelan. Commissioned by John Ruskin, all the works were carved freestyle, without previous sketches, using only plant specimens from the botanical garden, and their sheer imagination, as references.

They are the protagonists of Sean Lynch's 2013 piece "A Blow by Blow Account of Stonecarving in Oxford", which we have been discussing with Sean for a while and finally saw in 2015 in Bordeaux. We continued learning more about this piece and its making during our joint adventure in Banff's "Geologic Time" residency programme last Fall. 


 (Above) Apostolos Georgiou, "FROM MY HEART" at Rodeo Gallery.

 (Above and 3 below) Leonor Antunes's "a thousand realities from an original mark" at Marian Goodman.
 Polycarbonate and brass screens and rope sculptures. Each screen corresponds to the exact measurements of one of the glass panels in the Upper Lawn Pavilion in Wiltshire, built between 1959 and 1962 by the British architects Alison and Peter Smithson (1928-1993 and 1923-2003).


(Above) Tacita Dean's "Landscape" exhibition premiered "Antigone", a new 1-hour long film and cloud paintings at The Royal Academy. Part 2 and 3 in the National Portrait Gallery (a retrospective of portrait films works) and at the National Gallery a two-room exhibition curated by the artist presents a selection of historical and contemporary still lives. 

 Fantastic assembly of square-format paintings by Markus Lüperz at Michael Werner Gallery, which the artist painted at age 24 using distemper on canvas.

 (Above and below) Batia Suter's work at The Photographers' Gallery. One of the nominees for the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2018.

(Above) The 2018 awardee was Luke Willis Thompson with his striking film "Autoportrait" (also nominated for this year's Turner Prize).

 Nicolas Lamas (above and immediately below) and Petra Feriancová (two following) two-person show "Becoming animal" at Tenderpixel
(Above) "Pregnant Landscape" by Phoebe Unwin at Amanda Wilkinson Gallery in SoHo.

 (Above and below) Wilhelm Sasnal at Sadie Coles.

  (Above and below) August Sander's "Men without masks" at Hauser & Wirth included an extensive selection of rare large-scale photographs made between 1910 and 1931. The photographs were printed in a unique oversize format for inclusion in an exhibition at the Mannheimer Kunstverein in 1973.
  (Above) Group exhibition curated by Gianni Jetzer at Hauser & Wirth. 


  (Above and detail below) Rose Wiley's "Lolita's House"three-floor solo show at David Zwirner.

  (Above and below) 1960s vinyl sculptures by South Korean Seung-taek Lee at White Cube (Mayfair). Works have been recreated for the exhibition using urethane vinyl to achieve greater durability whilst retaining a similar visual quality.

  (Above and below) Abigail Reynolds mid-career survey at Peer.

  (Above) Visiting Ian White and Sadie Benning (photographed) at Camden Art Center with Antoni Hervàs.


  (Above and 2 below) Last day to see Magali Reus solo show at South London Gallery. 

   (Above and two below) Osaías Yanov's "Orphan Dance" at Gasworks.

   (Above and below) Antoni Hervàs studio at Gasworks, his 3-month residency is supported by Acción Cultural Española (AC/E)
   (Above and 2 below) Joan Jonas exhibition at Tate Modern.

   (Above) View of Trafalgar Square with Michael Rakowitz's "The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist" featuring on the Fourth Plinth commission.


On the way to see Tacita Dean's-curated exhibition "STILL LIFE" at the National Gallery, a much-obliged stop in the room with Vermeer and Dutch still life. Jacob van Walscapelle (1644-1727) and Jan van Huysum (1682–1749) masters in flower painting.


(Above) English singer-songwriter, record producer and humanitarian Peter Gabriel during the internet interspecies symposium "The Shape of a Circle in the Mind of a Fish" curated by Lucia Pietroiusti and Filipa Ramos for the Serpentine Gallery at the London Zoo.

Not photographed but also visited: Chisenhale Gallery, Matt's Gallery, Spruth Magers, Blain Southern, Pilar Corrias, Frith Street Gallery (both locations), Hollybush Gardens, Josh Liley Gallery, Kate McGarry, Mother's Tankstation, Modern Art (unexpectedly closed when it should have been open!, and so was Project Native Informant – which had a broken lift so had to go up 3 flights of stairs). 

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Photo report: Trip to Berlin Gallery Weekend 2018 and Cologne

(Above) Detail from the K, inaugural show dedicated to exploring the work of East German designer and exhibition-maker Klaus Wittkugel. K, A Year with P. Krishnamurthy on Ebersstrasse 3 (Schöneberg) is a workshop for exhibition-making led by designer, curator, writer and educator Prem Krishnamurthy, co-director of the multidisciplinary design Wkshps, which extends his previous exhibition space and ‘mom-and-pop’ P! based in New York between 2012-2017. The project is organised in collaboration with KW Institute for Contemporary Art. All photos: Latitudes.

 (Above and below) Claudia Comte's ‘When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth’ at König Galerie's St Agnes, Berlin. 

 (Above) ‘ARTHUR JAFA: A SERIES OF UTTERLY IMPROBABLE, YET EXTRAORDINARY RENDITIONS’ at the Julia Stoschek Collection

(Above) Loris Gréaud at Max Hetzler.

 (Above and below) Lawrence Weiner and Manfred Pernice in the old/new venue of Konrad Fischer Galerie, Berlin. 

  (Above and below) Nevin Aladağ's ‘Mustrop’ exhibition at Wentrup, Berlin. 


(Above) Andro Wekua at Spruth Magers. The gallery concurrently presented exhibitions by Senga Nengudi and Kara Walker. 

 (Above and two below)  Ibrahim Mahama at DAAD Galerie, Berlin.


 (Above and below) Views of the exhibition ‘Neolithic Childhood. Art in a False Present, c. 1930’ at Haus der Kulturen der Welt.

 (Above and two below) View of ‘Hello World. Revising a Collection’ in the central nave Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin.

 (Above and below) One of the most interesting sections of the expansive Hello World. Revising a Collection’ exhibition, was ‘Colomental. The Violence of Intimate Histories’ curated by Sven Beckstette and Azu Nwagbogu. The curators commissioned four artists (Joël Andrianomearisoa, Peggy Buth, Astrid S. Klein and Dierk Schmidt) to produce work critically reflecting on the lack of contemporary art holdings of the National Galerie on the connections between African countries and Germany. Above Peggy Buth's work tracking the display and inventories in colonial museum revealing their historical narratives and representations. Below works by Joël Andrianomearisoa.
Very happy to finally be able to see this object in the flesh: "Nuage articulé" one of the most beautiful Surrealist objects firstly executed in 1937 with dry natural sponges by the German-Austrian-Mexican artist Wolfgang Paalen.
 (Above and below) Olivier Laric's ‘Year of the Dog’ at Tanya Leighton, included the European debut of his latest animation video ‘Betweenness’ (all 2018), alongside ‘Hundemensch’ a group of pigmented cast resin anthropomorphic sculptures.

 (Above and below) Becky Beasley's ‘Depressive Alcoholic Mother’ show at Galeria Plan B.

  (Above and below) AA Bronson + General Idea, 1968–2018, ‘Catch me if you can!’ exhibition at Esther Schipper.

  (Above and following two) Mariana Castillo Deball's ‘das Haut-Ich’ at Galerie Barbara Wien, taking the tonalpohualli calendar and the deity Xipe Totec as a starting point.

 (Above and below) Haegue Yang's installation ‘Silo of Silence – Clicked Core’ in the Boiler House space at KINDL - Centre for Contemporary Art in Berlin’s Neukölln district. 

Berlin skyline from KINDL's second floor.

 (Above and below) ‘Defying Gravity’ exhibition by Swiss artists Taiyo Onorato and Nico Krebs occupying the two floors of the Maschinenhaus (Power House) at KINDL - Centre for Contemporary Art, gathering photographs, 16mm films, sculptures and new installations from the past decade.

 4h train to Cologne. The 2017 edition of "KölnSkulptur #9" titled ‘La fin de Babylone’ added new works by Andrea Büttner, Claudia Comte, Jan Kiefer, Eduardo Navarro, Solange Pessoa, Lin May Saeed, Teresa Solar and Pedro Wirz to the existing collection; and was curated by Chus Martínez. Above and following seven photos.

 (Above and below) ‘Pumping Station’ (2017) by Teresa Solar.
  (Above) ‘The Nordic Cactuses’ (2017) by Claudia Comte.
  (Above) Michael Sailstorfer (helicopter) and Mark di Suvero.
  (Above) ‘Untitled’ (2017) by Solange Pessoa.
  (Above and below) ‘Schale’ (2017) by Andrea Büttner.
 (Above) ‘Pagliaccio non son’ (2011) by Jimmie Durham. 
(Above) ‘Garten’ (1997–1999) by Peter Fischli and David Weiss. 
(Above) Pathway into the park.
 (Above and below) View of ‘Games of Decentralized Life’ exhibition by Simon Denny at Galerie Buchholz, Cologne, around Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. 

 (Above and below) View of the exhibition ‘The Superman’ by Alex da Corte on view the at Kölnischer Kunstverein. 

(Above) Beautiful 1950s architecture of the Kölnischer Kunstverein. 

 (Above and following) View of Haegue Yang's mid-career retrospective ‘ETA 1994–2018’ at Museum Ludwig in Cologne. In this room ‘Series of Vulnerable Arrangements’ are displayed alongside ‘Seven Basel Lights’ and ‘Medicine Men’.

 (Above) ‘Mountains of Encounter’ and ‘Sol Lewitt Upside Down — K123456. Expanded 1078 Times. Doubled and Mirrored’.
(Above) Installation ‘5, Rue Saint-Benoît’.

  (Above) View of the first solo exhibition ‘ DAS – IST — DAS?’ in Germany by Ana Jotta at Temporary Gallery, Cologne. Curated by Regina Barunke and Miguel Wandschneider.



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Third episode of 'Incidents (of Travel)' – Dispatch by Yu JI and Xiao Kaiyu reporting from Suzhou, China


As part of Kadist Online Projects, Kadist and Latitudes partnered in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)'. The new phase is developed as an online periodical that publishes regular contributions from curators and artists working around the world. 

Originally conceived by Latitudes as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City (2012, with dispatches presented as part of an exhibition at Casa del Lago) – followed by Hong Kong (2013, online dispatches via twitter, instagram, and soundcloud) and San Francisco (2015, online dispatches via daily instagram posts) – 'Incidents (of Travel)' explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter and an extended conversation between curator/s and artist/s. Online storytelling presents and documents curatorial fieldwork and an offline day conceived by an artist for a curator.


The third 'Incidents (of Travel)' episode comes from Suzhou, China, where artist and curator Yu Ji met poet Xiao Kaiyu. Their offline day took place in April 2016, when they embarked on a hike on Dong Shan (East Mountain), 130 km west of Shanghai, on a peninsula stretching into Tai Hu lake near the city of Suzhou.


Each of the 12 photographs in the sequence is augmented by one or more extra assets: a brief commentary, a caption or a soundscape, and is accessed by clicking the words which overlay the images.

The series inaugurated with an itinerary from curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – their tour was photographed by Nabiha Khan. The second dispatch came from Jinja in Uganda, where curator Moses Serubiri invited photographer Mohsen Taha to explore Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972.


Forthcoming contributions: Marianna Hovhannisyan (Yerevan), Simon Soon (Kuala Lumpur / Sydney) and Natalia Zuluaga (Pereira / Miami), all fellows who participated in the seminar ‘The Place From Where We Look’ at Kadist Paris in June 2015. 


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Last chance to read the August 2016 Monthly Cover Story "Fermínlandia"


Last chance to read the August 2016 Monthly Cover Story "Fermínlandia" on www.lttds.org (after August 2016 it will be archived here)

"
Five years ago, in August 2011, Fermín Jiménez Landa initiated the surrender, conquest and defence of a small nameless island using the power of music. With the help of local fishermen he had taken a portable generator, two tripod-mounted loudspeakers, and an mp3 player out into the Aegean Sea and planted the equipment on this uninhabited Greek island. Its new national anthem played again and again until the batteries ran out. You can just make out the two loudspeakers sitting atop the grassy rock in this photograph by Fermín." Continue reading...

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage to highlight past, present or forthcoming projects, research, exhibitions or field trips related to our activities. 


Related content:
  • Archive of Cover Stories.
  • Cover Story, July 2016: Through the grapevine – Rasmus Nilausen’s Soups & Symptoms 3 July 2016
  • Last days! Cover Story and exhibition of José Antonio Hernández-Díez: techno-pop, death and resurrection (20 June 2016)
  • Cover Story, May 2016: Material histories – spilling the beans at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux (10 May 2016)
  • Cover Story, March 2016: José Antonio Hernández-Díez: The sacred heart of the matter (3 March 2016
  • Cover Story, February 2016: Sarah Ortmeyer, Towering allusions (9 Febrero 2016)




Kadist and Latitudes present 'Incidents (Of Travel)' online


Latitudes and Kadist Art Foundation are partnering in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)' as an online periodical. As part of its Online Projects, Kadist will be publishing regular contributions from six of its fellows working around the world. 
 
Originally conceived by Latitudes as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City (2012) – followed by Hong Kong (2013) and San Francisco (2015) – 'Incidents (of Travel)' explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter. Online storytelling present and document curatorial fieldwork and an offline day’s itinerary.
 
Curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez inaugurate the series with a dispatch from Chicagofieldwork and online storytelling photographed by Nabiha Khan of an offline day’s itinerary. 

Forthcoming contributions from Marianna Hovhannisyan (Yerevan / Istanbul), Yu Ji (Shanghai), Moses Serubiri (Kampala), Simon Soon (Kuala Lumpur / Sydney), and Natalia Zuluaga (Pereira / Miami), fellows who participated in the seminar ‘The Place From Where We Look’ at Kadist Paris in June 2015. 



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Storify of Curating Lab 2014 Overseas Field Trip to Hong Kong, 16–20 June 2014







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