Cover Story – March-April 2019: Icelandic refraction


Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org

The March-April 2019 Monthly Cover Story “Icelandic refraction” is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org

“It has been speculated that Icelandic spar was at one time used for navigational purposes,” reflects curator Becky Forsythe. Her account of a short Reykjavík day spent with artist Þorgerður Ólafsdóttir is the latest episode of Incidents (of Travel), the series edited by Latitudes and produced by Kadist.”


—> Continue reading
—> After April it will be archived here.


Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.


RELATED CONTENT:

  • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
  • Cover Story–February 2019: Schizophrenic Machine (1 February 2019)
  • Cover Story—January 2019: “Seesaw” (7 January 2019)
  • Cover Story—December 2018: "Treasures! exhibitionism! showmanship!" 1 December 2018
  • Cover Story—November 2018: "Joan Morey—postmortem judgement reenactment" 1 November 2018
  • Cover Story–October 2018: "I can’t take my eyes off you: Eulàlia Rovira and Adrian Schindler" 1 October 2018
  • Cover Story–September 2018: Harald Szeemann’s travel sculpture, 10 September 2018
  • Cover Story–August 2018: Askeaton Joyride, 2 August 2018
  • Cover Story–July 2018: No Burgers for Sale 2 July 2018
  • Save the date: 13 September, 6–9pm. Latitudes-curated exhibition ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’, Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna, 21 June 2018
  • Cover Story—June 2018: Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group, 4 June 2018
  • Cover Story – May 2018: Shadowing Roman Ondák, 7 May 2018 




Eighth episode of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Alejandra Aguado and Diego Bianchi from Buenos Aires, Argentina

Episode 8 from Buenos Aires now online on http://incidents.kadist.org/


In the eighth '
Incidents (of Travel)' dispatch Móvil co-founder and curator Alejandra Aguado followed the itinerary devised by the artist Diego Bianchi around Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

Their exploration took them from the self-regulated community Velatropa to the buzzing commercial area of Once, identifying human and non-human flows and interactions. This became an entry point for discussing Bianchi's interests in how, as consumers, we define a particular zeitgeist and appropriate trends that enable us to affirm our identities.

Each of the 20 photographs is augmented by one or more extra assets – a brief commentary, a sound or a caption – accessed by clicking the words overlaying the images.








'Incidents (of Travel)' explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter and an extended offline conversation between curator/s and artist/s. Online storytelling presents and documents curatorial fieldwork and a day conceived by an artist for a curator.

Conceived by Latitudes in 2012 as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City (with five dispatches presented as part of an exhibition at Casa del Lago), 'Incidents of Travel' had sequels in 2013 in Hong Kong (online dispatches published via Twitter, Instagram, and Soundcloud) and San Francisco in 2015 (daily posts as part of Kadist's Instagram take over initiative #ArtistNotInTheStudioCuratorNotAtTheOffice).

In 2016 Kadist and Latitudes partnered in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)' as part of Kadist Online Projects, publishing contributions from invited curators and artists working around the world.





Earlier conversations have taken place in Hobart (Tasmania), Yerevan (Armenia), Terengganu (Malaysia), Lisbon (Portugal), Suzhou (China), Jinja (Uganda) and Chicago (US). 

The first dispatch launched in April 2016 with an itinerary by curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – a day photographed by Nabiha Khan.





The second dispatch came from Jinja in Uganda, where curator Moses Serubiri invited photographer Mohsen Taha to explore Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972.



The third episode took place while curator Yu Ji and poet Xiao Kaiyu hiked on Dong Shan (East Mountain), 130 km west of Shanghai, on a peninsula stretching into Tai Hu lake near the city of Suzhou, China.

The fourth dispatch came from Lisbon, where Galician curator Pedro de Llano visited key locations that marked the life and work of Luisa Cunha.



The fifth episode took place in April 2016, when curator Simon Soon and artist chi too visited the Malaysian North Eastern state of Terengganu, where chi spent some time in 2013, surrounded by "men and women who work(ed) multiple jobs as a fishermen, house builders, boat builders, farmers, coconut pickers, food producers, and everything else that matters."


The sixth episode narrates a walking itinerary conducted by curator Marianna Hovhannisyan with Vardan Kilichyan, Gohar Hosyan, and Anaida Verdyan in Yerevan, the capital of Armenia, documenting the transformed, disappeared, or permanently-closed art institutions in the city centre.



The seventh episode comes from Hobart, capital of Tasmania. It is narrated by curator Camila Marambio, following an itinerary devised by artist Lucy Bleach. They spent the day "encircling the outer limits of human understanding by visiting the histories, both past, and present, of attempts to reach beyond our sensory capacities through governance, technology, and reverie", and ended the day cooking at Lucy's home sharing their mutual love for quinces.

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Seventh episode of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Camila Marambio and Lucy Bleach from Hobart, Tasmania

http://incidents.kadist.org/hobart.html

The seventh 'Incidents (of Travel)' dispatch comes from Hobart, capital of Tasmania. It is narrated by curator Camila Marambio, following an itinerary devised by artist Lucy Bleach. Lucy "shared her knowledge of volcanoes, lava, and magma leading (Camila) on a quest to relate local geochemical and geophysical conundrums to the expansive solar system." 

They spent the day "encircling the outer limits of human understanding by visiting the histories, both past, and present, of attempts to reach beyond our sensory capacities through governance, technology, and reverie", and ended the day cooking at Lucy's home sharing their mutual love for quinces.

Each of the 19 photographs is augmented by one or more extra assets – a brief commentary, soundscape or a caption – accessed by clicking the words which overlay the images
.



Originally conceived by Latitudes as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City in 2012 (with five dispatches presented as part of an exhibition at Casa del Lago) 'Incidents of Travel' had sequels in 2013 in Hong Kong (online dispatches published via twitter, Instagram, and Soundcloud) and San Francisco in 2015 (daily posts on Kadist's Instagram as part of their #ArtistNotInTheStudioCuratorNotAtTheOffice take over initiative).

The project explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter and an extended conversation between curator/s and artist/s. Online storytelling presents and documents curatorial fieldwork and an offline day conceived by an artist for a curator.
In 2016 Kadist and Latitudes partnered in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)' as part of Kadist Online Projects. This new phase is developed as an online periodical that publishes contributions from invited curators and artists working around the world.


http://incidents.kadist.org/chicago

A series of itineraries conceived by six curators, artists or researchers — previous fellows of the seminar The Place from Where We Look (Kadist Paris, June 2015) — launched in April 2016 with an itinerary by curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – a day photographed by Nabiha Khan


http://incidents.kadist.org/jinja

The second dispatch came from Jinja in Uganda, where curator Moses Serubiri invited photographer Mohsen Taha to explore Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972.


http://incidents.kadist.org/suzhou

The third episode took place while curator Yu Ji and poet Xiao Kaiyu hiked on Dong Shan (East Mountain), 130 km west of Shanghai, on a peninsula stretching into Tai Hu lake near the city of Suzhou, China
http://incidents.kadist.org/lisbon

The fourth dispatch came from Lisbon, where Galician curator Pedro de Llano visited key locations that marked the life and work of Luisa Cunha.
http://incidents.kadist.org/terengganu

The fifth episode took place in April 2016, when curator Simon Soon and artist chi too visited the Malaysian North Eastern state of Terengganu, where chi spent some time in 2013, surrounded by "men and women who work(ed) multiple jobs as a fishermen, house builders, boat builders, farmers, coconut pickers, food producers, and everything else that matters." 
http://incidents.kadist.org/terengganu

The sixth episode narrates a walking itinerary conducted by curator Marianna Hovhannisyan with Vardan Kilichyan, Gohar Hosyan, and Anaida Verdyan in Yerevan, the capital of Armenia, documenting the transformed, disappeared, or permanently-closed art institutions in the city centre.


RELATED CONTENT:




Sixth episode of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Marianna Hovhannisyan and students from the National Center of Aesthetics from Yerevan, Armenia

http://incidents.kadist.org/yerevan

The sixth 'Incidents (of Travel)' episode narrates a walking itinerary in Yerevan, the capital of Armenia, documenting the transformed, disappeared, or permanently-closed art institutions in the city center

The itinerary was conducted by curator Marianna Hovhannisyan with Vardan Kilichyan, Gohar Hosyan, and Anaida Verdyan — three art students from the National Center of Aesthetics, one of the oldest alternative art educational hubs in the city. 

The inquiry was based on how knowledge transmission and generational exchanges in the Armenian contemporary art field could be approached—particularly in terms of exploring the fragmented histories of its institutional work.

Each of the 15 photographs is augmented by one or more extra assets – a brief commentary or a caption –, accessed by clicking the words which overlay the images.



Marianna Hovhannisyan (Yerevan/San Diego) is a research-based curator, a Ph.D student in Art History, Theory, and Criticism at Visual Arts Department, Univerisity of California San Diego. 

Originally conceived by Latitudes as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City in 2012 (with five dispatches presented as part of an exhibition on Latitudes' curatorial practice at Casa del Lago) 'Incidents of Travel' had sequels in 2013 in Hong Kong (online dispatches published via twitter, instagram, and soundcloud) and San Francisco in 2015 (daily posts on Kadist's Instagram as part of their #ArtistNotInTheStudioCuratorNotAtTheOffice take over initiative).


The project explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter and an extended conversation between curator/s and artist/s. Online storytelling presents and documents curatorial fieldwork and an offline day conceived by an artist for a curator.
In 2016 Kadist and Latitudes partnered in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)' as part of Kadist Online Projects. This new phase is developed as an online periodical that publishes contributions from invited curators and artists working around the world.


http://incidents.kadist.org/chicago

A series of itineraries conceived by six curators, artists or researchers — previous fellows of the seminar The Place from Where We Look (Kadist Paris, June 2015) — launched in April 2016 with an itinerary by curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – a day photographed by Nabiha Khan


http://incidents.kadist.org/jinja

The second dispatch came from Jinja in Uganda, where curator Moses Serubiri invited photographer Mohsen Taha to explore Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972.


http://incidents.kadist.org/suzhou

The third episode took place while curator Yu Ji and poet Xiao Kaiyu hiked on Dong Shan (East Mountain), 130 km west of Shanghai, on a peninsula stretching into Tai Hu lake near the city of Suzhou, China
http://incidents.kadist.org/lisbon

The fourth dispatch came from Lisbon, where Galician curator Pedro de Llano visited key locations that marked the life and work of Luisa Cunha.
http://incidents.kadist.org/terengganu

The fifth episode took place in April 2016, when curator Simon Soon and artist chi too visited the Malaysian North Eastern state of Terengganu, where chi spent some time in 2013, surrounded by "men and women who work(ed) multiple jobs as a fishermen, house builders, boat builders, farmers, coconut pickers, food producers, and everything else that matters."  


RELATED CONTENT:






    Cover Story—October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier

    October 2017 Monthly Cover Story on http://www.lttds.org


    The October 2017 Monthly Cover Story "Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier" is now up on www.lttds.org – after this month it will be archived here

    "We are looking for glimpses of life as it was over half a billion years ago. In sight of the snout of the Stanley Glacier in Kootenay National Park, lie deposits of Burgess Shale, a rock famous for its exceptional preservation of hitherto unknown, and frankly bizarre, soft-bodied marine creatures." Continue reading  

    Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities. 

    RELATED CONTENT:




    Sediments of the Geologic Time 4-week residency at the Banff Centre for Arts & Creativity




    September 11, 2017:
    Banff is a town located within Banff National Park in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, Alberta. Elevation: 1,383 m. We'll be spending four weeks at The Banff Centre, at the foot of Sleeping Buffalo Mountain (Tunnel Mountain) overlooking the Bow Valley. 


    The programme conceived by Latitudes (Lead Faculty), and with the participation of Irish artist Sean Lynch as Guest Faculty, asked how a geologic lens might affect artistic and curatorial practice.

    Participants: Justy Phillips & Margaret Woodward (A Published Event) based in Hobart; Semâ Bekirovic, based in Amsterdam; Caitlin Chaisson based in Vancouver; Becky Forsythe, based in Reykjavik; Chloe Hodge, based in London; Shane Krepakevich, based in Toronto; Caroline Loewen, based in Calgary; Penelope Smart, based in St. John's, Newfoundland; and Camila Sposati, based in São Paulo.



    Views of the Banff Centre campus from the Vistas dining centre, the trees slowly starting to turn yellow.


     

    Group photo of 'Geologic Time' 10 participants and Lead Faculty – participant Penelope Smart and Guest Faculty artist Sean Lynch are camera shy.


     

    The door to Latitudes' Studio 317 in Glyde Hall.



    Stunning views towards the Banff Springs Hotel and Sulphur Mountain from the GH 317 studio.



    'Geologic Time' dedicated section in the library.



    Campus tour with local legend Jim Olver, Customer Service at Banff Centre for Arts & Creativity, "passionate about river canoeing, geology, ski-touring & curling!"



    September 16, 2017: Hike up to Tunnel Mountain, with panoramic views of the town, the Bow and Spray River valleys, and the Banff Springs Hotel site. The Stoney people (indigenous people of Western Canada) had long called the mountain "Sleeping Buffalo", as it resembles a sleeping buffalo when viewed from the north and east. The name Tunnel Mountain was given in 1882 when a proposed route for the Canadian Pacific Railway was to be blasted through. An alternate route costing much less money was put around the mountain, but the name Tunnel Mountain remained.



    September 17, 2017: (Above and below) Hoodoos Trail descends to the river and follows it east and north under the cliff face of Tunnel Mountain. We were interrupted by a herd of elk (wapiti) so decided to turn around.





    September 19, 2017: Lecture by the legendary Rocky Mountains expert Ben Gadd, 71 (pictured above), one of Canada’s better-known naturalists, geologists, and mountain writers.



    Some of the rock specimens brought by Ben Gadd to his lecture – including some very fetching custom cushions sewn by his wife.



    Ben Gadd during his Q&A with Geologic Time participants.



    Gadd holding a 170-95 million-year-old coast mountains granite.



    September 20, 2017: Morning visit to the archive of the Whyte Museum in Banff, a museum that collects, preserves, and exhibits all kinds of materials related to the cultural heritage of the Canadian Rocky Mountains.



    September 20, 2017: Afternoon visit to Bankhead and Lake Minnewanka ("Water of the Spirits" in Nakoda).

    Bankhead is an abandoned coal mining town in Banff National Park. The mine began in 1903 and ceased operations in 1922 when it was generally understood that mining had not been profitable. In 1926, many of the town's buildings were moved to Banff and Canmore. Bankhead was located at the foot of Cascade Mountain, which contains high-grade anthracite coal deposits. The Bankhead coal mine was operated by the Pacific Coal Company, a subsidiary of the Canadian Pacific Railway, which needed the coal to fuel its steam engines.





    Air powered (fireless) locomotive on display at Bankhead, Alberta.



    (Above) Rhubarb grows out of jet-black anthracite: high-grade coal formed 100 million years ago. At its peak in 1911, the Bankhead mine that once stood on this site at the base of Cascade Mountain employed 480 men. Its tunnels produced half a million tonnes of coal that year, destined for the furnaces of the Canadian Pacific Railway. Miners came mostly from Poland, Italy, Britain, and Russia, while a group of 90 Chinese men were brought to Canada to sort rock from coal for minimal wages. Unwelcome in the town, they set up on the far side of the slag heaps, where they made a shanty town from scrap wood. They also created a kitchen garden, where they cultivated, among other plants, the hardy rhubarb that still thrives today.

    Apart from it being forbidden to remove plants from what has been a part of Banff National Park since its designation in 1930, the whole site is contaminated with dioxins from waste oil. So no crumble today.



    'Wave Sound' (2017) piece by Anishinaabe artist Rebecca Belmore commissioned by @landmarksreperes2017



    Rocky Mountains beauty by Lake Minnewanka.



    A Jeff Wall-esque shot of the group by Lake Minnewanka.



    September 21, 2017: (Above and below) Geology tour around campus with Jim Olver (Director of Customer Service, Banff Centre) "reading" the campus, its formations and fossils. Olver has worked at the Banff Centre for 35 years.





    (A
    bove) A well rounded composite rock and (below) finding rocks around campus.


    September 23, 2017: (below and following six) Stunning Bow Lake hike with independent curator and BICI resident, Heidi Rabben.













    September 24, 2017: (Below) Visual Arts + Digital department excursion to Lake Louise, named 'Lake of the Little Fishes' by the Stoney Nakota First Nations people.

    Lake Louise's impressive emerald colour of the water is due to the silt-like rock flour continually being carried into the lake by melt-water from the surrounding glaciers. The tiny and uniform particles become suspended in the water, refracting blue and green wavelengths of light.









    September 25, 2017: (Below) Monday weekly meeting and afternoon group seminar led by Caroline Loewen, Shane Krepakevich and Semâ Bekirovic around Don McKay's essay “Ediacaran & Anthropocene: poetry as a reader of deep time” inducing imaginative speculation through geopoetry. Guest Faculty
    Sean Lynch arrives from Ireland.





    September 26, 2017: (Below) Afternoon lecture by "Geologic Time" Guest Faculty Sean Lynch on the value of conversations, Bardic traditions, stone-carvers James and John O'Shea, and fried chicken.





    September 27, 2017: (Below) 1:1 sessions with Sean Lynch and a bit of time to dig into the library and read the beautifully written book "The Writing of Stones" by Roger Caillois (1970) with an introduction by Marguerite Yourcenar: "Those fusions, pressures, ruptures, imprints of matter in matter have left traces inside and out which sometimes almost exactly resemble writing and which actually do transcribe events from millions of years ago."





    September 28, 2017: Evening seminar in the Banff Upper Hot Springs, elevated at 1,585 meters it's the highest hot water bathing in Canada.



    September 29, 2017: (Below) "Geologic Time" hike to the Stanley Glacier in the Kootenay National Park in British Columbia, led by guides Rona Schneberger and Jane Whitney. At the base of Mount Stanley, we turned over some rocks and found 505-million-year-old Burgess Shale trilobites, soft-body fossils from the Eldon formation.





















    September 30, 2017: Second screening night led by Sean Lynch.

     
    October 2, 2017: (Below) Final week of the programme. Last Monday weekly meeting, this time under the snow. Third and final afternoon workshop led by 'Geologic timers' Becky Forsythe, Caitlin Chaisson and Chloe Hodge around Hito Steyerl's text "In Free Fall: A Thought Experiment on vertical perspective" (e-flux journal #24, April 2011).






    October 3 and 4, 2017: Final 1:1 conversations with participants, and open studios by the Independent artists.
     
    October 5, 2017, 5—7pm: (photos below) The Open event of
    Geologic Time in the library, followed by a visit to Illuminations, "a participative artwork experience by Sarah Fuller, Moment Factory and Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity".

    The closing event of Geologic Time was conceived as a two-hour infiltration into the pages, shelves, and display possibilities of The Banff Centre library. Featuring storytelling, documentation, annotation, sculpture, video, conversation and other live situations, the event presented some sediments of the ten participants’ ongoing research and lithic collaborations. Pdf of the event programme here.


    Caitlin Chaisson has been researching a former experimental farm station in Agassiz, British Columbia, and a forgotten centennial time capsule buried under a granite marker there. Caitlin also presented a cut-and-paste station on the table next to the photocopier, and a display for the tall vitrine just behind it. If you plan on attending the Agassiz Fall Fair and Corn Festival around September 14, 2018, Caitlin will be there, lending an extra hand in the rocky relay that is the shape of time. Pickles may be involved. 

    Meanwhile read her reflections on her "Geologic Time" experience.


    Also on the main floor, Chloe Hodge made an arrangement of book spreads and purloined texts on a large desk on the side of the library that faces Sulphur Mountain. From 1956–1981 the latter peak was the site of a high altitude geophysical laboratory, a Cosmic Ray Station. Chloe’s presentation filters the macro-perspective enabled by this buoyant micro-history through into a speculative research-workshop around freefall, the loss of perspective, and groundlessness. 



    Becky Forsythe has been making plans for a future exhibition inspired by the artist and naturalist known as Petra, who spent decades collecting stones and minerals from the mountains in Stöðvarfjörður, Iceland. Camila Sposati has been reflecting on the various “extractions” of a residency and exhibition that took place in the Amazon in 2004, gradually turning them into a script for a play. Becky and Camila are collaborating for this event on a procedural work using the library photocopier on the main floor (Receding Agate and Rhodochrosite). On the upper floor, they present two further collaborations via the media of “chairs and view” – Looking at the mountains and The mountain at my back – that recontextualize the interior space with respect to vistas of Mt Bourgeau, the Massive Range, Pilot Mountain, and so on.


    Chloe is also one of eight 'Geologic Time' narrators whose readings can be heard through speakers on the main floor. What we are hearing are excerpts from Lost Rocks (2017–21), a growing library of short fiction books commissioned by Justy Phillips & Margaret Woodward (A Published Event). Described by the Hobart-based duo as “an accumulative event of mineralogical, metaphysical and metallurgical telling”, the books that have come into the world to date have been incorporated into the library’s holdings alongside a glossary and can be found in the geology section upstairs.



    Caroline Loewen has put together documentation at the top of the stairs, along the narrow “bar”. Caroline delves deep into the story of sandstone in Alberta, a rock that gained widespread favour for building and decorative use following Calgary’s Great Fire of 1886. The black-and-brown Rundle Rock that was once quarried at the base of Banff-Centre-neighbour Mount Rundle and was used extensively in creating the Banff Springs Hotel also joins a conversation that anticipates an exhibition scheduled for next summer at Lougheed House in Calgary. (The same Lougheed dynasty lends its name to the Jeanne and Peter Lougheed Building (JPL), the Banff Centre’s media headquarters.) 



    For these two hours in the library Semâ Bekirovic employed a number of external hard drives to act as pedestals for small stones. How many terabytes can a hunk of rock hold? What fragments of data detritus, chunks and grains of documents, broken off images, or weathered files, might be read and written, stored or retrieved? We might ponder this as we stand by the “bar” looking towards Sulphur Mountain. 


    An audio narration drafted by Penelope Smart was also heard on the upper floor via a Bluetooth speaker in the stacks, near “memoirs and narrative”. Here, an image of the exquisite marble bust by Giovanni Strazza animated Penny’s writing during the last weeks. It came to St.John’s, Newfoundland, in 1856. Ring the bell to the right of the main door of the Presentation Convent adjoining the Basilica in St.John’s and maybe one of the sisters will let you see it.



    Shane Krepakevich has been prototyping an exhibition display system, or running a 1:1 scale artist-run research institute, in his studio overlooking Mike MacDonald’s butterfly garden. Shane has been thinking about design impulses, transparency, support structures, and the refraction of light through glass, sometimes during the hours he has spent sanding and polishing a series of bronze paperweights, or prospecting the library for textual gems. For the library presentation, Shane made 8.5"×11" arrangements of found sentences, printed them, and then squirrelled them away inside selected library books, alongside images he has photocopied for his display system project.



    A number of commemorative posters by Latitudes are presented in the meeting room upstairs. These mark some of the excursions and talks that have formed a part of the last weeks through the motif of the human hand as a geologic scale device. 



    Finally, if we ever need reminding about the mystery and power of geological formations, 'Picnic at Hanging Rock', the 1975 Australian film directed by Peter Weir, was screened on a monitor on the upper floor.

    Special thanks to Mark Black, Brandy Dahrouge, Peta Rake, and Angela Schenstead. 

    October 6, 2017: Exit interviews, pack up, and departures.

    'Geologic Time' participants: Justy Phillips & Margaret Woodward (A Published Event), based in Hobart; Semâ Bekirovic, based in Amsterdam; Caitlin Chaisson based in Vancouver; Becky Forsythe, based in Reykjavik; Chloe Hodge, based in London; Shane Krepakevich, based in Toronto; Caroline Loewen, based in Calgary; Penelope Smart, based in St. John’s, Newfoundland; and Camila Sposati, based in Sao Paulo.

    'Geologic Time' was a residency programme of the Banff International Curatorial Institute (BICI), organised by the Banff Centre for Art and Creativity in Alberta, Canada. The 2017 residency took place between September 11–October 6 within the framework of the group exhibition 4.543 billion. The matter of matter curated by Latitudes at CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux, France, on view until January 7, 2018.


    RELATED CONTENT:




    “Thinking with” geology at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity


    Greetings from the Banff Centre in the Canadian Rockies!

    For the next four weeks, Latitudes will be Lead Faculty of the residency programme "Geologic Time" organised by the Banff International Curatorial Institute (BICI) at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity

    Curators, artists and writers Justy Phillips & Margaret Woodward (A Published Event) based in Hobart; Sema Bekirovic, based in Amsterdam; Caitlin Chaisson based in Vancouver; Becky Forsythe, based in Reykjavik; Chloe Hodge, based in London; Shane Krepakevich, based in Toronto; Caroline Loewen, based in Calgary; Penelope Smart, based in St. John's, Newfoundland; and Camila Sposati, based in Sao Paulo, are here for a month to discuss geological formations and timescales, while speculating about a more expansive and longer-term view of art, exhibitions, and their institutions. 

    Through fieldwork, seminars, and independent study, 'Geologic Time' we will be thinking with geology as a potential way to consider non-conventional, deep-time perspectives on curating, exhibition making, programming, and fieldwork within contemporary art.

    Programme on Banff's website.

    On September 12, 4 pm, Latitudes will give a lecture presenting their practice at the Jeanne & Peter Lougheed Building 204. Everyone is welcome!

    "Geologic Time" is a thematic residency programme of the Banff International Curatorial Institute (BICI), Visual + Digital Arts organised by the Banff Centre for Art and Creativity in Alberta, Canada. Within the framework of the residency, Latitudes curated the group exhibition "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux, France, on view until January 7, 2018.  


    Entrance to one of the two wings of the exhibition "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux, France, on view until January 7, 2018. Photo: Latitudes / RK.

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    "Geologic Time" thematic residency programme at the Banff Centre for Art and Creativity in Alberta, Canada

    Julius von Schoppe (1795–1868), Illustration of giant stone near the Rauenschen Mountains near Furstenwalde, 1827, Lithograph, von Tempeltey.

    Between September 11 and October 6, 2017, ten artists, researchers, writers and curators from around the world will ponder geological formations and stratigraphy, minerals, and resource extraction to speculate about a more expansive, slower and longer-term view of art, exhibitions, and institutions. The spectacular Rocky Mountains will not only be the backdrop, but the active participants.

    Through
    fieldwork, seminars, and independent study, 'Geologic Time' participants will be “thinking with” geology (beyond the depiction of landscape) as a potential way to consider non-conventional, deep-time perspectives on curating, exhibition making, programming, and fieldwork within contemporary art. 

    Lead faculty: Latitudes  
    Guest Faculty: Sean Lynch

    "Geologic Time" is a thematic residency programme of the Banff International Curatorial Institute, Visual + Digital Arts organised by the Banff Centre for Art and Creativity in Alberta, Canada. Within the framework of the residency Latitudes curated the group exhibition "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux, France, on view until January 7, 2018.   


    View of the Banff Centre campus. Photo: Latitudes.

    RELATED CONTENT:

    • "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" in pictures.
    • Guest Faculty of the Thematic Residency 'Blueprint for Happiness' at The Banff Centre, Canada, 27 July–8 August 2015 16 July 2015
    • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
    • Cover Story December 2016: Ten years ago – Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook 5 December 2016 
    • Cover Story – May 2016: Material histories – spilling the beans at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux 10 May 2016.
    • Second research trip to Bordeaux 16 July 2016 




    Cover Story – April 2017: "Banff Geologic Time"

    The April 2017 Monthly Cover Story "Banff Geologic Time" is now up on www.lttds.org after April it will be archived here.  

    "Johann Wolfgang von Goethe spent a great deal of time worrying about stones. Not least, he was troubled by a giant 700-tonne granite rock that lay near the otherwise flat land near Berlin. What on earth was this alien to the region’s geology doing there? Goethe’s realisation that the strange mineral object must have been displaced by glaciers helped instigate the theory of ice ages and deep time. Stone provokes us to recalibrate our concept of the past and our place in the world. Rock is radical." Continue reading by clicking the grey bar underneath the image.

    We remind artists, researchers, cultural writers and curators interested in slower and longer-term view of art, exhibitions, and their institutions (as well as rocks of course!) that the call for the Banff thematic residency programme "Geologic Time" (September 11–October 6, 2017) led by Latitudes and artists Sean Lynch as Guest Faculty, is open until May 24 (11:59pm MST).




    Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities, and are archived here.

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    Third episode of 'Incidents (of Travel)' – Dispatch by Yu JI and Xiao Kaiyu reporting from Suzhou, China


    As part of Kadist Online Projects, Kadist and Latitudes partnered in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)'. The new phase is developed as an online periodical that publishes regular contributions from curators and artists working around the world. 

    Originally conceived by Latitudes as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City (2012, with dispatches presented as part of an exhibition at Casa del Lago) – followed by Hong Kong (2013, online dispatches via twitter, instagram, and soundcloud) and San Francisco (2015, online dispatches via daily instagram posts) – 'Incidents (of Travel)' explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter and an extended conversation between curator/s and artist/s. Online storytelling presents and documents curatorial fieldwork and an offline day conceived by an artist for a curator.


    The third 'Incidents (of Travel)' episode comes from Suzhou, China, where artist and curator Yu Ji met poet Xiao Kaiyu. Their offline day took place in April 2016, when they embarked on a hike on Dong Shan (East Mountain), 130 km west of Shanghai, on a peninsula stretching into Tai Hu lake near the city of Suzhou.


    Each of the 12 photographs in the sequence is augmented by one or more extra assets: a brief commentary, a caption or a soundscape, and is accessed by clicking the words which overlay the images.

    The series inaugurated with an itinerary from curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – their tour was photographed by Nabiha Khan. The second dispatch came from Jinja in Uganda, where curator Moses Serubiri invited photographer Mohsen Taha to explore Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972.


    Forthcoming contributions: Marianna Hovhannisyan (Yerevan), Simon Soon (Kuala Lumpur / Sydney) and Natalia Zuluaga (Pereira / Miami), all fellows who participated in the seminar ‘The Place From Where We Look’ at Kadist Paris in June 2015. 


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    Second 'Incidents (of Travel)' dispatch by Moses Serubiri and Mohsen Taha reporting from Jinja, Uganda


    As part of Kadist Online Projects, Kadist and Latitudes are partnering in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)' as an online periodical that is publishing regular contributions from curators and artists working around the world. 

    Originally conceived by Latitudes as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City (2012) – followed by Hong Kong (2013) and San Francisco (2015) – 'Incidents (of Travel)' explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter and an extended conversation between curator/s and artist/s. Online storytelling presents and documents curatorial fieldwork and an offline day conceived by an artist for a curator.



    The second 'Incidents (of Travel)' dispatch comes from Jinja, Uganda, where writer, researcher and curator Moses Serubiri met photographer Mohsen Taha. On this occasion Taha photographed the day together exploring Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972. Taha's photographs show the architectural remnants of their presence, and Serubiri's commentary tells of the forces at work in Uganda during that period.

    Each of the 18 photographs in the sequence is augmented by one or more extra assets: a brief commentary, a caption or a soundscape, and is accessed by clicking the words which overlay the images.


    The series inaugurated with an itinerary from curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – their tour was photographed by Nabiha Khan

    Forthcoming contributions by Marianna Hovhannisyan (Yerevan / Istanbul), Yu Ji (Shanghai), Simon Soon (Kuala Lumpur / Sydney) and Natalia Zuluaga (Pereira / Miami), all fellows who participated in the seminar ‘The Place From Where We Look’ at Kadist Paris in June 2015. 


    RELATED CONTENT:




    Kadist and Latitudes present 'Incidents (Of Travel)' online


    Latitudes and Kadist Art Foundation are partnering in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)' as an online periodical. As part of its Online Projects, Kadist will be publishing regular contributions from six of its fellows working around the world. 
     
    Originally conceived by Latitudes as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City (2012) – followed by Hong Kong (2013) and San Francisco (2015) – 'Incidents (of Travel)' explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter. Online storytelling present and document curatorial fieldwork and an offline day’s itinerary.
     
    Curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez inaugurate the series with a dispatch from Chicagofieldwork and online storytelling photographed by Nabiha Khan of an offline day’s itinerary. 

    Forthcoming contributions from Marianna Hovhannisyan (Yerevan / Istanbul), Yu Ji (Shanghai), Moses Serubiri (Kampala), Simon Soon (Kuala Lumpur / Sydney), and Natalia Zuluaga (Pereira / Miami), fellows who participated in the seminar ‘The Place From Where We Look’ at Kadist Paris in June 2015. 



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    'Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group' seminar convenes in its third iteration in Birmingham's Eastside Projects, 15 November 2015

    Façade of Eastside Projects in Birmingham.

    Latitudes
    will lead a day-long session on November 15, one of the two-day self-reflective evaluation sessions that the Extra Special People (ESP) Associate scheme programme of Eastside Projects is organising under the title "Re-Imagining ESP II".

    Taking place during the weekend of the 14–15 November in Birmingham, UK, these two sessions are aimed at stimulating a conversation amongst the current members of the practice-led peer support network ESP in order to explore the possibility of them becoming active participants and even producers instead of receivers of predefined formats and contents.


    This will be the third iteration of the 'Near-Future Artworlds...' meetings (following those in Bari and San Francisco) – a forum for informal dialogue about megatrends and the future of contemporary art institutions.  

    The first meeting in Bari broadly addressed to what degree organisational forms of art institutions are embracing or resisting similar transformations through various curatorial/editorial prototypes and prognosticative use-case scenarios. With an emphasis on cross-pollination between design thinking and curatorial thinking, the second meeting in San Francisco broached, among other things, the notion of the post-disciplinary, and the question of appropriate speeds or periodicities institutions should follow

    Poster produced for the seminar by Kadist Art Foundation, San Francisco.

    In Birmingham, the session will collectively imagine a ‘What if?’ – a post-apocalyptic scenario in which an art ecology has to be regrown from the ground up. What would be most urgent in terms of organisation, facilities, tools? The second part of the meeting will involve a practical exercise modeled to prototype initiatives that might be best suited to Birmingham’s real or imagined artistic, economic and social context.

    In order to be conducive to freedom of interaction, these meetings are held under the Chatham House Rule. This allows participants to express personal views, to listen, reflect and gather insights with a clear distinction from the position of their employers and/or the policies of any associated organization. Participation is expected, but there will be no resolutions issued, no votes are undertaken, and no policy statements proposed.


    Archive photo of ESP activity. Courtesy: Eastside Projects.

    Extra Special People (ESP)
    is a practice-led peer support network organised by Eastside Projects that "works with artists, designers, curators and writers to support the development of work, ideas, connections and careers through a programme of events, opportunities, and projects. Members become active contributors to a practice-led peer support network and benefit from Eastside Projects’ experience of the contemporary art world and regional, national and international contacts."

    Eastside Projects is an "internationally renowned centre of excellence based in a free public gallery imagined and organized by artists, in partnership with Birmingham City University." Eastside Projects is an Arts Council England National Portfolio Organisation, supported by the Paul Hamlyn Foundation Breakthrough Fund 2010-14, and Esmée Fairbairn Foundation.

    Eastside Projects
    86 Heath Mill Lane
    Birmingham B9 4AR
    0121-771-1778
    www.eastsideprojects.org
    www.extraspecialpeople.org


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