Cover Story–December 2018: "Treasures! exhibitionism! showmanship!"

Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org

The December 2018 Monthly Cover Story "Treasures! exhibitionism! showmanship!" is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org


"A clutch of shows in Vienna (where Latitudes was recently a guest of Art Week) and Amsterdam (which just held its Art Weekend) offer a distinctive take on curatorial liberty and creative exhibition display.

—> Continue reading
—> After December it will be archived here.


Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.

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Photo report: Trip to Vienna Art Week and Amsterdam Art Weekend

A snowy Belvederegarten. All photos (unless stated otherwise): Latitudes.

As part of this year’s VIENNA ART WEEK, Latitudes was invited to get to know Vienna's art scene over the course of three days (19–21 November). On Tuesday 19 November, the visiting group of curators and artists participated in the panel ‘Some Current Positions of Curating’ at das weisse haus. The panel, chaired by Alexandra Gausman of das weisse haus, briefly introduced recent projects by Argentinian artists Guillermo Faivovich & Nicolás Goldberg; soon-to-be Paris-based curator Claire Hoffmann (Centre Culturel Suisse de Paris); artists and curators FICTILIS from San Francisco; Avi Lubin (Faculty at Jerusalem’s Beit Berl College); and Stephanie Weber (Curator of Contemporary Art at Lembachhaus in München).

Above and below photos: eSeL.

Grand staircase of the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna.

(Above and nine below) Views from the exhibition ‘Spitzmaus Mummy in a Coffin and other Treasures’ guest curated by filmmaker Wes Anderson and writer and illustrator Juman Malouf, in collaboration with Jasper Sharp (Kunsthistorisches Museum) and Mario Mainetti (Fondazione Prada). ‘Anderson and Malouf have assembled more than 400 objects drawn from all fourteen of the museum’s historical collections. Among them are Egyptian, Greek and Roman antiquities, Old Master paintings, selections from the Kunstkammer and the Imperial Treasury, items from the Imperial Armoury, Coin Collection, and Collection of Historic Musical Instruments, as well as pieces from the Theatermuseum, the Weltmuseum, the Imperial Carriage Museum, and Schloss Ambras Innsbruck. A handful of special guests from the Natural History Museum are also included. Particular attention was given to the museum’s storage: more than 350 of the objects have been brought from depots, with many of them on public display for the very first time. (...) The gathering and arrangement of these treasures – from the earliest, a necklace of ceramic beads strung together in Ancient Egypt, to the most recent, a wooden monkey carved in Indonesia almost 5,000 years later – suggest the spectacular breadth, depth, history and complexity of the Kunsthistorisches Museum’s collections.’ (from the venue website)


(Above and below) Donna Huanca exhibition ˝Piedra quemada˝ at the Lower Belvedere.

 (Above and two below) One of the rooms at the Naturhistorisches Museum (NHM). Below Faivovich and Goldberg intervention ˝In Search of Mesón de Fierro˝, part of their long-term research on meteorites at El Chaco region in northern Argentina. For the exhibition, they presented a 19-gram fragment in a meteorite in the collection of the NHM Vienna, which they were able to trace quite convincingly to Mesón de Fierro.

(Above and three below) On our own time, we arranged a visit to the artist-run-space Guimarães. Hugo Canoilas, one of the artists that run it alongside Nicola Pecoraro and Christoph Meier, gave us a detailed tour of the show which explored the concept of excessive sentimentality. ‘SCHMALTZ’ showcased unique editions, amusing finds, objects that accompany artists in their studio, as well as artworks by over 50 artists. 
A special edition of Luisa Gardini's photos. 

(Above and four below) Views from ‘55 dates. Highlights of the MUMOK collection’, presenting 55 works with an exhibition design by (Portscapes artist) Hans Schabus.
(Above and below) Also at MUMOK, "a photographic journey through Austrian history from 1918 to the present" was the focus of ‘Photo/Politics/Austria’ this time with exhibition design by Markus Schinwald.

 (Above and two below) Views from Asier Mendizábal's solo exhibition at Galerie Martin Janda.

 At the nearby Kunsthalle Wien, Vanessa Joan Müller and Nicolas Schafhausen curated ‘Antarctica. An Exhibition on Alienation’, showing works by Viltė Bražiūnaitė / Tomas Sinkevičius, Burak Delier, Buck Ellison, Isabella Fürnkäs, Eva Giolo, Thibaut Henz, Jan Hoeft, Hanne Lippard, Joanna Piotrowska, Jeroen de Rijke / Willem de Rooij, Jana Schulz, Andrzej Steinbach, Ingel Vaikla, Peter Wächtler, Ian Wallace and Tobias Zielony. ˝The exhibition explores how the term “alienation” functions in our world today. In doing so, it also addresses the following question: What other forms of relationship to the self and to the world do we need? Before we can even begin to create something like a space supportive of self-determination and self-realization?" (from the venue website)

 One of the nine studio visits at Prater Ateliers. Here with Christian Kosmas Mayer. 
Studio visit with Judith Fegerl at Prater Ateliers.

 Tour by curator Moritz Stipsicz of Tomás Saraceno's intervention in the baroque Karlskirche in Karlsplatz. 
 Views of Karlsplatz and Vienna skyline from the cupola.

 (Above and three below) Ed Ruscha's ‘Double Americanisms’ at Secession
(Above) Detail from Philipp Timischl's ‘Artworks For All Age Groups’ in the downstairs galleries of Secession.
(Above) View of Kris Lemsalu's ‘Keys Open Doors’ in the upper Secession gallery.

On November 22, we took off to Amsterdam taking advantage of the Amsterdam Art Week events which included the Rijksakademie open, the opening of two exhibitions at Stedelijk Museum (a solo show by Raquel van Haver and the biannual group exhibition presenting Amsterdam’s Municipal Art Acquisitions, ‘Freedom of Movement’). We also visited De Appel, kunstverein, Rongwrong, a few galleries that opened jointly.


(Above and below) De Appel exhibited Ben Russel's film ‘Good luck’ (2017) premiered during documenta 13. ‘Accompanying the installation, the artist created a sculptural analogue to process and portraiture, Good Luck (Echo) that turns a sheet of copper into a resonant, speaking subject.’ (from the venue website)


 Mr Peanut exhibition at kunstverein Amsterdam, gathering material from Vincent Trasov who became Mr. Peanut in 1971. In 1974 he ran for mayor of Vancouver. ‘The exhibition traces the history of Trasov’s revolutionary alias and includes historical documents, publications, correspondence, video footage as well as more recent drawings of Mr. Peanut and paintings by Vincent Trasov. A major retrospective on Image Bank will follow in the summer of 2019 at Kunst-Werke in Berlin.’


 (Above and below) Works by Cees Mogami de Haas.

 (Above and below) Works by Riet Wijnen.

 (Above and below) Works by Marieke Zwart.

 (Above and below) Works by Morgan Courtois.

  (Above and below) Works by Marina Xenofontos.

 (Above and below) Works by Mire Lee.

  (Above and below) Works by Omar A. Chowdhury.

 (Above and below) Works by Maurice van Es.

  (Above and below) Works by Isabelle Andriessen.


  (Above and below) Works by Omar Vega Macotela.

   (Above and below) A film by Tyna Adebowale.

 (Above and below) Works by Josse Pyl. 

  (Above and below) Works by Gaëlle Choisne.

  (Above and below) Works by Dan Zhu.

  (Above and below) Works by Danielle Dean.

 (Above and below) Works by Polina Kani.

  (Above and below) Works by Femke Herregraven.

  (Above and below) Works by Kévin Bray.

  (Above and below) Library display initiated by Anna Dasovic. 

(Above) Exhibition by Paul Kooiker at the tegenboschvanvreden gallery.

 Gabriel Lester exhibition at Fons Welters, Amsterdam. 

 Lara Almarcegui's video at Ellen de Bruijne. 
 Rory Pilgrim exhibition at andriesse eyck.

 Talk with Janet Cardiff at Oude Kerk. Below her work, with Georges Bures Miller, an intervened mellotron ‘The Instrument of Troubled Dreams˝ (2018), with 72 keys each of them programmed with a sound effect, a vocal track or a musical fragment.


(Above and four below) Stedelijk Collection in the basement of the museum. 

 (Above and two below) Metahaven exhibition at the Stedelijk Museum.

Merlin Carpenter exhibition at Rongwrong.


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Liverpool Biennial 2018: "Beautiful world, where are you?" in photos



The Liverpool Biennial 2018: Beautiful world, where are you? (14 July – 28 October 2018) presented the work of over 40 artists in locations across Liverpool including public spaces, civic buildings and the city’s leading art venues: Blackburne House, Bluecoat, FACT, Open Eye Gallery, Liverpool John Moores University’s Exhibition Research Lab, Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral, the Oratory, the Playhouse theatre, RIBA North – National Architecture Centre, St George’s Hall, Tate Liverpool, Victoria Gallery & Museum (University of Liverpool), public spaces and online.

The 2018 edition was curated by Kitty Scott (Carol and Morton Rapp Curator, Modern and Contemporary Art at the Art Gallery of Ontario) and Sally Tallant (Director, Liverpool Biennial) with the Liverpool Biennial team.

The following texts are from the Liverpool Biennial website. All photos by Latitudes.

Above and below. Banu Cennetoğlu's "The List" on a 280-metre hoarding on Liverpool's Great George Street.

Compiled and updated each year by UNITED for Intercultural Action, an anti-discrimination network of 550 organisations in 48 countries, "The List" traces information relating to the deaths of more than 34,000 refugees and migrants who have lost their lives within, or on the borders of Europe since 1993. Since 2007, in collaboration with art workers and institutions, Banu Cennetoğlu has facilitated up-to-date and translated versions of "The List"  using public spaces such as billboards, transport networks, and newspapers. An updated edition of The List is presented on Great George Street in Liverpool and can be accessed online at guardian.co.uk. Copies of "The List", which were distributed by The Guardian newspaper on World Refugee Day on 20 June, are also available at exhibition venues.

Installed on a 280-metre hoarding on Liverpool's Great George Street, "The List" has been vandalised twice since the biennial opened in July. Cennetoğlu decided not to install it for a third time, leaving the ripped remains as a “reminder of the systematic violence exercised against people”. 


Mathias Poledna at The Oratory.

Screened within a specially designed structure, Mathias Poledna’s new film "Indifference" (2018) further advances his exploration of modernity’s visual imaginary. The work is set against the backdrop of early 20th-century European history, a period of traumatic modernisation and conflict.


Suki Seokyeong Kang at Bluecoat

Conceived as a visual translation of the Korean musical notation ‘Jeongganbo’, Land Sand Strand is a new multi-part installation by Suki Seokyeong Kang. The work transforms the exhibition space into a grid. Building on the concept of the hwamunseok – a traditional Korean woven mat, interpreted as the minimum space provided for each individual in society – it is activated by performers and the audience. The choreography, inspired by the Spring Oriole Dance and traditionally performed on the hwamunseok, is shared with visitors. The movements on the mat serve as the blueprint for the wider installation consisting of painting, sculpture and video.

Brian Jungen at Tate Liverpool.

Brian Jungen carves ‘feathers’ from the soles of Nike trainers to create a series of sculptures that resemble Cheyenne-style war bonnets. These headdresses, familiar from countless Westerns, address a long history of conflict and the lingering effects of colonisation. They signify the strength and pride of indigenous people today.

Duane Linklater at Tate Liverpool.

The sculptural works of Duane Linklater consider the notions of cultural loss, social amnesia and identity from the perspective of the indigenous peoples in Canada. Commenting on the economy of the fur trade, they suggest that animals, even in death, might retain their spirits or selfhood beyond the value they possess as commodities.






Haegue Yang at Tate Liverpool.

Haegue Yang presented her sculpture series "The Intermediates" (2015-ongoing) in Tate Liverpool's Wolfson Gallery. Made from artificial woven straw, The Intermediates allude to both traditional arts and crafts techniques and modern industrial production methods. Representing figures and sites from folk tales and ancient traditions, they question definitions of ‘paganism’. Yang’s environment for these works includes recordings of wildlife taken from the British Library’s sound collection, a wallpaper juxtaposing pagan traditions and modern history, and suspended ribbons that evoke folk traditions such as maypole dancing. Her multisensory, hybrid environments suggest fleeting connotations of time, place, figures and experiences that connect ‘folk’ traditions and contemporary culture.



 Not as part of the biennial programming, but this conversation coincided with our visit. 

The White Pube's Zarina Muhammad and Gabrielle de la Puente were in conversation with Tate Liverpool's new director Helen Legg about their origins as "embodied art critics", their practice and the challenges art criticism presents today. 

Aslan Gaisumov at St George’s Hall

Tracing the struggles and turbulent histories of the Chechen people, Aslan Gaisumov’s most recent work Keicheyuhea (2017) follows the artist’s grandmother as she returns to her lost homeland in the mountainous scenery of the North Caucasus for the first time since the displacement of her family 73 years earlier. 

Naeem Mohaiemen at the St George’s Hall.
  
Screened in the courtroom at St George’s Hall is "Two Meetings and a Funeral" (2017), a three-channel film by Naeem Mohaiemen – currently nominated for the Turner Prize 2018. The work revisits the Cold War-era power struggles between the political coalitions of the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) and the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC). The project navigates alliances of convenience made during Bangladesh’s fight for UN recognition, as well as parallel decolonisation struggles in Palestine-Israel, the Portuguese colonies and South Africa.

At the Victoria Gallery & Museum. Part of "Worlds within worlds" section. 

Display of the Brendel Plant Models of World Museum anatomical models of plants, made for display and teaching purposes by the Berlin firm of R Brendel & Co in Germany around the turn of the 20th century.


Francis Alÿs' paintings at the Victoria Gallery & Museum. 

Francis Alÿs presents a selection of postcard-size paintings from the 1980s to today under the title Age Piece. Executed in the tradition of classic à plein air painting, these works allude to the condition of global tourism in the contemporary art scene. Many of the paintings were done while scouting new locations for future film projects, often in conflict zones such as Israel and Palestine, Afghanistan and Iraq.

Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral Plateau.

Five bench-like sculptures can be found on the plateau behind the Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral. For this new commission, Ryan Gander dissected a model of architect Frederick Gibberd’s modernist cathedral into a series of simple ‘building blocks’. The blocks were then reassembled into different configurations by schoolchildren from Liverpool: Jamie Clark, Phoebe Edwards, Tianna Mehta, Maisie Williams and Joshua Yates. The maquettes that Gander and the children created have been reproduced on a larger scale to produce this new public seating arrangement within the cathedral grounds. This presentation is part of a larger project, Time Moves Quickly.

 John James Audubon at the Central Library.

One of the only 120 complete edition copies of The Birds of America by John James Audubon at the Central Library. The 19th-century book contains exquisite illustrations of a wide variety of birds of the United States.

Paul Elliman's work at Exhibition Research Lab.

Paul Elliman presents the "Vauxhall Astra 2020", the forthcoming and newest model of a car available since 1979 when General Motors launched the Vauxhall/Opel Astra, now the only car produced at Ellesmere Port. The Astra 2020 is offered as a constellation of raw materials, half-a-dozen boulders and rock-like lumps of the car’s constituent parts at original scale, made of steel (iron ore), glass, plastic, aluminum, rubber, and electrical components.


Mohamed Bourouissa has created a garden working with local people, gardeners, school pupils, teachers and artists. The artist was inspired by a garden made by a patient of the psychoanalyst and writer Frantz Fanon at the Blida-Joinville Psychiatric Hospital in Blida, Algeria. Fanon’s patient created the garden as occupational therapy, reflecting the organisation of his mental space through its structure. Bourouissa researched and learned the patient’s approach to botany, architecture, and therapy in order to create a similar garden in Liverpool. The garden has been conceived as a space of ‘resilience’. Some of the plants are native to Algeria and others have healing effects. A film documenting the garden and its evolution is presented at FACT.


Very close to Bourouissa's Resilience Garden is Assemble's ongoing project at Granby's Street.

Assemble's ceramic workshop in Granby Street, "a manufacturer of architectural ceramics, based in Liverpool and established in 2015. The workshop is part of Assemble's ongoing involvement with the Granby Four Streets neighbourhood."

Work by Taus Makhacheva at Blackburne House.

Taus Makhacheva has created a ruin-like sculptural installation that serves as a spa, in collaboration with artist Alexander Kutovoi. The installation incorporates ASMR (Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response) techniques and video.


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Eighth episode of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Alejandra Aguado and Diego Bianchi from Buenos Aires, Argentina

Episode 8 from Buenos Aires now online on http://incidents.kadist.org/


In the eighth '
Incidents (of Travel)' dispatch Móvil co-founder and curator Alejandra Aguado followed the itinerary devised by the artist Diego Bianchi around Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

Their exploration took them from the self-regulated community Velatropa to the buzzing commercial area of Once, identifying human and non-human flows and interactions. This became an entry point for discussing Bianchi's interests in how, as consumers, we define a particular zeitgeist and appropriate trends that enable us to affirm our identities.

Each of the 20 photographs is augmented by one or more extra assets – a brief commentary, a sound or a caption – accessed by clicking the words overlaying the images.








'Incidents (of Travel)' explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter and an extended offline conversation between curator/s and artist/s. Online storytelling presents and documents curatorial fieldwork and a day conceived by an artist for a curator.

Conceived by Latitudes in 2012 as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City (with five dispatches presented as part of an exhibition at Casa del Lago), 'Incidents of Travel' had sequels in 2013 in Hong Kong (online dispatches published via Twitter, Instagram, and Soundcloud) and San Francisco in 2015 (daily posts as part of Kadist's Instagram take over initiative #ArtistNotInTheStudioCuratorNotAtTheOffice).

In 2016 Kadist and Latitudes partnered in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)' as part of Kadist Online Projects, publishing contributions from invited curators and artists working around the world.





Earlier conversations have taken place in Hobart (Tasmania), Yerevan (Armenia), Terengganu (Malaysia), Lisbon (Portugal), Suzhou (China), Jinja (Uganda) and Chicago (US). 

The first dispatch launched in April 2016 with an itinerary by curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – a day photographed by Nabiha Khan.





The second dispatch came from Jinja in Uganda, where curator Moses Serubiri invited photographer Mohsen Taha to explore Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972.



The third episode took place while curator Yu Ji and poet Xiao Kaiyu hiked on Dong Shan (East Mountain), 130 km west of Shanghai, on a peninsula stretching into Tai Hu lake near the city of Suzhou, China.

The fourth dispatch came from Lisbon, where Galician curator Pedro de Llano visited key locations that marked the life and work of Luisa Cunha.



The fifth episode took place in April 2016, when curator Simon Soon and artist chi too visited the Malaysian North Eastern state of Terengganu, where chi spent some time in 2013, surrounded by "men and women who work(ed) multiple jobs as a fishermen, house builders, boat builders, farmers, coconut pickers, food producers, and everything else that matters."


The sixth episode narrates a walking itinerary conducted by curator Marianna Hovhannisyan with Vardan Kilichyan, Gohar Hosyan, and Anaida Verdyan in Yerevan, the capital of Armenia, documenting the transformed, disappeared, or permanently-closed art institutions in the city centre.



The seventh episode comes from Hobart, capital of Tasmania. It is narrated by curator Camila Marambio, following an itinerary devised by artist Lucy Bleach. They spent the day "encircling the outer limits of human understanding by visiting the histories, both past, and present, of attempts to reach beyond our sensory capacities through governance, technology, and reverie", and ended the day cooking at Lucy's home sharing their mutual love for quinces.

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Seventh episode of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Camila Marambio and Lucy Bleach from Hobart, Tasmania

http://incidents.kadist.org/hobart.html

The seventh 'Incidents (of Travel)' dispatch comes from Hobart, capital of Tasmania. It is narrated by curator Camila Marambio, following an itinerary devised by artist Lucy Bleach. Lucy "shared her knowledge of volcanoes, lava, and magma leading (Camila) on a quest to relate local geochemical and geophysical conundrums to the expansive solar system." 

They spent the day "encircling the outer limits of human understanding by visiting the histories, both past, and present, of attempts to reach beyond our sensory capacities through governance, technology, and reverie", and ended the day cooking at Lucy's home sharing their mutual love for quinces.

Each of the 19 photographs is augmented by one or more extra assets – a brief commentary, soundscape or a caption – accessed by clicking the words which overlay the images
.



Originally conceived by Latitudes as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City in 2012 (with five dispatches presented as part of an exhibition at Casa del Lago) 'Incidents of Travel' had sequels in 2013 in Hong Kong (online dispatches published via twitter, Instagram, and Soundcloud) and San Francisco in 2015 (daily posts on Kadist's Instagram as part of their #ArtistNotInTheStudioCuratorNotAtTheOffice take over initiative).

The project explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter and an extended conversation between curator/s and artist/s. Online storytelling presents and documents curatorial fieldwork and an offline day conceived by an artist for a curator.
In 2016 Kadist and Latitudes partnered in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)' as part of Kadist Online Projects. This new phase is developed as an online periodical that publishes contributions from invited curators and artists working around the world.


http://incidents.kadist.org/chicago

A series of itineraries conceived by six curators, artists or researchers — previous fellows of the seminar The Place from Where We Look (Kadist Paris, June 2015) — launched in April 2016 with an itinerary by curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – a day photographed by Nabiha Khan


http://incidents.kadist.org/jinja

The second dispatch came from Jinja in Uganda, where curator Moses Serubiri invited photographer Mohsen Taha to explore Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972.


http://incidents.kadist.org/suzhou

The third episode took place while curator Yu Ji and poet Xiao Kaiyu hiked on Dong Shan (East Mountain), 130 km west of Shanghai, on a peninsula stretching into Tai Hu lake near the city of Suzhou, China
http://incidents.kadist.org/lisbon

The fourth dispatch came from Lisbon, where Galician curator Pedro de Llano visited key locations that marked the life and work of Luisa Cunha.
http://incidents.kadist.org/terengganu

The fifth episode took place in April 2016, when curator Simon Soon and artist chi too visited the Malaysian North Eastern state of Terengganu, where chi spent some time in 2013, surrounded by "men and women who work(ed) multiple jobs as a fishermen, house builders, boat builders, farmers, coconut pickers, food producers, and everything else that matters." 
http://incidents.kadist.org/terengganu

The sixth episode narrates a walking itinerary conducted by curator Marianna Hovhannisyan with Vardan Kilichyan, Gohar Hosyan, and Anaida Verdyan in Yerevan, the capital of Armenia, documenting the transformed, disappeared, or permanently-closed art institutions in the city centre.


RELATED CONTENT:




Sixth episode of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Marianna Hovhannisyan and students from the National Center of Aesthetics from Yerevan, Armenia

http://incidents.kadist.org/yerevan

The sixth 'Incidents (of Travel)' episode narrates a walking itinerary in Yerevan, the capital of Armenia, documenting the transformed, disappeared, or permanently-closed art institutions in the city center

The itinerary was conducted by curator Marianna Hovhannisyan with Vardan Kilichyan, Gohar Hosyan, and Anaida Verdyan — three art students from the National Center of Aesthetics, one of the oldest alternative art educational hubs in the city. 

The inquiry was based on how knowledge transmission and generational exchanges in the Armenian contemporary art field could be approached—particularly in terms of exploring the fragmented histories of its institutional work.

Each of the 15 photographs is augmented by one or more extra assets – a brief commentary or a caption –, accessed by clicking the words which overlay the images.



Marianna Hovhannisyan (Yerevan/San Diego) is a research-based curator, a Ph.D student in Art History, Theory, and Criticism at Visual Arts Department, Univerisity of California San Diego. 

Originally conceived by Latitudes as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City in 2012 (with five dispatches presented as part of an exhibition on Latitudes' curatorial practice at Casa del Lago) 'Incidents of Travel' had sequels in 2013 in Hong Kong (online dispatches published via twitter, instagram, and soundcloud) and San Francisco in 2015 (daily posts on Kadist's Instagram as part of their #ArtistNotInTheStudioCuratorNotAtTheOffice take over initiative).


The project explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter and an extended conversation between curator/s and artist/s. Online storytelling presents and documents curatorial fieldwork and an offline day conceived by an artist for a curator.
In 2016 Kadist and Latitudes partnered in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)' as part of Kadist Online Projects. This new phase is developed as an online periodical that publishes contributions from invited curators and artists working around the world.


http://incidents.kadist.org/chicago

A series of itineraries conceived by six curators, artists or researchers — previous fellows of the seminar The Place from Where We Look (Kadist Paris, June 2015) — launched in April 2016 with an itinerary by curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – a day photographed by Nabiha Khan


http://incidents.kadist.org/jinja

The second dispatch came from Jinja in Uganda, where curator Moses Serubiri invited photographer Mohsen Taha to explore Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972.


http://incidents.kadist.org/suzhou

The third episode took place while curator Yu Ji and poet Xiao Kaiyu hiked on Dong Shan (East Mountain), 130 km west of Shanghai, on a peninsula stretching into Tai Hu lake near the city of Suzhou, China
http://incidents.kadist.org/lisbon

The fourth dispatch came from Lisbon, where Galician curator Pedro de Llano visited key locations that marked the life and work of Luisa Cunha.
http://incidents.kadist.org/terengganu

The fifth episode took place in April 2016, when curator Simon Soon and artist chi too visited the Malaysian North Eastern state of Terengganu, where chi spent some time in 2013, surrounded by "men and women who work(ed) multiple jobs as a fishermen, house builders, boat builders, farmers, coconut pickers, food producers, and everything else that matters."  


RELATED CONTENT:






    Cover Story—February 2018: Paradise, Promises and Perplexities


    Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org 

    The February 2018 Monthly Cover Story "Paradise, Promises and Perplexities" is now up on www.lttds.org – after this month it will be archived here.

    "This month marks ten years since the opening of Greenwashing, curated by Latitudes and Ilaria Bonacossa. Subtitled Environment: Perils, Promises and Perplexities, this exhibition at the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin, addressed the melding of corporate agendas and individual ethics in the wake of the exhaustion of traditional environmentalism." Continue reading

    Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.

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    Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
    Cover Story – January 2018: I'll be there for you, 2 January 2018
    Cover Story – December 2017: "Tabet's Tapline trajectory", 4 December 2017
    Cover Story – November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
    Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
    Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
    Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
    Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
    Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
    Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
    Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
    Cover Story – March 2017: Time travel with Jordan Wolfson 1 March 2017
    Cover Story — February 2017: The Dutch Assembly, five years on 1 February 2017
    Cover Story – January 2017: How open are open calls? 4 January 2017





      Progress of Amy Balkin's ‘Today’s CO2 Spot Price’ (2009)

      Throughout the course of the ‘4.543 billion. The Matter of Matter’ exhibition at the CAPC musée in Bordeaux, the work by Amy Balkin (Baltimore, Maryland, 1967. Lives in San Francisco) ‘Today’s CO2 Spot Price’ (2009) charted the daily price of carbon dioxide emissions allowances in the world’s largest carbon market, the EU Emissions Trading Scheme. The numbering system was manually updated every morning to show the price in Euros of an entitlement to legally emit one metric tonne of CO2. Polluters—power plants or factories—receive or buy emissions allowances at auctions and trade them as needed to minimize costs.

      A product of the increasing dominance of the finance sector and the expansion of financial derivatives that emerged in the 1970s, the carbon market ‘fix’ has abstracted the qualitative problem of climate change mitigation into a commodity market based on a molecule treated as the singular cause. There is a trend towards emissions that can be lucratively ‘avoided’, while there has been little effect on structural fossil fuel dependence. In this perspective, global warming is a market failure that can be corrected by governing the atmosphere via an economic instrument with no real material or historical reference.

      Balkin's piece was presented alongside works by Pep Vidal, Lucas Ihlein, and Lara Almarcegui, all focusing on humans' calculations and quantification of nature and its progressive abstraction.

      —Latitudes 

      (Text from the exhibition guide)

      4.543 billion. The matter of matter’ took place between the June 29, 2017 and January 7, 2018 at the CAPC musée d'art contemporain, Bordeaux, France.



      General view of room 8. Photo: Latitudes/RK.


      Work by Lara Almarcegui (wall) and Pep Vidal (floor). Photo: Latitudes/RK.


      Prints by Lucas Ihlein (wall) and part of a tree by Pep Vidal (floor). Photo: Latitudes/RK.


      Below a sequence of all the social media posts (mostly from Instagrammers, more on this and other works on this Wakelet feed) showing the ongoing flux of its price—which has ranged from 4,84 Eur per tonne of CO2 during the installation of the piece, to 4,93 Eur on the opening day (29 June 2017), to the last picture on record showing a whopping 7,76 Eur per tonne of CO2.

      We would like to thank the Kadist in San Francisco for having given us the opportunity to, after years of corresponding over email, finally meet Amy during a residency in September 2015. Her "Incidents of Travel" day on several locations in and outside San Francisco (download the specially-commissioned itinerary here) was invaluable towards the conceptualization of this exhibition.




      During installation of the work. Photo: Latitudes for @capc 



      Taken on the opening day, 29 June 2017. Photo: Latitudes/RK. 



      Taken on 2 July 2017. Photo: Latitudes. 




      Image published in the Sudouest newspaper on 12 July 2017 showing 04,98 EUR/tC02.



      Taken on 13 July 2017 by Hélène Lucien. 


      Taken on 16 July 2017 by Adriano Pedrosa. 


      Taken on 2 August 2017 by Lena Joreis. 


      Taken on 19 August 2017 by Semi-Sans.


      Taken on 22 August 2017 by Mads Freund Brunse.


      Taken on 12 October 2017 by Tomas Mendizabal.


      Taken on 17 October 2017 by Margareth.


      Taken on 20 November 2017 by @matlegall. 


      Taken on 2 November 2017 by @Elénie. 


      Taken on 30 November 2017 by @mllelahaye 


      Taken on 1 December 2017 by @mommou.elle 


      Taken on January 7, 2018 by Alice Cavender. 


      RELATED CONTENT: 

      • 4.543 billion. The Matter of Matter” exhibition 
      • Archive of social networks posts related to "4.543 billion" 
      • Photo gallery of the exhibition 
      • CAPC website (French, English, Spanish) http://www.capc-bordeaux.fr/programme/4543-milliards
      • Cover Story—December 2017: "Tabet's Tapline trajectory" 4 December 2017
      • Alfred Roll's 1878 "The Old Quarryman" exchanged with Alfred Smith's "The Grave Docks" (1884) in the exhibition "4.543 billion" at the CAPC musée 3 November 2017
      • Cover Story—November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth" 1 November 2017
      • 15 November 2017, 4:30–8pm: 'The Return of the Earth. Ecologising art history in the Anthropocene' study day at the CAPC musée, Bordeaux 24 October 201
      • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
      • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
      • SAVE THE DATE: 29 June, 19h. Private view of the exhibition "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" at the CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux 30 May 2017 
      • Cover Story – May 2016: Material histories – spilling the beans at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux 10 May 2016
      • Second research trip to Bordeaux 16 July 2016





        2017 in 12 monthly Cover Stories

        Another year has gone by!

        Revisit some of Latitudespast–present–future–ongoing projects through our online archive of Monthly Cover Stories, a chance to focus on an artwork, article, event, film, exhibition, excursion or ongoing train of thoughts. 


        Cover Story January 2017: "How open are open calls?", 4 January 2017

        Cover Story February 2017: "The Dutch Assembly, five years on", 1 February 2017

        Cover Story – March 2017: "Time travel with Jordan Wolfson", 1 March 2017

        Cover Story – April 2017: "Banff Geologic Time", 3 April 2017

        Cover Story – May 2017: "S is for Shale or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps", 1 May 2017 

        Cover Story – June 2017: "Moth light—Absent Forms", 1 June 2017
        Cover Story – July 2017: "4.543 billion", 3 July 2017 


        Cover Story – August 2017: "Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern", 1 August 2017  


        Cover Story – September 2017: "Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis'", 1 September 2017

        Cover Story – October 2017: "Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier", 11 October 2017

        Cover Story—November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
        Cover Story—December 2017: "Tabet’s Tapline trajectory", 4 December 2017

        RELATED CONTENT:
        Latitudes' Cover Story archive,
        Latitudes' writing archive,
        Latitudes' newsletters.




        Cover Story—December 2017: Tabet’s Tapline trajectory

        Monthly Cover Story on http://www.lttds.org

        The December 2017 Monthly Cover Story "Tabet’s Tapline trajectory" is now up on www.lttds.org – after this month it will be archived here.
         

        "Rayyane Tabet’sSteel Rings and the mobile Three Logos (both 2013) slice through and loom over the web of natural histories and human natures, mineral agency and political ecology that comprises the exhibition 4.543 billion. The matter of matter. Rayyane was one of the first artists to come on board what would become this Latitudes-curated exhibition at CAPC Bordeaux. And as the show approaches the end of its journey—it finishes on 7 January 2018—it seems appropriate that this month’s cover story creates a bookend of sorts. Moreover, it gives a perfect reason to mention Rayyane’s stunning exhibition Fragments that has recently opened at Hamburg Kunstverein." Continue reading  

        Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities. 

        RELATED CONTENT:
        • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
        • Cover Story – November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
        • Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
        • Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
        • Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
        • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
        • Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
        • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
        • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
        • Cover Story – March 2017: Time travel with Jordan Wolfson 1 March 2017
        • Cover Story February 2017: The Dutch Assembly, five years on 1 February 2017
        • Cover Story January 2017: How open are open calls? 4 January 2017




        Cover Story—November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth"

        Monthly Cover Story on http://www.lttds.org/blog/


        The November 2017 Monthly Cover Story "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth" is now up on www.lttds.org – after this month it will be archived here

        "On 15 November the study day The Return of the Earth: Ecologising art history in the Anthropocene takes place at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain Bordeaux in conjunction with the Latitudes-curated exhibition 4.543 billion. The matter of matter. With a keynote by science historian Jean-Baptiste Fressoz, and a conversation between artists Xavier Ribas and Ângela Ferreira—the latter both featured in the exhibition—the event will intertwine discussions of art practice and historical research, with environmental and geological narratives, and vice versa." Continue reading
         
        Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities


        RELATED CONTENT:
        • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
        • 15 November 2017, 4:30–8pm: 'The Return of the Earth. Ecologising art history in the Anthropocene' study day at the CAPC musée, Bordeaux 24 October 2017
        • Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
        • Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
        • Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
        • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
        • Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
        • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
        • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
        • Cover Story – March 2017: Time travel with Jordan Wolfson 1 March 2017
        • Cover Story February 2017: The Dutch Assembly, five years on 1 February 2017
        • Cover Story January 2017: How open are open calls? 4 January 2017




        Latitudes' "out of office" 2016–2017 season

         Downtime for physical and mental "reparations" begins. 
        Photos: Latitudes (except where noted otherwise).

        It's the end of the 2016–17 season, at last. Following a Latitudes' tradition we mark the summer downtime with an "out of office" post (see the 2008-9, 2009-10, 2010-11, 2011-12, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2015–16 ones) with a series of "behind the scenes" and "making of" moments from the year gone by. Here are some glimpses of the past season, from September 2016 to July 2017.

        We'll be back in September 2017, when we'll be leading a residency programme at Banff Centre in the Canadian Rockies!

         
        15 September
        2016: The 2016–17 season started with glitter and sparkle as Antoni Hervàs' "The Mystery of Caviria" exhibition opened in La Capella. The eight chapters of his complex scenario revolved around the legend of Jason and the Argonauts’ expedition in search of the Golden Fleece. The spectacular scenography took as its point of origin the section of the tale in which the expedition led by Jason stops for a few months in Lemnos, the island of fire, in the northern part of the Aegean Sea. Taking this fragment, Hervàs explored the transformist and genre-bending possibilities of drawing, a medium that enabled him to unite two mythologies: the Cabeirian rites of Classical Greece and figures from Barcelona’s dwindling cabaret scene. Photos of the exhibition here.

        Toni's exhibition was the focus of the September and November Cover Story series on our home page, archived here.



        Photos above: Latitudes and Toni Hervàs.

        18 September 2016: More sparkle awaited on the former site of the Copacabana club and nearby frontón court. The former is currently a parking lot used by the Department of Culture of the Catalan Government. The lone castanets master Juan de la Cruz el Rosillo interpreted a moving repertoire of popular Spanish coplas. For the second part of the event, the audience walked a few meters up Las Ramblas towards the frontón, where Gerard López, Senior Spanish Champion in male rhythmic gymnastics, interpreted newly-commissioned choreography with specially-produced music by Norman Bambi, while wearing a Hervàs-designed garment (exhibited as part of his exhibition).


        20 September 2016: Just as we are catching our breath from the memorable exhibition opening and the first event related to Toni's exhibition, street banners popped up around the city announcing the second Barcelona Gallery Weekend.


        26–28 September 2016: Installation of "Composiciones" projects, five site-specific commissions for the second iteration of the Barcelona Gallery Weekend. Three days of intense preparations! Curated by Latitudes for the second time (see 2015 edition), the project further explored Barcelona as a rich fabric of the historic and the contemporary, the unfamiliar and the conspicuous.

         Above and below: Lola Lasurt at the Biblioteca Pública Arús. 
        (Above) Lúa and Mariana admiring the serendipitous finding of "El Espejo equivocado" painting at the Club Billar Barcelona. An almost spooky, yet incredibly fitting find. 

        (Above) With Rafel Bianchi and Gina Giménez unpacking Gina's works and spreading them around the former textile factory Can Trinxet, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat. 

        Silkscreened outfits for the runners finally ready to be worn throughout the weekend. Photos: Robert Llimós.

        Runners pass by Galeria dels Àngels. Photo: Gabriela Moragas.
         Testing the resistance of a pair of Levi's jeans in preparation for Wilfredo Prieto "Pantalones Rotos" at the Mounted Unit of the Barcelona City Police.


        29 September–2 October 2016: Opening and guided visits around the five "Composiciones" interventions by Lúa Coderch (at the Club Billar Barcelona); Regina Giménez (at the former textile factory Can Trinxet, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat); Lola Lasurt (at the Biblioteca Pública Arús); Robert Llimós (connecting all the participating galleries) and Wilfredo Prieto (at the Mounted Unit of the Barcelona City Police) in unique sites across the neighbourhoods of the city. Their projects offered moments of intermission, intimacy and bewilderment throughout the weekend, highlighting some lesser-known aspects of the city’s cultural heritage and municipal life.

        Storify archive of social networks posts. Photographs here.

        Guided tour by Lúa Coderch in her intervention at the Club Billar Barcelona.

        Guided tour by Gina Giménez to ARCOwalks group in Can Trinxet. 

         Speaking for the radio at the Mounted Unit of the Barcelona City Police.

         
         TV presenter Josep Paris modeled Robert Llimós' 1972 updated runners design during the weekly cultural TV programme Àrtic. Photo: Àrtic.

         Double spread on "Composiciones" in the cultural supplement "Tendències" by national newspaper El Mundo. Photo: Vanessa Graell.

        26 October 2016: Launch of Rasmus Nilausen book "Soups & Symptoms" at Múltiplos, which includes an essay by Max Andrews. For the event, Rasmus and Max served up a carrot soup (potage crécy) and requested questions from friends, family and collaborators which would be accepted as long as they fitted onto Jacob's Cream cracker.

        The catalogue was produced thanks to the funding from Premi Art Nou 2015, Art Barcelona, Associació de Galeries d’Art Contemporani in collaboration with the Institut de Cultura de Barcelona, García Galeria (Madrid) and Estrany de la Mota (Barcelona). It can be purchased in La Central.

        Max and Rasmus prepare the carrots for a large pot of Potage Crécy, questions are written on a Jacob's Cream crackers (that will later accompany the soup) and book launch at Múltiplos.


        3 November 2016: Runway show at La Capella with some costumes from the 1980s and 90s designed by actor and impresario Victor Guerrero. Part of the activities programmed on the occasion of the exhibition.

        Photos: Latitudes.

        8 November 2016: Mariana Cánepa Luna's review on Ana Jotta's exhibition published on art-agenda, focused on "her ongoing series 'Notas de rodapé' [Footnotes] [which] provide a key to understanding the semantic complexity of her work. It comprises a selection of the eclectic bits and pieces which Jotta has gathered for decades and that coexist in her studio alongside works that she has fabricated." Continue reading


        23-24 November 2016: Latitudes participated in a two-day summit "You are such a curator!" organised by the Curatorial Programme of De Appel, Amsterdam. With contributions by Mira Asriningtyas, Lucrezia Calabro Visconti, Renata Cervetto, Mateo Chacon-Pino, Galerie (Adriano Wilfert Jensen and Simon Asencio), Natasha Hoare, Kati Ilves, Prem Krishnamurthy, Inga Lace, Latitudes (Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna), Ariane Loze, Shona Mei Findlay, Fadwa Naamna, Kim Nguyen, Emma Ines Panza, Aneta Rostkowska and Kuba Woynarowski, Chris Sharp, Niels Van Tomme, Huib Haye van der Werf, and others. We took the opportunity to extend our stay on the occasion of the Amsterdam Art Weekend 2016, which included the opening of Jordan Wolfson's at the Stedelijk and the Open Studios at the Rijksakademie.


        Latitudes' presention "Following the Holy Greyhound" reflected "on the disinterment of a sculpture from 1991 – part of an exhibition by the Venezuelan artist José Antonio Hernández-Díez curated by Latitudes at MACBA, Barcelona, earlier this year – and their approach to a group exhibition in preparation for CAPC Musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux in Summer 2017. Full report here.

          Photos: Carina Erdmann/De Appel.

        November-December 2016: Two of Latitudes' projects ("Composiciones" commissions for the Barcelona Gallery Weekend and "El misterio de Caviria" by Antoni Hervàs) are shortlisted for the best exhibition of the year by the TV culture programme Tria33. The audience casts their votes online until January. Antoni Hervàs won with 40% of the audience votes. "Composiciones" ends in the third position with 17% of the votes.



        January 2017: Issue of frieze magazines includes Max Andrews' "Salon Selectives" text in the Opinion section, discussing "How open are open calls?":

        "While competition organizers typically trumpet the volume and cosmopolitanism of applications received an ebullient endorsement, others may rue the sheer amount of collectively wasted effort made by the also-rans. (In Spain, Bilbao-based studio Taller de Casquería estimated that the hours involved in the 1,715 submissions received for the Guggenheim Helsinki open call for designs represented over €18 million worth of speculative work.) In Gary Hustwit’s 2011 documentary film, Urbanized, Rem Koolhaas stated that such competitions were a ‘complete drain of intelligence’, inviting mass creative thinking with the guarantee that the vast majority of it will be discarded. This addiction in the field of architecture appears to be gaining traction in contemporary art as a means not only of generating exhibitions but of programming institutions."

        The text was the January Cover Story on our website.


        25 January 2017: Presentation of Antoni Hervàs' La Capella publication at the Antic Teatre in the background of one of his scenographic drawings dedicated to Gilda Love (this was the second time this had been displayed in this space, following the recording in May last year of Gilda performing, a video later included in the exhibition). The evening was followed by the "Desplume" monthly cabaret show.




        16 February 2017: A moving evening seeing Toni Hervàs receive the Premi Ciutat de Barcelona for visual arts exhibition of the year at the Sala de Consell de Cent in the Barcelona City Hall. The jury recognised "the artist's research in linking Greek mythology with the Barcelona cabaret scene from the 1960s–80s and for the recuperation of its vitality."

        Toni receiving the award from Barcelona mayor Ada Colau and during his speech. Photos: Latitudes.

        1 March 2017: Launch of the fourth 'Incidents (of Travel)' episode, in which Galician curator Pedro de Llano met Lisboeta artist Luisa Cunha in Lisbon. Their offline day took place in early December and went through key locations in the artist's life – from Ar.Co, the School of Visual Arts in Almada where she enrolled at age thirty-seven, to the Largo da Academia de Belas Artes in Chiado, where she conceived a public project that never materialised.
        Above: captures from the project website.

        2 March 2017: Opening of Joana Hurtado Matheu's "Nostalgic Dissidence" exhibition mentored by Latitudes as part of the Barcelona Producció 2016 season. Repairs and conservation work in the Baroque cupola had delayed the opening by three months, so we were all pleased the day finally arrived. 

          Working on the exhibition layout.

        Francesco Arena's "Mare della tranquillità" (2013) is activated by a performer. "An old wooden table, taken from the family dining room, has been cut into four pieces to form the corners of a much bigger new table. Enlarged with inserts of metal, its size evokes the table on which, on May 7, 1945, the signing of the German surrender ended World War II in Europe. The work is the support for a participative action which consists of walking back and forth on the five-metre table a total of 155 km, the length of the Berlin Wall. Every day during the two months of the exhibition someone will get up on the table and, wearing shoes that have never touched the ground and holding a tally counter, walk from one end to the other 596 times." (exhibition wall label by the curator)

        Photos: Pep Herrero/La Capella and Marc Llibre Roig.

        January 2017: The artist Alexandra Navratil pots an image of the work she will present in the forthcoming exhibition "4.543 billion" due to open June 29 at the CAPC musée in Bordeaux.


        22–24 March 2017: Third trip to Bordeaux. Packed with meetings. Three months to go to the opening of "4.543 billion" exhibition. In two weeks deadline to submit the texts for the gallery guide. 

         Running through each work through our sketch up exhibition rendering with the curatorial, collections, registrar, press and installation teams.

        23 March 2017: Meanwhile in Barcelona, Toni Hervàs wins yet another award – for the best exhibition of the year, and given by the Catalan Association of Art Critics. 

        Hervàs during the award ceremony. Photo: ACCA.

        April 2017: A bit of a website refresh – these things are so darn tedious yet they feel so good when they are done and dusted!


        26 April 2017: Fifth 'Incidents (of Travel)' episode online narrating the encounter between curator Simon Soon and artist Chi Too. Their offline day took place in April 2016, when they visited the Malaysian state of Terengganu, where chi spent some time in 2013, surrounded by "men and women who work(ed) multiple jobs as a fishermen, house builders, boat builders, farmers, coconut pickers, food producers, and everything else that matters."

        'Incidents (of Travel)' is a chartered day-long itinerary as an alternative to the standard studio-visit, inviting an extended conversation between a curator and an artist. Previous destinations have included Chicago, US; Jinja, Uganda; Suzhou, China; and Lisbon, Portugal. Produced by Kadist; photographs and video by Awang Ketut; site built by The Present Group.



        Above: captures from the project website.

        3 May 2017: Conversation with Korean-born, Berlin-based artist Haegue Yang at the Fundació Tàpies, Barcelona. The evening discussion analysed Yang's practice from the perspective of historical development and cyclic fluctuations, asked, as phrased by sociologist and economist Giovanni Arrighi – what is accumulative, what is cyclical, what is new? 

        Photos: Fundació Han Nefkens.

        May 2017: After three intense weeks of jury process, eighteen selected projects of Barcelona Producció 2017 grant scheme are announced. We begin the year-long mentoring process of three projects out of the seventeen selected projects this year as part of the Barcelona Producció 2017 production grants. David Mutiloa's SYNTHESIS (18 July–25 September 2017) is first to occupy La Capella's 15th-century exhibition space. The other two projects mentored by Latitudes are a publication by Anna Moreno and an exhibition "Artengo2000" at the small exhibition space by Camille Orny and Magda Vaz.

         Jury searching for a solid wifi spot to watch video documentation sent by an applicant.

        12 June 2017, in Basel: Max Andrews of Latitudes contributed the essay "C-H-R-I-S-T-O-P-H-E-R-K-N-O-W-L-E-S. SO LISTEN UP" about the spoken-word works, "typings", poetry and paintings of Christopher Knowles. The publication is made to accompany his solo presentation in the stand of NoguerasBlanchard gallery at Liste art fair in Basel. The exquisite short-run publication is designed and printed by Barcelona-based independent publishers and Riso printers Do The Print. Read on.

         Photos: Latitudes

        Photo via @gal_NB


        12 June, in Barcelona: Following the announcement of the awardees of the 2017–18 season of Barcelona Producció production grants, we visit David Mutiloa's temporary studio in Hangar. Mutiloa is the first artist to open the season and his exhibition "SYNTHESIS" will take place in the central nave of La Capella from July 18. 

        "Using sculpture, video projections and human presence, David Mutiloa’s exhibition Synthesis proposes that this condition has led to the appearance of pharmacologically managed depression, “an illness of responsibility”. It has also induced a terrible form of boredom – the spectre of both the boundless outsourcing of undesirable labour to the developing world and automation leading to a world without work. – Text from the gallery guide, written by Latitudes (pdf here). 

        Here is a short video documenting the exhibition.

         Photos: Latitudes

         
        19 June–2 July: We're off to Bordeaux for the installation and opening of "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" exhibition in ten days. After two years of preparation, it's a truly exciting moment to see it all coming together.  

        —> Press release here
        —> Ongoing archive of social media posts here.

        Lucy Skaer's 26 coal and resin sculptures after Brancusi's 26 different editions of "Bird in Space".

        Deciding the layout of Félix Arnaudin's incredible suite of photographs kindly lent by the Musée d'Aquitaine Bordeaux.

        Photovoltaic panels charging the batteries that power Nicholas Mangan's double video projection "Ancient Lights" (2015). 

         Anne Garde's photos documenting Richard Serra's "Threats of Hell" (1990) production from Dillinger Hütter (Germany) to its exhibition at the CAPC nave, to its current location at a private collector home on the banks of the Garonne, where it changed its name to a happier "Hopes of Paradise".
         Part of the CAPC installation team having a coffee break enjoying Stéphane's awesome chocolate cake.
         Rayyane Tabet's mobile pieces arriving from Hamburg at the CAPC.
        Registrar thick checklist file.
         François measuring Lara Almarcegui's works before placing them on the wall.

         Construction of the warehouse and jetty. Statements of works by engineer and architect Claude Deschamps.
         Christophe moving the 600kg rock by Hubert Duprat to the entrance.
         Pascal lighting the exhibition.

        Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller stretching their new work "Untitled (Blue)" (2017), for a work focused on indigo and colonial trade. 

        Christina Hemauer and Terence Gower listening to Pep Vidal explaining his sculpture work "19-metre tree cut in 7 equal volumes" (2015). 

         One of the many guided visits for press, staff, friends of the museum during the opening days. Photo: Latitudes/RK.

        11–14 July 2017: Installation of "SYNTHESIS" in La Capella. David Mutiloa's solo exhibition is the first of the 2017–18 season of Barcelona Producció. Opening on July 18, on view until September 25.

        "In the modern office workplace, spatial design and brand communication have evolved in step with novel notions of management, business efficiency and a labour market that progressively favours flexibility and adaptability. The typical Western office worker – their physiology as well as their psychology – has also been overhauled. Twentieth-century time-and-motion studies first standardised and rationalised the salaried worker’s time and space. And today the twenty-first-century worker is increasingly a co-working independent contractor who navigates an entirely dissolved working-week structure, continuous competitive ‘disruption’ and the so-called ‘gig economy’." – Text by Latitudes from the exhibition sheet.

        Scheme to help assemble the platform.

         Artist at work.



        24–26 July 2017: Trip to Copenhagen to visit the impressive solo exhibition by John Kørner, "Altid Mange Problemer" at Kunsthal Charlottenborg, curated by Marie Nipper—the largest exhibition of his works to date. Max Andrews of Latitudes has been invited to contribute an essay for his forthcoming monograph published by Roulette Russe which is due to come out in November 2017. Max has previously written on John's work for his 2006 exhibition "Problems" at Victoria Miro Gallery in London. Our first visit to Copenhagen to see John's work was precisely the subject of our first blog post in September 2006!

        Everything in Copenhagen seemed to have turned yellow – we knew John's love for the colour (first image below), but also Mark Leckey's exhibition at the x-room of the Statens Museum fur Kunst, seemed to have been inspired by "the Nyboder yellow" hue – the historic row house district of former Naval barracks in Copenhagen. 


        Mark Leckey's exhibition ‘He Thrusts his fists against the posts but still insists he sees the ghosts’ recreated the ramps underneath the M53 motorway bridge in Ellesmere Port. 

        Example of the "Nyboder yellow" hue – the historic row house district of former Naval barracks in Copenhagen. 

        27 July 2017: Visit Ricardo Bofill's Walden7 and his nearby studio Taller de Arquitectura with Anna Moreno. Moreno was awarded a grant of Barcelona Producció 2017 to produce the publication "The Drowned Giant", a project focusing on a performance–happening staged by Bofill in 1970 to promote his unrealised architectural project La Ciudad en el Espacio in Moratalaz (Madrid). The publication will be launched in late November 2017 and is mentored by Latitudes. As part of Moreno's ongoing research on Bofill's practice, she has been living in Walden7 for the past month in order to carry research for a forthcoming commission for the Spring 2018 exhibition "Beehave" at the Fundació Miró. 


         (Above) Taller de arquitectura studio. (Below) Walden7 in Sant Just Desvern (Barcelona).



        At the time of writing, we are frantically preparing for what will be an intense September. On September 10 we'll travel to Banff, where Latitudes will be Lead Faculty of the month-long residency programme "Geologic Time" at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity which will bring together 10 curators/artists/writers from around the world to discuss geological formations and timescales, while speculating about a more expansive and longer-term view of art, exhibitions, and their institutions. We will be “thinking with” geology (beyond the depiction of the landscape) as a potential way to consider non-conventional, deep-time perspectives on curating, exhibition making, programming, and fieldwork within contemporary art. 

         Julius Schoppe (1795–1868), “Illustration of giant stone near the Rauenschen Mountains near Fürstenwalde”, c. 1827. Public domain – Wikimedia Commons.

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        Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern


        The August 2017 Monthly Cover Story "Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern" is now up on www.lttds.org after this month it will be archived here

        "Anna Moreno is waving from the roof of Walden 7, the vertiginous sixteen-storey apartment complex designed by architect Ricardo Bofill in 1975. Hola Anna, què fas!? Looming out of the greenery far below is another extraordinary building that we visited earlier in the day. La Fábrica is a former cement works whose silos and cavernous “cathedral” are home to Bofill’s Taller de Arquitectura. It is 29°C and the humidity is at 62% in Sant Just Desvern, west of Barcelona. Two rooftop swimming pools provide a refreshing respite. We don’t complain." Continue reading 

        Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities. 

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        Cover Story – May 2017: "S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps"

         

        The May 2017 Monthly Cover Story "S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps" is now up on www.lttds.org after May it will be archived here.  

        "Today, as for millennia, the mighty River Zambezi is crashing over a series of precipitous basalt gorges—a place the Makololo people described as Mosi-oa-Tunya. The smoke that thunders. Since the 1870s, a Scottish stream has been plunging over a diminutive replica, seen in this month’s video Cover Story, located in the gardens of a mansion that is now a country house hotel (by all accounts with an enviable breakfast) in the village of Polbeth, less than an hour’s drive from Edinburgh." Continue reading

        Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities. 

        RELATED CONTENT:
        • Archive of Cover Stories
        • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
        • Cover Story – March 2017: Time travel with Jordan Wolfson 1 March 2017
        • Cover Story February 2017: The Dutch Assembly, five years on 1 February 2017
        • Cover Story January 2017: How open are open calls? 4 January 2017
        • Cover Story December 2016: Ten years ago – Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook 5 December 2016
        • Cover Story November 2016: Plucking Gilda, synesthetic Toni and dazzling Víctor 2 November 2016
        • Cover Story October 2016: "A Funny thing Happened on the Way to the Gallery, 13 October 2016
        • Cover Story September 2016: "El misterio de Caviria" by Antoni Hervàs 1 Septiembre 2016
        • Last chance to read the August 2016 Monthly Cover Story "Fermínlandia" 31 August 2016




        Fifth episode of 'Incidents (of Travel)' – Dispatch by Simon Soon and chi too from Terengganu, Malaysia


        The fifth 'Incidents (of Travel)' episode narrates an encounter between curator Simon Soon and artist chi too. Their offline day took place in April 2016, when they visited the Malaysian North Eastern state of Terengganu, where chi spent some time in 2013, surrounded by "men and women who work(ed) multiple jobs as a fishermen, house builders, boat builders, farmers, coconut pickers, food producers, and everything else that matters."


        Each of the 16 photographs and videos is augmented by one or more extra assets (a brief commentary, a caption or a soundscape), accessed by clicking the words which overlay the images. 


        Originally conceived by Latitudes as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City in 2012 (with five dispatches presented as part of an exhibition on Latitudes' curatorial practice at Casa del Lago) 'Incidents of Travel' had sequels in 2013 in Hong Kong (online dispatches published via twitter, instagram, and soundcloud) and San Francisco in 2015 (daily posts on Kadist' instagram as part of their #ArtistNotInTheStudioCuratorNotAtTheOffice take over initiative).


        The project explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter and an extended conversation between curator/s and artist/s. Online storytelling presents and documents curatorial fieldwork and an offline day conceived by an artist for a curator.

        Since April 2016 Kadist and Latitudes partnered in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)' as part of Kadist Online Projects. This new phase is developed as an online periodical that publishes regular contributions from invited curators and artists working around the world.
        The series inaugurated in April 2016 with an itinerary from curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – their tour was photographed by Nabiha Khan. The second dispatch came from Jinja in Uganda, where curator Moses Serubiri invited photographer Mohsen Taha to explore Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972. The third episode took place while curator Yu Ji and poet Xiao Kaiyu hiked on Dong Shan (East Mountain), 130 km west of Shanghai, on a peninsula stretching into Tai Hu lake near the city of Suzhou, China. The fourth dispatch came from Lisbon, where Galician curator Pedro de Llano visited key locations that marked the life and work of Luisa Cunha.

        Forthcoming: Marianna Hovhannisyan (Yerevan).
          

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        Fourth episode of 'Incidents (of Travel)' – Dispatch by Pedro de Llano and Luisa Cunha from Lisbon, Portugal


        The fourth 'Incidents (of Travel)' episode comes from Lisbon, Portugal, where Galician curator Pedro de Llano met Lisboeta artist Luisa Cunha. Their offline day took place in early December and went through key locations in the artist's life – from Ar.Co, the School of Visual Arts in Almada where she enrolled at age thirty seven, to the Largo da Academia de Belas Artes in Chiado, where she conceived a public project that never materialised. 

        Each of the 23 photographs in the sequence is augmented by one or more extra assets (a brief commentary, a caption or a soundscape), and is accessed by clicking the words which overlay the images. 


        Originally conceived by Latitudes as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City in 2012 (with five dispatches presented as part of an exhibition on Latitudes' curatorial practice at Casa del Lago) 'Incidents of Travel' had sequels in 2013 in Hong Kong (online dispatches published via twitter, instagram, and soundcloud) and San Francisco in 2015 (daily posts on Kadist' instagram as part of their #ArtistNotInTheStudioCuratorNotAtTheOffice initiative). 

        The project explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter and an extended conversation between curator/s and artist/s. Online storytelling presents and documents curatorial fieldwork and an offline day conceived by an artist for a curator.

        Since April 2016 Kadist and Latitudes partnered in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)' as part of Kadist Online Projects. This new phase is developed as an online periodical that publishes regular contributions from invited curators and artists working around the world. 

        The series inaugurated with an itinerary from curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – their tour was photographed by Nabiha Khan. The second dispatch came from Jinja in Uganda, where curator Moses Serubiri invited photographer Mohsen Taha to explore Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972. The third episode took place while curator Yu Ji and poet Xiao Kaiyu hiked on Dong Shan (East Mountain), 130 km west of Shanghai, on a peninsula stretching into Tai Hu lake near the city of Suzhou, China.
        Forthcoming contributions: Simon Soon (Kuala Lumpur / Sydney); Natalia Zuluaga (Pereira / Miami) and Marianna Hovhannisyan (Yerevan), all fellows who participated in the seminar ‘The Place From Where We Look’ at Kadist Paris in June 2015.  

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        Third episode of 'Incidents (of Travel)' – Dispatch by Yu JI and Xiao Kaiyu reporting from Suzhou, China


        As part of Kadist Online Projects, Kadist and Latitudes partnered in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)'. The new phase is developed as an online periodical that publishes regular contributions from curators and artists working around the world. 

        Originally conceived by Latitudes as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City (2012, with dispatches presented as part of an exhibition at Casa del Lago) – followed by Hong Kong (2013, online dispatches via twitter, instagram, and soundcloud) and San Francisco (2015, online dispatches via daily instagram posts) – 'Incidents (of Travel)' explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter and an extended conversation between curator/s and artist/s. Online storytelling presents and documents curatorial fieldwork and an offline day conceived by an artist for a curator.


        The third 'Incidents (of Travel)' episode comes from Suzhou, China, where artist and curator Yu Ji met poet Xiao Kaiyu. Their offline day took place in April 2016, when they embarked on a hike on Dong Shan (East Mountain), 130 km west of Shanghai, on a peninsula stretching into Tai Hu lake near the city of Suzhou.


        Each of the 12 photographs in the sequence is augmented by one or more extra assets: a brief commentary, a caption or a soundscape, and is accessed by clicking the words which overlay the images.

        The series inaugurated with an itinerary from curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – their tour was photographed by Nabiha Khan. The second dispatch came from Jinja in Uganda, where curator Moses Serubiri invited photographer Mohsen Taha to explore Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972.


        Forthcoming contributions: Marianna Hovhannisyan (Yerevan), Simon Soon (Kuala Lumpur / Sydney) and Natalia Zuluaga (Pereira / Miami), all fellows who participated in the seminar ‘The Place From Where We Look’ at Kadist Paris in June 2015. 


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        September Cover Story: "El misterio de Caviria" by Antoni Hervàs


        You can now read our September 2016 Monthly Cover Story "El misterio de Caviria" on www.lttds.org (after September 2016 it will be archived here), a preview of his forthcoming solo exhibition "El misterio de Caviria" at La Capella, part of the BCNProducció'16 production grants. Hervàs' project is one of the three exhibitions Latitudes mentors this year.

        (...) "Antoni Hervàs draws back the curtains on his exhibition El Misterio de Caviria at the Sala Gran of La Capella, Barcelona, on 15 September. As part the tutorial team of BCNProducció'16 alongside David Armengol and Mireia Sallarès, Latitudes has been working with Toni since February on the development of what can only be described as an epic production. Continue reading...

        Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage to highlight past, present or forthcoming projects, research, exhibitions or field trips related to our activities. 


        Related content:
        • Archive of Cover Stories
        • Last chance to read the August 2016 Monthly Cover Story "Fermínlandia" 31 August 2016
        • Cover Story, July 2016: Through the grapevine – Rasmus Nilausen’s Soups & Symptoms 3 July 2016
        • Last days! Cover Story and exhibition of José Antonio Hernández-Díez: techno-pop, death and resurrection (20 June 2016)
        • Cover Story, May 2016: Material histories – spilling the beans at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux (10 May 2016)
        • Cover Story, March 2016: José Antonio Hernández-Díez: The sacred heart of the matter (3 March 2016
        • Cover Story, February 2016: Sarah Ortmeyer, Towering allusions (9 Febrero 2016)




        Last chance to read the August 2016 Monthly Cover Story "Fermínlandia"


        Last chance to read the August 2016 Monthly Cover Story "Fermínlandia" on www.lttds.org (after August 2016 it will be archived here)

        "
        Five years ago, in August 2011, Fermín Jiménez Landa initiated the surrender, conquest and defence of a small nameless island using the power of music. With the help of local fishermen he had taken a portable generator, two tripod-mounted loudspeakers, and an mp3 player out into the Aegean Sea and planted the equipment on this uninhabited Greek island. Its new national anthem played again and again until the batteries ran out. You can just make out the two loudspeakers sitting atop the grassy rock in this photograph by Fermín." Continue reading...

        Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage to highlight past, present or forthcoming projects, research, exhibitions or field trips related to our activities. 


        Related content:
        • Archive of Cover Stories.
        • Cover Story, July 2016: Through the grapevine – Rasmus Nilausen’s Soups & Symptoms 3 July 2016
        • Last days! Cover Story and exhibition of José Antonio Hernández-Díez: techno-pop, death and resurrection (20 June 2016)
        • Cover Story, May 2016: Material histories – spilling the beans at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux (10 May 2016)
        • Cover Story, March 2016: José Antonio Hernández-Díez: The sacred heart of the matter (3 March 2016
        • Cover Story, February 2016: Sarah Ortmeyer, Towering allusions (9 Febrero 2016)




        Cover Story: July 2016 – Through the grapevine – Rasmus Nilausen’s Soups & Symptoms


        New Monthly Cover Story "Through the grapevine – Rasmus Nilausen’s Soups & Symptoms" is now on www.lttds.org (after July 2016 it will be archived here)

        "Rasmus Nilausen’s "The Cluster" III (2014) sits tight in a cupboard in what was once the house of a priest. This painting formed just one part of the exhibition that, together with Pere Llobera, Nilausen made for the Latitudes-devised Composiciones last October (the programme of artists’ interventions returns later this year). "Vera Icon" took over the rooms of the abandoned house in the gardens of La Central bookstore, itself a former city-centre church, and tweeting Mayoress Ada Colau was one of the many curious visitors over the weekend." continue reading...

        Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage to highlight past, present or forthcoming projects, research, exhibitions or field trips related to our activities. 
        "Highly recommended the #BarcelonaGAlleryWeekend @ArtBarcelona_AS". Twitter by Ada Colau, Barcelona Mayor during her visit to Rasmus Nilausen (photographed on the left and upper right corner) and Pere Llobera exhibition at the house of a former priest, La Central Bookstore. Slideshow starts here.

        Related content:
        • Archive of Cover Stories.
        • Last days! Cover Story and exhibition of José Antonio Hernández-Díez: techno-pop, death and resurrection (20 June 2016)
        • Cover Story, May 2016: Material histories – spilling the beans at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux (10 May 2016)
        • Cover Story, March 2016: José Antonio Hernández-Díez: The sacred heart of the matter (3 March 2016
        • Cover Story, February 2016: Sarah Ortmeyer, Towering allusions (9 Febrero 2016)




        Second 'Incidents (of Travel)' dispatch by Moses Serubiri and Mohsen Taha reporting from Jinja, Uganda


        As part of Kadist Online Projects, Kadist and Latitudes are partnering in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)' as an online periodical that is publishing regular contributions from curators and artists working around the world. 

        Originally conceived by Latitudes as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City (2012) – followed by Hong Kong (2013) and San Francisco (2015) – 'Incidents (of Travel)' explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter and an extended conversation between curator/s and artist/s. Online storytelling presents and documents curatorial fieldwork and an offline day conceived by an artist for a curator.



        The second 'Incidents (of Travel)' dispatch comes from Jinja, Uganda, where writer, researcher and curator Moses Serubiri met photographer Mohsen Taha. On this occasion Taha photographed the day together exploring Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972. Taha's photographs show the architectural remnants of their presence, and Serubiri's commentary tells of the forces at work in Uganda during that period.

        Each of the 18 photographs in the sequence is augmented by one or more extra assets: a brief commentary, a caption or a soundscape, and is accessed by clicking the words which overlay the images.


        The series inaugurated with an itinerary from curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – their tour was photographed by Nabiha Khan

        Forthcoming contributions by Marianna Hovhannisyan (Yerevan / Istanbul), Yu Ji (Shanghai), Simon Soon (Kuala Lumpur / Sydney) and Natalia Zuluaga (Pereira / Miami), all fellows who participated in the seminar ‘The Place From Where We Look’ at Kadist Paris in June 2015. 


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        Kadist and Latitudes present 'Incidents (Of Travel)' online


        Latitudes and Kadist Art Foundation are partnering in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)' as an online periodical. As part of its Online Projects, Kadist will be publishing regular contributions from six of its fellows working around the world. 
         
        Originally conceived by Latitudes as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City (2012) – followed by Hong Kong (2013) and San Francisco (2015) – 'Incidents (of Travel)' explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter. Online storytelling present and document curatorial fieldwork and an offline day’s itinerary.
         
        Curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez inaugurate the series with a dispatch from Chicagofieldwork and online storytelling photographed by Nabiha Khan of an offline day’s itinerary. 

        Forthcoming contributions from Marianna Hovhannisyan (Yerevan / Istanbul), Yu Ji (Shanghai), Moses Serubiri (Kampala), Simon Soon (Kuala Lumpur / Sydney), and Natalia Zuluaga (Pereira / Miami), fellows who participated in the seminar ‘The Place From Where We Look’ at Kadist Paris in June 2015. 



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        A report from the symposium 'How Institutions Think' organised by the LUMA Foundation and CCS Bard College, Arles, 24–27 February 2016

        All photographs: Latitudes.

        [The following text was originally published on Frieze Blog on 9 March 2016].

        Co-presented by the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College with the LUMA Foundation, the four-day symposium ‘How Institutions Think’ [pdf of the programme] met to reconsider the habits and rhetorics of contemporary art institutions and curatorial practice. The event, held at the Parc des Ateliers, Arles, from 24–27 February, was developed in partnership with a long list of collaborators (Valand Academy of Arts, Gothenburg, Sweden; Afterall Books and the Exhibition Histories programme at Saint Martins, London, UK; Goldsmiths, London; the V-A-C Foundation, Moscow; and de Appel art centre, Amsterdam).

        Taking its title from the 1986 book by British anthropologist Mary Douglas, the symposium played out on the site of the future LUMA Arles, a 20-acre former railway yard that includes a new building designed by Frank Gehry scheduled to open in summer 2018 as exhibitions spaces, archives, residency and study facilities, as well as a restaurant, hotel and park. Introduced by CCS Bard’s Paul O’Neill and LUMA founder Maja Hoffmann, the presentations were hosted in the recently-restored L’Atelier des Forges spaces in the middle of this construction site. O’Neill took the work-in-progress status outside as an invitation for the more than 30 speakers and around 150 delegates to debate not only what the future of art institutions in general might be, but more immediately, how new ways of operating could underpin this nascent institution in the south of France. 

        LUMA Arles is located in the former railway yards of Arles and includes a new building designed by Frank Gehry and the renovation of the industrial buildings on the Parc des Ateliers by Selldorf Architects.

        Yet what transpired was something far more pervasive. An amplification of the noun ‘institution’ and the verb ‘instituting’ soon engulfed not only a discussion of art and academic establishments, but law, governance, and the psyche of the French state, post-November 2015 Paris attacks. The grim predicament of a Europe in the depths of the refugee crisis – as the symposium took place, at the other end of the country, Calais’s ‘Jungle’ camp was being dismantled – became the lens for considering nothing less than the spectral institution that is Western European colonial imperialism. In the first evening’s fragmented keynote by Zahia Rahmani, the writer and historian gave an account of the ‘Made in Algeria’ exhibition of colonial cartography she has curated for the MuCEM museum in Marseilles. She argued that we cannot plausibly think about the future of any institution without confronting the terrible failures and opprobrious injustices of the past, most glaringly what she characterised as the ‘toxicity’ of Western Europe’s colonial system. 


        Céline Condorelli's 'All our tomorrows' (2015) hanging curtain.

        ‘Is institution building still desirable?’ wondered artist Céline Condorelli in her presentation the following day as she evoked All our tomorrows (2015), her installation that humbly corralled the symposium’s setting, comprised a large hanging curtain inspired by the ‘poor architecture’ of Lina Bo Bardi’s SESC Pompéia, the social and cultural centre established in São Paulo. 

        Reflecting on his own transformative experiences made while directing the 2014 edition of the São Paulo Biennial, Charles Esche – Director of the Van Abbemuseum in Eindhoven, Netherlands – astutely articulated both the decisiveness of Western Imperialism’s poisonous effect on the rest of the world, and the nervousness about whether anyone can even venture to be hopeful about the future. Esche persuasively argued that Western museums must make decolonialisation fundamental to their missions and no longer a marginal issue by analysing the entrails of neoliberalism’s ‘dogged persistence’ and, soothsayer-like, intuitively sensing the ‘weak signals’ of a more just politics.
         
         Question from Mick Wilson, artist, educator and Head of the Valand Academy of Arts, University of Gothernburg, Sweden, and moderatior of one of the sessions.  

        Attendees gather outside the symposium venue at the Parc des Ateliers.

        Sociologists Luc Boltanski and Arnaud Esquerre spoke of France’s deep investment in what they termed the ‘economy of enrichment’ in observations that were particularly prickly given the art-destination place-making unfolding on the very site of the symposium. They submitted that the luxury brands that dominate the image of the country abroad enjoy a close but officially-unacknowledged complicity with heritage and culture. They argue that this compound myth of the French art de vivre accounts for the country consistently being the globe’s most visited tourist destination, yet also that, less innocuously, France’s defiance of normative economic rules about price and value make it both a haven for inequality as well as unusually susceptible to instability. Put candidly, the presence of refugee and terrorists is not conducive to tourism and handbag sales. Later, speaking about ‘turbo-fascism’ and a transition to ‘necropolitics’ (a term coined by philosopher Achille Mbembe regarding the politics of sovereignty over life and death), philosopher Marina Gržinić contended that we are living in a time of war in which our institutions battle to preserve this ‘good life’ at any cost. 

        Céline Condorelli, Artist, Professor at Nuova Accademia di Belle Arti, Milan, and Founding Co-Director Eastside Projects, in conversation with Helena Reckitt, Senior Lecturer in Curating at Goldsmiths, University of London.  
         Clémentine Deliss, Independent Curator and Fellow of the Institute of Advanced Study (Wissenschaftskolleg).

        Turning more specifically to art’s institutions, independent curator and editor Nataša Petrešin-Bachelez argued that they are so often so deeply implicated in an economy of precarity that they spawn new toothless art forms of ‘safe participation’ and ‘soft interactivity’. ‘Stubborn’ institutions thus appeared to be both the problem and the solution. Accordingly, Clémentine Deliss – recently dismissed as the Director of the Weltkulturen Museum in Frankfurt – delivered a scorching critique of the racism and intransigence persisting in ethnographic museums founded in the 19th century, particularly in Germany and France. She characterised how the hundreds of thousands of objects ‘salvaged’ from the frontline of the colonial project are now trapped in a legislative embargo, reduced to little more than dormant entries on databases. Access to these hoards of material culture and their restitution is critical she asserted, yet young curators are too afraid to deal with them – contemporary art offers an easier ride. 

        In the context her work directing the SBG Gallery in Montréal, Canada, curator Pip Day discussed Canada’s settler-colonialist legacy, the evasions allowed by conceiving of decolonization as merely a metaphor, and her advocacy of the work of First Nation artists such as Maria Hupfield. Bassam El Baroni, an independent curator based in Alexandria, Egypt, later presented a paper that threaded a bewilderingly dense route through a tangle of cognitive philosophy and ‘prometheanism’. Yet Day’s case studies, as well as those discussed by Mélaine Bouteloup, curator of Paris’s Bétonsalon, regarding the recently opened Villa Vassilieff which is now the second site of that institution, helped to link such abstraction to more practical curatorial and artistic thinking-in-action that addresses the past while creating new knowledge. 

        Gehry’s LUMA building will comprise presentation and exhibition spaces, archive, library, offices, seminar rooms, artist-in-residence facilities, café-restaurant and hotel and is due to open in summer 2018.

        Yet it was through the presentations by writer Dave Beech and especially architect Keller Easterling that the symposium actually approached something resembling a strategy to address what had been almost uniformly painted as the shameful, broken state of the contemporary institution. According to both Beech and Easterling, we should be paying keener attention to infrastructure rather than institution per se. Following her book Extrastatecraft: The Power of Infrastructure Space (2014) Easterling’s bruising and exhilarating contention was that an enveloping urban medium (including preposterous towers, mall sprawl, special-trade-zone legal lacunae) defies consideration as a thing and is better thought of as a global operating system, a ‘disposition’ that thrives on saying one thing and doing quite another. 

        Ljublijanan philosopher, theoretician and artist Marina Gržinić; writer and professor Dave Beech and curator and theorist Simon Sheikh.

        At the start of the symposium artist Liam Gillick – one of LUMA’s luminary consultants alongside Tom Eccles, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Philippe Parreno and Beatrix Ruf – had asked somewhat rhetorically, ‘can an institution be thought collectively on this scale?’ It was clearly not only Charles Esche who looked out at the spine of what will be a 24,000 square metre Frank Gehry-designed tower and noticed that the institution’s die was cast already – and thanks to an architect long synonymous with the art museum as an importunate form of trophy. Following Keller’s strategic spatial repertoire of ‘counterbalances’, ‘interplays’, ‘toggles’, ‘incentives’ and ‘ratchets’, as well as her talk of heeding the dynamics of joke-telling or dough-tending, she implied that if we are going to formulate a resilient future for art institutions, we had better start feeling our way – and get a whole lot more canny. 


        Max Andrews is a contributing editor of frieze and, with Mariana Cánepa Luna, runs Latitudes, an independent curatorial office based in Barcelona, Spain.
        – 

         LUMA Foundation spaces under construction.

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        Mariana Cánepa Luna review on Francesc Ruiz's 'Correos' exhibition for art-agenda

        View of Francesc Ruiz, “Correos,” garcía galería, Madrid, 2016. All images courtesy of garcía galería, Madrid. Photos by Roberto Ruiz.

        Francesc Ruiz’s “Correos”
        garcía galería, Madrid   
        January 16–March 5, 2016


        by Mariana Cánepa Luna



        Francesc Ruiz’s second solo show at Madrid’s garcía galería delves into the visual communication of one of Spain’s most iconic institutions, the Sociedad Estatal Correos y Telégrafos—the national postal service, commonly known as Correos—whose graphic identity was created in 1977 by Spanish designer and artist José María Cruz Novillo (b. 1936). Ruiz’s interest is not limited to Cruz Novillo’s pervasive design, but more broadly includes Correos as an agent of distribution as well as the various commercial guises that come into play in this public service. Ruiz’s choice to focus this exhibition on the postal system, the pre-eminent pre-internet network, is not casual: through his characteristic strategy of “expanded comics” he has long been concerned with the potential of distribution and official versus alternative forms of circulation.

        Continue reading...

        Originally published on art-agenda.com on 25 February 2016.


         View of Francesc Ruiz, “Correos,” garcía galería, Madrid, 2016.

          View of Francesc Ruiz, “Correos,” garcía galería, Madrid, 2016.
         Francesc Ruiz, Correos IV (Carton), 2015.
         Francesc Ruiz, Correos IV (Carton), 2015.
         Francesc Ruiz, Correos I (Bufanda), 2015.
         Francesc Ruiz, THE MIDAS TOUCH, 2015.
         Francesc Ruiz, MARCAR (6549/6567/6574/6547), 2015.
          Francesc Ruiz, Correos III (Caja), 2015.



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        Documentation of Latitudes' talks at the Athens Biennale summit and Tabakalera, Donostia-San Sebastián, November 2015


        Latitudes in the international Summit 'Synapse 1' at New Rex of the National Theatre of Greece. 'Session II: Rethinking Institutions', November 18, 2015. Photo: Athens Biennale.

        Documentation of two recent presentations by Latitudes in Athens and Donostia–San Sebastián is now online. 

        Entitled Omonoia (‘concord’ in Greek), the Athens Biennale 2015–17 is directed by Massimiliano Mollona and will grow over the next two years with the help of anthropologists, researchers, activists, academics, artists and civic organisations. In November 2016, Omonoia launched with the summit Synapse 1: Introducing a laboratory for production post-2011. Latitudes participated in the “Rethinking Institutions” session alongside Maria Hlavajova (founder and artistic director of BAK, Utrecht); political economist Leo Panitch; Emily Pethick, director of The Showroom, London; Documenta 14 Artistic Director Adam Szymczyk; public services expert Hilary Wainwright, and Amalia Zepou, Athens Vice Mayor for Civil Society and Municipality Decentralization. 

        By way of introduced we discussed the “Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group”, the forum for megatrends and the future of institutions of contemporary art that has taken place in May 2015 at the Vessel / MADA (Monash Art Design and Architecture) 2015 International Curatorial Retreat in Bari, Italy; in August at Kadist Art Foundation, San Francisco, and in November at Eastside Projects, Birmingham, UK. We followed this with some geological speculation that in “digging deeper” both literally and figuratively, we perhaps find new institutional models. How do we think about artworks and institutions in terms of tens of thousands of years, for example.

        See the video here (in English).


        Public lecture organised by consonni as part of LaPublika. Tabakalera, Donostia–San Sebastián. Wednesday, November 11, 2015. Photo: Consonni.

        Also in November, Latitudes led the workshop “Beyond The Roundabout, or How Public Is Public Art?” for consonni/LaPublika at Tabakalera. As part of this Latitudes gave a public lecture. The workshop addressed the work of artists who conceptualize or actualize their works against a backdrop of vast stretches of time or topological change. In the public lecture we made various transects through our curatorial projects determined by the public sphere, raw materials and their transformation. “From the zinc which led to an Esperanto micro-nation, to the air of a Beijing shopping centre, or the dead trees of printed news, Latitudes will join some traits and ideas around ‘human resources’, extractive modernity, obsolescence and the carbon cycle.” 

        Hear the audio here (in Spanish). 

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            More from OMONOIA – Athens Biennale 2015–2017 on our December Cover Story

            International Summit Synapse 1 at New Rex of the National Theatre of Greece. 'Session II: Rethinking Institutions': (from left to right) Leo Panitch, Maria Hlavajova, Adam Szymczyk, Amalia Zepou (moderator), Hilary Wainwright, Emily Pethick, Latitudes (Max Andrews & Mariana Cánepa Luna) © Eva Galatsanou.

            The above picture by Eva Galatsanou was taken during 'Session II: Rethinking Institutions' one of the Summit panels that launched OMONOIA, the Athens Biennale 2015–2017. Latitudes participated in this panel on November 18, as one of the speakers. The current Cover Story on our home page features this event at the National Theatre of Greece, New Rex.  

            Below some more photos of that day and the working group meetings that took place at the former Bageion Hotel (18 Omonoia Square) on November 19, 2015.

             Omonoia Square. On the left the Bargeion Hotel (with the orange banner), HQ of the Athens Biennial 2015–2017.
             
            Omonoia Square from the first floor of the Bageion Hotel.

             Artistic Director Massimiliano Mollona, and Athens Biennale directors Xenia Kalpaktsoglou (left) and Poka-Yio (right) welcome guests to the second day of the Summit "Synapse 1: Introducing a laboratory for production post". 

             After the welcoming words, guests joined closed-door working groups sessions around the building on 'Cooperativism', 'Commons & Urban Welfare', 'Alternative Currencies' and 'Solidarity Networks'.

             10am–1pm: Latitudes joined the 'Commons & Urban Welfare' working group which had representatives of Avtonomi Akadimia (GR), Omada Metavasis / Transition (GR), Omikron Project (GR), Sarantaporo (GR), Votanikos Kipos Squat (GR), Athens Wireless Metropolitan Network (TBC) (GR), Green Park (TBC) (GR), Luigi Coppola (Parco Commune dei Frutti Minori, IT), Sylvia de Fanti (Teatro Valle, IT) and Federica Giardini.

            2–5pm: During the Open Assembly, artist, activist and Berlin-based curator Margarita Tsomou feeds back to the audience what was discussed during the 'Solidarity Networks' working group which had representatives from Refugees Welcome (GR), Solidarity4all (GR), HYLE[Ύλη]matter (GR), Notara Squat (TBC) (GR), The Other Human (TBC) (GR), Metropolitan Community Clinic at Helliniko (GR), European Village (GR), Ivor Stodolsky (Perpetuum Mobile) (NO).

            Potent voices like that of Tsomou raised questions about a proposed 'open' biennale format and the possible (in)adequacy of visual arts to host activism. "I do my activism in the street" – she exclaimed. (Tsomou has recently interviewed Adam Szymczyk (artistic director of documenta 14) for DIE ZEIT – download here.)

             Other speakers were more direct in their pragmatism and asked the forum "What do we have? Do we have a hammer? Do we have chairs?" to which Mollona and Poka-Yio responded the biennial has the Bageion Hotel building and in-kind sponsorship for production, everything else has to be decided and invented collectively for the next two years. 

             End of the Open Assembly at the Bageion Hotel.

             Stairs of the Bageion Hotel.


            RELATED CONTENT:





            Latitudes' "out of office" 2014–2015 season

            It's that end-of-the-season time of the year again. It has become a tradition for Latitudes (see the 2008-9, 2009-10, 2010-11, 2011-12, 2012–13, 2013–14 posts) to mark the summer break, not by presenting a written memo of activities or a financial statement, but with a 'behind the scenes' post filled with photos revisiting moments from the year gone by. So here are some glimpses from September 2014 to August 2015.

            Slowing down is rather relative this Summer, as at the end of July we embarked on a two-week trip to The Banff Centre in Canada to be Guest Faculty of one of its thematic residencies, 'Blueprint for Happiness' led by British artists Heather & Ivan Morison. At the end of August, we will be in residency at Kadist Art Foundation in San Francisco for another two weeks. 

            Milestones during the first part of 2015 were two-fold: after months of technical tweaking and editorial wrangling, we launched our newly designed website in February and secondly, this Spring Latitudes celebrated its 10th anniversary.

            Have a great holiday, más en septiembre! 

            7 October 2014: Latitudes hosted the second year students of the MA Curating Contemporary Art at the Royal College of Art, London, and took the opportunity of presenting and reflecting on our collaborations with three Catalan artists – Martí Anson, Ignasi Aballí and Francesc Ruiz
             Francesc Ruiz presenting his work to the RCA students.

            Trip reporting: We reported from the field including at Madrid's Apertura in September, London's Frieze week in October, David Jablonowski's "Hype Cycle" at Fons Welters during Amsterdam's Art Weekend in November, and from Bordeaux in January, to Bari in May.

            Writing: This year Max Andrews has joined Frieze as Contributing Editor – where he has been writing since 2004. His writing has been more visible in recent months as Frieze have published reviews on Maria Thereza Alves at CAAC in Sevilla, the group show "What cannot be used is forgotten" at CAPC Bordeaux, a profile of Nicholas Mangan and a review of the Spanish and Latin American Pavilions at the Venice Biennale. Mariana Cánepa Luna also published an interview with Mangan in Mousse Magazine last February.

            New website: Our homemade website finally saw the light of day in February. As explained in this post, the website features new elements such as the 'Cover Story' (more on that in the next paragraph), sliding photo galleries, a tidied-up sidebar with a calendar of events, tags to filter projects by 'year' or 'exhibition', etc.

            'Cover Story': More writing has emerged through the new monthly section "Cover Story" on our home page (check out the archive of this section):

            March 2015: Focused on a single artwork: Wilfredo Prieto's ‘Grasa, jabón y plátano’ (2006); 

            April 2015: Revisited a peculiar site: the Connaught Road West flyover, in Hong Kong;


            April 2015 Cover Story.

            May 2015: Honoured two artistazos: Lawrence Weiner and Sergi Aguilar and a whisky-enhanced chat on the Barcelona shore in October 2008; 


            June 2015: Visited Ignasi Aballí at his Raval studio.

            Summer 2015: Orbited around Australian artist Nicholas Mangan, an artist with whom Latitudes just did an in conversation in the context of his solo exhibition "Ancient Lights" at Chisenhale, London and whose work has been the focus in Max Andrews' Frieze text as well as in Mariana Cánepa Luna's interview in the February-March issue of Mousse Magazine


             Summer 2015 Cover Story (plus the archive here).

            26 February, ARCOmadrid: On jury duty visiting the galleries participating in the #Opening section of the art fair, in order to select its best stand. The award was given to Barcelona-based gallery etHALL which presented works by Martin Vitaliti and Sergio Prego.

             

            Spring, celebration time! Later in May we celebrated our 10th anniversary (well, officially it was in April!) launching a series of limited editions in the form of tote bags by four artists that have a special place in our hearts and with whom we have collaborated with in the past: Lawrence Weiner (New York, 1942), Haegue Yang (Seoul, 1971), Ignasi Aballí (Barcelona, 1958) and Mariana Castillo Deball (Mexico City, 1975). Below is a glimpse from the making of the tote bags at Print Workers Barcelona, and here's where you can place your order.
             Photolith design for the tote bag by Haegue Yang – realised in collaboration with OK-RM. 
             Silkscreen process of Lawrence Weiner's design. Photo: Print Workers.
             Silkscreening Ignasi Aballí's tote. Photo: Print Workers.
             Silkscreening Mariana Castillo Deball tote. Photo: Print Workers.
             Silkscreening the credit for each bag in the inside pocket. Photo: Print Workers.
            Homemade photo studio documenting the totes. Results of the photo shoot here.

            9–13 May 2015: After an intense week of Biennale overdose in Venice, we traveled to Bari to join Vessel and MADA's 2015 International Curatorial Retreat as two of its tutors. The week was far from being a retreat, it was more like an "intensive" – though it certainly was a "treat". Highly interesting debates and conversations on-and-off the scheduled activities of lectures and break-out sessions emerged in places such as a cave or in the nearby town Monopoli – no direct link to the property trading board game. Here a report from fellow tutor Dr. Alexandra Ross
              
             Visiting the market. Photo: Piero Percoco.
            Market stall selling tomatoes of all kinds and origins.
             Chef Boris Portnoy doing some dinner prep at Doppelgaenger gallery/home.
             Due to a fire in Rome's airport, our flight was cancelled and we had to rearrange our travel, spending another day in Bari. We therefore visited (we were in fact their only visitors) the Palazzo dell'Acquedotto Pugliese di Bari, decorated by roman designer Duilio Cambellotti
            A food detour to purchase delightful spicy rucola in the Mercato ex Manifattura Bari, in the Quartiere Libertà.


            3–5 June 2015: Max Andrews participated in the annual 'Invest Conference 2015' organised by Stroom den Haag, in The Hague, consisting of "an incentive for the artistic development of recently graduated artists who have received the PRO Invest subsidy in the year before. A group of ten international curators is asked to visit these artists in their studios and meet with the art scene of The Hague." 
              Above (visiting Machteld Rullens) and following photographs by Myung Feyen. Courtesy Stroom den Haag.

            7 July 2015: For our last public event of the year we joined Melbourne artist Nicholas Mangan for an in conversation in the context of his solo show 'Ancient Lights' that opened a few days earlier at Chisenhale Gallery in London. Mint and Lime Films video documented the talk – watch it from Chisenhale's website / Vimeo.

            Vinyl listing the exhibition events.
             (Above) Photos by Manuela Barczewski.


            27 July–7 August 2015: Guest Faculty of the Thematic Residency 'Blueprint for Happiness' at The Banff Centre, Canada. We joined the group in the middle two weeks of the six week programme led by British artists Heather and Ivan Morison

            View of The Banff Centre from our bedroom in Lloyd Hall.
            Banff TV announcing Latitudes' talk on 28 July, 4pm. 

             Blueprint for Happiness' participants.
             Views from Latitudes' studio in the Jeanne & Peter Lougheed Building.
             Studio visit with "Blueprint for Happiness" participant Vanessa Kwan.
             Studio visit with "Blueprint for Happiness" participant Robert Cram.
            Inevitable photo of a deer walking around Banff.
            Stunning evening sunset over the Bow River after a storm with a double rainbow.

            While in Banff, Latitudes led three seminars bringing forward a series of case studies as well as focussing on a number of artists whose practice has dealt with public space in different geographical contexts. We also undertook studio visits with each of the 11 resident artists, and participated in a field trip to Calgary to visit the HQ of art construction company Heavy Industries and the Esker Foundation Contemporary Art Gallery


             (School) Field trip to Calgary to visit Heavy Industries fabricators and the Esker Foundation. 
             Even though the school bus seats were no longer in scale to our adult bodies, interesting chats happened over the 2 hours of each trajectory.

            On Sunday 2 August, Latitudes hosted a closed-door evening film programme screening works by Spanish artist Emilio Moreno, Irish artist Sean Lynch and Australian artist Nicholas Mangan. The three films share a focus on public sculptures, monuments or buildings that have been displaced from their original context. 

             Flicking through some of the 4,000 artist books at Banff library.

            Most of this past months' activity has been invested in preparing for 2015–16 projects: Firstly, 'Compositions' a series of five artistic interventions by six artists active in the Barcelona art scene: David Bestué (Barcelona, 1980. Lives in Barcelona); Dora García (Valladolid, 1965. Lives in Barcelona), Jordi Mitjà (Figueres, 1970. Lives between Lladó and Banyoles); Rasmus Nilausen (Copenhagen, 1980. Lives in Barcelona) & Pere Llobera (Barcelona, 1970. Lives in Barcelona) and Daniel Steegmann Mangrané (Barcelona, 1977. Lives in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), which will take place in the context of the first Barcelona Gallery Weekend (1–4 October 2015). 

            Façade of Cosme Toda in L'Hospitalet municipality (Barcelona) part of a 1920s factory complex where David Bestué will present his intervention in the context of the first Barcelona Gallery Weekend, 1–4 October 2015.
            Site visit to the Umbracle with Daniel Steegmann Mangrané.


            Secondly, we've been working on the forthcoming solo exhibition of Venezuelan-born, Barcelona-based artist José Antonio Hernández-Díez which will be on view at La Capella MACBA from March 2016. Onwards!


            Digging through documentation in MACBA library in preparation for José Antonio Hernández-Díez exhibition.

            RELATED CONTENT:

            Latitudes 'Out of office' 2013–14, 31 July 2014;
            Latitudes' "out of office" photo album, 2012–2013 season, 31 July 2013;
            Latitudes' "out of office" photo album 2011–2012, 31 July 2012;
            Latitudes 'out of office' photo album 2010–11 season, 1 August 2011;
            Latitudes 'out of office' photo album 2009–10 season, 30 July 2010;
            Latitudes' "out of office" photo album 2008-9, 30 July 2009.


            This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
            All photos:
            Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
            This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




            Latitudes' re-designed website now online!


            Our website is finally up and running! Take a look at www.lttds.org

            After months of re-editing, digging floppy disks and analogue archives, we're proud (and relieved!) to launch our newly designed website, same address as always: http://www.lttds.org




            We have improved several things. Our home page now features a "cover story", a monthly focus on an artwork, artist, book, site or trip we've experienced in our recent past, accompanied by a short text. Our first cover story centers on Wilfredo Prieto's work "Grease, Soap, Banana" presented in 2007 in the group show "Extraordinary Rendition".
              
            Below this section we highlight three recent projects which are refreshed with each visit.

            Yes! Each page is more tablet and mobile-friendly, yet has an even wider format for your desktop.


            Each of our project pages includes a sliding photo gallery complementing our flickr sets, and has clearer access to our social media networks – such as our twitter or facebook.

            At the end of each project's text, we've added "Related Content": an expandable section linking to our blog posts.
            The sidebar includes details of the locations, publication (if applicable) and project supporters; a calendar of events and biography of the artist (for solo shows).

            Our project page now includes tags enabling you to dynamically filter our projects by 'year', 'exhibition', 'research', 'public realm', 'with publication', etc.
            From here you can also check our Index, our Publications or download the pdf 'Projects Dossier' detailing a selection of our projects.

            We have revised the 'About' page and placed an accordion listing our "Lectures", "Teaching", "Awards & Affiliations", "Juries", "Residencies", "Bibliography/Press" and "Research and Field Trips".

            And last, but certainly not least, we continue to report from our blog on the development of our projects as well as on our field trips, news, shows, or books worth discussing.





            This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
            All photos:
            Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
            Work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




            Report from Bordeaux: Visit to CAPC/Musée d'Art Contemporain's shows of Franz Ehrard Walther and the group show "Ce qui ne sert pas s'oublie"

             Views of Franz Erhard Walther's show "Le Corps décide" from CAPC's mezzanine.

            The exhibition 'Franz Erhard Walther: Le Corps décide' was initiated by WIELS Centre d’Art Contemporain, in Brussels – see a video of its iteration here – and has been co-produced together with CAPC musée d'art contemporain in Bordeaux, alongside The Franz Erhard Walther Foundation. The exhibition is accompanied by a beautiful publication that includes brightly colored pop up shapes that spread throughout the book. 

            From Wiels' website... "Franz Erhard Walther’s exhibition offers an in-depth look at an influential German artist whose pioneering work straddles minimalist sculpture, conceptual art, abstract painting, and performance all while positing fundamental questions about the conventional idea of the artwork as an immutable, obdurate pedestal or wall-bound thing. Bringing together pivotal works made between the 1950s and the present, this exhibition focuses on Walther’s ability to transform notions of object-hood and perception through drawings, paintings, fabric sculptures, participatory forms, language-based works, photographic documentation and archival material."



            On the second floor, CAPC just opened 'Ce qui ne sert pas s’oublie' (What Cannot be Used is Forgotten) (22 January–3 May 2015) a group show curated by Mexico-based Colombian-born curator Catalina Lozano, that includes works by Mathieu K. Abonnenc, Sven Augustijnen, Mariana Castillo Deball, Sean Lynch, Pauline M’Barek, Museo Comunitario del Valle de Xico, Wendelien van Oldenborgh, Uriel Orlow, Beatriz Santiago Muñoz and Jorge Satorre.

            The exhibition "deals with the mutating statuses of objects in relation to the possible historical narratives, especially those related to colonial past an present and the layers of cultural, spiritual and identity production that stem from them. Objects carry a wealth of immaterial aspects in and around their materiality, constituted by means of the relations they form with others, both human and non-human... This exhibition seeks to understand how our relation to the material world entails endless processes of assimilation, acculturation, re-appropriation, ritualisation which in their complexity whiteness and embody the historical binds in which they are caught." [this and following quotations describing each work are taken from the exhibition leaflet].

            The exhibition is accompanied by a French/Spanish publication (Les Presses du Réel, 2015) with contributions by Mathieu K. Abonnenc, Mariana Castillo Deball, Catalina Lozano, Beatriz Santiago Muñoz and Jorge Satorre.

            Entrance to the group exhibition "Ce qui ne sert pas s'oublie".


            The first room of the exhibition featured 'Killing Pots' (2013–14), a series of sculptural works by Jorge Satorre (1979, Mexico). Information about these pieces can be found in this extensive text by curator Caterina Riva.


             
            Sean Lynch (1978, Ireland), 'A blog-by-blow account of stone-carving in Oxford', (2014) an installation composed of photographs, sculptures and a video projection "exploring the oeuvre of nineteenth-century stone-carvers John and James O’Shea, who carved monkeys, cats, owls and parrots on buildings in Oxford and Dublin."

            Sean Lynch, 'A blog-by-blow account of stone-carving in Oxford' (2014). 


            (Left) 'Nocturne' (2015) a video by Beatriz Santiago Muñoz (1972, Puerto Rico); (right) Mathieu K. Abonnenc (1977, French Guyana) 'Sas titre (des corps entassés'), (2012) and 'Names and surnames' (2012-13).


            (Left) Sven Augustijnen (1970, Belgium) series of photographs 'L'Histoire Belge' (2007) "question the monumentality of Belgium's history and any optimistic relation to its past, including its colonial incursions in Africa"; (right) 'Nocturne' (2015) a video by Beatriz Santiago Muñoz (1972, Puerto Rico) focusing on syncretic religions from the Caribbean, namely Haitian Vodou, characterised by the flexibility they show towards drastic change, be it geographical, social, material or natural".

              (Detail of) Sven Augustijnen (1970, Belgium) series of photographs 'L'Histoire Belge' (2007).


            General view of the exhibition. (Right wall) Museo Comunitario del Valle de Xico (Community Museum of the Xico Valley), a community organisation founded in 1996 "entrusted with the safeguard and display of pre-colonial remains found by the neighbours of the locality over the past few decades."


            (Above) Detail of Mariana Castillo Deball (1975, Mexico) "Le Problème de Molyneux" (2001) "addressing the immediacy of experiencing an object without seeing it and the subjective construction of its image".

            Room with "Showcase" (2012), "Rope" (2013), "Trophy stands" (2011) and "Semiophores" (2013), all works by Pauline M'barek (1979, Germany).


            (Above) Wendelien van Oldenborgh (1972, The Netherlands), "La Javaise" (2012). "Shot in the former Colonial Institute in Amsterdam, explores the links between colonialism and globalisation through the example of Vlisco, a Dutch firm producing textiles for the African market."



            The show closes with two works produced in 2007 by Uriel Orlow (1973, Switzerland): "Lost Wax" and "A Very Fine Cast (110 Years)". The first deals with the production of brass-casting artifacts in Benin City, Nigeria, produced via this already out of use technique. The latter (below) is a series of 28 engravings displaying descriptions of artifacts from museum cataloging systems, revealing the racist and colonial narratives that lie within the looted objects that are now part of European museum collections.




            Related Content:


            This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
            All photos:
            Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
            Work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




            David Jablonowski's "Hype Cycle" at Fons Welters, Amsterdam


            In his sculptural work, David Jablonowski skillfully juxtaposes a broad spectrum of man-made and mass-produced materials in order to reflect on timely topics such as the status of objects and the flow of data through the lens of technology. We had seen his work in group shows (see this blog post), but having the chance to see his solo presentation 'Hype Cycle' at Fons Welters was a very welcome addition to our Amsterdam Art Weekend visit.

            Jablonowski's interest in the complexity of today's networks of information and its technologies is manifested in a series of sculptures clustered as glass totems ('Prediction Tower, Hype Cycle 1' 2 and 3, all from 2014) or simple low shelves à la mode of still lives ('No Market Left Waiting To Merge (Taipei)', 2014). He favors working with contrasting materials in texture and warmth (e.g. reflecting glass vs. wicker baskets) constantly moving between the analogue and the digital (e.g. offset printing plates vs. LED screens). His sculptural arrangements belie their minimal appearance by incorporating organic materials such as dry orange slices, spices, leaves or rice crackers, often tricking the eye as to what is real and what is a prop. He plays, for example with the veracity of immaterial financial data against the seeming-artificiality of actually-present indexed produce – such as ears of grain. 

            'Hype Cycle' incorporates some of the elements from his recent Art Cologne presentation 'Hello Prediction! / Data Mining' (2014). One of the most intriguing pieces is 'Industrial3d Display', a 4 metre-long work arranged on the floor composed of materials such as aluminum, dried rye, peppers, plexiglass, Samsung LED screens, plaster, dried leaves and acrylic. This piece, one that best sublimates his conceptual and sculptural efforts, elegantly alloys all his concerns around the evolution of media and obsolescence, layering found video footage on two flat screens, used offset printing sheets folded in their corners and reed baskets containing ears of wheat. Jablonowski's choice of wheat is significant as the cultivation of this cereal was one of the main factors in the emergence of city societies. It was easily grown and could be stored over long periods of time as well as serving as a construction material. 



            Another imposing piece is 'New Trade Routes, Trade Alert' (2014), featuring one of the stars of the show: an 18th Century wooden wagon. 'New Trade Routes...' appears to lance any uneasy nostalgia for mankind as a tool-maker. Although similar wagons are doubtless still used in many communities today, the proximity to modern and contemporary items such as consumer objects and the trapping of newer technology (LED panels, aluminum printing plates, reproduction Chinese dim sum, etc.) turns the wagon into a sort of time-traveled artifact. It is as if it has become hardly recognizable as technology for the many of us more familiar to interacting with a touch screen than a horse harness.

            The show is underscored by many of the social, technological and economic changes we are witnessing today. A pointed example of this is the graphic printed on a transparent sheet (typically used for overhead projectors in pre-PowerPoint corporate and educational presentations) and included in one of Jablonowski's totems. The Hype Cycle is "a branded graphical tool developed and used by IT research and advisory firm Gartner, Inc. for representing the maturity, adoption and social application of specific technologies." The curve shows, for example, that Predictive Analytics reached the "Plateau of Productivity" phase as of July 2013.

            It is interesting to put Jablonowski's work in the light of the nearby exhibition at SMBA with film work by Zachary Formwalt, which focuses on the progressive abstraction and remoteness of financial trade, taking as a point of departure the 1903 H.P. Berlage's Amsterdam Stock and commodities Exchange in contrast to the 2013 OMA-designed Shenzhen Stock Exchange.

            Both Jablonowski and Formwalt's approach resonates with our current research on artistic practice broadly inquiring on the circulation of raw materials, economic trade, information flows and technological obsolescence. 

            For better photo documentation of the show, check Fons Welters' website or Artsy



            David Jablonowski (1982) lives in Amsterdam and works with Fons Welters (Amsterdam), Lüttgenmeijer (Berlin), Max Wigram (London). 


            Related Content: 

            Report from Madrid: Apertura 2014 gallery and museums programme in tweets, 11–13 September (15 September 2014) 

            Report from London's Frieze week 2014 now on Storify (27 October 2014) 

            Report from the Amsterdam Art Weekend, 27–30 November 2014 now on Storify (2 December 2014)  

            "Esta puerta pide clavo" at Galerie Tatjana Pieters (22 June 2012) 

            Maaike Lauwaert write up of the exhibition on Artforum's Critics' Picks



            This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
            All photos:
            Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
            This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




            Seven storify threads available on https://storify.com/lttds

            Report from Frieze week: Frieze Art Fair, Frieze Masters and the whole other rest, 12–18 October 2014 
            https://storify.com/lttds/report-from-frieze-week-frieze-art-fair-frieze-mas

            Report from Madrid: exhibitions during Apertura 2014 (11–13 September 2014)
            https://storify.com/lttds/report-from-madrid-museums-and-galleries-during-ap

            Visiting Curator Program, Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne, 12 May–7 June 2014
            https://storify.com/lttds/visiting-curator-program-gertrude-contemporary-mel

            More on this residency here.

            'Incidents of Travel', Hong Kong, 7 January–10 February 2013
            https://storify.com/lttds/incidents-of-travel-hong-kong

            More on this project and residency here.

            'The Margins of the Factory', a show by Iratxe Jaio and Klaas van Gorkum at ADN Platform, 25 January–30 April 2014
            https://storify.com/lttds/the-margins-of-the-factory-an-exhibition-by-iratx

            More on this exhibition here.

            Report from Paris: FIAC 2013, 21–25 October 2013
            https://storify.com/lttds/paris-during-fiac-2013

            #OpenCurating research, June 2012–April 2013
            https://storify.com/lttds/opencurating 

            More on this research project here.


            Related content:

            "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" symposium, National Library of Singapore, 14 May 2014

            Lunchtime Art Forum and seminar with PhD candidates in Curatorial Practice, MADA | Monash Art Design & Architecture, Melbourne, 14 May 2014 

            'The Margins of the Factory' on Artforum's Critics' Picks

            "Focus Interview: Iratxe Jaio & Klaas van Gorkum", frieze, Issue 157, September 2013



            This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
            All photos:
            Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
            This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




            Report from London's Frieze week 2014 now on Storify






            Report from Madrid: Apertura 2014 gallery and museums programme in tweets, 11–13 September




            More photos documenting the same shows we saw or others that didn't make it to the twitter for lack of time (or network):

             "Antología del desajuste adverbial" by Abigail Lazkoz at Galería Bacelos.

             Ángel Vergara at Marta Cervera.

             "B. Wurtz. Works 1972 - 2014" at Maisterravalbuena.

             Dora García at Juana de Aizpuru.

             Browsing one of the books that hanged from Thonet bentwood rocking chairs at Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster's installation "Spendide Hotel" at the Palacio de Cristal, the venue run by the MNCARS located at the Parque del Retiro.

            Related posts:

            Report from Glasgow: Lecture at The Common Guild and studio and gallery visits (4 December 2013)
            Report from Paris: FIAC week, 21–28 October 2013 (5 November 2013)

            Report from Athens: "AGORA", 4th Athens Biennale 2013 (4 November 2013)
            Report from New York: Gramcsi Monument, visiting critics at ISCP, Carol Bove at The High Line and galleries route (23 September 2013) 
            Report from Dublin and Derry-Londonderry: research trip to Ireland, 8–14 March 2013 (16 March 2013)
            Report from Urdaibai: commission series 'Sense and Sustainability', Urdaibai Arte 2012 (22 July 2012)



            This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
            All photos:
            Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
            This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




            Photoreport and storify of the symposium "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?", National Library of Singapore, 14 May 2014

             During the presentation of Shabbir Hussain Mustafa and Charles Lim. Photo: Latitudes.

            The public symposium "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" (14 May 2014) was part of this year Curating Lab 2014 programme organised by NUS Museum. The event, convened and moderated by Heman Chong and Latitudes, counted with the participation of Shabbir Hussain Mustafa (Curator, National Gallery Singapore), Charles Lim (artist); Anca Rujoiu and Vera Mey (Curators, CCA — Centre for Contemporary Art, Singapore) and artist Shubigi Rao.

            Addressing the format of the exhibition in terms of duration and process, the public symposium "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" consisted of two complimentary sessions that reflected on exhibitions' capacity to articulate its own making and incorporate its own history. In the same way that the Internet has untethered television from fixed schedules and newspapers from print deadlines, the symposium will further ponder on how the exhibition and today's art institutions are undergoing similar transformations. Should exhibitions embrace or resist becoming more like broadcasting or live-publishing? "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" considered how exhibitions produce knowledge through the format of conversations between curators and artists. 

            First panel with Shabbir Hussain Mustafa and Charles Lim. Photo: Luca E.C.

            Charles Lim and Shabbir Hussain Mustafa during the Q&A. Photo: Luca E.C.


             Audience. Photo: Luca E.C.

             Vera Mey, Anca Rajoiu and Shubigi Rao during the Q&A. Photo: Luca E.C.

            The event was an occasion to reflect on the role of a symposium and its public within curatorial practice, and counted with the engagement of Curatorial-Intensive participants who live-tweeted proceedings, a second group mapped concepts of the discussions (see photos below), and a final group will soon publish a blog post documenting and reporting the day for those not physically present.

             Curatorial Intensive participants live-tweeting the proceedings. Photo: Luca E.C.
            Group working on the mapping of concepts throughout the symposium. Photo: Luca E.C.
             Map 1 by Curatorial Intensive participants. Photo: Latitudes.
            Map 2 by Curatorial Intensive participants. Photo: Latitudes.
            Below archive of all the tweets produced during the presentations - via Storify.



             
            Related links:

            Workshop for Curating Lab 2014: Imagining an institution, 1 July 2014.

            "Hauntological trajectories in “When Does An Exhibition Begin And End?”" by Amanda Lee Koe on Art Asia Pacific's blog, 23 July 2014.

            "Curating Lab: When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" by Bruce Quek on Radian, 18 August 2014.



            This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
            All photos:
            Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
            This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




            Public Symposium "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" on 14 June 2014 at the National Library, Singapore



            "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?"
            A public symposium part of Curating Lab 2014
            Saturday 14 June 2014
            3–5pm 
            Level 5 - Possibility, National Library Building, Singapore 
            Free admission with registration, please write to [email protected]

            Addressing the format of the exhibition in terms of duration and process, the public symposium "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" on June 14th, will consist of two complimentary sessions with the participation of curators and artists who will reflect on exhibitions' capacity to articulate its own making and incorporate its own history. In the same way that the Internet has untethered television from fixed schedules and newspapers from print deadlines, the symposium will further ponder on how the exhibition and today's art institutions are undergoing similar transformations.

            Is an ongoing production of discourse and research accountability increasingly expected of curators? Are artists engaging differently with new channels for the documentation and distribution of their work and what contextualises it? Should exhibitions embrace or resist becoming more like broadcasting or live-publishing? "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" will consider how exhibitions produce knowledge through the format of conversations between curators and artists.


            In the first session Shabbir Hussain Mustafa (Curator, National Gallery Singapore) and artist Charles Lim will talk about their ongoing professional collaboration including Lim's long-term SEA STATE project and the related solo exhibition In Search of Raffles’ Light (NUS Museum, 24 October 2013–27 April 2014). Mustafa and Lim will address these projects' engagement with the maritime history of Singapore in its intersection with the present while speculating about their approach to future exhibitions, including their forthcoming collaboration for the Singapore Pavilion at the 2015 Venice Biennale.

            In the second session Anca Rujoiu and Vera Mey (Curators,
            CCA — Centre for Contemporary Art, Singapore) will discuss their recent project "The Disappearance" (CCA, 5–6 April 2013), which took place during the dismantling of a previous exhibition "as a durational event unfolding over two days including a continuous series of manifestations". Rujoiu and May will be joined by participating artist Shubigi Rao to discuss her project "Visual snow" (2014), presented during "The Disappearance" as an ongoing part of her biographical study of "the reclusive S. Raoul".

            Within the context of Curating Lab 2014, "When Does An Exhibition Begin and End?" will be treated as an occasion to reflect on the role of a symposium and its public within curatorial practice. It will count on the engagement of Curatorial-Intensive participants who will be live-tweeting proceedings, mapping concepts of the discussions, and devising an approach to documenting and reporting the day for those not physically present.

            The symposium is convened and moderated by artist, curator and writer Heman Chong and Barcelona-based curatorial office Latitudes (Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna).

            Organised by: NUS Museum
            Institutional Partner: Centre for Contemporary Art, Singapore
            Supported by: National Arts Council
            Venue Sponsor: National Library Board, Singapore
             



            This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
            All photos:
            Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
            This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




            Latitudes as guest tweeters of #ARCOmeetings during ARCOmadrid 2014

            Photo: Latitudes
            In the build-up and during ARCOmadrid, Latitudes will be reporting on and live-tweeting from the forthcoming Professional Meetings as well as the 3rd Meeting of European & Latin American Museums. 

            Reserved exclusively for professionals, and with admission by invitation only, each of these closed-door meetings provides an opportunity for guests to share their thoughts, compare experiences and discuss new ideas.

            Follow us on twitter: @ARCOmeetings and join us using #ARCOmeetings
            We'll be gathering all the social media posts here: http://storify.com/ARCOmeetings/2014

            Photo: ARCOmadrid.
            Programme 19–22 February 2014

            Wednesday 19 February, noon–2pm
            3rd MEETING OF EUROPEAN AND IBERO-AMERICAN MUSEUMS

            Session co-organised with the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía.
            Moderated by:
            João Fernandes, Deputy Director, Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía.
            Jesús Carrillo, Head of Cultural Programmes,
            Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía.
            Rosario Peiró, Head of Collections,
            Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía.

            Twitter
            @MuseoReinaSofia
            Participants: 
            Zdenka Badovinac, Cristina Cámara, Cosmin Costinas, Ticio Escobar, Patrick Flores, Rafael García, Lola Hinojosa, Vasif Kortun, Pablo León de la Barra, Soledad Liaño, Ana Longoni, Natalia Majluf, Cuauhtémoc Medina, Joanna Mytkowska, Gabriel Pérez-Barreiro, José Roca, Berta Sureda, Luiz Augusto Teixeira, Steven ten Thije.
             
            Wednesday 19 February, 4–6pm

            MATERIAL CULTURE AND CONTEMPORARY ART 
            Moderated by:
            Ruba Katrib, Curator, SculptureCenter, New York.

            Twitter
            @RubaKatrib
            @sculpturecenter

            Participants:  
            Max Andrews, Patrick Charpenel, Reem Fadda, Nav Haq, Geir Haraldseth, Candice Hopkins, Gabi Ngcobo, Paul O’Neill, Nicolaus Schafhausen. 

            Thursday 20 February, noon–2pm
            TALKING ABOUT MY GENERATION: ON THE RELEVANCE OF GENERATIONS IN CONTEMPORARY CURATING  
            Moderated by: 
            Martha Kirszenbaum, Independent Curator, Paris/Los Angeles.
             
            Participants: 
            Antonia Alampi, Karen Archey, Marc Bembekoff, Jarrett Gregory, Tobi Maier, Andrea Rodriguez, Jakob Schillinger, Aura Seikkula, Polly Staple. 

            Thursday 20 February, 4–6pm
            PARTICIPATORY ART PRACTICE - CHALLENGES AND POTENTIAL
             

            Moderated by: 
            Paula Toppila, Executive Director of IHME Contemporary Art Festival in Helsinki, Finland.
            Twitter

            @PToppila
            @ihme_fi
            #FocusFinland
             
            Participants:  
            Mônica Hoff, Alistair Hudson, Mary Jane Jacob, Kaija Kaitavuori, Aaron Levy, Raimundas Malasauskas, Ramon Parramon, Yasmil Raymond. 

            Friday 21 February, noon–2pm 
            ARTIST RESIDENCIES. COLLABORATION MODELS AND STRATEGIES
            Session organized by Acción Cultural Española (AC/E)
            Moderated by:  
            Juan de Nieves, Curator and Director of Rupert (Vilnius, Lithuania), a new centre for contemporary art based on a programme of independent studies, residencies and exhibitions. 
            Twitter:  
            @JuanDeNieves 
            @Rupert_Vilnius
            @acecultura 
            Participants: 
            Carlota Álvarez Basso, Alessio Antoniolli, Tere Badía, Francisca Caporali, Amanda Cruz, Pablo Guardiola, Juha Huuskonen, Zineb Sedira, Agnieszka Sosnowska, Mathilde Villeneuve. 
            (Note: "Biennials at the Periphery" is a two-part session) 
            Friday 21 February, noon–2pm and 4–6pm
            BIENNIALS AT THE PERIPHERY
            Moderated by:  
            Irene Hofmann, Phillips Director and Chief Curator of SITE Santa Fe in New Mexico; and Lucía Sanromán, Independent curator and writer, and co-curator of the forthcoming SITElines 2014.  
            Twitter:  
            @SITESantaFe  
            Participants:
            Brooke Davis Anderson, Dan Cameron, Jota Castro, Janet Dees, Taru Elfving, Candice Hopkins, Bill Kelley jr., Sally Tallant. 

            Saturday 22 February, noon–2pm
            CURATING AFRICA (IN, FROM AND FOR) 
            Moderated by: 
            Miguel Amado, Independent Curator, Lisbon/Barcelona. Amado has been the Curator of the Portuguese Pavilion "Trafaria Praia" at the 2013 Venice Biennale.
            Participants: 
            Elise Atangana, Christa Clarke, Elvira Dyangani Ose, Caroline Hancock, Nadine Siegert, Bomi Odufunade, Gabi Ngcobo, Suzana Sousa. 



            This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
            All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
            This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




            Report from Paris: FIAC week, 21–28 October 2013

            Latitudes was recently invited to take part in the 2013 Young Curators Invitational programme (YCI) coinciding with FIAC, the Parisian art fair that has been gaining acclaim in recent years, particularly since Jennifer Flay took over as director in 2003 and relocated the fair to the light-filled Grand Palais in 2006. This was its 40th edition and it included more outdoor installations, a new performance series and a film screening series. Held since 2006 as a collaboration between the art fair, Fondation d’Entreprise Ricard and the Institut Français, YCI gathers a group of curators during FIAC week for a programme of visits to Parisian cultural institutions, as well as a series of meetings with art professionals that gather on the occasion of the fair.

            The other 2013 participants were Maaike Lauwaert (Curator, Stroom den Haag, The Hague), Christiane Rekade (independent curator based in Berlin), Margit Säde Lehni (Independent curator based in Estonia and Zürich and co-publisher of Rollo Press), Miriam Kathrein (Curator at TBA21, Vienna) and Amira Gad (Managing Curator/Publications at Witte de With, Rotterdam and Managing Curator, Fogo Island Arts, Canada). The YCI is by invitation only, and Latitudes were thankful to be recommended by Zoë Gray (independent curator based in Brussels and vice-president of IKT).

            In addition to the following, you can also check out photodocumentation in the archive of tweets and instagrams posted during the week.


            Monday 21 October: After arrival and introductions among the group, we set off to the press view of Philippe Parreno's solo show at Palais de Tokyo. "Anywhere, Anywhere, Out Of The World" took over the whole of the Palais de Tokyo, a vast space of 22,000 square metres that Parreno had orchestrated, according to the venue website "along the lines of a dramatic composition where the spectral presence of objects, music, lights, and films guide and manipulate the visitor’s experience, offering a journey through his works, both old and new, transforming this monologue into a polyphony". Voilà! 

            In a recent interview between the artist and Jennifer Higgie, frieze co-editor, Parreno discussed his ideas for his exhibition at Palais de Tokyo: "I’m going to structure my exhibition around the score of Igor Stravinsky’s 1910 ballet, Petrushka.. (...) At the Palais de Tokyo, all of the pauses and movements will be directed by the piano. Petrushka will be the master of the show, its code. In automation you always ask who is the master and who is the slave. Here the show will be enslaved by a piano. When certain notes are played, something particular will happen: for example, lights will flicker according to the piano movement; and at the moment when the ballet dancer appears, my film Marilyn (2012) will be screened. People will do certain things, like in a Kafka novel where people also follow the programme. I am looking at the Palais de Tokyo itself as if it were an automaton."

            For a more experiental description of the exhibition, you might read the review by The Guardian contributor Adrian Searle (although somewhat missleadingly it introduces Parreno only as a video artist). Check also Ivo Bonacorsi's on Domus with lots of great photos.


            Installation, Petrouchka by Stranvinski, recorded by Mikhail Rudy on a Yamaha "Disklavier" piano, 2013.


            Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster's bookshelf gives access to a secret room containing a recreation of a John Cage and Merce Cunningham show.


             Theatrical entrance awnings flashed on and off in synch with another digital piano-roll.


            Parreno in collaboration with Douglas Gordon, "Zidane: un portrait du XXIème siècle", 2006.

            General view of the exhibition.

            Tuesday 22 October: The following day we visited the Château de Versailles (no introduction needed), whose vast gardens hosted works by arte povera éminence grise Giuseppe Penone, including tree-and-rock sculptures such as that recently seen at Kassel's Karlsauer Park during the past Documenta 13. The works where supported by the Fondation d’entreprise Hermès.


            On our way back to Paris, we stopped at Calmart to visit Nicolas Boulard's solo exhibition "The rule of cool" at the Centre d'art Albert Chanot (until 22 December).

            View of Nicolas Boulard's "Aéroplane" (2013) and on the right fifteen "Agroglyphes" (2011-12), drawings of crop designs applied in different geographies.

            In the afternoon we strolled around the Berges de Seine (checking out the installations along the left bank of the Seine) and the Jardin des Tuileries, sites of FIAC's 'Hors les Murs' programme with interventions and sculptures by artists including Societé Réaliste (pictured below their "UN Camouflage" (2013)).

              
            Visit to the Jardin des plantes followed by a reception at the Grande Galerie de l'Évolution. Victor Costales and Julia Rometti installation "Roca | Azul | Jacinto | Marino | Errante" (2013) (photographed below) was one of the many works displayed around the Jardin. Last year the piece was part of the artists stand which won the illy SustainArt Prize during ARCOmadrid 2012. 
             

            Before the reception at the splendorous Grande Galerie de l'Évolution (below), we watched the new film "Apotomé" by Jennifer Allora & Guillermo Calzadilla at the auditorium, which takes as its starting point the attempt of a man to communicate with two fossil elephants that arrived at the Museum in March 1798.




            Wednesday 23 October: Closed-door session "Curatorial research, criticism and publishing practices in the French art scene" at the Auditorium du Grand Palais, FIAC. Photographed below (left to right): Ida Soulard (Art Historian and Research Director of Fieldwork: Marfa); Emilie Villez (Director of Kadist Foundation, Paris) and Marie Cozette (Director of the Synagogue de Delme). Other speakers were Pierre Bal-Blanc (Director of CAC Brétigny); Elisabeth Lebovici (Art Critic and Senior Lecturer at EHESS) and Benjamin Thorel (Art Critic, curator at castillo/corrales, and editor of Paraguay Press). The panel was moderated by curator and writer, Vincent Normand.



            As time was limited we decide to concentrate and peruse the upper floor of FIAC, stopping at the stands of Galerie Jan Mot (Brussels), gb Agency (Paris), Monitor (Rome), ProjecteSD (Barcelona), Jocelyn Wolff (Paris), Vitamin Creative Space (Guanghzou), LABOR (Mexico City), Ellen de Bruijne Projects (Amsterdam),  Meessen de Clercq (Brussels), castillo/corrales (Paris), Parra & Romero (Madrid), RODEO (Istanbul and winner of the Lafayette Prize), Juliette Jongma (Amsterdam), Bugada & Cargnel (Paris), Galerie Jousse Enterprise (Paris) and Motive Gallery (Amsterdam), (participating in their last fair, as they will soon wrap up their gallery programme and transition into an institute). 

            Towards the first floor level of FIAC, the Salon d’Honneur.

            Guillaume Leblon, Asier Mendizabal and Iñaki Bonillas on the photo. ProjecteSD, Barcelona.

             Koki Tanaka at Vitamin Creative Space, Guanghzou.


             Hans Schabus at Jocelyn Wolff, Paris, where he also had a solo show we later visited.
             Francesco Arena performance at Monitor, Rome.
            Christodoulous Panayiotou shoes made of leather bags given by his friends at the stand of RODEO, Istanbul.
            Wonderful set of prints by Terence Gower of Sert's US Embassy in Bagdad at LABOR from Mexico City.
             Adrien Missika at the stand of parisian Bugada & Cargnel.
             More works by Costales and Rometti, here at Jousse Enterprise.
            hunt kastner exhibited a solo presentation of Eva Kotatkova, following her much-discussed work in the current Venice Biennale.
                                                             
            Early afternoon visit to Kadist Foundation and tour of the exhibition "Room by us" by the artist Nicolás Paris (on view until 8 December).


            We ended the day visiting Pierre Huyghe's exhibition at Centre Pompidou and the 2012 Prix Marcel Duchamp at the Espace 315. The latter featured a large tapestry of merino wool, a painting on silk and a bodybuilder sculpture made of oak by Daniel Dewar and Grégory Gicquel (both on view until 6 January 2014).
             

            Huyghe's retrospective exhibition presented fifty works that span over the last twenty years of production. As stated in the exhibition leaflet "The exhibition emphasizes the living and organic dimension of his propositions, which envisage the space as a world in intself, unplanned, living according to its own rhythms: it is not so much the points but rather the flow, the interplay and the intensities arising between the elements that he reveals. Moreover, the exhibition highlights the filiations between the works, sometimes separated by as much as a decade: adolescents wearing the heads of animals for La Toison d'Or (1993) in a park in Dijon hence relate to the protagonists of the procession in Streamside Day (2003) or even to Human, the dog with the pink leg [see Documenta 13 photodocumentation]. Rooted in the walls and remnatns of previous exhibitions, particularly the preceding one of Mike Kelley, the show opens towards the exterior in an outgrowth, where certain organic and climatic works can exist."  

            Untitled (Liegender Frauenakt), 2012. Presented in the recent Documenta 13 last year – see photodocumentation.
            Part of the installation in three acts "L'Expedition Scintillante", 2002. 

             Here: "De Hory Modigliani" (2007) "The Host and the Cloud" (video, 2010) & "RSI, un bout de réel" (2006).

            Thursday 24 October: Fondation Ricard exhibition "La vie matérielle" curated by Yann Chateigné, Chair of the Department of Visual Arts at the Haute école d’art et de design in Geneva. The show presents works by Stéphane Barbier-Bouvet, Jonathan Binet, Alex Cecchetti, Caroline Mesquita, Chloé Quenum, Lili Reynaud Dewar, Alexandre Singh, Benjamin Valenza (see more photos here), and was organised on the occasion of the 15th Prix Fondation d'entreprise Ricard, an award that consist in the purchase of a work from the winner, which is then donated to the Centre Pompidou and presented in the permanent collections of the institution. The 2013 awardee was Lili Reynaud Dewar.



            During our free time, we set off to the Musée d'art Moderne de la Ville de Paris (MAM) to visit the group show "Decorum. Carpets and tapestries by artists" (on view until 9 February 2014). London-based artist Marc Camille Chaimowicz directed the exhibition scenography together with architect Christine Ilex Beinemeier, and Jean-Philippe Antoine, professor of Aesthetics, selected a playlist of 65 songs (including pieces by John Cage, Béla Bartók, Michael Nyman, David Crosby or Brian Eno) which accompanies the visitor to the exhibition [it can also be listened to here and on the website of the exhibition]. The sprawling exhibition, laid out under five loose thematic sections ("Painterly", "Decorative", "Orientalisms", "Primitivisms" and the "Sculptural") presented over a hundred pieces by modernist artists (Fernand Léger, Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró, Sophie Taeuber-Arp, Alexander Calder, Anni Albers) alongside contemporary artists (including Isabel Cornaro, Leonor Antunes, Albert Oehlen, Mai-Thu Perret, Vincent Vulsma), and started off with two large installations, by Franz West ("Auditorium", 1982), made up of sofas covered with oriental carpets on which the public is invited to sit, and a large weaving loom by Michael Beutler which reflects on mass production and collaborative work. Watch a short video documentary here (in French).


            General view of the exhibition.

              (Above) Work by Elsi Giauque's "Élément Spatial" (1979). Colection of MUDAC, Lausanne.  

            We also visited Bétonsalon, centre d'art et de recherche which hosted the publication-as-exhibition "They remember only the photographs". It focused on the research undertaken at the Bibliothèque Kandinsky (Centre Pompidou MNAM-CCI) by the research group "Modern and contemporary art photographed" of the Ecole du Louvre and the University Paris Diderot - Paris 7, represented by five students from the association Politik’art. It represented the research undertaken at the by ten students from the Ecole du Louvre Masters degree. More photos here.


            Reconnecting with our programmed schedule we visited the Cité internationale des arts and made studio visits with artists Benoit Pype, Stéphanie Lagarde and Pieter Van der Schaaf. With over 300 individual studios and living spaces facilities in Marais and Montmatre, the Cité internationale des arts has, since 1965, provided short or long stays (2 months to 1 year) for over 18,000 professional artists who want to develop an artistic work in France.


            Pieter Van der Schaaf's Untitled (postcards), 2013. 

            Lagarde is researching the peculiar names of the different varieties of iris (Pink Confetti, Midsummer Night's Dream, Oregon Skies, Dancing Shiva...) in order to compose a series of poems and at a later stage, to plant them following the order of her poem.
             
            To end the day, we had a meeting with artist Farah Atassi (shortlisted for the 2013 Marcel Duchamp prize) at Galerie Xippas. The winner, announced on Saturday 26th, was Latifa Echakhch (born in 1974, represented by kamel mennour, Paris). Other shortlisted artists were Claire Fontaine (collective founded in Paris in 2004 represented by Chantal Crousel and Air de Paris) and Raphaël Zarka (born in 1977, represented by Michel Rein, Paris).
             

            We later had an impromptu meeting with artists Bevis Martin and Charlie Youle, who exhibited at the temporary space Galerie Samy Abraham's had at the Espace des Blancs Manteaux during FIAC.



            The day ended with several openings around Marais: gb agency with Omer Fast; Galerie Chantal Croussel with Abraham Cruzvillegas; Galerie Jousse Enterprise with Superflex; Campoli Presti with Liz Deschenes, Yvon Lambert with David Claerbout, New Gallery with Daniel Keller; TORRI with a group show with works by Braco Dimitrijevic, Hamish Fulton, Ai Wei Wei and Zhao Zhao... comme ci, comme ça.

             Galerie Chantal Croussel with Abraham Cruzvillegas.

             Daniel Keller's "Lazy Ocean Drift" at New Gallery.

            Friday 25 October: Visit to the artist-run-space Treize and tour of Belleville galleries: Samy Abraham; Balice Hertling; Antoine Levi; Marcelle Alix; Crèvecoeur; Jocelyn Wolff and castillo/corrales.


            The artist-run-space Treize hosted the show "Pavillon Moret" with works by Sophie Lamm, Sarah Tritz, Lucille Uhlrich and Marion Verboom.

            Antoine Levi hosted the solo show "Problems of Style" by Sean Townley.

            Jocelyn Wolff presented a solo show of Austrian artist Hans Schabus.


            Marcelle Alix presented a solo show of English artist Ian Kiaer.


            Crèvecoeur hosted the solo show "The Public Imagination" Erica Baum.

             Visiting castillo/corrales space which hosted 26 works generously donated by a bunch of artists soon after auctioned as part of their annual benefit event

            Le Plateau/FRAC Île-de-France with the solo show "Make Every Show Like it's your Last" by British artist Ryan Gander.

            We finished our day with a guided tour of the exhibition Europunk at Cité de la musique by its curator David Sanson, and a visit to the recently opened Chalet Society (a new association founded in 2012 by former Palais de Tokyo director, Marc-Olivier Wahler), which hosted "The Hidden World. Jim Shaw / A Didactic Collection" (until 29 December). The show included astonishing materials from the artist collection which accounts as his source of inspiration: "secret societies, far-fetched orders and fraternities, evangelical and fundamentalist movements, New Age spiritualists, Scientologists, Mormons, Freemasons, ultraconservatives and all kinds of conspirators, encyclopaedias for children and even Dr. Netter’s famous medical illustrations". Occuping 1,000m2 on 14 boulevard Raspail, this former school also hosts a "conceptual crêperie" and a shop with books selected by the califormnian artist.


            During the weekend we had time to visit a museum that came highly recommended by those that knew our taste for obscure collections and wunderkammer exhibits, the Musée de la Chasse et de la Nature (picture below). We also returned to the Centre Pompidou to pay a visit to their 'Plural Modernities 1905–1970' exhibition. This re-reading of the collection showcased a series of interrelated micro-exhibitions and is well worth a visit. Rarely seen works populated the fourth floor galleries in an effort to present to what until recently were considered 'minor' modernities. There was a special focus on the Maghreb, Latin America and Asia, the latter represented by a selection of works by Asian artists living in Paris at the height of Impressionism, whose work followed the same aesthetic principles. There were some delightful inclusions such as the wealth of art journal covers that filled the walls as wallpaper, allowing the visitor to cross-relate the graphics and texts to the paintings and sculptures produced concurrently. Gallery guide here.


            Façade of the Pompidou.


            This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
            All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
            This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




            Report from Athens: "AGORA", 4th Athens Biennale 2013

            The former stock exchange displayed nine digital price boards, a work by George Harvalias.

            The tumultuous events of the last years in Greece have seen hundreds of thousands of people rallying, striking and rioting to protest the waves of austerity measures imposed on the debt-stricken country. Protestors have repeatedly clashed with police, lives have been lost, unemployment has skyrocketed, and the government warned in 2010 that the nation was "on the brink of the abyss". This year's Athens Biennale set itself the courageous task of asking, "Now what?". Taking its cue from the notion of the agora as a place of gathering and collaborative reconciliation, the Biennale transposed an ancient discursive framework onto the holy mess of the present. Its bitingly resonant main venue was the former Athens stock exchange, not quite a ruin, but a scarred shell of a building in the centre of the city.



              
            The main hall of the former Athens stock exchange building on Sofocleous Street. This neo-Classical building opened in 1876 and was the trading floor for shares listed on the ATHEX exchange until it moved to another venue in July 2007. The nine digital price boards (the actual boards of the former exchange) was a work by George Harvalias, perhaps the touchstone of the biennial. It reproduced the share prices from the last day's trading in the building in 26 June 2007 when prices were near their peak value, with no sign of the subsequent catastrophic market crash to come. 


             


            The text work on the balcony of the stock exchange hall was part of series entitled "New Behavioral Notes" (2012) by Dimitris Dokatzis, an Athenian artist of the same generation as Harvalias born in the 1950s. The words read "Money – Money! That is always the danger with you", a fragment taken from an Agatha Christie novel.


            Among the younger generation of Greek artists and the more veiled comments on the financial crises, Constantinos Hadzinikolaou showed "Peacock" (2003–13), a Super 8 loop of a male Peafowl's extravagant courtship display.

            One of at least three Spanish artists in the Biennial (besides Catalans Núria Güell and Ester Partegàs), Fernando García-Dory focused "on Pacific, Caribbean and Mediterranean islands as semi-enclosed ecosystems that stage the classic neo-liberal drama in which local economies succumb to the promissory spectacle of worldly paradise."

            The guts of the Biennale were a series of discussions, workshops and roundtables, and on 12 October 2013 the main venue hosted a fascinating, sobering and graph-filled economics conference, featuring blue chip economists from around the world including Heiner Flassbeck, Director of the Division on Globalization and Development Strategies of the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development. Poka-Yio, Biennale co-founder and co-director introduced the conference (photographed above). 




             Paolo Manasse, Professor of Macroeconomics and International Economic Policy at the University of Bologna.


            This year's biennale is fully online, and can be followed on twitter #AB4AGORA, facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, Tumblr, Vimeo and YouTube platforms. Alternatively, for an overview of what's coming up, check out the biennale calendar.

            AB4 was put together by a large group of contributing curators and collaborating correspondents as well as through an open call for projects. One of the features of the exhibition was the presence of a number of artists from Chicago, reflecting the engagement of Stephanie Smith, Deputy Director and Chief Curator of the Smart Museum of Art at the University of Chicago. (Stephanie was a contributor to the Latitudes-edited "Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook"). Among them, Geof Oppenheimer stood out with his "Reversals" (2013) new work which grew out of the sifting of archival advertising and press images to comprise ambiguous montages of economic affluence and political intrigue (photographed above). 



            At the Contemporary Art Meeting Point (CAMP, on 4 Eupolidos & 2 Apellou str.), material related to four decades of socially engaged art in Chicago was presented under the name "Never the Same", the archive led by Daniel Tucker and Rebecca Zorach (photographed above). 



            Of the artists more familiar from the better-worn paths of contemporary art, Gabriel Kuri presented "Quick Standards" (2005), which comprised four emergency blankets taped on wooden sticks.

            We were very grateful to curator and art historian Christoforos Marinos and his partner Xenia Kalpaktsoglou (co-founder and co-director of the force that is the Athens Biennale) for helping us in setting up some impromptu meetings with some impressive artists while we were in Athens. We managed to meet Vangelis Vlahos, Kostis Velonis, Rallou Panagiotou, AlexandrosTzannis, Kernel (an artist/architect curatorial collaboration of Pegy Zali, Petros Moris and Theodoros Giannakis) and Dora Economou


            (Above) Kernel (Pegy Zali, Petros Moris and Theodoros Giannakis) at the café of the Athens Biennial.

            Apart from the Biennial, elsewhere in Athens, the Deste Foundation/Dakis Joannou Collection presented "The System of Objects", a show inspired by Jean Baudrillard's 1968 book of the same name. Curated by Andreas Angelidakis with Italian curator Maria Cristina Didero, the show extended over densely-installed rooms which were, as Angelidakis suggested "a little bit like floating down that river of the internet... Cypriot antiquities float alongside major installations by Maurizio Cattelan, paintings by Jeff Koons and worn out red vinyl tights from American Apparel? A seminal Archizoom chair from 1968 floats next to a painting by a Cypriot artist given to Dakis ages ago? Really?".
             

             

            And of course what visit to Athens could ignore the treasures of the National Archaeological Museum? Of the objects on show, the finds from the Antikythera shipwreck were perhaps the most astonishing. Dated to 60–50 BC, they came from what experts believe was a freighter packed with Greek art headed to Italy. Ancient reminders from the dawn of the art trade, the antiquities – half consumed by the sea – were brought together for the first time in a special exhibition. 


             


            This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
            All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
            This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




            "Modernitat Amagada" (Hidden Modernity), an exhibition at Casa Capell, Mataró (3–31 October 2013)

             Casa Capell at the Parc Central, Mataró.

            'Modernitat Amagada' (3–31 October 2013), organised by ACM (Associació per a la Cultura i l’Art Contemporani de Mataró), was a short-lived group show at Casa Capell in Mataró, the wonderful former home of the Masjuan family ("former" as today there are hardly any traces of its original domestic use as it has been coverted into City Hall offices for its department of sustainability). It was built in 1959 by Jordi Capell (1925–1970), a little-known rationalist architect, mathematician and humanist.

            The exhibition extended over two floors, presenting works by Alexander Apóstol, Xavier Arenós, Rafel G. Bianchi, Eva Fàbregas, Carla Filipe, Regina Giménez, Terence Gower and Jaume Roure, as well as works by its two organisers, the artists Domènec and Dani Montlleó. The works were mostly produced in 2013, and ranged from sculptural interventions (Eva Fàbregas), responses to the home environment and its particular architecture (Rafel G. Bianchi, Regina Giménez, Jaume Roure), to contributions by artists whose artistic practice usually navigates the field of modern architecture (Terence Gower, Domènec, Xavier Arenós). 
             First room included works by Carla Filipe (on the table), Jaume Roure (by the chimney) and Eva Fàbregas (by the window). All works from 2013. 

            Carla Filipe, "Ideal City and Current Town" (2013). 10 acrylic stands with collages. 
             Detail of Carla Filipe's "Ideal City and Current Town" (2013).

            Extending the line of her previous projects, Carla Filipe recuperated lost or forgotten memories, trying to connect unknown fragments of local history. Her modules revived the 'Moderno Escondido' (Hidden Modernity) concept which was developed by Portuguese architects in the 1950s and 60s and which resulted in a series of offices, chuches, domestic spaces and commercial spaces though now these are mostly abandoned, both physically and ideologically. 
            Regina Giménez, "Composició en vermell, groc, blau i blanc" (Composition in red, yellow, blue and white, 2013).

            Regina Giménez thought of her painting as a wink to Capell, the house's modernist architect who was also a fervent activist for Catalan culture, dovetailing him with two referents of Modernism, the artist Piet Mondrian and the architect Mies van der Rohe. Her work suggested a possible intervention within the dinning room of Casa Capell – the incorporatation of a red carpet, white and blue cushions and a yellow wall – based on the principles of Neoplasticism, a movement which often used these primary colours in modern architecture, colours which are coincidentally also that of the Estelada, the Catalan independence flag. 
            Jaume Roure, "RE: Projecte Casa Capell" (2013). 

            Upon visiting the house and realising that little trace was visible of its original domestic use, Jaume Roure decided to recuperate the family presence by trying to locate photographs and personal memories of the original inhabitants. He couldn't find any photographs and only knew they were a couple with four children. He therefore tried to put faces to them by reconstructing a series of fictional images of what he thought they would look like, and framed them as if these memories were finally coming back to their original setting. 
             Eva Fàbregas, "Collapsible Sculptures" (2013).

            The series "Collapsible Sculptures" reflected on the progressive 'containerisation' of our culture  which since the 1950s has triggered a revolution in the production and transportation of merchandising. Our daily lives have also been highly affected by this shift: our food is able to be stored and transported and so are our domestic environments with modular, foldable, extensible or stackable items. Fàbregas sculptures (located in three spaces throughout the house), revealed the correspondences between mass-production and the aesthetics of Modernity.
            Above: Jaume Roure, "RE: Projecte Casa Capell" (2013), and below on the screen the 17' video "New Utopias" (2010) by Terence Gower.

            Still from "New Utopias" (2010) by Terence Gower.

            (From the artist's website): "New Utopias is a lecture about pop culture utopias filmed in the style of a 1950s Walt Disney documentary. The set, costuming, lighting and camera work are based on 1950s television production standards. But where the original Disney documentaries celebrated rockets and nuclear technology, this updated version promotes aesthetic frivolity, sexual perversion and UFO abduction fantasies. Among the new utopias under analysis are an afrofuturist extraterrestrial society, a dreary French seaside town transformed into an aesthetic paradise, and a retelling of the Frankenstein myth set in a sexual utopia ruled by the uninhibited libido. This video is shown accompanied by the Mothership Blueprints."
             Rafel G. Bianchi, Album (2013). 6x7 slides on lightbox.

            Rafel Bianchi's slides portrayed the cacti he had been documenting in his own garden in Barcelona. Upon visiting Casa Capell, he felt the need to bring some of the domesticity back to a space which was heavily restored in 2009–10 for it new adminstrative use. Cacti are a recurring motif used in the photographic documentation of architectural spaces, plants that often appear in photographs of works by the Catalan architect and city planner Josep Lluís Sert. Upon finishing a commission, Sert would arrange furniture and plants, with the aim of trying to give an appearance of domesticity and commodity as well as of Mediterraneity and modenity. 
             More "Collapsible Sculptures" by Eva Fàbregas downstairs by the window towering as cacti. These are reminiscent of those projected by Mexican architect Juan O’Gorman to protect Kahlo and Rivera's studio in Mexico City.
            Lower gallery with works by Domènec (left) and Dani Montlleó (right).
            Lower gallery with works by Dani Montlleó (left) and Alexander Apóstol (right).

            Alexander Apóstol's photographic series "Le Corbusier quemado en Bogotá" (2005), documented the interior of the burnt Centro Nariño, a residencial campus of 23 buildings built in Bogotá, developed by Colombian architects following the doctrines of Le Corbusier, who earlier proposed a modern city that was finally never built. Amindst student revolts in the 60s, the buildings were set on fire, destroying most of its interiors, which are still intact amongst the ashes and electric wiring revealing some of the important traces that the Modern thinking left in Latin American cities.

             Domènec, "Conversation Piece: Narkomfin" (2013). Maquette and formica chairs.

            "Conversation Piece: Narkomfin" (2013) was supported on two formica chairs, typically used in 1950s and 60s homes, and a maquette of the social housing Narkomfin, a building that fascinated Le Corbusier in his 1930s trip to the Soviet Union and that later inspired his Unité Habitation in Marseille.

             
            Maquette of Jean Prouvé's ’Maison Bulldog’ (2011) by Dani Montlleó

            This little half-bunker, half-trench-looking house of Dani Montlleó's work was also planned in 1959 (as was Can Masjuan house) for the writer Louis-Ferdinand Céline, although he died shortly after in 1961. The house was a replica of the Villa Arpel, designed by Jacques Lagrange for Jacques Tati's film "Mon Oncle" (1958).
             
            Xavier Arenós, ’Madriguera#10. Proun. Desenterrament’ (2012). 15' with music by Rafa Ruiz.

            Arenós' video, suitably projected in the lower floor storage room, recreated an excavation in which a Proun – a projection of an imaginary space, a term coined by El Lissitsky in the 1920s – is seemingly unearthed, like an anachronic residue of a remote civilisation, a transitional object. The accompanying futuristic soundtrack enhanced its science-fiction atmosphere.


            This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
            All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
            This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.