Photo report: Trip to Vienna Art Week and Amsterdam Art Weekend

A snowy Belvederegarten. All photos (unless stated otherwise): Latitudes.

As part of this year’s VIENNA ART WEEK, Latitudes was invited to get to know Vienna's art scene over the course of three days (19–21 November). On Tuesday 19 November, the visiting group of curators and artists participated in the panel ‘Some Current Positions of Curating’ at das weisse haus. The panel, chaired by Alexandra Gausman of das weisse haus, briefly introduced recent projects by Argentinian artists Guillermo Faivovich & Nicolás Goldberg; soon-to-be Paris-based curator Claire Hoffmann (Centre Culturel Suisse de Paris); artists and curators FICTILIS from San Francisco; Avi Lubin (Faculty at Jerusalem’s Beit Berl College); and Stephanie Weber (Curator of Contemporary Art at Lembachhaus in München).

Above and below photos: eSeL.

Grand staircase of the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna.

(Above and nine below) Views from the exhibition ‘Spitzmaus Mummy in a Coffin and other Treasures’ guest curated by filmmaker Wes Anderson and writer and illustrator Juman Malouf, in collaboration with Jasper Sharp (Kunsthistorisches Museum) and Mario Mainetti (Fondazione Prada). ‘Anderson and Malouf have assembled more than 400 objects drawn from all fourteen of the museum’s historical collections. Among them are Egyptian, Greek and Roman antiquities, Old Master paintings, selections from the Kunstkammer and the Imperial Treasury, items from the Imperial Armoury, Coin Collection, and Collection of Historic Musical Instruments, as well as pieces from the Theatermuseum, the Weltmuseum, the Imperial Carriage Museum, and Schloss Ambras Innsbruck. A handful of special guests from the Natural History Museum are also included. Particular attention was given to the museum’s storage: more than 350 of the objects have been brought from depots, with many of them on public display for the very first time. (...) The gathering and arrangement of these treasures – from the earliest, a necklace of ceramic beads strung together in Ancient Egypt, to the most recent, a wooden monkey carved in Indonesia almost 5,000 years later – suggest the spectacular breadth, depth, history and complexity of the Kunsthistorisches Museum’s collections.’ (from the venue website)


(Above and below) Donna Huanca exhibition ˝Piedra quemada˝ at the Lower Belvedere.

 (Above and two below) One of the rooms at the Naturhistorisches Museum (NHM). Below Faivovich and Goldberg intervention ˝In Search of Mesón de Fierro˝, part of their long-term research on meteorites at El Chaco region in northern Argentina. For the exhibition, they presented a 19-gram fragment in a meteorite in the collection of the NHM Vienna, which they were able to trace quite convincingly to Mesón de Fierro.

(Above and three below) On our own time, we arranged a visit to the artist-run-space Guimarães. Hugo Canoilas, one of the artists that run it alongside Nicola Pecoraro and Christoph Meier, gave us a detailed tour of the show which explored the concept of excessive sentimentality. ‘SCHMALTZ’ showcased unique editions, amusing finds, objects that accompany artists in their studio, as well as artworks by over 50 artists. 
A special edition of Luisa Gardini's photos. 

(Above and four below) Views from ‘55 dates. Highlights of the MUMOK collection’, presenting 55 works with an exhibition design by (Portscapes artist) Hans Schabus.
(Above and below) Also at MUMOK, "a photographic journey through Austrian history from 1918 to the present" was the focus of ‘Photo/Politics/Austria’ this time with exhibition design by Markus Schinwald.

 (Above and two below) Views from Asier Mendizábal's solo exhibition at Galerie Martin Janda.

 At the nearby Kunsthalle Wien, Vanessa Joan Müller and Nicolas Schafhausen curated ‘Antarctica. An Exhibition on Alienation’, showing works by Viltė Bražiūnaitė / Tomas Sinkevičius, Burak Delier, Buck Ellison, Isabella Fürnkäs, Eva Giolo, Thibaut Henz, Jan Hoeft, Hanne Lippard, Joanna Piotrowska, Jeroen de Rijke / Willem de Rooij, Jana Schulz, Andrzej Steinbach, Ingel Vaikla, Peter Wächtler, Ian Wallace and Tobias Zielony. ˝The exhibition explores how the term “alienation” functions in our world today. In doing so, it also addresses the following question: What other forms of relationship to the self and to the world do we need? Before we can even begin to create something like a space supportive of self-determination and self-realization?" (from the venue website)

 One of the nine studio visits at Prater Ateliers. Here with Christian Kosmas Mayer. 
Studio visit with Judith Fegerl at Prater Ateliers.

 Tour by curator Moritz Stipsicz of Tomás Saraceno's intervention in the baroque Karlskirche in Karlsplatz. 
 Views of Karlsplatz and Vienna skyline from the cupola.

 (Above and three below) Ed Ruscha's ‘Double Americanisms’ at Secession
(Above) Detail from Philipp Timischl's ‘Artworks For All Age Groups’ in the downstairs galleries of Secession.
(Above) View of Kris Lemsalu's ‘Keys Open Doors’ in the upper Secession gallery.

On November 22, we took off to Amsterdam taking advantage of the Amsterdam Art Week events which included the Rijksakademie open, the opening of two exhibitions at Stedelijk Museum (a solo show by Raquel van Haver and the biannual group exhibition presenting Amsterdam’s Municipal Art Acquisitions, ‘Freedom of Movement’). We also visited De Appel, kunstverein, Rongwrong, a few galleries that opened jointly.


(Above and below) De Appel exhibited Ben Russel's film ‘Good luck’ (2017) premiered during documenta 13. ‘Accompanying the installation, the artist created a sculptural analogue to process and portraiture, Good Luck (Echo) that turns a sheet of copper into a resonant, speaking subject.’ (from the venue website)


 Mr Peanut exhibition at kunstverein Amsterdam, gathering material from Vincent Trasov who became Mr. Peanut in 1971. In 1974 he ran for mayor of Vancouver. ‘The exhibition traces the history of Trasov’s revolutionary alias and includes historical documents, publications, correspondence, video footage as well as more recent drawings of Mr. Peanut and paintings by Vincent Trasov. A major retrospective on Image Bank will follow in the summer of 2019 at Kunst-Werke in Berlin.’


 (Above and below) Works by Cees Mogami de Haas.

 (Above and below) Works by Riet Wijnen.

 (Above and below) Works by Marieke Zwart.

 (Above and below) Works by Morgan Courtois.

  (Above and below) Works by Marina Xenofontos.

 (Above and below) Works by Mire Lee.

  (Above and below) Works by Omar A. Chowdhury.

 (Above and below) Works by Maurice van Es.

  (Above and below) Works by Isabelle Andriessen.


  (Above and below) Works by Omar Vega Macotela.

   (Above and below) A film by Tyna Adebowale.

 (Above and below) Works by Josse Pyl. 

  (Above and below) Works by Gaëlle Choisne.

  (Above and below) Works by Dan Zhu.

  (Above and below) Works by Danielle Dean.

 (Above and below) Works by Polina Kani.

  (Above and below) Works by Femke Herregraven.

  (Above and below) Works by Kévin Bray.

  (Above and below) Library display initiated by Anna Dasovic. 

(Above) Exhibition by Paul Kooiker at the tegenboschvanvreden gallery.

 Gabriel Lester exhibition at Fons Welters, Amsterdam. 

 Lara Almarcegui's video at Ellen de Bruijne. 
 Rory Pilgrim exhibition at andriesse eyck.

 Talk with Janet Cardiff at Oude Kerk. Below her work, with Georges Bures Miller, an intervened mellotron ‘The Instrument of Troubled Dreams˝ (2018), with 72 keys each of them programmed with a sound effect, a vocal track or a musical fragment.


(Above and four below) Stedelijk Collection in the basement of the museum. 

 (Above and two below) Metahaven exhibition at the Stedelijk Museum.

Merlin Carpenter exhibition at Rongwrong.


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Eighth episode of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Alejandra Aguado and Diego Bianchi from Buenos Aires, Argentina

Episode 8 from Buenos Aires now online on http://incidents.kadist.org/


In the eighth '
Incidents (of Travel)' dispatch Móvil co-founder and curator Alejandra Aguado followed the itinerary devised by the artist Diego Bianchi around Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

Their exploration took them from the self-regulated community Velatropa to the buzzing commercial area of Once, identifying human and non-human flows and interactions. This became an entry point for discussing Bianchi's interests in how, as consumers, we define a particular zeitgeist and appropriate trends that enable us to affirm our identities.

Each of the 20 photographs is augmented by one or more extra assets – a brief commentary, a sound or a caption – accessed by clicking the words overlaying the images.








'Incidents (of Travel)' explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter and an extended offline conversation between curator/s and artist/s. Online storytelling presents and documents curatorial fieldwork and a day conceived by an artist for a curator.

Conceived by Latitudes in 2012 as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City (with five dispatches presented as part of an exhibition at Casa del Lago), 'Incidents of Travel' had sequels in 2013 in Hong Kong (online dispatches published via Twitter, Instagram, and Soundcloud) and San Francisco in 2015 (daily posts as part of Kadist's Instagram take over initiative #ArtistNotInTheStudioCuratorNotAtTheOffice).

In 2016 Kadist and Latitudes partnered in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)' as part of Kadist Online Projects, publishing contributions from invited curators and artists working around the world.





Earlier conversations have taken place in Hobart (Tasmania), Yerevan (Armenia), Terengganu (Malaysia), Lisbon (Portugal), Suzhou (China), Jinja (Uganda) and Chicago (US). 

The first dispatch launched in April 2016 with an itinerary by curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – a day photographed by Nabiha Khan.





The second dispatch came from Jinja in Uganda, where curator Moses Serubiri invited photographer Mohsen Taha to explore Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972.



The third episode took place while curator Yu Ji and poet Xiao Kaiyu hiked on Dong Shan (East Mountain), 130 km west of Shanghai, on a peninsula stretching into Tai Hu lake near the city of Suzhou, China.

The fourth dispatch came from Lisbon, where Galician curator Pedro de Llano visited key locations that marked the life and work of Luisa Cunha.



The fifth episode took place in April 2016, when curator Simon Soon and artist chi too visited the Malaysian North Eastern state of Terengganu, where chi spent some time in 2013, surrounded by "men and women who work(ed) multiple jobs as a fishermen, house builders, boat builders, farmers, coconut pickers, food producers, and everything else that matters."


The sixth episode narrates a walking itinerary conducted by curator Marianna Hovhannisyan with Vardan Kilichyan, Gohar Hosyan, and Anaida Verdyan in Yerevan, the capital of Armenia, documenting the transformed, disappeared, or permanently-closed art institutions in the city centre.



The seventh episode comes from Hobart, capital of Tasmania. It is narrated by curator Camila Marambio, following an itinerary devised by artist Lucy Bleach. They spent the day "encircling the outer limits of human understanding by visiting the histories, both past, and present, of attempts to reach beyond our sensory capacities through governance, technology, and reverie", and ended the day cooking at Lucy's home sharing their mutual love for quinces.

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Seventh episode of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Camila Marambio and Lucy Bleach from Hobart, Tasmania

http://incidents.kadist.org/hobart.html

The seventh 'Incidents (of Travel)' dispatch comes from Hobart, capital of Tasmania. It is narrated by curator Camila Marambio, following an itinerary devised by artist Lucy Bleach. Lucy "shared her knowledge of volcanoes, lava, and magma leading (Camila) on a quest to relate local geochemical and geophysical conundrums to the expansive solar system." 

They spent the day "encircling the outer limits of human understanding by visiting the histories, both past, and present, of attempts to reach beyond our sensory capacities through governance, technology, and reverie", and ended the day cooking at Lucy's home sharing their mutual love for quinces.

Each of the 19 photographs is augmented by one or more extra assets – a brief commentary, soundscape or a caption – accessed by clicking the words which overlay the images
.



Originally conceived by Latitudes as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City in 2012 (with five dispatches presented as part of an exhibition at Casa del Lago) 'Incidents of Travel' had sequels in 2013 in Hong Kong (online dispatches published via twitter, Instagram, and Soundcloud) and San Francisco in 2015 (daily posts on Kadist's Instagram as part of their #ArtistNotInTheStudioCuratorNotAtTheOffice take over initiative).

The project explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter and an extended conversation between curator/s and artist/s. Online storytelling presents and documents curatorial fieldwork and an offline day conceived by an artist for a curator.
In 2016 Kadist and Latitudes partnered in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)' as part of Kadist Online Projects. This new phase is developed as an online periodical that publishes contributions from invited curators and artists working around the world.


http://incidents.kadist.org/chicago

A series of itineraries conceived by six curators, artists or researchers — previous fellows of the seminar The Place from Where We Look (Kadist Paris, June 2015) — launched in April 2016 with an itinerary by curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – a day photographed by Nabiha Khan


http://incidents.kadist.org/jinja

The second dispatch came from Jinja in Uganda, where curator Moses Serubiri invited photographer Mohsen Taha to explore Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972.


http://incidents.kadist.org/suzhou

The third episode took place while curator Yu Ji and poet Xiao Kaiyu hiked on Dong Shan (East Mountain), 130 km west of Shanghai, on a peninsula stretching into Tai Hu lake near the city of Suzhou, China
http://incidents.kadist.org/lisbon

The fourth dispatch came from Lisbon, where Galician curator Pedro de Llano visited key locations that marked the life and work of Luisa Cunha.
http://incidents.kadist.org/terengganu

The fifth episode took place in April 2016, when curator Simon Soon and artist chi too visited the Malaysian North Eastern state of Terengganu, where chi spent some time in 2013, surrounded by "men and women who work(ed) multiple jobs as a fishermen, house builders, boat builders, farmers, coconut pickers, food producers, and everything else that matters." 
http://incidents.kadist.org/terengganu

The sixth episode narrates a walking itinerary conducted by curator Marianna Hovhannisyan with Vardan Kilichyan, Gohar Hosyan, and Anaida Verdyan in Yerevan, the capital of Armenia, documenting the transformed, disappeared, or permanently-closed art institutions in the city centre.


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Photo report: Trip to London and Oxford


 (Above and four below) Cinthia Marcelle's "The Family in Disorder" (2018) at Museum and Modern Art Oxford.


(Above and below) The magnificent main hall of the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford.

 An example of Micronesian currency – we're reminded of our extended conversation with Melbourne-based artist Nicholas Mangan published in his 2016 Sternberg Press publication "Limits to growth" (and also during Chisenhale's live conversation and while chasing Ancient Lights).


(Above and below) These column capitals are the main reasons we visited Oxford. They were carved for the Oxford Museum of Natural History in 1859-60 by Irish brothers James and John O'Shea, along with their nephew Edward Whelan. Commissioned by John Ruskin, all the works were carved freestyle, without previous sketches, using only plant specimens from the botanical garden, and their sheer imagination, as references.

They are the protagonists of Sean Lynch's 2013 piece "A Blow by Blow Account of Stonecarving in Oxford", which we have been discussing with Sean for a while and finally saw in 2015 in Bordeaux. We continued learning more about this piece and its making during our joint adventure in Banff's "Geologic Time" residency programme last Fall. 


 (Above) Apostolos Georgiou, "FROM MY HEART" at Rodeo Gallery.

 (Above and 3 below) Leonor Antunes's "a thousand realities from an original mark" at Marian Goodman.
 Polycarbonate and brass screens and rope sculptures. Each screen corresponds to the exact measurements of one of the glass panels in the Upper Lawn Pavilion in Wiltshire, built between 1959 and 1962 by the British architects Alison and Peter Smithson (1928-1993 and 1923-2003).


(Above) Tacita Dean's "Landscape" exhibition premiered "Antigone", a new 1-hour long film and cloud paintings at The Royal Academy. Part 2 and 3 in the National Portrait Gallery (a retrospective of portrait films works) and at the National Gallery a two-room exhibition curated by the artist presents a selection of historical and contemporary still lives. 

 Fantastic assembly of square-format paintings by Markus Lüperz at Michael Werner Gallery, which the artist painted at age 24 using distemper on canvas.

 (Above and below) Batia Suter's work at The Photographers' Gallery. One of the nominees for the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2018.

(Above) The 2018 awardee was Luke Willis Thompson with his striking film "Autoportrait" (also nominated for this year's Turner Prize).

 Nicolas Lamas (above and immediately below) and Petra Feriancová (two following) two-person show "Becoming animal" at Tenderpixel
(Above) "Pregnant Landscape" by Phoebe Unwin at Amanda Wilkinson Gallery in SoHo.

 (Above and below) Wilhelm Sasnal at Sadie Coles.

  (Above and below) August Sander's "Men without masks" at Hauser & Wirth included an extensive selection of rare large-scale photographs made between 1910 and 1931. The photographs were printed in a unique oversize format for inclusion in an exhibition at the Mannheimer Kunstverein in 1973.
  (Above) Group exhibition curated by Gianni Jetzer at Hauser & Wirth. 


  (Above and detail below) Rose Wiley's "Lolita's House"three-floor solo show at David Zwirner.

  (Above and below) 1960s vinyl sculptures by South Korean Seung-taek Lee at White Cube (Mayfair). Works have been recreated for the exhibition using urethane vinyl to achieve greater durability whilst retaining a similar visual quality.

  (Above and below) Abigail Reynolds mid-career survey at Peer.

  (Above) Visiting Ian White and Sadie Benning (photographed) at Camden Art Center with Antoni Hervàs.


  (Above and 2 below) Last day to see Magali Reus solo show at South London Gallery. 

   (Above and two below) Osaías Yanov's "Orphan Dance" at Gasworks.

   (Above and below) Antoni Hervàs studio at Gasworks, his 3-month residency is supported by Acción Cultural Española (AC/E)
   (Above and 2 below) Joan Jonas exhibition at Tate Modern.

   (Above) View of Trafalgar Square with Michael Rakowitz's "The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist" featuring on the Fourth Plinth commission.


On the way to see Tacita Dean's-curated exhibition "STILL LIFE" at the National Gallery, a much-obliged stop in the room with Vermeer and Dutch still life. Jacob van Walscapelle (1644-1727) and Jan van Huysum (1682–1749) masters in flower painting.


(Above) English singer-songwriter, record producer and humanitarian Peter Gabriel during the internet interspecies symposium "The Shape of a Circle in the Mind of a Fish" curated by Lucia Pietroiusti and Filipa Ramos for the Serpentine Gallery at the London Zoo.

Not photographed but also visited: Chisenhale Gallery, Matt's Gallery, Spruth Magers, Blain Southern, Pilar Corrias, Frith Street Gallery (both locations), Hollybush Gardens, Josh Liley Gallery, Kate McGarry, Mother's Tankstation, Modern Art (unexpectedly closed when it should have been open!, and so was Project Native Informant – which had a broken lift so had to go up 3 flights of stairs). 

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Sixth episode of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Marianna Hovhannisyan and students from the National Center of Aesthetics from Yerevan, Armenia

http://incidents.kadist.org/yerevan

The sixth 'Incidents (of Travel)' episode narrates a walking itinerary in Yerevan, the capital of Armenia, documenting the transformed, disappeared, or permanently-closed art institutions in the city center

The itinerary was conducted by curator Marianna Hovhannisyan with Vardan Kilichyan, Gohar Hosyan, and Anaida Verdyan — three art students from the National Center of Aesthetics, one of the oldest alternative art educational hubs in the city. 

The inquiry was based on how knowledge transmission and generational exchanges in the Armenian contemporary art field could be approached—particularly in terms of exploring the fragmented histories of its institutional work.

Each of the 15 photographs is augmented by one or more extra assets – a brief commentary or a caption –, accessed by clicking the words which overlay the images.



Marianna Hovhannisyan (Yerevan/San Diego) is a research-based curator, a Ph.D student in Art History, Theory, and Criticism at Visual Arts Department, Univerisity of California San Diego. 

Originally conceived by Latitudes as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City in 2012 (with five dispatches presented as part of an exhibition on Latitudes' curatorial practice at Casa del Lago) 'Incidents of Travel' had sequels in 2013 in Hong Kong (online dispatches published via twitter, instagram, and soundcloud) and San Francisco in 2015 (daily posts on Kadist's Instagram as part of their #ArtistNotInTheStudioCuratorNotAtTheOffice take over initiative).


The project explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter and an extended conversation between curator/s and artist/s. Online storytelling presents and documents curatorial fieldwork and an offline day conceived by an artist for a curator.
In 2016 Kadist and Latitudes partnered in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)' as part of Kadist Online Projects. This new phase is developed as an online periodical that publishes contributions from invited curators and artists working around the world.


http://incidents.kadist.org/chicago

A series of itineraries conceived by six curators, artists or researchers — previous fellows of the seminar The Place from Where We Look (Kadist Paris, June 2015) — launched in April 2016 with an itinerary by curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – a day photographed by Nabiha Khan


http://incidents.kadist.org/jinja

The second dispatch came from Jinja in Uganda, where curator Moses Serubiri invited photographer Mohsen Taha to explore Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972.


http://incidents.kadist.org/suzhou

The third episode took place while curator Yu Ji and poet Xiao Kaiyu hiked on Dong Shan (East Mountain), 130 km west of Shanghai, on a peninsula stretching into Tai Hu lake near the city of Suzhou, China
http://incidents.kadist.org/lisbon

The fourth dispatch came from Lisbon, where Galician curator Pedro de Llano visited key locations that marked the life and work of Luisa Cunha.
http://incidents.kadist.org/terengganu

The fifth episode took place in April 2016, when curator Simon Soon and artist chi too visited the Malaysian North Eastern state of Terengganu, where chi spent some time in 2013, surrounded by "men and women who work(ed) multiple jobs as a fishermen, house builders, boat builders, farmers, coconut pickers, food producers, and everything else that matters."  


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    Cover Story—October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier

    October 2017 Monthly Cover Story on http://www.lttds.org


    The October 2017 Monthly Cover Story "Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier" is now up on www.lttds.org – after this month it will be archived here

    "We are looking for glimpses of life as it was over half a billion years ago. In sight of the snout of the Stanley Glacier in Kootenay National Park, lie deposits of Burgess Shale, a rock famous for its exceptional preservation of hitherto unknown, and frankly bizarre, soft-bodied marine creatures." Continue reading  

    Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities. 

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    "Geologic Time" thematic residency programme at the Banff Centre for Art and Creativity in Alberta, Canada

    Julius von Schoppe (1795–1868), Illustration of giant stone near the Rauenschen Mountains near Furstenwalde, 1827, Lithograph, von Tempeltey.

    Between September 11 and October 6, 2017, ten artists, researchers, writers and curators from around the world will ponder geological formations and stratigraphy, minerals, and resource extraction to speculate about a more expansive, slower and longer-term view of art, exhibitions, and institutions. The spectacular Rocky Mountains will not only be the backdrop, but the active participants.

    Through
    fieldwork, seminars, and independent study, 'Geologic Time' participants will be “thinking with” geology (beyond the depiction of landscape) as a potential way to consider non-conventional, deep-time perspectives on curating, exhibition making, programming, and fieldwork within contemporary art. 

    Lead faculty: Latitudes  
    Guest Faculty: Sean Lynch

    "Geologic Time" is a thematic residency programme of the Banff International Curatorial Institute, Visual + Digital Arts organised by the Banff Centre for Art and Creativity in Alberta, Canada. Within the framework of the residency Latitudes curated the group exhibition "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux, France, on view until January 7, 2018.   


    View of the Banff Centre campus. Photo: Latitudes.

    RELATED CONTENT:

    • "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" in pictures.
    • Guest Faculty of the Thematic Residency 'Blueprint for Happiness' at The Banff Centre, Canada, 27 July–8 August 2015 16 July 2015
    • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
    • Cover Story December 2016: Ten years ago – Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook 5 December 2016 
    • Cover Story – May 2016: Material histories – spilling the beans at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux 10 May 2016.
    • Second research trip to Bordeaux 16 July 2016 




    SAVE THE DATE: 29 June, 19h. Private view of the exhibition "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" at the CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux


    Xavier Ribas, Chilean Nitrate publicity postcard, c. 1920 from "A History of Detonations", 2013. Courtesy the artist and ProjecteSD, Barcelona; and Lucas Ihlein, "Under Ground", 2010. Courtesy of the artist.


    SAVE THE DATE

    Exhibition ‘4.543 billion. The matter of matter’, CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux, June 29, 2017–January 7, 2018.  

    Opening: June 29, 2017 (6 pm)

    With: A.J. Aalders, Lara Almarcegui, Maria Thereza Alves, Félix Arnaudin, Amy Balkin, Alessandro Balteo-Yazbeck in collaboration with Media Farzin, Bernd Becher and Hilla Becher, Étienne Denisse, Hubert Duprat, Giulio Ferrario, Ângela Ferreira, Anne Garde, Ambroise-Louis Garneray, Terence Gower, Rodney Graham, Ilana Halperin (also at the Université de Bordeaux’s zoology department), Marianne Heier, Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, Lucas Ihlein and Louise Kate Anderson, Jannis Kounellis, Martín Llavaneras, Erlea Maneros Zabala, Nicholas Mangan, Fiona Marron, Alexandra Navratil, Xavier Ribas, Alfred Roll, Amie Siegel, Lucy Skaer, Alfred Smith, Rayyane Tabet, Pierre Théron, Pep Vidal, Alexander Whalley Light, Stuart Whipps (also at the Musée des Beaux-Arts) as well as documents and objects lent by the archives of the CAPC, the Archives Bordeaux Métropole, the Archives départementales de la Gironde, and the geology collection of the UFR Sciences de la Terre et de la Mer, Université de Bordeaux.

    Curated by Latitudes

    With contributions from more than 30 artists, “4.543 billion. The matter of matter” is a major exhibition that addresses works of art, collections and cultural histories in relation to ecological processes and a geological scale of time. It presents a continuum of materials and temporal landscapes – films, works on paper, photographs, sculptures, documents, and other meaningful things – and springs from the CAPC building’s former life as a warehouse for colonial commodities whose limestone walls were once deep in the ground and whose wooden beams were once part of a forest.


    A central proposal of the exhibition is that works of art are part of geophysical history as much as art history. 4.543 billion attempts to take into account both a micro-local and a planetary perspective, and to rethink some of the histories of art as fragments of broader narratives about the Earth and how our place in it has been represented. What is at stake when art and museums take on greater temporal and material awareness? How might they move beyond a spatial framework of “think globally, act locally”, to “think historically, act geologically”? 

    Collections are accumulations of real physical matter in time as well as of ideas, decisions, fashions, knowledge, and use. Likewise minerals and organic matter might be regarded as both cultural evidence and archival storage media. This exhibition takes a situated view of the past that resists an undifferentiated narrative in which modernity in general is at fault for global ecological disarray, or humanity in an invariably abstract sense must take responsibility.


    Accordingly, the artists included instead often address the specific roles and purposeful effects of individuals, practices, states or corporations in an account of how mineral agents and organic processes have intertwined with and underpinned culture. Marianne Heier’s contribution, for example, documents a project addressing the decisive roll North Sea oil has played in shaping art and culture in Norway. Rayyane Tabet’s works deal sculpturally with the legacy of the Trans-Arabian Pipe Line, a joint venture by three American oil companies that came together in 1946 to construct an pipeline from Saudi Arabia to the Mediterranean. Incorporating a fragment of Breccia Pernice marble from the lobby of Trump Tower, Dynasty (2017) by Amie Siegel weaves Italian geology into the political turmoil of the present. 

    Several of the more documentary projects on display (including those by Alessandro Balteo Yazbeck and Terence Gower) trace the relationships between Modern art, the museum, and wealth created through extractive industry, combining approaches framed by Earth sciences with colonial history, sociology and political reportage. Yet other works take a more atmospheric, filmic, sculptural or graphic approach to extraction, economy, energy and global exchange, whether orbiting around sunlight, forests, synthetic materials derived from fossil fuels (a subject addressed by Alexandra Navratil), or the services and substances entailed in buildings that display art (as seen through the work of Lucas Ihlein and Lara Almarcegui).
    In addition to two new projects in development for the occasion (by Christina Hemauer & Roman Keller and Ilana Halperin), the exhibition will include many works kindly lent by the artists and international galleries, as well as those from the CAPC collection and its archives. Loans from Bordeaux institutions include those from the Archives Bordeaux Métropole, the Archives départementales de la Gironde, the Musée des Beaux-Arts, the Musée d’Aquitaine and the geology collection of the UFR Sciences de la Terre et de la Mer, Université de Bordeaux.


    Located at opposite ends of the galleries will be two imposing works that bookend the exhibition conceptually as well as physically. Originally made for CAPC in 1985, Jannis Kounellis’s nine-metre-long Sans titre is a slab of steel draped with coffee sacks that spits flames. On the other side, Ancient Lights (2015) is a two-screen video installation by Nicholas Mangan that is powered by an off-grid solar system with panels on the roof of the CAPC building. With sections filmed at the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona, and a salt-storage solar plant near Seville, Mangan’s looped videos speculates on the ideology and politics of energy. 


    Several works by Ângela Ferreira also link diverse histories: those of the Cullinan Diamond Mine in South Africa, the source of one of the largest gems ever found, and the Chislehurst Caves in South East London, a crucible of counter-culture in the 1960s. In terms of an exploration of the underground – in this case with a sociological dimension – one could also mention All surface expectations disappear with depth (2010) a three-screen video work by Fiona Marron that juxtaposes text from a 1954 field report on working conditions in an American gypsum mine with footage from present-day excavation in Ireland.


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    ‘4.543 billion’ is the contribution of the CAPC musée to the cultural season Paysages Bordeaux 2017. Within the exhibition framework, Latitudes will lead the month-long residency programme ‘Geologic Time’ at Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity, Alberta, Canada, in September–October 2017.


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    Antoni Hervàs's exhibition "El Misterio de Caviria" awarded the Visual Arts prize of the Premis Ciutat de Barcelona 2016


    Antoni Hervàs receiving the award from Ada Colau, Mayor of Barcelona, at the Saló de Cent of the Ajuntament de Barcelona, 16 February. Photos: Latitudes.

    We are delighted to announce that Antoni Hervàs's exhibition "El Misterio de Caviria" (The Mystery of Caviria) has been awarded the Visual Arts prize of the Premis Ciutat de Barcelona 2016 (City of Barcelona Award). The award has been organised on a yearly basis since 1949 by the Ajuntament de Barcelona (Barcelona City Council), "to award the creation, research and production of quality produced in Barcelona by creators or collectives working for institutions and organizations in Barcelona that promote or produce projects".  

    The jury recognised "the artist's research in linking Greek mythology with the Barcelona cabaret scene from the 1960s–80s and for the recuperation of its vitality." The jury also acklowledged the "formalisation of the project into a scenographic and immersive installation and the range of public programmes it generated". Huge congratulations Toni, a very well-deserved recognition for your Herculian efforts!

    The prize comes hot-on-the-heels of Hervàs's exhibition winning the public vote for the best show of 2016 given by the Tria 33 programme of the Catalan TV3 channel. 

    "El Misterio de Caviria" (The Mystery of Caviria) took place at La Capella between September and November 2016. It was part of the BCN Producció'16 season and was one of the three projects mentored this year by Latitudes.  

    View of "El Misterio de Caviria" exhibition by Antoni Hervàs at La Capella.  
    This and following photos: Pep Herrero / La Capella–BCN Producció'16.

    Antoni Hervàs’ artistic project revolves around the legend of Jason and the Argonauts’ expedition in search of the Golden Fleece. The exhibition "El Misterio de Caviria" (The Mystery of Cabeiria), divided into eight chapters (exhibition guide (pdf) and description of each chapter (pdf)), took as its point of origin the section of the tale in which the expedition led by Jason stops for a few months in Lemnos, the island of fire, in the northern part of the Aegean Sea. Here live a kind of tribe of Amazons organized under the gynaecocracy of Queen Hypsipyle who are keeping a grisly secret. Taking this fragment, Hervàs explores the transformist and genre-bending possibilities of drawing, a medium that enables him to unite two mythologies: the Cabeirian rites of Classical Greece and figures from Barcelona’s dwindling cabaret scene. 

    Video of the exhibition (Spanish subtitles).

     
    Exhibition layout. Space design: Goig.
     
    Publication of the project edited by Ajuntament de Barcelona and The Flames. Photos: Latitudes.

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    Second research trip to Bordeaux in preparation for an exhibition at CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux

    We just returned from a week in Bordeaux, where we continued with meetings and archival research in preparation for the forthcoming Latitudes-curated group show at CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux opening at the end of June 2017 coinciding with the 7th edition of the Agora Biennial of Architecture, Planning and Design centred on landscape. 

    The exhibition will present existing artworks (including several from CAPC’s collection) alongside commissioned pieces, as well as documents and objects from Bordeaux’s municipal archives, seeking to problematise the time-span of museums and consider their collections as tangible material history.


    Upon arrival, led by Bruno Cahuzac (Maître de conférence), we visited the incredible carothèque-lithothèque at the Université de Bordeaux in Talence which houses over 30,000 core samples from the subsoil of the Aquitaine basin. 
     


    We also went back to the Archives Bordeaux Métropole to continue looking for documents related to the trade with the former French colonies of the Antilles (known as "sugar islands"). We also visited the Archives Départamentales / Gironde where we found further evidence of CAPC musée's past as the former warehouse for colonial commodities known as Entrépot Lainé. 

    Delving deeper into colonial landscapes and commodities exchange we were glad to revisit the permanent presentation of the Marcel Chatillon Collection at the Musée d'Aquitaine, which includes an incredible selection of over 600 documents and iconographic representations of slave working conditions, as well as portraits, flora and landscapes from the 17th to the 20th Century. 

    Some of the Bordeaux's frantic maritime trade is visible in Pierre Lacour's majestic "Vue d'une partie du port et des quais de Bordeaux dits des Chartrons et de Bacalan" (1804–1806) one of the most iconic pieces in the Musée des Beaux-Arts (below). 



    Pierre Lacour, "Vue d'une partie du port et des quais de Bordeaux dits des Chartrons et de Bacalan" (1804–1806), Musée des Beaux-Arts.

    On the left one can identify the two iconic conical towers of Hôtel Fenwick, built between 1796-99 by Jean-Baptiste Dufart, and the location of the first Embassy of the United States. Out of the picture, also on the left, a few years later in 1822, architect and engineer Claude Deschamps would build the Entrêpot Lainé, headquarters of the CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux since 1974.

    Photo of the Entrêpot Lainé published in the book "Bordeaux: Il y a 100 ans en cartes postales anciennes" by Fabienne Texier and Jean-Claude Bertreau.   


    Related content:
    • Cover Story, May 2016: Material histories – spilling the beans at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux (10 May 2016).




    Cover Story, May 2016: Material histories – spilling the beans at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux


    A cover story is published monthly on www.lttds.org

    "In pondering a museum’s memories you seldom think of coffee beans. Yet at CAPC Contemporary Art Museum Bordeaux, burnished nuggets of the past in the form of the seeds of Coffea arabica occasionally materialise, as if out of nowhere. One day one might appear atop a pile of papers on an office desk; weeks later, another bean might show up in the middle of one of the exhibition galleries. A look on top of a shelf in the library might harvest several. During Latitudes’ recent residency at CAPC, François Poisay from the exhibition team showed us the stash he has been squirrelling away in his desk for years." 

    Continue reading on www.lttds.org (after May 2016, it will be archived here

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    The story behind José Antonio Hernández-Díez's 'San Guinefort' (1991)

     Pages with the story behind Plaça dels Àngels.

    When giving a presentation or tour of an exhibition or project we have worked on, we are often asked how the project emerged – if there was a particular trigger or point of origin. In the case of José Antonio Hernández-Díezs exhibition currently on view at MACBA (until June 26, 2016), our approach was a familiar one to us we started by both delving in-depth in researching the artists previous works while at the same time looking into the history of the venue where the exhibition was going to take place. 

    We are very fond of a book that has been in our library for many years – 'Histories and legends of Barcelona' by Joan Amades (Edicions 62). This two-volume tome gathers some of the myths behind Barcelona place names and includes the tales behind both familiar and obscure buildings, streets and monuments in the city. The story that most captivated us concerned the chapel of the Convent dels Àngels, and it is recounted in the essay we wrote to accompany the exhibition (published as the Quaderns Portàtils #32 pdfs available in Spanish and English and epub in Spanish only). It goes as follows:

    (...) "Outside the doorway of the deconsecrated sixteenth-century church that formed part of Barcelona’s Convent dels Àngels there once stood the stone figure of a dog, standing upright on its hind legs. Two separate legends account for its existence, as recorded by ethnologist and folklorist Joan Amades in the 1950s. A boorish man would routinely interrupt the services and torment the church congregation, it is said. He was punished by being turned into a dog. The other version states that the canine figure commemorates the thwarting of a robbery. The church once displayed an image of Saint Roch, the patron saint of dogs, accompanied by a hound. It is said that the prospective thieves were frightened away as the image miraculously began to bark. (The supernatural mythology of the chapel does not cease there – in 1627 an image of Christ began to sweat blood profusely.) 

    Sculpture of a dog once stood in front of La Capella dels Àngels, church of the Convent dels Àngels.
     
    Parallel to this, we started looking at Hernández-Díezs earliest works and investigating his pieces in MACBAs collection. We found that the museum had his 1991 work San Guinefort on long-term loan in their collection, but it had never been exhibited. As narrated in our essay: 

    (...) "that José Antonio Hernández-Díez (Caracas, Venezuela, 1964) had already been dealing with Catholic belief and superstition in his art – and moreover, specifically addressing canine veneration – is much more than an uncanny coincidence for his exhibition at MACBA’s Convent dels Àngels in 2016."  

    The legend behind Saint Guinefort is one of the more obscure intersections of Catholic history and folk tradition:

    (...) "Writing around 1260, the Inquisitor and Dominican friar Étienne de Bourbon related his investigation into the veneration of Saint Guinefort in the Dombes region of France. He discovered that this supposed Saint was, in fact, a dog. The account he disclosed was that a knight and his wife had one day left their greyhound Guinefort to guard their baby. When they returned to the castle they found the cradle empty and Guinefort covered in blood. Assuming it had murdered the baby, the knight hastily killed the dog, only later realising his error. Guinefort had in fact fought off a snake in order to save the child, who was found unharmed. Guinefort was buried unceremoniously in the forest outside the castle walls. Hearing of the martyred dog, local people began to believe in its power to protect children and began to bring their sick infants to the grave. Étienne de Bourbon was horrified to discover the strength of the superstition that had taken root. Children were being left overnight by Guinefort’s grave in the belief that he would rid them of spirits, and several babies had died as a consequence. Defending the orthodoxy of the church, the friar had the heretical remains of the greyhound dug up and destroyed, razed the forest and outlawed the canine cult, yet there is evidence of its persistence into the nineteenth century. The episode is worth recounting in detail, as previous accounts of it in relation to Hernández-Díez’s work have been misleading."


    Coinciding with our research period, in August 2014 we happened to be travelling near Lyon, France, and took the opportunity to visit to the Bois de Saint Guinefort in the Dombes region, where the story of Saint Guinefort emerged (and where the dog-saint may still be venerated every 22nd August, despite the regional tourism office assuring us the festival day was no longer celebrated). 

    Somewhere on the road between Villars-les-Dombes and Châtillon-sur-Chalaronne one can, with the help of a tagged flickr photo and GPS, find a sign, as seen below, which briefly narrates these peculiar events from the 13th Century



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    LaPublika – Public sphere laboratory for artistic research, consonni, Donostia, 10–11 November 2015


    Latitudes has been invited by consonni to give a two-day seminar and a public lecture in the context of LaPublika, a programme of activities concerning the way artistic practices construct the public sphere. The programme will take place over the next two years in the recently opened International Centre for Contemporary Culture Tabakalera in Donostia, on the 10 and 11 November, and is a joint initiative together with Donostia-San Sebastian European Cultural Capital 2016.

    "Public sphere here is understood as spaces considered to be public (the street, the square, the city), as well as the internet or the communications media, and the mechanisms with which we participate in managing what is common (language, rites, norms, the aesthetic of collective processes). At a time when new social and civic paradigms are arising, LaPublika seeks to provide a framework of work and reflection upon those processes." (....) "In addition to the presence-based programme, all the activities have their version in podcast format on LaPublika’s radio-web, the central hub of the project, which is also backed up by programming involving interviews, radio spots and sound pieces."


    Visitors at Robert Smithson's "Broken Circle" (1971), an event organised by Land Art Contemporary. Picture: Kunstbeeld.
    Breaking Ground: Broken Circle/Spiral Hill, by Robert Smithson & Nancy Holt - See more at: http://ajuntament.barcelona.cat/lavirreina/en/activities/breaking-ground-broken-circlespiral-hill-robert-smithson-nancy-holt#sthash.8wxhhHQB.dpuf

    Breaking Ground: Broken Circle/Spiral Hill, by Robert Smithson & Nancy Holt - See more at: http://ajuntament.barcelona.cat/lavirreina/en/activities/breaking-ground-broken-circlespiral-hill-robert-smithson-nancy-holt#sthash.8wxhhHQB.dpuf

    Breaking Ground: Broken Circle/Spiral Hill, by Robert Smithson & Nancy Holt - See more at: http://ajuntament.barcelona.cat/lavirreina/en/activities/breaking-ground-broken-circlespiral-hill-robert-smithson-nancy-holt#sthash.8wxhhHQB.dpuf
    Breaking Ground: Broken Circle/Spiral Hill, by Robert Smithson & Nancy Holt - See more at: http://ajuntament.barcelona.cat/lavirreina/en/activities/breaking-ground-broken-circlespiral-hill-robert-smithson-nancy-holt#sthash.8wxhhHQB.dpuf
    Latitudes' workshop titled “Beyond the roundabout, or what’s public about public art?” will take the legacy of Land Art as a starting point – or more specifically, Robert Smithson’s notion of “continual movement” – to address the multiple temporalities which can constitute the form of an artwork in public space. Approaching projects (rather than beholding objects) the workshop will discuss artists who conceptualize or actualize their works against a backdrop of vast stretches of time or topological change. In the context of a networked culture which seems to offer an accelerating and horizontal concept of the public sphere, the workshop will furthermore address what is at stake when “digging deep” and slowing down.

     Production of Jan Dibbets' "6 Hours Tide Object with Correction of Perspective" (1969–2009) on 9 February 2009 the Port of Rotterdam, a beach that has now disappeared to become Maasvlakte 2. Photo: Latitudes.

    For the public lecture on November 11, Latitudes will forgo a chronological account of its projects of the last decade, and instead attempt various transects through its curatorial projects determined by the public sphere, raw materials and their transformation. From the zinc which led to an Esperanto micro-nation, to the air of a Beijing shopping centre, or the dead trees of printed news, Latitudes will join some traits and ideas around “human resources”, extractive modernity, obsolescence and the carbon cycle.

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    Session with first year participants of the MA Curatorial Practice at the California College of the Arts (CCA), San Francisco, 8 September

    Photo: Arash Fayed.  

    On September 8, 2015, Latitudes led a 3h session with the participants of the first year of the MA in Curatorial Practice at the California College of the Arts (CCA) in San Francisco. This was our last day as residents at the Kadist Art Foundation.

    As a mode of introduction we presented a range of projects we have worked on and referred to the closed-door seminar ‘The Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group’, we had led a week earlier with the participation of colleagues and art professionals – an informal dialogue about the future of contemporary art institutions, and more particularly concerned with programming speeds, institutional scale, and periodicity. 

    For the second part of the evening, we split the group in three and asked them to prepare descriptions of hypothetical art organisations and to reflect on urban/ non-urban contexts and mission statements. 

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    Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
    Work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




    Storify of Curating Lab 2014 Overseas Field Trip to Hong Kong, 16–20 June 2014







    This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
    All photos:
    Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




    Visiting Curator Program, Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne, 12 May–7 June 2014

    Courtesy: Gertrude Contemporary.

    Latitudes has been invited to participate in Gertrude Contemporary's Visiting Curator Program between 12 May and 7 June.
     
    The Visiting Curator Program is an initiative in which three international curators are invited to Australia each year. During the residency (between two weeks up to two months) the invited curator is hosted in Gertrude's Studio 18 and Gertrude Contemporary facilitates a series of studio visits and meetings with artists and Australian peers within the contemporary arts sector. The residencies receive support from Arts Victoria International or the Australia Council for the Arts. 

    As part of the residency, Latitudes has been invited to present their work at MADA | Monash University of Art Design & Architecture. The talk will be followed by an afternoon closed-door seminar with candidates from Curatorial Practice PhD [download course pdf] and other guests, during which Latitudes will lead a discussion concentrating on their #OpenCurating research which manifested in 10 freely published interviews with artists, curators and editors investigating new forms of interaction between publics with artworks and their production, display and discursive context.

    Residency in partnership with MADA | Monash University of Art Design & Architecture, as part of Gertrude Contemporary’s Visiting Curator Program.

    Follow us on our twitter and the archived posts on storify.


    Courtesy: Gertrude Contemporary.


    This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
    All photos:
    Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




    Report from Paris: FIAC week, 21–28 October 2013

    Latitudes was recently invited to take part in the 2013 Young Curators Invitational programme (YCI) coinciding with FIAC, the Parisian art fair that has been gaining acclaim in recent years, particularly since Jennifer Flay took over as director in 2003 and relocated the fair to the light-filled Grand Palais in 2006. This was its 40th edition and it included more outdoor installations, a new performance series and a film screening series. Held since 2006 as a collaboration between the art fair, Fondation d’Entreprise Ricard and the Institut Français, YCI gathers a group of curators during FIAC week for a programme of visits to Parisian cultural institutions, as well as a series of meetings with art professionals that gather on the occasion of the fair.

    The other 2013 participants were Maaike Lauwaert (Curator, Stroom den Haag, The Hague), Christiane Rekade (independent curator based in Berlin), Margit Säde Lehni (Independent curator based in Estonia and Zürich and co-publisher of Rollo Press), Miriam Kathrein (Curator at TBA21, Vienna) and Amira Gad (Managing Curator/Publications at Witte de With, Rotterdam and Managing Curator, Fogo Island Arts, Canada). The YCI is by invitation only, and Latitudes were thankful to be recommended by Zoë Gray (independent curator based in Brussels and vice-president of IKT).

    In addition to the following, you can also check out photodocumentation in the archive of tweets and instagrams posted during the week.


    Monday 21 October: After arrival and introductions among the group, we set off to the press view of Philippe Parreno's solo show at Palais de Tokyo. "Anywhere, Anywhere, Out Of The World" took over the whole of the Palais de Tokyo, a vast space of 22,000 square metres that Parreno had orchestrated, according to the venue website "along the lines of a dramatic composition where the spectral presence of objects, music, lights, and films guide and manipulate the visitor’s experience, offering a journey through his works, both old and new, transforming this monologue into a polyphony". Voilà! 

    In a recent interview between the artist and Jennifer Higgie, frieze co-editor, Parreno discussed his ideas for his exhibition at Palais de Tokyo: "I’m going to structure my exhibition around the score of Igor Stravinsky’s 1910 ballet, Petrushka.. (...) At the Palais de Tokyo, all of the pauses and movements will be directed by the piano. Petrushka will be the master of the show, its code. In automation you always ask who is the master and who is the slave. Here the show will be enslaved by a piano. When certain notes are played, something particular will happen: for example, lights will flicker according to the piano movement; and at the moment when the ballet dancer appears, my film Marilyn (2012) will be screened. People will do certain things, like in a Kafka novel where people also follow the programme. I am looking at the Palais de Tokyo itself as if it were an automaton."

    For a more experiental description of the exhibition, you might read the review by The Guardian contributor Adrian Searle (although somewhat missleadingly it introduces Parreno only as a video artist). Check also Ivo Bonacorsi's on Domus with lots of great photos.


    Installation, Petrouchka by Stranvinski, recorded by Mikhail Rudy on a Yamaha "Disklavier" piano, 2013.


    Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster's bookshelf gives access to a secret room containing a recreation of a John Cage and Merce Cunningham show.


     Theatrical entrance awnings flashed on and off in synch with another digital piano-roll.


    Parreno in collaboration with Douglas Gordon, "Zidane: un portrait du XXIème siècle", 2006.

    General view of the exhibition.

    Tuesday 22 October: The following day we visited the Château de Versailles (no introduction needed), whose vast gardens hosted works by arte povera éminence grise Giuseppe Penone, including tree-and-rock sculptures such as that recently seen at Kassel's Karlsauer Park during the past Documenta 13. The works where supported by the Fondation d’entreprise Hermès.


    On our way back to Paris, we stopped at Calmart to visit Nicolas Boulard's solo exhibition "The rule of cool" at the Centre d'art Albert Chanot (until 22 December).

    View of Nicolas Boulard's "Aéroplane" (2013) and on the right fifteen "Agroglyphes" (2011-12), drawings of crop designs applied in different geographies.

    In the afternoon we strolled around the Berges de Seine (checking out the installations along the left bank of the Seine) and the Jardin des Tuileries, sites of FIAC's 'Hors les Murs' programme with interventions and sculptures by artists including Societé Réaliste (pictured below their "UN Camouflage" (2013)).

      
    Visit to the Jardin des plantes followed by a reception at the Grande Galerie de l'Évolution. Victor Costales and Julia Rometti installation "Roca | Azul | Jacinto | Marino | Errante" (2013) (photographed below) was one of the many works displayed around the Jardin. Last year the piece was part of the artists stand which won the illy SustainArt Prize during ARCOmadrid 2012. 
     

    Before the reception at the splendorous Grande Galerie de l'Évolution (below), we watched the new film "Apotomé" by Jennifer Allora & Guillermo Calzadilla at the auditorium, which takes as its starting point the attempt of a man to communicate with two fossil elephants that arrived at the Museum in March 1798.




    Wednesday 23 October: Closed-door session "Curatorial research, criticism and publishing practices in the French art scene" at the Auditorium du Grand Palais, FIAC. Photographed below (left to right): Ida Soulard (Art Historian and Research Director of Fieldwork: Marfa); Emilie Villez (Director of Kadist Foundation, Paris) and Marie Cozette (Director of the Synagogue de Delme). Other speakers were Pierre Bal-Blanc (Director of CAC Brétigny); Elisabeth Lebovici (Art Critic and Senior Lecturer at EHESS) and Benjamin Thorel (Art Critic, curator at castillo/corrales, and editor of Paraguay Press). The panel was moderated by curator and writer, Vincent Normand.



    As time was limited we decide to concentrate and peruse the upper floor of FIAC, stopping at the stands of Galerie Jan Mot (Brussels), gb Agency (Paris), Monitor (Rome), ProjecteSD (Barcelona), Jocelyn Wolff (Paris), Vitamin Creative Space (Guanghzou), LABOR (Mexico City), Ellen de Bruijne Projects (Amsterdam),  Meessen de Clercq (Brussels), castillo/corrales (Paris), Parra & Romero (Madrid), RODEO (Istanbul and winner of the Lafayette Prize), Juliette Jongma (Amsterdam), Bugada & Cargnel (Paris), Galerie Jousse Enterprise (Paris) and Motive Gallery (Amsterdam), (participating in their last fair, as they will soon wrap up their gallery programme and transition into an institute). 

    Towards the first floor level of FIAC, the Salon d’Honneur.

    Guillaume Leblon, Asier Mendizabal and Iñaki Bonillas on the photo. ProjecteSD, Barcelona.

     Koki Tanaka at Vitamin Creative Space, Guanghzou.


     Hans Schabus at Jocelyn Wolff, Paris, where he also had a solo show we later visited.
     Francesco Arena performance at Monitor, Rome.
    Christodoulous Panayiotou shoes made of leather bags given by his friends at the stand of RODEO, Istanbul.
    Wonderful set of prints by Terence Gower of Sert's US Embassy in Bagdad at LABOR from Mexico City.
     Adrien Missika at the stand of parisian Bugada & Cargnel.
     More works by Costales and Rometti, here at Jousse Enterprise.
    hunt kastner exhibited a solo presentation of Eva Kotatkova, following her much-discussed work in the current Venice Biennale.
                                                     
    Early afternoon visit to Kadist Foundation and tour of the exhibition "Room by us" by the artist Nicolás Paris (on view until 8 December).


    We ended the day visiting Pierre Huyghe's exhibition at Centre Pompidou and the 2012 Prix Marcel Duchamp at the Espace 315. The latter featured a large tapestry of merino wool, a painting on silk and a bodybuilder sculpture made of oak by Daniel Dewar and Grégory Gicquel (both on view until 6 January 2014).
     

    Huyghe's retrospective exhibition presented fifty works that span over the last twenty years of production. As stated in the exhibition leaflet "The exhibition emphasizes the living and organic dimension of his propositions, which envisage the space as a world in intself, unplanned, living according to its own rhythms: it is not so much the points but rather the flow, the interplay and the intensities arising between the elements that he reveals. Moreover, the exhibition highlights the filiations between the works, sometimes separated by as much as a decade: adolescents wearing the heads of animals for La Toison d'Or (1993) in a park in Dijon hence relate to the protagonists of the procession in Streamside Day (2003) or even to Human, the dog with the pink leg [see Documenta 13 photodocumentation]. Rooted in the walls and remnatns of previous exhibitions, particularly the preceding one of Mike Kelley, the show opens towards the exterior in an outgrowth, where certain organic and climatic works can exist."  

    Untitled (Liegender Frauenakt), 2012. Presented in the recent Documenta 13 last year – see photodocumentation.
    Part of the installation in three acts "L'Expedition Scintillante", 2002. 

     Here: "De Hory Modigliani" (2007) "The Host and the Cloud" (video, 2010) & "RSI, un bout de réel" (2006).

    Thursday 24 October: Fondation Ricard exhibition "La vie matérielle" curated by Yann Chateigné, Chair of the Department of Visual Arts at the Haute école d’art et de design in Geneva. The show presents works by Stéphane Barbier-Bouvet, Jonathan Binet, Alex Cecchetti, Caroline Mesquita, Chloé Quenum, Lili Reynaud Dewar, Alexandre Singh, Benjamin Valenza (see more photos here), and was organised on the occasion of the 15th Prix Fondation d'entreprise Ricard, an award that consist in the purchase of a work from the winner, which is then donated to the Centre Pompidou and presented in the permanent collections of the institution. The 2013 awardee was Lili Reynaud Dewar.



    During our free time, we set off to the Musée d'art Moderne de la Ville de Paris (MAM) to visit the group show "Decorum. Carpets and tapestries by artists" (on view until 9 February 2014). London-based artist Marc Camille Chaimowicz directed the exhibition scenography together with architect Christine Ilex Beinemeier, and Jean-Philippe Antoine, professor of Aesthetics, selected a playlist of 65 songs (including pieces by John Cage, Béla Bartók, Michael Nyman, David Crosby or Brian Eno) which accompanies the visitor to the exhibition [it can also be listened to here and on the website of the exhibition]. The sprawling exhibition, laid out under five loose thematic sections ("Painterly", "Decorative", "Orientalisms", "Primitivisms" and the "Sculptural") presented over a hundred pieces by modernist artists (Fernand Léger, Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró, Sophie Taeuber-Arp, Alexander Calder, Anni Albers) alongside contemporary artists (including Isabel Cornaro, Leonor Antunes, Albert Oehlen, Mai-Thu Perret, Vincent Vulsma), and started off with two large installations, by Franz West ("Auditorium", 1982), made up of sofas covered with oriental carpets on which the public is invited to sit, and a large weaving loom by Michael Beutler which reflects on mass production and collaborative work. Watch a short video documentary here (in French).


    General view of the exhibition.

      (Above) Work by Elsi Giauque's "Élément Spatial" (1979). Colection of MUDAC, Lausanne.  

    We also visited Bétonsalon, centre d'art et de recherche which hosted the publication-as-exhibition "They remember only the photographs". It focused on the research undertaken at the Bibliothèque Kandinsky (Centre Pompidou MNAM-CCI) by the research group "Modern and contemporary art photographed" of the Ecole du Louvre and the University Paris Diderot - Paris 7, represented by five students from the association Politik’art. It represented the research undertaken at the by ten students from the Ecole du Louvre Masters degree. More photos here.


    Reconnecting with our programmed schedule we visited the Cité internationale des arts and made studio visits with artists Benoit Pype, Stéphanie Lagarde and Pieter Van der Schaaf. With over 300 individual studios and living spaces facilities in Marais and Montmatre, the Cité internationale des arts has, since 1965, provided short or long stays (2 months to 1 year) for over 18,000 professional artists who want to develop an artistic work in France.


    Pieter Van der Schaaf's Untitled (postcards), 2013. 

    Lagarde is researching the peculiar names of the different varieties of iris (Pink Confetti, Midsummer Night's Dream, Oregon Skies, Dancing Shiva...) in order to compose a series of poems and at a later stage, to plant them following the order of her poem.
     
    To end the day, we had a meeting with artist Farah Atassi (shortlisted for the 2013 Marcel Duchamp prize) at Galerie Xippas. The winner, announced on Saturday 26th, was Latifa Echakhch (born in 1974, represented by kamel mennour, Paris). Other shortlisted artists were Claire Fontaine (collective founded in Paris in 2004 represented by Chantal Crousel and Air de Paris) and Raphaël Zarka (born in 1977, represented by Michel Rein, Paris).
     

    We later had an impromptu meeting with artists Bevis Martin and Charlie Youle, who exhibited at the temporary space Galerie Samy Abraham's had at the Espace des Blancs Manteaux during FIAC.



    The day ended with several openings around Marais: gb agency with Omer Fast; Galerie Chantal Croussel with Abraham Cruzvillegas; Galerie Jousse Enterprise with Superflex; Campoli Presti with Liz Deschenes, Yvon Lambert with David Claerbout, New Gallery with Daniel Keller; TORRI with a group show with works by Braco Dimitrijevic, Hamish Fulton, Ai Wei Wei and Zhao Zhao... comme ci, comme ça.

     Galerie Chantal Croussel with Abraham Cruzvillegas.

     Daniel Keller's "Lazy Ocean Drift" at New Gallery.

    Friday 25 October: Visit to the artist-run-space Treize and tour of Belleville galleries: Samy Abraham; Balice Hertling; Antoine Levi; Marcelle Alix; Crèvecoeur; Jocelyn Wolff and castillo/corrales.


    The artist-run-space Treize hosted the show "Pavillon Moret" with works by Sophie Lamm, Sarah Tritz, Lucille Uhlrich and Marion Verboom.

    Antoine Levi hosted the solo show "Problems of Style" by Sean Townley.

    Jocelyn Wolff presented a solo show of Austrian artist Hans Schabus.


    Marcelle Alix presented a solo show of English artist Ian Kiaer.


    Crèvecoeur hosted the solo show "The Public Imagination" Erica Baum.

     Visiting castillo/corrales space which hosted 26 works generously donated by a bunch of artists soon after auctioned as part of their annual benefit event

    Le Plateau/FRAC Île-de-France with the solo show "Make Every Show Like it's your Last" by British artist Ryan Gander.

    We finished our day with a guided tour of the exhibition Europunk at Cité de la musique by its curator David Sanson, and a visit to the recently opened Chalet Society (a new association founded in 2012 by former Palais de Tokyo director, Marc-Olivier Wahler), which hosted "The Hidden World. Jim Shaw / A Didactic Collection" (until 29 December). The show included astonishing materials from the artist collection which accounts as his source of inspiration: "secret societies, far-fetched orders and fraternities, evangelical and fundamentalist movements, New Age spiritualists, Scientologists, Mormons, Freemasons, ultraconservatives and all kinds of conspirators, encyclopaedias for children and even Dr. Netter’s famous medical illustrations". Occuping 1,000m2 on 14 boulevard Raspail, this former school also hosts a "conceptual crêperie" and a shop with books selected by the califormnian artist.


    During the weekend we had time to visit a museum that came highly recommended by those that knew our taste for obscure collections and wunderkammer exhibits, the Musée de la Chasse et de la Nature (picture below). We also returned to the Centre Pompidou to pay a visit to their 'Plural Modernities 1905–1970' exhibition. This re-reading of the collection showcased a series of interrelated micro-exhibitions and is well worth a visit. Rarely seen works populated the fourth floor galleries in an effort to present to what until recently were considered 'minor' modernities. There was a special focus on the Maghreb, Latin America and Asia, the latter represented by a selection of works by Asian artists living in Paris at the height of Impressionism, whose work followed the same aesthetic principles. There were some delightful inclusions such as the wealth of art journal covers that filled the walls as wallpaper, allowing the visitor to cross-relate the graphics and texts to the paintings and sculptures produced concurrently. Gallery guide here.


    Façade of the Pompidou.


    This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
    All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
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    "Archive as Method: An Interview with Chantal Wong, Hammad Nasar and Lydia Ngai" of the Asia Art Archive, Hong Kong. Final #OpenCurating interview.


    "Archive as Method: An interview with Chantal Wong, Hammad Nasar and Lydia Ngai" of the Asia Art Archive in Hong Kong, is available on ISSUU to view on screen and is also downloadable. It is also available as pdf format via Latitudes' web. 

    …And last, but certainly not least, our #OpenCurating research concludes with an interview with three members of the amazing Asia Art Archive in Hong Kong.
     

    Asia Art Archive (AAA) was founded in 2000 with the mission of documenting, securing and making easily available information on the history of contemporary art in Asia within an international context. Based in the Sheung Wan district of Hong Kong, the non-profit organisation holds hundreds of thousands of physical and digital items. AAA aims to stimulate dialogue and critical thinking about how the region’s art histories are told and to “facilitate understanding, research, and writing in the field, enrich existing global narratives, and re-imagine the role of the archive”. Through its website – aaa.org.hkAAA offers access to a wealth of digital material including scanned images, correspondence, artists’ personal documents, audio and video of performance art, artist talks, lectures, and events. A broad range of initiatives including the journal Field Notes, research grants, residencies, symposia, exhibitions and teaching workshops address the core of AAA’s commitment “to create a collection belonging to the public, existing not in an enclosed space, but in a space that is open and productive, generating new ideas and works that continually reshape the Archive itself”.

    Follow:
    @LTTDS 
    #OpenCurating 
    @AsiaArtArchive
       
    ABOUT #OPENCURATING

    What "old rules" about art programming, production and distribution has the internet broken? What challenges, expectations, and new possibilities does digital culture and social media present to contemporary art institutions? To what degree are curators, media teams, publishers and archivists concerned with a dialogue with their audiences? #OpenCurating has investigated these questions through how new forms of culture, participation and connectivity are being developed both on site and on line.

    The research was structured around three elements. Ten new interviews were produced and published as free digital editions as well as via Issuu; a Twitter thread was moderated around the hashtag #OpenCurating; and a public conversation (transcribed as interview #7) between Latitudes and Yasmil Raymond, Curator of Dia Art Foundation, New York, was held on 19 February 2013 at the Auditorium of the Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA).


    #OpenCurating was a research project by Latitudes produced through La Capella. BCN Producció 2012 of the Institut de Cultura de Barcelona. 









     
    Content partners: Walker Art Center

     




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    Interview with Steven ten Thije, Research Curator, Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, sixth in the #OpenCurating research series

    Play Van Abbe, Part 2: Time Machine (10 April–24 September 2010). Curated by Steven ten Thije (guest curator) and Diana Franssen, Curator and Head of Research. Exhibition view of: Raum der Gegenwart, (1930) 2009 scale 1:1, various materials. Installation: 430 x 860 x 610 cm. Collection Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, The Netherlands. Photo: Peter Cox, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.

    As Research Curator at the Van Abbemuseum, in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, Steven ten Thije is part of the team of one the first public museums for contemporary art to be established in Europe. Under the directorship of Charles Esche since 2004, the museum has defined itself through "an experimental approach towards art’s role in society", where "openness, hospitality and knowledge exchange are important". Ten Thije is also a lecturer and researcher at the University of Hildesheim, Germany, where he is studying for a doctorate in the genealogical analysis of the exhibition curator. He was co-curator of the Spirits of Internationalism (Van Abbemuseum, 2012), and alongside Esche, with curators Christiane Berndes, Annie Fletcher, and Diana Franssen, he was guest curator of Play Van Abbe (2011). Subtitled The museum in the 21st Century, this was a four-part multifaceted programme of exhibitions, research and events in which the Van Abbemuseum reflected on the meaning and role of the art museum. Using its collection to articulate questions about the public's reaction to art and its contexts, the Van Abbemuseum probed its own history and purpose alongside how cultural production has reflected the social and political dynamics of the last twenty years.





    ABOUT #OPENCURATING

    Drawing on the emerging practices of so-called 'Open Journalism' – which seek to better collaborate with and use the ability of anyone to publish and share#OpenCurating is a research project that investigates how contemporary art projects may function beyond the traditional format of exhibition-and-catalogue. #OpenCurating is concerned with new forms of interaction between publics – whether online followers or physical visitors – with artworks and their production, display and discursive context.

    The project is articulated around a series of ten new interviews with curators, artists, writers and online strategists published as a free digital edition [read here the published ones so far], a Twitter discussion moderated around the hashtag #OpenCurating and a finissage event in Barcelona (date TBA).

    #OpenCurating is a research project by Latitudes produced through La Capella. BCN Producció 2012 of the Institut de Cultura de Barcelona. 










    Content partners: Walker Art Center

     




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    'Beyond Interface', first interview of the #OpenCurating series, BCN Producció 2012 research grant, 2012

    Photo: Courtesy Walker Art Center, Minneapolis.


    'Beyond Interface' is the first interview of Latitudes' #OpenCurating project, which was awarded the first BCN Producció 2012 Research Grant. The inaugural interview was conducted with three key figures involved in the website of the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, which is also the #OpenCurating content partner.

     
    #OpenCurating interview with Robin Dowden, Nate Solas and Paul Schmelzer from the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis.

    Robin Dowden (Director of New Media Initiatives), Nate Solas (Senior New Media Developer) and Paul Schmelzer (Web Editor), discuss the museum's new websitewalkerart.org – relaunched in December 2011 following a two-year conceptual reboot and complete redesign. Styled as an online newspaper, the new site heralds a paradigmatic shift for innovative museum websites in creating an online platform with an emphasis on publishing while placing itself at the centre of generating conversations around content from both inside and outside the Walker’s activities. 




    ABOUT #OPENCURATING

    Drawing on the emerging practices of so-called 'Open Journalism' – which seek to better collaborate with and use the ability of anyone to publish and share#OpenCurating is a research project that investigates how contemporary art projects may function beyond the traditional format of exhibition-and-catalogue. #OpenCurating is concerned with new forms of interaction between publics – whether online followers or physical visitors – with artworks and their production, display and discursive context.

    The project is articulated around a series of ten new interviews with curators, artists, journalists and online strategists published as a free digital edition, a Twitter discussion moderated around the hashtag #OpenCurating and a finissage event in Barcelona (date TBA).

    #OpenCurating was awarded the first BCN Producció 2012 Research Grant of the Institut de Cultura de Barcelona. 









    Content partners: Walker Art Center

     



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    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.




    #OpenCurating Research Project awarded the 'BCN Producció 2012' grant


    | UK |

    Building on concerns explored by Latitudes during “The Last Newspaper” project (New Museum, 2010), and drawing on the emerging practices of so-called 'Open Journalism' – which seek to better collaborate with and use the ability of anyone to publish and share#OpenCurating is a research project which will investigate how contemporary art projects can function beyond the traditional format of exhibition-and-catalogue in ways which might be more fully knitted into the web of information which exists in the world today. #OpenCurating is concerned with new forms of interaction between publics – whether online followers or physical visitors – with artworks and their production, display and discursive context.

    The project is structured around three elements: a Twitter discussion moderated around the hashtag #OpenCurating. Secondly, a series of ten new interviews with curators, artists, journalists and online strategists, each of which will be published as a digital edition, and a final public event in Barcelona.

    #OpenCurating has been awarded the first BCN Producció 2012 Research Grant of the Institut de Cultura de Barcelona.

    | ES |

    Partiendo de las preocupaciones exploradas por Latitudes durante el proyecto editorial realizado durante “The Last Newspaper” (New Museum, 2010), y basándose en las prácticas emergentes del denominado 'periodismo abierto' ('Open Journalism') – que trata de mejorar la colaboración y utilizar la habilidad de cualquier persona para publicar y compartir – #OpenCurating es un proyecto de investigación que indagará cómo los proyectos de arte contemporáneo estan planteándose más allá del tradicional formato 'exposición y catálogo', analizando las nuevas formas de interacción entre los públicos – sean seguidores online o visitantes físicos – con obras de arte, su producción, exhibición y su contexto discursivo.

    El proyecto se estructura a partir de tres elementos: una discusión en Twitter moderada por el hashtag #OpenCurating. En segundo lugar, una serie de diez entrevistas a comisarios, artistas, periodistas y expertos online, cada una de los cuales será publicada en una edición digital y por último, un evento público que tendrá lugar en Barcelona. 

    #OpenCurating es ganadora de la primera convocatoria en la categoría de investigación de BCN Producció 2012, que otorga el Institut de Cultura de Barcelona.


    All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)

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    Latitudes in residency at the Frankfurter Kunstverein


    Latitudes is in residence this month of August at the Frankfurter Kunstverein, Frankfurt. During this time we are researching the local artistic context, developing some writing for magazines and catalogues as well as planning projects for this and next year such as Lawrence Weiner exhibition (opening 8 October), a series of artists' projects and commissions around the future extension of the Port of Rotterdam (from February 2009 onwards) and an exhibition around the notion of the future at the Arnolfini in Bristol (Summer 2009), amongst other things! – see future projects.