Longitudes

Visiting Curator Program, Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne, 12 May–7 June 2014

Courtesy: Gertrude Contemporary.

Latitudes has been invited to participate in Gertrude Contemporary's Visiting Curator Program between 12 May and 7 June.
 
The Visiting Curator Program is an initiative in which three international curators are invited to Australia each year. During the residency (between two weeks up to two months) the invited curator is hosted in Gertrude's Studio 18 and Gertrude Contemporary facilitates a series of studio visits and meetings with artists and Australian peers within the contemporary arts sector. The residencies receive support from Arts Victoria International or the Australia Council for the Arts. 

As part of the residency, Latitudes has been invited to present their work at MADA | Monash University of Art Design & Architecture. The talk will be followed by an afternoon closed-door seminar with candidates from Curatorial Practice PhD [download course pdf] and other guests, during which Latitudes will lead a discussion concentrating on their #OpenCurating research which manifested in 10 freely published interviews with artists, curators and editors investigating new forms of interaction between publics with artworks and their production, display and discursive context.

Residency in partnership with MADA | Monash University of Art Design & Architecture, as part of Gertrude Contemporary’s Visiting Curator Program.

Follow us on our twitter and the archived posts on storify.


Courtesy: Gertrude Contemporary.


This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Witte de With opens the group show "The Part In The Story Where A Part Becomes A Part Of Something Else" on May 22, 2014

Anthony Marcellini, "The Object In And Of Itself", 2011. Courtesy the artist and Witte de With, Rotterdam.

The group exhibition "The Part In The Story Where A Part Becomes A Part Of Something Else", opening on 22 May at Rotterdam's Witte de With brings a conclusion to "Moderation(s)", the long-term multifarious programme that began in August 2012 with a teaser event at Spring Workshop, Hong Kong, co-partner of the initiative. 

The exhibition, curated by 'moderator' Heman Chong (artist and writer, Singapore) and Samuel Saelemakers (Associate Curator, Witte de With), will include works by +40 artists "gathered around key concepts such as time, duration and space (Douglas Gordon, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, On Kawara), memory and inscription (Ang Song Ming, John Cage, Sharon Hayes), transformation (Bik Van der Pol, Nicolás Lamas), pleasure (Ivan Argote, Chu Yun, Willem de Rooij, Haegue Yang), and encounters (Lee Kit, Narcisse Tordoir)." [from the website].
 
"Moderation(s)" began in January 2013 with Latitudes' month-long residency at Spring Workshop, Hong Kong, with its project "Incidents of Travel": an invitation to four Hong Kong-based artists – Nadim Abbas, Ho Sin Tung, Yuk King Tan and Samson Young – to develop day-long tours, thus retelling the city and each participant’s artistic concerns through personal itineraries and waypoints. 

Around Kwun Tong market and shops with Samson Young. Photo: Spring Workshop. More photo-documentation here.

On 31 January a group of "Moderation(s)" participants [Heman Chong, Latitudes (Mariana Cánepa Luna and Max Andrews), Nadim Abbas, Mimi Brown, Chantal Wong, and Yuk King Tan] spent eight hours consulting the Asia Art Archive and engaging in multiple discussions around collectivity, time and knowledge triggered by archival resources [see "Asia Art Archive Intervention"]

Latitudes will also contribute to the forthcoming publication to be released on the occasion of the "The Part In The Story...", with documentation from each of the "Incidents of Travel" tours and an interview with curator Christina Li, Moderation(s)' witness.  

Participants during the Asia Art Archive intervention on 31 January 2013. Photo: Spring Workshop.

Follow:  
#ThePartInTheStory

Related posts:
– 

This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

'The Margins of the Factory' on Artforum's Critics' Picks

 
If you can't read it correctly, click this link to the review by Miguel Amado.

The exhibition 'The Margins of the Factory' by Iratxe Jaio and Klaas van Gorkum is on view until 30 April at ADN Platform. There will be a breakfast and guided visit on Saturday 12 April at 10:30am. If you would like to join please contact Jordi Vernis <[email protected]>

La exposición 'Los márgenes de la fábrica' de Iratxe Jaio y Klaas van Gorkum permanecerá abierta hasta el 30 de abril en ADN Platform. El sábado 12 de abril a las 10:30am habrá un desayuno y visita guiada, si estáis interesados en asistir, por favor poneros en contacto con Jordi Vernis <[email protected]>


Related posts:
– 

This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Tuesday 18 March, 17:30h: Book launch of "European contextualising in analytical sociology and ethnographical representation on history and present" and conversation between Remco Torenbosch and Max Andrews (Latitudes) at the Library Fundació Tàpies

This and following images, courtesy of Remco Torenbosch.
Book launch
"European contextualising in analytical sociology and ethnographical representation on history and present"
Tuesday 18 March, 17:30h
Library of the Fundació Tàpies
c/ Aragó 255, 08007 Barcelona
Limited seating available. Please RSVP [email protected]

Book launch and conversation between Dutch artist and publication editor Remco Torenbosch and Barcelona-based curator Max Andrews of Latitudes.

In the context of the solo exhibition "European Contextualisation" by Dutch artist Remco Torenbosch (1982, Assen) opening next Thurday 20 March, 19h at NoguerasBlanchard, the gallery has organised the book launch of his most recent publication "European contextualising in analytical sociology and ethnographical representation on history and present" (Black Dog Publishing, 2014) at the library of Fundació Tàpies. The exhibition is part of the exhibition cycle "The Story Behind", curated by Direlia Lazo.



From the artist website:  

"Originally conceived for the Council of Europe, the successful design of the flag was later adopted by the European Union in 1985 whilst under the moniker of the European Economic Community. Designed by Arsene Heitz, a French draughtsman at the CoE, and Paul Levy, a Jewish-Belgian Holocaust survivor who worked for many years as the council's Director of Information, the finalised design was presented to the CoE in 1955 at its headquarters in Strasbourg, Heitz's hometown.

This publication profiles the documents, design proposals and written correspondence between Heitz, Levy and further collaborators that would form the painstakingly diplomatic development of an iconic vexillological moment. As part of the book's research, a collection of fabric monochromes woven by weavers from all 28 member states of the EU in the base colour of the flag was compiled. These collated monochromes as such become a map themselves of the socio-economic shift within EU member communities, an embodiment of the disappearing textile industries of Europe."




Author/Editor: Remco Torenbosch
Contributors: Charles Esche, Mihnea Mircan, Council of Europe Archive

Paperback: 244 pages
Publisher: Black Dog Publishing London

ISBN-13: 978-1908966698



This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Documentation of Iratxe Jaio and Klaas van Gorkum's exhibition "The Margins of the Factory" and the opening performance by Nathaniel R. Mann

Installation view of "Producing time in between other things" (2011). Three videos (12' 30'', 5' 22'', 36' 11''), 32 colour photographs (76x115 cm & 50x75 cm), 49 wooden legs, and MDF platforms with objects made by Jos van Gorkum between 1976 and 1996. Photo: Roberto Ruiz. Courtesy: ADN Platform.

More installation photos of the exhibition here (flickr).

The exhibition "The Margins of the Factory" (ADN Platform, Sant Cugat, 25 January–30 April 2014) presents two recent projects by the Rotterdam-based duo Iratxe Jaio & Klaas van Gorkum that are motivated by their interest in art's relationship with labour. Each explores sculptural form and manufacturing processes from the perspective of artists who have not usually made objects. Jaio & van Gorkum undertake what are in part sociological investigations by documenting the local, marginal effects of the displacement of manufacturing industries over the last two generations with the emergence of the global market. Emerging from the artists' personal history and implicating the direct effects of their own vocation as well as work they ask of others, the projects are moreover complicit in asking what kind of industriousness brings value and what political life objects might have.

The exhibition opening featured a performance by British “avant-folk” musician Nathaniel Robin Mann developed for the occasion in collaboration with Jaio & van Gorkum around the raw footage of "Work in Progress" (2013), a film by the artists showing men and women at work in the Lea Artibai region in Basque Country, where they trim rubber parts destined for the global automobile industry. 


Photos: Roberto Ruiz.
Mann interpreted the Basque popular song “Oi Peio Peio” – a dialogue between a woman worker and her cruel boss "Peio", who insists she carries on working throughout the night. He keeps telling her to carry on with the next step in the spinning process, until the sun comes up and it is too late to go to sleep. First collected in Cancionero Popular Vasco in 1918, the song was popularized by singer–songwriter Mikel Laboa, founder of “Ez Dok Amairu” (“No Thirteen”), the cultural movement of Basque poets, musicians and artists whose name was a suggestion of sculptor Jorge Oteiza.

  Nathaniel Robin Mann performing "Oi Peio Peio" during the exhibition opening of "The Margins of the Factory". Video by Iratxe Jaio & Klaas van Gorkum.

While singing, Mann manually assembled a device which broadcasted his prerecorded voice to a transistor radio, with which he then performed a moving duet. The performance is Nathan's response to the themes and issues explored in the installation of "Work in Progress", infused with his own longstanding interest in work song and traditional music.

More info:

www.lttds.org/projects/jaiovangorkum/
Download exhibition leaflet (English or Spanish):

www.lttds.org/projects/jaiovangorkum/archive/

Related posts:


This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License

Storifying the social media related to the exhibition "The Margins of the Factory" (until 30 April) at ADN Platform, Sant Cugat

We have began to storify all the social media posts related to the exhibition "Iratxe Jaio and Klaas van Gorkum: The Margins of the Factory" that opened last Saturday 25 January at ADN Platform in Sant Cugat. 

The exhibition will remain open until 30 April. If you would like to visit, please make an appointment writing to [email protected] or calling (+34) 93 451 00 64.

More information about the exhibition:  
Press Release: http://mad.ly/7b4164 (English) / http://mad.ly/657564 (Español)
Exhibition leaflet (pdf English) / Hoja de sala (pdf en Español) 

Follow
@LTTDS
@KlaasvanGorkum
#ADNPlatform 




Related content:


This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Colaboración en el catálogo digital de la exposición "7.000.000.000" de Arlandis/Marroquí para el Espai d'art Contemporani Castelló (EACC)

El próximo 31 de enero inaugura en el Espai d'art Contemporani Castelló (EACC) la exposición colectiva "7.000.000.000", un proyecto que parte de la idea de desarrollo sostenible. La exposición está comisariada por David Arlandis y Javier Marroquí.  

Arlandis y Marroquí han invitado a una serie de autores a contribuir textos para el catálogo digital, entre ellos a Mariana Cánepa Luna de Latitudes que ha escrito sobre Time/Bank, el sistema económico alternativo creado en el 2009 por los artistas Anton Vidokle y Julieta Aranda. Podéis leer o descargar la publicación desde este enlace.

Para la ocasión, como avanzan los comisarios en este texto, Time/Bank abrirá una sucursal "y colaborará con otra iniciativa similar, la Ecoxarxa, que se está desarrollando fuera del ámbito artístico. Time/Bank es un proyecto que consta de una instalación en la que podemos ver material diverso y documentación relacionada con las primeras iniciativas de banco de tiempo. La segunda parte trata de poner en marcha esa sucursal de banco de tiempo, con voluntad de continuidad, en la ciudad. Lo que se persigue es favorecer la implantación real de un modelo económico alternativo donde se intercambia con el tiempo como moneda."

Time/Bank en dOCUMENTA (13), 2012.
A continuación un extracto del texto de Cánepa Luna que se incluye en la publicación:

"Como acertadamente señala el antropólogo teórico David Graeber en su ensayo “The Sadness of Post-Workerism” (La tristeza del post-laboralismo), una de las ideas más ignoradas y, sin embargo, más poderosas y perdurables del marxismo, es que el mundo no solo consiste en la producción de mercancías que puedan ser compradas y vendidas, sino en acciones y procesos.[1] El sistema económico alternativo Time/Bank, de Anton Vidokle y Julieta Aranda, que utiliza el tiempo como unidad de cambio, se concretó en 2009, un año después de que la crisis actual llegara a su punto álgido. Time/Bank evolucionó de forma natural a partir de PAWNSHOP (2007), su negocio de préstamos a corto plazo para obras de arte, situado en un local comercial de la calle Ludlow, en Nueva York. Ambas iniciativas median inquietudes en torno a la circulación y la distribución, temas que siguen presentes en sus prácticas artísticas, y que posiblemente estén mejor ejemplificadas en e-flux, el servicio de mensajes por correo electrónico que fundaron conjuntamente en 1999, y que se utiliza dentro del mundo del arte para difundir información sobre acontecimientos relacionados con el arte, exposiciones y proyectos, entre sus más de 90.000 suscriptores electrónicos.

La creciente desconfianza hacia los sistemas económicos y financieros existentes creó la tormenta perfecta para que se materializara su propuesta Time/Bank, aunque Vidokle y Aranda insisten en situarlo en el contexto de otros casos previos de moneda alternativa o local, y de estructuras financieras basadas en la reciprocidad, como Ithaca HOUR, la moneda creada por el organizador de comunidades Paul Glover en 1991 en el norte del estado de Nueva York, que todavía está en funcionamiento y se ha convertido en la moneda local que más tiempo lleva en circulación en Estados Unidos. Vidokle y Aranda crearon Time/Bank con la intención de fomentar un sentimiento de valor cultural dentro de la comunidad cultural, donde a menudo se ha dado un intercambio de aptitudes y productos al margen de los sistemas monetarios –por ejemplo, intercambio de obras, ayuda durante la instalación, traducción, etc. Como sostiene Vidokle, "Time/Bank puede potencialmente convertirse en la base de una economía diferente, capaz de soportar nuevas y distintas formas de relaciones sociales y prácticas culturales... Esperamos ir más allá y crear una estructura económica que pueda ser compartida por otros y que sea capaz, hasta cierto punto, de atender a sus necesidades". [2]

[1] David Graeber, “The Sadness of Post-Workerism or“Art And Immaterial Labour” Congreso: A Sort of Review (Tate Britain, sábado 19 de enero de 2008)”. Editado en The Commoner, 5 de diciembre de 2013.  
[2] Jolien Verlaek, "Working With That 'We-Feeling'”, Metropolis M núm.1, 2011.

Billetes Time Bank diseñados por Lawrence Weiner.

"7.000.000.000" permanecerá abierta hasta el 27 de abril 2014.
Artistas participantes: ANETTA MONA CHIŞA & LUCIA TKÁČOVÁ, BASURAMA, CARLOS MOTTA, DANIELA ORTIZ Y XOSÉ QUIROGA, JOHAN GRIMONPREZ, JULIETA ARANDA Y ANTON VIDOKLE, JUAN JOSÉ MARTÍN ANDRÉS, NÚRIA GÜELL, TUE GREENFORT, REGINA JOSÉ GALINDO, OLIVER RESSLER, OLIVER RESSLER Y ZANNY BEGG, THE OTOLITH GROUP, URSULA BIEMANN
 
Posts relacionados:
dOCUMENTA (13) in pictures & as seen by the critics, 9 June–16 September 2012 (12 June 2012)



This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Commentary text on Roman Ondák now available via The Common Guild' website


Compilation of commentary texts. Photo: The Common Guild.

The Common Guild regularly commissions artists, writers and curators a series of short texts to accompany their ongoing exhibitions programme. These commentaries are uploaded as pdfs on their website, and can be printed and easily compiled – see image as a suggestion for how to do this. 

Latitudes' commentary text on Roman Ondák's work and exhibiton "Some Thing" (12 October – 14 December 2013) has just been uploaded and can be found as a pdf here. The text follows Latitudes' talk on 21 November 2013 (audio here).

Commentary text can be downloadable as a pdf here.



This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

25 January 2014: Opening of the solo exhibition 'The Margins of the Factory' by Iratxe Jaio & Klaas van Gorkum at ADN Platform, Sant Cugat del Vallès (Barcelona)

The Margins of the Factory, a solo exhibition by the Rotterdam-based duo Iratxe Jaio & Klaas van Gorkum curated by Latitudes will open on Saturday 25 January 2014, as part of ADN Galería and ADN Platform's exhibitions programme. 


Opening programme:

12h: Opening at ADN Galería (c/ Enric Granados 49, Barcelona). Exhibition: “This is not Just Fucking Business” by Carlos Aires
13:15h: Buses depart from ADN Galería towards ADN Platform (Avda. Can Roquetas, Sant Cugat del Vallès). To book a seat in the bus: [email protected] / 93 451 0064

14h: Arrival at ADN Platform and light lunch. Exhibitions: Micro-actions of Emergency #2 [Curated by Colectivo de vuelta y vuelta (Claudia Segura & Inés Jover)] and The Margins of the Factory by Iratxe Jaio & Klaas van Gorkum [Curated by Latitudes].
14:15h: 15 min. voice and instrumental performance by Nathaniel Robin Mann, as part of The Margins of the Factory
16/16:30h: Buses return from ADN Platform (Sant Cugat) towards ADN Galería (Barcelona).

The Margins of the Factory presents two recent projects by Iratxe Jaio & Klaas van Gorkum that are motivated by their interest in art's relationship with labour. Each explores sculptural form and manufacturing processes from the perspective of artists who have not usually made objects. Jaio & van Gorkum undertake what are in part sociological investigations by documenting the local, marginal effects of the displacement of manufacturing industries over the last two generations with the emergence of the global market. Emerging from the artists' personal history and implicating the direct effects of their own vocation as well as work they ask of others, the projects are moreover complicit in asking what kind of industriousness brings value and what political life objects might have.


The exhibition opening will also feature a performance by British “avant-folk” musician Nathaniel Robin Mann, developed in collaboration with Jaio & van Gorkum around the raw footage of Work in Progress and the tradition of work song. Mann interprets the Basque popular song “Oi Peio Peio” – a dialogue between a woman worker and her cruel boss, who insists that she carries on working throughout the night. First collected in Cancionero Popular Vasco in 1918, the song was popularized by singer–songwriter Mikel Laboa, founder of “Ez Dok Amairu” (“No Thirteen”), the cultural movement of Basque poets, musicians and artists whose name was a suggestion of sculptor Jorge Oteiza. 

Installation of Producing time in between other things. Courtesy of the artists. Photo: MUSAC.

Central to Producing time in between other things (2011) is a selection of wooden objects made by retired factory worker Jos van Gorkum – Gorkum’s grandfather – which the artists documented in the homes of his relations, friends and former neighbours across the Netherlands. During this process, the artists located the original lathe on which these items had been crafted and began to teach themselves woodturning. The forms which they made as they worked at learning a hobby become the means to support the display of the original objects, presented alongside three videos and photography

Still from the video "Work in Progress". Courtesy of the artists.

Work in Progress (2013) immerses itself in the manufacturing industry of Markina-Xemein, the rural Basque village where Jaio comes from. A video documents the mass-production of rubber car parts, following the pieces from the assembly line in a worker-owned factory to subcontracted workshops where informal workers finish them by hand. Several of these workers are employed by the artists to cast hundreds of replicas of small modernist sculptures. These are displayed on mass-produced shelving to evoke the "Chalk Laboratory" of Basque sculptor Jorge Oteiza, a fierce critic of the commodification of art. 

Visit adnplatform:
Avda. Can Roquetas (corner with Victor Hugo)
08173 Sant Cugat del Vallès
[email protected]
Tel. (+34) 93 451 00 64
By appointment only

Location map

Download the A3 invite-as-poster-as-leaflet of the exhibition (Spanish & English versions). 

Producing time in between other things was produced as part of the Latitudes-curated Amikejo exhibition season at MUSAC, León, in 2011, supported in part by the Mondriaan Foundation (now Mondriaan Fonds). Work in Progress was produced with support from the Eremuak program of the Basque Government and from the Centrum Beeldende Kunst Rotterdam.

Related content:  
"Focus Interview: Iratxe Jaio & Klaas van Gorkum", frieze, Issue 157, September 2013 (14 October 2013).



This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

La cultura en España (2a parte): estadísticas, cifras y porcentajes del 2013

Hace poco más de un año analizamos los resultados ofrecidos por el Anuario de Estadísticas Culturales 2012. Hace unos días el Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deportes ha publicado el del presente año, el Anuario de Estadísticas Culturales 2013, una publicación que aporta datos de los principales indicadores del quinquenio 2008–2012. Se puede descargar en formato pdf e incluye 345 páginas, así que paciencia.

Tal y como han resaltado varios periódicos, portales de noticias y blogs, las estadísticas desprenden ya claros datos sobre el devastador impacto que han tenido los recortes en la cultura, aunque sólo recoge datos sobre los últimos 4 meses del 2012 cuando subió el IVA al 21%, así que habrá que esperar al año próximo para ver con más claridad (¡si es que aún hubiese dudas!) el tremendo impacto que están teniendo los recortes en la economía española. Pero vayamos por partes. 

Como es de esperar, desde las adminstraciones (Gobierno central, local y Ayuntamientos) se ha invertido menos en cultura. La Administración General del Estado, por ejemplo, ha pasado de invertir 1.051.000 de Euros en el 2010 a 957.000 millones en el 2011, un descenso del 8,9% – no hay datos del 2012.


Estadística de Financiación y Gasto Público en Cultura, desarrollada por el Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte. Descargar pdf aquí.


El número de trabajadores dedicados a la cultura ha pasado de los 481.700 del año 2011 a los 457.600 de 2012, lo que supone un descenso de 24.100 empleos, según desprende el informe. Asímismo se han perdido 1.978 empresas cuya actividad económica era la cultura (pasando de 103.320 a 101.342 en el mismo periodo).

Estadística del empleo cultural en el 2012. Descargar pdf aquí.
Seguimos atónitos viendo cómo el Ministerio califica los datos de positivos, al reflejar que el sector cultural supone un 3,5% del Producto Interior Bruto (3,6% en el 2009), dato que incluye la aportación vinculada con la propiedad intelectual, y que genera un 2,6% del empleo total en España. El Ministerio ha recurrido una vez más a la recurrente frase que recalca "el significativo peso de las actividades culturales dentro de la economía española", y vuelve a señalar su importancia en la comparativa con otros sectores com la Agricultura, Ganadería y Pesca (2,5%), la industria química (1,1%) o las telecomunicaciones (1,8%).
 

No obstante, el gobierno hace oídos sordos a las contínuas demandas del sector en aplicar un IVA super-reducido a la Cultura tal y como tienen nuestros vecinos europeos – recordamos a partir del 1 Septiembre del 2012 España soporta el IVA más alto de la Unión Europea, y que sólo los libros impresos, periódicos y revistas disfrutan del 4% de IVA, el resto de actividades sufrieron la subida del tipo del 8% al 10% (música y cine) o mayores subidas de 13 puntos, del 8% al 21% en CDs, DVDs o importaciones de obras de arte y del 18% al 21% en la venta de obras de arte. 

En relación al cine: El número de festivales españoles de cine han descendido dramáticamente, pasando de 80 en el 2011 a 36 un año después. Este descenso se sigue reflejando prácticamente en todas sus cifras: en millones de espectadores (98,3 millones en el 2011 a 94,2 en el 2012); películas estrenadas (511 en el 2011, 472 en el 2012), y se han producido menos cortometrajes (249 en el 2011, 228 en el 2012). El cine, no obstante, sigue siendo el espectáculo cultural con más demanda, seguido por la asistencia a espectáculos en directo.
 Estadística sobre el cine y el video. Descargar pdf aquí. En más detalle aquí.
Más datos. Ahora libros (descargar pdf de las estadísticas). En el 2011 se inscribieron 111.907 libros en ISBN, en el 2012 han sido 104.724 (80.094 de ellos en soporte papel, 24.630 en otros soportes). 7.183 libros menos para disfrutar, y un 6.4% menos de un año a otro. En cuanto a editores, en el 2012 contamos con 96.910 editores privados, frente a 7.814 públicos (eran 104.118 en el 2011, frente a 7.789 públicos), ahí hay 7.208 editores que han terminado su actividad, y como siempre ocurre en cualquier caso, la cadena que genera de descenso de empleo para diseñadores, impresores, distribuidores y para lectores, claro está, que caen en picado. 

Más llamativo es el dato que aporta el apartado 18, el titulado "Cuenta Satélite de la Cultura", cuando vemos que por sectores culturales el sector que más aporta al PIB total, es el sector de Libros y prensa, con una aportación total que representa el 38,1% en el conjunto de actividades culturales, seguido por Audivisual y multimedia (25,9%), las Artes Plásticas (15,2%), las Artes escénicas (9,1%), el Patrimonio, archivos y bibliotecas (6,9%) y una zona gris del 5,8% perteneciente a "lo interdisciplinar" (¡a saber!). También fue el sector de los libros, quien tuvo el comportamiento más favorable del comercio exterior, con exportaciones por valor de 540,1 millones de euros (véase gráfico 6 de Comercio exterior de bienes y servicios culturales).
 Gráfico de la "Cuenta Satélite de la Cultura", descargable aquí.
En el 2012, el español ha gastado una media de €289 Euros en cultura, €24 menos que en el 2011, la mayoría de este gasto se ha invertido en "equipos y accesorios audiovisuales de tratamiento de la información e Internet", seguido por servicios culturales (cines, teatros, entradas museos, bibliotecas, etc...). 

A pesar de los datos aportados por los 18 capítulos (hubo 17 en el anuario pasado, este año se ha añadido "Asuntos taurinos" como nº 17), y de encontrar datos aislados sobre el comportamiento de las artes plásticas (¡esa terminología tan demodé!), no encontramos ningún gráfico específico a las artes visuales contemporáneas

Para completar el estudio, finalizamos aportando datos de una reveladora estadística que ha publicado recientemente el periódico El País sobre la representación de las mujeres españolas en el sistema del arte, con datos recogidos por la asociación Mujeres en las Artes Visuales (MAV). Y con un post que ha publicado NIAL Art Law sobre la obligación del Ministerio de Fomento a destinar en los contratos de obras públicas una partida de al menos el 1% (el llamado "1% cultural") a trabajos de conservación o enriquecimiento del Patrimonio Cultural Español.

Analicemos primero el artículo de El País. Lamentablemente, en él constatamos lo que ya sabemos: que en el sistema artístico también se reproduce la estructura piramidal que existe en otros sectores profesionales. Mientras que las mujeres predominan en las carreras de Bellas Artes (65% de las titulaciones) e Historia del Arte (74%), así como en los departamentos de coordinación y conservación de numerosos museos y centros de arte (un alto 81%; o un 67% que ha pasado por oposiciones para solicitar cargos de conservación en museos públicos), pocas ocupan puestos de responsabilidad (22% son directoras de museos o centros de arte contemporáneo) o de reconocimiento profesional (ninguna mujer española ha sido, por ejemplo, galardonada con el Premio Velázquez. Y aunque ya sabemos que éste es sólo un premio de los muchos existentes, es el que mejor dotación económica tiene: 100,000 Euros en 2013). 


Representación de las mujeres españolas en el sistema del arte publicado en El País.
En cuanto a la adquisición de obra realizada por mujeres, museos como el Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía (MNCARS) en Madrid han ido, desde 2008, adquiriendo obra con criterios paritarios (46% mujeres y 54% hombres), aunque las cifras de su colección permanente (un 4% de obras y un 6% de artistas españolas en su colección) arrastran, como apunta el artículo, un notable desequilibrio. 

Lo mismo le pasa al Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA), cuya colección tiene sólo el 9.5% de piezas producidas por mujeres frente a un total de 5,314 obras. El Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo (CAAC), es único museo que trabaja con criterios de estricta paridad en programación y compras desde 2010, aunque su colección permanente sólo tiene un 13,9% de creadoras de un total de 537. 

Y para finalizar, volvamos al llamado 1% cultural. El pasado 15 de octubre la ministra de Fomento y el ministro de Educación, Cultura y Deporte han firmado un acuerdo con el que se amplía la aportación del 1% destinado a los citados proyectos de restauración y enriquecimiento del Patrimonio Histórico al 1,5% Cultural (no aquellas obras que excedan los 601.012,10 Euros totales, o aquellas que afecten a la seguridad y defensa del Estado, así como a la seguridad de los servicios públicos). ¿Quién puede solicitarlo? Como bien apunta el post de Nial Art Law y recoge la web del Ministerio es el propio Estado (las Comunidades Autónomas, Ayuntamientos, Diputaciones Forales y Provinciales, Consejos y Cabildos Insulares), Universidades públicas o Fundaciones públicas o privadas sin ánimo de lucro quienes pueden solicitarlo. Está por ver qué procedimientos se seguirán para su gestion, si se regirán bajo los deseados principios de transparencia y qué requisitos se establecen en las convocatorias públicas, pues ya sabemos que muchas veces la redacción, expectativas, plazos y términos que éstas imponen determinan quienes serán los destinatarios de tales ayudas.

Una de las medidas más preocupantes es, tal y como lamenta el post de Nial Art Law, que en la gran mayoría de las ocasiones, las medidas van encaminadas a favorecer la conservación y el mantenimiento del patrimonio cultural ya existente (mayormente en inmuebles declarados de interés cultural o similares, véanse por ejemplo las actuaciones llevadas a cabo en el 2011), y no necesariamente a favorecer la generación de nuevo patrimonio cultural, es decir, a apoyar a creadores activos, peligrando en consecuencia la generación de futuro patrimonio y el apoyo a la creación actual. Y es que a este paso, si no fomentamos a la producción actual, no tendremos patrimonio futuro que queramos exponer ni proteger para generaciones venideras.



This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Longitudes cuts across Latitudes’s projects and research with news, updates, and reportage.

Latitudes | www.LTTDS.org (except when otherwise noted).

Latitudes 2006–2020

Previous posts

Dec 2019 (2)
Nov 2019 (6)
Oct 2019 (2)
Sep 2019 (6)
Aug 2019 (5)
Jul 2019 (1)
Jun 2019 (2)
May 2019 (3)
Apr 2019 (1)
Mar 2019 (3)
Feb 2019 (1)
Jan 2019 (3)
Dec 2018 (5)
Nov 2018 (3)
Oct 2018 (5)
Sep 2018 (7)
Aug 2018 (5)
Jul 2018 (2)
Jun 2018 (2)
May 2018 (3)
Apr 2018 (3)
Mar 2018 (2)
Feb 2018 (4)
Jan 2018 (3)
Dec 2017 (3)
Nov 2017 (3)
Oct 2017 (4)
Sep 2017 (3)
Aug 2017 (2)
Jul 2017 (2)
Jun 2017 (2)
May 2017 (2)
Apr 2017 (3)
Mar 2017 (3)
Feb 2017 (3)
Jan 2017 (2)
Dec 2016 (2)
Nov 2016 (3)
Oct 2016 (3)
Sep 2016 (2)
Aug 2016 (6)
Jul 2016 (2)
Jun 2016 (3)
May 2016 (5)
Apr 2016 (2)
Mar 2016 (2)
Feb 2016 (6)
Jan 2016 (3)
Dec 2015 (1)
Nov 2015 (1)
Oct 2015 (3)
Sep 2015 (1)
Aug 2015 (4)
Jul 2015 (5)
Jun 2015 (3)
May 2015 (3)
Apr 2015 (4)
Mar 2015 (2)
Feb 2015 (2)
Jan 2015 (2)
Dec 2014 (2)
Nov 2014 (3)
Oct 2014 (2)
Sep 2014 (2)
Aug 2014 (2)
Jun 2014 (3)
May 2014 (3)
Apr 2014 (2)
Mar 2014 (3)
Feb 2014 (1)
Jan 2014 (1)
Dec 2013 (4)
Nov 2013 (3)
Oct 2013 (6)
Sep 2013 (4)
Aug 2013 (2)
Jul 2013 (1)
Jun 2013 (3)
May 2013 (4)
Apr 2013 (2)
Mar 2013 (4)
Feb 2013 (2)
Jan 2013 (5)
Dec 2012 (5)
Nov 2012 (4)
Oct 2012 (4)
Sep 2012 (6)
Aug 2012 (4)
Jul 2012 (2)
Jun 2012 (3)
May 2012 (8)
Apr 2012 (7)
Mar 2012 (5)
Feb 2012 (5)
Jan 2012 (4)
Dec 2011 (4)
Nov 2011 (3)
Oct 2011 (6)
Sep 2011 (4)
Aug 2011 (7)
Jul 2011 (3)
Jun 2011 (8)
May 2011 (10)
Apr 2011 (6)
Mar 2011 (7)
Feb 2011 (9)
Jan 2011 (3)
Dec 2010 (8)
Nov 2010 (9)
Oct 2010 (6)
Sep 2010 (11)
Aug 2010 (6)
Jun 2010 (4)
May 2010 (5)
Apr 2010 (11)
Mar 2010 (4)
Feb 2010 (6)
Jan 2010 (7)
Dec 2009 (6)
Nov 2009 (3)
Oct 2009 (7)
Sep 2009 (11)
Aug 2009 (11)
Jul 2009 (2)
Jun 2009 (10)
May 2009 (7)
Apr 2009 (5)
Mar 2009 (6)
Feb 2009 (4)
Jan 2009 (5)
Dec 2008 (6)
Nov 2008 (5)
Oct 2008 (5)
Sep 2008 (5)
Aug 2008 (3)
Jul 2008 (3)
Jun 2008 (5)
May 2008 (4)
Apr 2008 (5)
Mar 2008 (3)
Feb 2008 (7)
Jan 2008 (5)
Dec 2007 (5)
Nov 2007 (5)
Oct 2007 (6)
Sep 2007 (8)
Aug 2007 (3)
Jul 2007 (5)
May 2007 (8)
Apr 2007 (8)
Mar 2007 (8)
Feb 2007 (3)
Jan 2007 (1)
Dec 2006 (8)
Nov 2006 (2)
Oct 2006 (6)
Sep 2006 (10)
Aug 2006 (1)
Founded in 2005 by Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna, Latitudes is a curatorial office based in Barcelona, Spain, that works internationally across contemporary art practices.

More about us. Browse projects. Read Longitudes. Receive newsletters.

Contact us. 
All content
Latitudes
2005—2020