Longitudes

Report: Trip to London and Oxford in pictures


 (Above and four below) Cinthia Marcelle's "The Family in Disorder" (2018) at Museum and Modern Art Oxford.


(Above and below) The magnificent main hall of the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford.

 An example of Micronesian currency – we're reminded of our extended conversation with Melbourne-based artist Nicholas Mangan published in his 2016 Sternberg Press publication "Limits to growth" (and also during Chisenhale's live conversation and while chasing Ancient Lights).


(Above and below) These column capitals are the main reasons we visited Oxford. They were carved for the Oxford Museum of Natural History in 1859-60 by Irish brothers James and John O'Shea, along with their nephew Edward Whelan. Commissioned by John Ruskin, all the works were carved freestyle, without previous sketches, using only plant specimens from the botanical garden, and their sheer imagination, as references.

They are the protagonists of Sean Lynch's 2013 piece "A Blow by Blow Account of Stonecarving in Oxford", which we have been discussing with Sean for a while and finally saw in 2015 in Bordeaux. We continued learning more about this piece and its making during our joint adventure in Banff's "Geologic Time" residency programme last Fall. 


 (Above) Apostolos Georgiou, "FROM MY HEART" at Rodeo Gallery.

 (Above and 3 below) Leonor Antunes's "a thousand realities from an original mark" at Marian Goodman.
 Polycarbonate and brass screens and rope sculptures. Each screen corresponds to the exact measurements of one of the glass panels in the Upper Lawn Pavilion in Wiltshire, built between 1959 and 1962 by the British architects Alison and Peter Smithson (1928-1993 and 1923-2003).


(Above) Tacita Dean's "Landscape" exhibition premiered "Antigone", a new 1-hour long film and cloud paintings at The Royal Academy. Part 2 and 3 in the National Portrait Gallery (a retrospective of portrait films works) and at the National Gallery a two-room exhibition curated by the artist presents a selection of historical and contemporary still lives. 

 Fantastic assembly of square-format paintings by Markus Lüperz at Michael Werner Gallery, which the artist painted at age 24 using distemper on canvas.

 (Above and below) Batia Suter's work at The Photographers' Gallery. One of the nominees for the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2018.

(Above) The 2018 awardee was Luke Willis Thompson with his striking film "Autoportrait" (also nominated for this year's Turner Prize).

 Nicolas Lamas (above and immediately below) and Petra Feriancová (two following) two-person show "Becoming animal" at Tenderpixel
(Above) "Pregnant Landscape" by Phoebe Unwin at Amanda Wilkinson Gallery in SoHo.

 (Above and below) Wilhelm Sasnal at Sadie Coles.

  (Above and below) August Sander's "Men without masks" at Hauser & Wirth included an extensive selection of rare large-scale photographs made between 1910 and 1931. The photographs were printed in a unique oversize format for inclusion in an exhibition at the Mannheimer Kunstverein in 1973.
  (Above) Group exhibition curated by Gianni Jetzer at Hauser & Wirth. 


  (Above and detail below) Rose Wiley's "Lolita's House"three-floor solo show at David Zwirner.

  (Above and below) 1960s vinyl sculptures by South Korean Seung-taek Lee at White Cube (Mayfair). Works have been recreated for the exhibition using urethane vinyl to achieve greater durability whilst retaining a similar visual quality.

  (Above and below) Abigail Reynolds mid-career survey at Peer.

  (Above) Visiting Ian White and Sadie Benning (photographed) at Camden Art Center with Antoni Hervàs.


  (Above and 2 below) Last day to see Magali Reus solo show at South London Gallery. 

   (Above and two below) Osías Yanov's "Orphan Dance" at Gasworks.

   (Above and below) Antoni Hervàs studio at Gasworks, his 3-month residency is supported by Acción Cultural Española (AC/E)
   (Above and 2 below) Joan Jonas exhibition at Tate Modern.

   (Above) View of Trafalgar Square with Michael Rakowitz's "The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist" featuring on the Fourth Plinth commission.


On the way to see Tacita Dean's-curated exhibition "STILL LIFE" at the National Gallery, a much-obliged stop in the room with Vermeer and Dutch still life. Jacob van Walscapelle (1644-1727) and Jan van Huysum (1682–1749) masters in flower painting.


(Above) English singer-songwriter, record producer and humanitarian Peter Gabriel during the internet interspecies symposium "The Shape of a Circle in the Mind of a Fish" curated by Lucia Pietroiusti and Filipa Ramos for the Serpentine Gallery at the London Zoo.

Not photographed but also visited: Chisenhale Gallery, Matt's Gallery, Spruth Magers, Blain Southern, Pilar Corrias, Frith Street Gallery (both locations), Hollybush Gardens, Josh Liley Gallery, Kate McGarry, Mother's Tankstation, Modern Art (unexpectedly closed when it should have been open!, and so was Project Native Informant – which had a broken lift so had to go up 3 flights of stairs). 

RELATED CONTENT:

Photo report: Trip to Berlin Gallery Weekend 2018 and Cologne

(Above) Detail from the K, inaugural show dedicated to exploring the work of East German designer and exhibition-maker Klaus Wittkugel. K, A Year with P. Krishnamurthy on Ebersstrasse 3 (Schöneberg) is a workshop for exhibition-making led by designer, curator, writer and educator Prem Krishnamurthy, co-director of the multidisciplinary design Wkshps, which extends his previous exhibition space and ‘mom-and-pop’ P! based in New York between 2012-2017. The project is organised in collaboration with KW Institute for Contemporary Art. All photos: Latitudes.

 (Above and below) Claudia Comte's ‘When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth’ at König Galerie's St Agnes, Berlin. 

 (Above) ‘ARTHUR JAFA: A SERIES OF UTTERLY IMPROBABLE, YET EXTRAORDINARY RENDITIONS’ at the Julia Stoschek Collection

(Above) Loris Gréaud at Max Hetzler.

 (Above and below) Lawrence Weiner and Manfred Pernice in the old/new venue of Konrad Fischer Galerie, Berlin. 

  (Above and below) Nevin Aladağ's ‘Mustrop’ exhibition at Wentrup, Berlin. 


(Above) Andro Wekua at Spruth Magers. The gallery concurrently presented exhibitions by Senga Nengudi and Kara Walker. 

 (Above and two below)  Ibrahim Mahama at DAAD Galerie, Berlin.


 (Above and below) Views of the exhibition ‘Neolithic Childhood. Art in a False Present, c. 1930’ at Haus der Kulturen der Welt.

 (Above and two below) View of ‘Hello World. Revising a Collection’ in the central nave Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin.

 (Above and below) One of the most interesting sections of the expansive Hello World. Revising a Collection’ exhibition, was ‘Colomental. The Violence of Intimate Histories’ curated by Sven Beckstette and Azu Nwagbogu. The curators commissioned four artists (Joël Andrianomearisoa, Peggy Buth, Astrid S. Klein and Dierk Schmidt) to produce work critically reflecting on the lack of contemporary art holdings of the National Galerie on the connections between African countries and Germany. Above Peggy Buth's work tracking the display and inventories in colonial museum revealing their historical narratives and representations. Below works by Joël Andrianomearisoa.
Very happy to finally be able to see this object in the flesh: "Nuage articulé" one of the most beautiful Surrealist objects firstly executed in 1937 with dry natural sponges by the German-Austrian-Mexican artist Wolfgang Paalen.
 (Above and below) Olivier Laric's ‘Year of the Dog’ at Tanya Leighton, included the European debut of his latest animation video ‘Betweenness’ (all 2018), alongside ‘Hundemensch’ a group of pigmented cast resin anthropomorphic sculptures.

 (Above and below) Becky Beasley's ‘Depressive Alcoholic Mother’ show at Galeria Plan B.

  (Above and below) AA Bronson + General Idea, 1968–2018, ‘Catch me if you can!’ exhibition at Esther Schipper.

  (Above and following two) Mariana Castillo Deball's ‘das Haut-Ich’ at Galerie Barbara Wien, taking the tonalpohualli calendar and the deity Xipe Totec as a starting point.

 (Above and below) Haegue Yang's installation ‘Silo of Silence – Clicked Core’ in the Boiler House space at KINDL - Centre for Contemporary Art in Berlin’s Neukölln district. 

Berlin skyline from KINDL's second floor.

 (Above and below) ‘Defying Gravity’ exhibition by Swiss artists Taiyo Onorato and Nico Krebs occupying the two floors of the Maschinenhaus (Power House) at KINDL - Centre for Contemporary Art, gathering photographs, 16mm films, sculptures and new installations from the past decade.

 4h train to Cologne. The 2017 edition of "KölnSkulptur #9" titled ‘La fin de Babylone’ added new works by Andrea Büttner, Claudia Comte, Jan Kiefer, Eduardo Navarro, Solange Pessoa, Lin May Saeed, Teresa Solar and Pedro Wirz to the existing collection; and was curated by Chus Martínez. Above and following seven photos.

 (Above and below) ‘Pumping Station’ (2017) by Teresa Solar.
  (Above) ‘The Nordic Cactuses’ (2017) by Claudia Comte.
  (Above) Michael Sailstorfer (helicopter) and Mark di Suvero.
  (Above) ‘Untitled’ (2017) by Solange Pessoa.
  (Above and below) ‘Schale’ (2017) by Andrea Büttner.
 (Above) ‘Pagliaccio non son’ (2011) by Jimmie Durham. 
(Above) ‘Garten’ (1997–1999) by Peter Fischli and David Weiss. 
(Above) Pathway into the park.
 (Above and below) View of ‘Games of Decentralized Life’ exhibition by Simon Denny at Galerie Buchholz, Cologne, around Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. 

 (Above and below) View of the exhibition ‘The Superman’ by Alex da Corte on view the at Kölnischer Kunstverein. 

(Above) Beautiful 1950s architecture of the Kölnischer Kunstverein. 

 (Above and following) View of Haegue Yang's mid-career retrospective ‘ETA 1994–2018’ at Museum Ludwig in Cologne. In this room ‘Series of Vulnerable Arrangements’ are displayed alongside ‘Seven Basel Lights’ and ‘Medicine Men’.

 (Above) ‘Mountains of Encounter’ and ‘Sol Lewitt Upside Down — K123456. Expanded 1078 Times. Doubled and Mirrored’.
(Above) Installation ‘5, Rue Saint-Benoît’.

  (Above) View of the first solo exhibition ‘ DAS – IST — DAS?’ in Germany by Ana Jotta at Temporary Gallery, Cologne. Curated by Regina Barunke and Miguel Wandschneider.



RELATED CONTENT



Cover Story–May 2018: "Shadowing Roman Ondák"

Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org

The May 2018 Monthly Cover Story "Shadowing Roman Ondák" is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org

This month we revisit Roman Ondák’s exhibition ‘Some Thing’ at The Common Guild, Glasgow, in 2013, during which Latitudes was invited to give a talk. Roman’s show comprised a series of composite works in display cases. Early still-life paintings and pencil drawings from his student days in Slovakia in the 1980s were coupled with the actual objects depicted – a chair, a length of rope, a helmet, a vase (a detail of "Shadow, 1981/2013" is the work above), and so on, which were placed in a deadpan way on top of them.

—> Continue reading
—> After May it will be archived here.

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.



RELATED CONTENT:



Max Andrews reviews Lúa Coderch; "Crash Test. The Molecular Turn" and Julia Spínola for frieze

Review ‘The Molecular Turn’: While Social Media Flourishes Ecological Systems are Collapsing. At La Panacée, Montpellier, Nicolas Bourriaud’s manifesto for a new movement and attempt to demarcate an artistic peer group." on frieze magazine.

Max Andrews, co-founder of Latitudes and contributing editor to frieze, has recently reviewed the group exhibition ‘Crash Test. The Molecular Turn’ (at La Panacée, Montpellier, until May 6, 2018) as well as Lúa Coderch's solo exhibition ‘The girl with no door on her mouth’ (àngels barcelona, on view until April 13, 2018) for friezeBoth texts are available online and are included in print in the April issue.

—> Video of Lúa Coderch presenting her work (Spanish with English subtitles).

Review "The Girl with No Door on Her Mouth: Lúa Coderch's Acts of Making Noise. The artist explores the politics of the female voice that speaks out or is shut up, at àngels barcelona, Spain." on frieze magazine.

A review on Julia Spínola's solo show "Lubricán" at the Centro de Arte 2 de Mayo (Móstoles, Madrid), has also just been published online and will also be included in the forthcoming May 2018 issue.

—> Video of Julia Spínola presenting the show (in Spanish).

Review "Julia Spínola: Twilight. At Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo, Móstoles, a crepuscular glow lends acute poignancy to simple forms and materials" on frieze magazine.


RELATED CONTENT:
  • Writing archive on Latitudes' website (since 2005);
  • "The Kørner problem” essay by Max Andrews in the monograph "John Kørner" published by Roulette Russe, 19 February 2018
  • Max Andrews essay on Christopher Knowles for NoguerasBlanchard at Liste 2017, 21 July 2017
  • Cover Story – January 2017: How open are open calls?, 4 January 2017
  • Cover Story – December 2016: Ten years ago – Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook, 5 December 2016
  • January 2016 Monthly Cover Story: Kasper Akhøj's Eileen Gray’s E.1027, 4 January 2016
  • Symposium participation, "The Shock of Victory", Glasgow, 25 September 2015
  • Review of the exhibition "What cannot be used is forgotten" in the May issue of frieze magazine, 29 April 2015
  • Review of Maria Thereza Alves' exhibition at CAAC Sevilla published in frieze magazine 9 March 2015

Cover Story—April 2018: Dates, 700 BC to the present: Michael Rakowitz

Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org


The April 2018 monthly Cover Story "Dates, 700 BC to the present: Michael Rakowitz" is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org

"As Michael Rakowitz’s fourth plinth commission is unveiled in London’s Trafalgar Square, this month’s cover story image revisits Return (2004-ongoing) a related project by the artist that also speaks about the turbulent history of Iraq. And dates. In London, Michael has deployed thousands of date syrup cans to make a 1:1 scale recreation of Lamassu, the fantastic winged bull that graced the gates of the city of Nineveh from 700 BC until it was destroyed by Isis in 2015."

—> Continue reading
—> After April it will be archived here.

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.

RELATED CONTENT:

  • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
  • Cover Story – March 2018: "Armenia's ghost galleries" 6 March 2018
  • Cover Story – February 2018: Paradise, promises and perplexities 5 February 2018
  • Cover Story – January 2018: I'll be there for you, 2 January 2018
  • Cover Story – December 2017: "Tabet's Tapline trajectory", 4 December 2017
  • Cover Story – November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
  • Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
  • Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
  • Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
  • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
  • Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
  • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
  • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017


    Mariana Cánepa Luna reviews ‘Allora & Calzadilla’ exhibition for art-agenda.com


    Allora & Calzadilla. ‘Stop, Repair, Prepare: Variations on Ode to Joy, No.3’ (2008). Modifyed Piano Bechstein © Photo: Roberto Ruiz © Fundació Antoni Tàpies, Barcelona, 2018. 

    Jennifer Allora and Guillermo Calzadilla’s “Allora & Calzadilla
    Fundació Antoni Tàpies, Barcelona
    February 6—May 20, 2018

    by Mariana Cánepa Luna


    "A piercing whistle punctuates the blaring of a trumpet. But in the columned central space of the Fundació Antoni Tàpies, the only visible instrument is a grand piano. For three days a week throughout the course of the exhibition, the instrument is played—and, one could say, worn—by a pianist who stands in a hole cut into its center. Leaning over the rim of the piano to strike the keys, the performer energetically interprets the fourth movement of Ludwig van Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 (1824), while slowly pushing the wheeled instrument around the space. The building has become a musical box, the exhibition orchestrated such that one movement flows into the other, spilling through the gallery’s spaces to create a dissonant soundscape."


    —> Continue reading...

    Originally published in art-agenda.com on March 19, 2018.



    Allora & Calzadilla. ‘Stop, Repair, Prepare: Variations on Ode to Joy, No.3’ (2008). Modifyed Piano Bechstein © Photo: Roberto Ruiz © Fundació Antoni Tàpies, Barcelona, 2018.

    Allora & Calzadilla. ‘Stop, Repair, Prepare: Variations on Ode to Joy, No.3’ (2008). Modifyed Piano Bechstein © Photo: Roberto Ruiz © Fundació Antoni Tàpies, Barcelona, 2018.

    Allora & Calzadilla. ‘Hope Hippo’ (2005). © Photo: Roberto Ruiz © Fundació Antoni Tàpies, Barcelona, 2018.

    Allora & Calzadilla. ‘Lifespan’ (2014) © Foto: Roberto Ruiz © Fundació Antoni Tàpies, Barcelona, 2018.

    Allora & Calzadilla, ‘Sweat Glands, Sweat Lands’ (2006). Video SD, color, sound. Duration: 2 minutes, 21 seconds. Courtesy Galerie Chantal Crousel. Photo: Roberto Ruiz. © Fundació Antoni Tàpies, 2018.

    Allora & Calzadilla, ‘A Man Screaming is Not a Dancing Bear’ (2008). 16 mm film, color, sound. Duration: 11 minutes, 15 seconds. Courtesy Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary (TBA21). Photo: Roberto Ruiz. © Fundació Antoni Tàpies. 

    Allora & Calzadilla, ‘Apotomē’ (2013). 16 mm film transferred to HD, colour, sound. Duration: 23 minutes, 9 seconds. Courtesy Galerie Chantal Crousel. Photo: Roberto Ruiz. © Fundació Antoni Tàpies, 2018. 

    RELATED CONTENT


    Cover Story – March 2018: Armenia's ghost galleries

    Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org 

    The March 2018 Monthly Cover Story ‘Armenia's ghost galleries’ is now up on www.lttds.org – after this month it will be archived here.

    Incidents (of Travel)’ – Latitudes collaboration with Kadist – returns with a dispatch from Yerevan, Armenia. The itinerary leads us on something of a ghost tour. Photographs and reportage unearth the fragmented memories of galleries and art spaces that no longer exist. This haunted dispatch is the fruit of two-years of meticulous shared inquiry by Armenian curator Marianna Hovhannisyan (currently based in San Diego) with Vardan Kilichyan, Gohar Hosyan, and Anaida Verdyan, alumni of the former Studio College of the National Center of Aesthetics in Yerevan. 


    —> Continue reading

    Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.


    RELATED CONTENT:
    • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
    • Cover Story – February 2018: Paradise, promises and perplexities 5 February 2018
    • Cover Story – January 2018: I'll be there for you, 2 January 2018
    • Cover Story – December 2017: "Tabet's Tapline trajectory", 4 December 2017
    • Cover Story – November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
    • Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
    • Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
    • Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
    • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
    • Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
    • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
    • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
    • Cover Story – March 2017: Time travel with Jordan Wolfson 1 March 2017

    Iratxe Jaio and Klaas van Gorkum's installation ‘Work in Progress’ in the process of being acquired by ARTIUM, Vitoria-Gasteiz


    Above and below: Installation views of "Work in progress" in the exhibition "The Margins of the Factory", ADN Platform, 25 January–30 April 2014. Video (14’ 22”), 739 polyurethane sculptures, and 47 moulds. Produced with support from the Eremuak program of the Basque Government and from Centrum Beeldende Kunst Rotterdam. Courtesy of the artists. Photos: Roberto Ruiz.






    We are very happy to know that Iratxe Jaio and Klaas van Gorkum's installation ‘Work in Progress’ (2013) is in the process of being acquired by ARTIUM, Centro Museo Vasco de Arte Contemporáneo in Vitoria-Gasteiz, Basque Country. The piece is on display as part of the exhibition ‘ARTres. El museo como deba ser’ (March 2–August 26, 2018).

    Work in Progress’ was one of the two works included in their solo exhibition "The Margins of the Factory" presented at ADN Platform in January 2014, and curated by Latitudes.






    Work in Progress’ immerses itself in the manufacturing industry of Markina-Xemein, the rural Basque village where Jaio comes from. A video documents the mass-production of rubber car parts, following the pieces from the assembly line in a worker-owned factory to subcontracted workshops where informal workers finish them by hand.

    Several of these workers are employed by the artists to cast hundreds of replicas of small modernist sculptures. These are displayed on mass-produced shelving to evoke the “Chalk Laboratory” of Basque sculptor Jorge Oteiza (1908–2003), a fierce critic of the commodification of art. 

     Exhibition leaflet. Pdf downloadable here.

    Latitudes previously collaborated with Jaio and van Gorkum in the exhibition cycle ‘Amikejo’ presented throughout 2011 in MUSAC, León, when they exhibited ‘Producing time between other things’ (2011), a work specially produced for the occasion, and also included in the above-mentioned show "The Margins of the Factory" in 2014.

    —> Photographs of the exhibition.
    —> Exhibition leaflet (pdf).
    —> Exhibition reviews.
    —> Video on ‘Producing time between other things’ (2011)



    RELATED CONTENT:

    Sixth episode of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Marianna Hovhannisyan and students from the National Center of Aesthetics from Yerevan, Armenia

    http://incidents.kadist.org/yerevan

    The sixth 'Incidents (of Travel)' episode narrates a walking itinerary in Yerevan, the capital of Armenia, documenting the transformed, disappeared, or permanently-closed art institutions in the city center

    The itinerary was conducted by curator Marianna Hovhannisyan with Vardan Kilichyan, Gohar Hosyan, and Anaida Verdyan — three art students from the National Center of Aesthetics, one of the oldest alternative art educational hubs in the city. 

    The inquiry was based on how knowledge transmission and generational exchanges in the Armenian contemporary art field could be approached—particularly in terms of exploring the fragmented histories of its institutional work.

    Each of the 15 photographs is augmented by one or more extra assets – a brief commentary or a caption –, accessed by clicking the words which overlay the images.



    Marianna Hovhannisyan (Yerevan/San Diego) is a research-based curator, a Ph.D student in Art History, Theory, and Criticism at Visual Arts Department, Univerisity of California San Diego. 

    Originally conceived by Latitudes as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City in 2012 (with five dispatches presented as part of an exhibition on Latitudes' curatorial practice at Casa del Lago) 'Incidents of Travel' had sequels in 2013 in Hong Kong (online dispatches published via twitter, instagram, and soundcloud) and San Francisco in 2015 (daily posts on Kadist's Instagram as part of their #ArtistNotInTheStudioCuratorNotAtTheOffice take over initiative).


    The project explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter and an extended conversation between curator/s and artist/s. Online storytelling presents and documents curatorial fieldwork and an offline day conceived by an artist for a curator.
    In 2016 Kadist and Latitudes partnered in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)' as part of Kadist Online Projects. This new phase is developed as an online periodical that publishes contributions from invited curators and artists working around the world.


    http://incidents.kadist.org/chicago

    A series of itineraries conceived by six curators, artists or researchers — previous fellows of the seminar The Place from Where We Look (Kadist Paris, June 2015) — launched in April 2016 with an itinerary by curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – a day photographed by Nabiha Khan


    http://incidents.kadist.org/jinja

    The second dispatch came from Jinja in Uganda, where curator Moses Serubiri invited photographer Mohsen Taha to explore Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972.


    http://incidents.kadist.org/suzhou

    The third episode took place while curator Yu Ji and poet Xiao Kaiyu hiked on Dong Shan (East Mountain), 130 km west of Shanghai, on a peninsula stretching into Tai Hu lake near the city of Suzhou, China
    http://incidents.kadist.org/lisbon

    The fourth dispatch came from Lisbon, where Galician curator Pedro de Llano visited key locations that marked the life and work of Luisa Cunha.
    http://incidents.kadist.org/terengganu

    The fifth episode took place in April 2016, when curator Simon Soon and artist chi too visited the Malaysian North Eastern state of Terengganu, where chi spent some time in 2013, surrounded by "men and women who work(ed) multiple jobs as a fishermen, house builders, boat builders, farmers, coconut pickers, food producers, and everything else that matters."  


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      "The Kørner problem” essay by Max Andrews in the monograph "John Kørner" published by Roulette Russe

      Exhibition poster of "Altid Mange Problemer" at Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen, Summer 2017. Photo: Latitudes.

      Last Summer, Max Andrews of Latitudes was invited to contribute an essay for the forthcoming monograph of John Kørner's work published by the Danish editorial Roulette Russe and designed by Spine Studio. The publication is out now and includes essays by Max, London-based writer Oliver Basciano, and a conversation between the artist and Marie Nipper, curator of John's recent mid-career exhibition in Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen. 

      The 280-page bilingual Danish/English monograph will be launched on March 2, 2018, at 4:30pm, in Kunsthal Charlottenborg's Apollo Kantine, though it will become available for online orders from February 26.

      (Above and following): Photos: Finn Wergel Dahlgren. Courtesy Roulotte Russe. 













      In his essay, Max tries to define what "The Kørner problem” (the title of the essay) might be:

      (...) "The apparently ‘wicked’ problems and appalling catastrophes that interpenetrate Kørner’s works are manifold. The upsurge in jihadist terrorist activity in Europe since 2015 and its fallout are unavoidable (whether vestiges of the Charlie Hebdo shootings and the Bataclan attacks in Paris, suicide bombings in Brussels and Manchester; or truck attacks in Nice, Berlin, Barcelona; rampaging attacks in London, and so on). The civil war and the rise of ISIL (ISIS, Daesh) in Syria and the exacerbating effects of climate change and mega-drought that affected the region are inescapable. The European debt and migrant crisis are here. Yet elsewhere Kørner also brings to mind what at first seem like unrelated problems: the 2011 Tōhoku tsunami and the calamity of the Fukushima nuclear power plant meltdown, human trafficking, et cetera, states of exception that seem to confirm that the problem is evermore radical, atrocious, ungrounded—more diffuse while remaining intractably real. American pop star Ariana Grande knows this as well as Kørner. Released in spring 2014, three years before the suicide bombing of her concert at Manchester Arena, her most successful single to date is titled “Problem”. We are witnessing new kinds of wicked problems and Kørner paints accordingly."


      In preparation for the catalogue essay, in July 2017 Latitudes visited Kørner's impressive "Altid Mange Problemer" mid-career exhibition at Kunsthal Charlottenborg, the largest exhibition of his works to date, gathering paintings and sculptural pieces from 2004 to the present.

      (Above and following): Photos by Latitudes.


      Max has previously written on John's work for the catalogue of his 2006 exhibition "Problems" at Victoria Miro Gallery in London.

      Latitudes' first visit to Copenhagen also involved Kørner's work, as we visited his solo show 'ARoS Bank' at the ARoS Århus Kunstmuseum, Denmark (13 June–10 September 2006), which became the subject of our first blog post over a decade ago, in September 2006 (!).

      RELATED CONTENT:
      • Latitudes' writing archive
      • Latitudes' "out of office" 2016–2017 season 1 August 2017
      • Max Andrews essay on Christopher Knowles for NoguerasBlanchard at Liste 2017 21 July 2017
      • Mariana Cánepa Luna reviews Ana Jotta’s “Abans que me n’oblidi (Before I forget)” exhibition in art-agenda 11 November 2016
      • '2006 Problems' exhibition and publication by John Kørner, Victoria Miro Gallery, London 29 November 2006
      • Copenhagen trip. 'Woman with 24 problems' by John Kørner 30 September 2006

      Founded in 2005 by Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna, Latitudes is a curatorial office based in Barcelona, Spain, that works internationally across contemporary art practices.

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      Latitudes
      2005—2019