Longitudes

Report: Trip to London and Oxford in pictures


 (Above and four below) Cinthia Marcelle's "The Family in Disorder" (2018) at Museum and Modern Art Oxford.


(Above and below) The magnificent main hall of the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford.

 An example of Micronesian currency – we're reminded of our extended conversation with Melbourne-based artist Nicholas Mangan published in his 2016 Sternberg Press publication "Limits to growth" (and also during Chisenhale's live conversation and while chasing Ancient Lights).


(Above and below) These column capitals are the main reasons we visited Oxford. They were carved for the Oxford Museum of Natural History in 1859-60 by Irish brothers James and John O'Shea, along with their nephew Edward Whelan. Commissioned by John Ruskin, all the works were carved freestyle, without previous sketches, using only plant specimens from the botanical garden, and their sheer imagination, as references.

They are the protagonists of Sean Lynch's 2013 piece "A Blow by Blow Account of Stonecarving in Oxford", which we have been discussing with Sean for a while and finally saw in 2015 in Bordeaux. We continued learning more about this piece and its making during our joint adventure in Banff's "Geologic Time" residency programme last Fall. 


 (Above) Apostolos Georgiou, "FROM MY HEART" at Rodeo Gallery.

 (Above and 3 below) Leonor Antunes's "a thousand realities from an original mark" at Marian Goodman.
 Polycarbonate and brass screens and rope sculptures. Each screen corresponds to the exact measurements of one of the glass panels in the Upper Lawn Pavilion in Wiltshire, built between 1959 and 1962 by the British architects Alison and Peter Smithson (1928-1993 and 1923-2003).


(Above) Tacita Dean's "Landscape" exhibition premiered "Antigone", a new 1-hour long film and cloud paintings at The Royal Academy. Part 2 and 3 in the National Portrait Gallery (a retrospective of portrait films works) and at the National Gallery a two-room exhibition curated by the artist presents a selection of historical and contemporary still lives. 

 Fantastic assembly of square-format paintings by Markus Lüperz at Michael Werner Gallery, which the artist painted at age 24 using distemper on canvas.

 (Above and below) Batia Suter's work at The Photographers' Gallery. One of the nominees for the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2018.

(Above) The 2018 awardee was Luke Willis Thompson with his striking film "Autoportrait" (also nominated for this year's Turner Prize).

 Nicolas Lamas (above and immediately below) and Petra Feriancová (two following) two-person show "Becoming animal" at Tenderpixel
(Above) "Pregnant Landscape" by Phoebe Unwin at Amanda Wilkinson Gallery in SoHo.

 (Above and below) Wilhelm Sasnal at Sadie Coles.

  (Above and below) August Sander's "Men without masks" at Hauser & Wirth included an extensive selection of rare large-scale photographs made between 1910 and 1931. The photographs were printed in a unique oversize format for inclusion in an exhibition at the Mannheimer Kunstverein in 1973.
  (Above) Group exhibition curated by Gianni Jetzer at Hauser & Wirth. 


  (Above and detail below) Rose Wiley's "Lolita's House"three-floor solo show at David Zwirner.

  (Above and below) 1960s vinyl sculptures by South Korean Seung-taek Lee at White Cube (Mayfair). Works have been recreated for the exhibition using urethane vinyl to achieve greater durability whilst retaining a similar visual quality.

  (Above and below) Abigail Reynolds mid-career survey at Peer.

  (Above) Visiting Ian White and Sadie Benning (photographed) at Camden Art Center with Antoni Hervàs.


  (Above and 2 below) Last day to see Magali Reus solo show at South London Gallery. 

   (Above and two below) Osías Yanov's "Orphan Dance" at Gasworks.

   (Above and below) Antoni Hervàs studio at Gasworks, his 3-month residency is supported by Acción Cultural Española (AC/E)
   (Above and 2 below) Joan Jonas exhibition at Tate Modern.

   (Above) View of Trafalgar Square with Michael Rakowitz's "The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist" featuring on the Fourth Plinth commission.


On the way to see Tacita Dean's-curated exhibition "STILL LIFE" at the National Gallery, a much-obliged stop in the room with Vermeer and Dutch still life. Jacob van Walscapelle (1644-1727) and Jan van Huysum (1682–1749) masters in flower painting.


(Above) English singer-songwriter, record producer and humanitarian Peter Gabriel during the internet interspecies symposium "The Shape of a Circle in the Mind of a Fish" curated by Lucia Pietroiusti and Filipa Ramos for the Serpentine Gallery at the London Zoo.

Not photographed but also visited: Chisenhale Gallery, Matt's Gallery, Spruth Magers, Blain Southern, Pilar Corrias, Frith Street Gallery (both locations), Hollybush Gardens, Josh Liley Gallery, Kate McGarry, Mother's Tankstation, Modern Art (unexpectedly closed when it should have been open!, and so was Project Native Informant – which had a broken lift so had to go up 3 flights of stairs). 

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Photo report: Trip to Berlin Gallery Weekend 2018 and Cologne

(Above) Detail from the K, inaugural show dedicated to exploring the work of East German designer and exhibition-maker Klaus Wittkugel. K, A Year with P. Krishnamurthy on Ebersstrasse 3 (Schöneberg) is a workshop for exhibition-making led by designer, curator, writer and educator Prem Krishnamurthy, co-director of the multidisciplinary design Wkshps, which extends his previous exhibition space and ‘mom-and-pop’ P! based in New York between 2012-2017. The project is organised in collaboration with KW Institute for Contemporary Art. All photos: Latitudes.

 (Above and below) Claudia Comte's ‘When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth’ at König Galerie's St Agnes, Berlin. 

 (Above) ‘ARTHUR JAFA: A SERIES OF UTTERLY IMPROBABLE, YET EXTRAORDINARY RENDITIONS’ at the Julia Stoschek Collection

(Above) Loris Gréaud at Max Hetzler.

 (Above and below) Lawrence Weiner and Manfred Pernice in the old/new venue of Konrad Fischer Galerie, Berlin. 

  (Above and below) Nevin Aladağ's ‘Mustrop’ exhibition at Wentrup, Berlin. 


(Above) Andro Wekua at Spruth Magers. The gallery concurrently presented exhibitions by Senga Nengudi and Kara Walker. 

 (Above and two below)  Ibrahim Mahama at DAAD Galerie, Berlin.


 (Above and below) Views of the exhibition ‘Neolithic Childhood. Art in a False Present, c. 1930’ at Haus der Kulturen der Welt.

 (Above and two below) View of ‘Hello World. Revising a Collection’ in the central nave Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin.

 (Above and below) One of the most interesting sections of the expansive Hello World. Revising a Collection’ exhibition, was ‘Colomental. The Violence of Intimate Histories’ curated by Sven Beckstette and Azu Nwagbogu. The curators commissioned four artists (Joël Andrianomearisoa, Peggy Buth, Astrid S. Klein and Dierk Schmidt) to produce work critically reflecting on the lack of contemporary art holdings of the National Galerie on the connections between African countries and Germany. Above Peggy Buth's work tracking the display and inventories in colonial museum revealing their historical narratives and representations. Below works by Joël Andrianomearisoa.
Very happy to finally be able to see this object in the flesh: "Nuage articulé" one of the most beautiful Surrealist objects firstly executed in 1937 with dry natural sponges by the German-Austrian-Mexican artist Wolfgang Paalen.
 (Above and below) Olivier Laric's ‘Year of the Dog’ at Tanya Leighton, included the European debut of his latest animation video ‘Betweenness’ (all 2018), alongside ‘Hundemensch’ a group of pigmented cast resin anthropomorphic sculptures.

 (Above and below) Becky Beasley's ‘Depressive Alcoholic Mother’ show at Galeria Plan B.

  (Above and below) AA Bronson + General Idea, 1968–2018, ‘Catch me if you can!’ exhibition at Esther Schipper.

  (Above and following two) Mariana Castillo Deball's ‘das Haut-Ich’ at Galerie Barbara Wien, taking the tonalpohualli calendar and the deity Xipe Totec as a starting point.

 (Above and below) Haegue Yang's installation ‘Silo of Silence – Clicked Core’ in the Boiler House space at KINDL - Centre for Contemporary Art in Berlin’s Neukölln district. 

Berlin skyline from KINDL's second floor.

 (Above and below) ‘Defying Gravity’ exhibition by Swiss artists Taiyo Onorato and Nico Krebs occupying the two floors of the Maschinenhaus (Power House) at KINDL - Centre for Contemporary Art, gathering photographs, 16mm films, sculptures and new installations from the past decade.

 4h train to Cologne. The 2017 edition of "KölnSkulptur #9" titled ‘La fin de Babylone’ added new works by Andrea Büttner, Claudia Comte, Jan Kiefer, Eduardo Navarro, Solange Pessoa, Lin May Saeed, Teresa Solar and Pedro Wirz to the existing collection; and was curated by Chus Martínez. Above and following seven photos.

 (Above and below) ‘Pumping Station’ (2017) by Teresa Solar.
  (Above) ‘The Nordic Cactuses’ (2017) by Claudia Comte.
  (Above) Michael Sailstorfer (helicopter) and Mark di Suvero.
  (Above) ‘Untitled’ (2017) by Solange Pessoa.
  (Above and below) ‘Schale’ (2017) by Andrea Büttner.
 (Above) ‘Pagliaccio non son’ (2011) by Jimmie Durham. 
(Above) ‘Garten’ (1997–1999) by Peter Fischli and David Weiss. 
(Above) Pathway into the park.
 (Above and below) View of ‘Games of Decentralized Life’ exhibition by Simon Denny at Galerie Buchholz, Cologne, around Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. 

 (Above and below) View of the exhibition ‘The Superman’ by Alex da Corte on view the at Kölnischer Kunstverein. 

(Above) Beautiful 1950s architecture of the Kölnischer Kunstverein. 

 (Above and following) View of Haegue Yang's mid-career retrospective ‘ETA 1994–2018’ at Museum Ludwig in Cologne. In this room ‘Series of Vulnerable Arrangements’ are displayed alongside ‘Seven Basel Lights’ and ‘Medicine Men’.

 (Above) ‘Mountains of Encounter’ and ‘Sol Lewitt Upside Down — K123456. Expanded 1078 Times. Doubled and Mirrored’.
(Above) Installation ‘5, Rue Saint-Benoît’.

  (Above) View of the first solo exhibition ‘ DAS – IST — DAS?’ in Germany by Ana Jotta at Temporary Gallery, Cologne. Curated by Regina Barunke and Miguel Wandschneider.



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Cover Story–May 2018: "Shadowing Roman Ondák"

Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org

The May 2018 Monthly Cover Story "Shadowing Roman Ondák" is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org

This month we revisit Roman Ondák’s exhibition ‘Some Thing’ at The Common Guild, Glasgow, in 2013, during which Latitudes was invited to give a talk. Roman’s show comprised a series of composite works in display cases. Early still-life paintings and pencil drawings from his student days in Slovakia in the 1980s were coupled with the actual objects depicted – a chair, a length of rope, a helmet, a vase (a detail of "Shadow, 1981/2013" is the work above), and so on, which were placed in a deadpan way on top of them.

—> Continue reading
—> After May it will be archived here.

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.



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Longitudes cuts across Latitudes’s projects and research with news, updates, and reportage.

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Founded in 2005 by Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna, Latitudes is a curatorial office based in Barcelona, Spain, that works internationally across contemporary art practices.

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2005—2020