Participants in the symposium "You're such a curator!" at de Appel Arts Centre, Amsterdam, 23–24 November 2016 and Amsterdam Art Weekend

 Above: de Appel director Niels van Tomme during his welcome speech.  
This and following photos: Carina Erdmann/De Appel.

Latitudes participated in de Appel Arts Centre two-day symposium "You are such a curator!" on 23 and 24 November 2016. Coinciding with the Amsterdam Art Weekend, the event presented lectures, discussions, performances and papers marking the conclusion of a three-year research project into the dynamics of de Appel’s curatorial programme and its position in the wider field of curatorial education.

Latitudes' presention "Following the Holy Greyhound" reflected "on the disinterment of a sculpture from 1991 – part of an exhibition by the Venezuelan artist José Antonio Hernández-Díez curated by Latitudes at MACBA, Barcelona, earlier this year – and their approach to a group exhibition in preparation for CAPC Musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux in 2017. Their point of departure was responding to the question "what does the wrongful killing of a dog in medieval France have to tell us about the micro and the macro, the hyper-specific and the universal?"  

Above: Chris Sharp during his presentation 'The Willfully Minor Anomaly of Lulu'. 
Below: Q+A session.
 
Above: Presentation by Aneta Rostkowska and Jakub Woynarowski.  
Below: Latitudes' presentation "Following the Holy Greyhound".
 
Above: galerie founders Adriano Wilfert Jensen and Simon Asencio during their presentation. 
Below: Attentive (femenine!) audience. 

Above: (Intensive) Q+A amongst speakers and audience. 
Below: Renata Cervetto during her presentation '(Art) Mediation Projects. In & Out The Museum'.

Above: Kim Nguyen during her presentation 'That's Why We Love the Moon'. 
Below: Niels van Tomme during one of the many Q+A's.

Above: Prem Krishnamurthy during a Q+A.

The two-day symposium included contributions by Mira Asriningtyas, Lucrezia Calabrò Visconti, Renata Cervetto, Mateo Chacon-Pino, Galerie (Adriano Wilfert Jensen and Simon Asencio), Natasha Hoare, Kati Ilves, Prem Krishnamurthy, Inga Lace, Latitudes (Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna), Shona Mei Findlay, Fadwa Naamna, Kim Nguyen, Emma Ines Panza, Aneta Rostkowska and Kuba Woynarowski, Chris Sharp, Niels Van Tomme and Huib Haye van der Werf.
  
We also visited a few exhibitions and attended a few events  programmed for the Art Amsterdam Weekend (24–27 November). One of the highlights was Marinus Boezem's exhibition at Oude Kerk's grand Gothic architecture, one of its finest and oldest examples in Holland. Boezem's pieces resonated with the Gothic style of the church, an architecture that has fascinated him throughout this artistic practice – he has produced several pieces using plans of cathedrals, his most famous one being "Gothic Growing Project" (1978–1987), popularly known as "The Green Cathedral" in a polder landscape near Almere, composed of 178 Italian poplars.
 
"Progetto Spaziale" (1970/2016) video works, and "Meteorieten" (2016) on the floor.

(above) "Windschaal" (Wind Scale) (1968) projected in the Holy Sepulchre chapel.
Majestic "Labyrinth" (2016) piece above and below.
(above) "New Improvisation with Bart de Kroon", one of the five performances Jeremiah Day presented at Ellen de Bruijne Projects.

And of course Friday is the big day at the Rijksakademie OPEN 2016, where we found interesting presentations by Argentinian performance artist Mercedes Azpilicueta; the Argentinian-Dutch Aimée Zito Lema; the abstracted images of Claudia Martínez Garay (below); the sculptural and archival material of British artist Alex Farrar around his suit; the glass work of German artist Christine Moldrickx; the drawings, paintings and small sculptures of Dutch artist Eva Spierenburg; the sculptural works by the also Dutch artist Marije Gertenbach and the large video work "Band Rumorose" by French artist Pauline Curnier Jardin on the Sicilian festivity devoted to San Sebastiano.


Abstracted images by Claudia Martínez Garay

(Above and below) Installation on the ground floor by Eva Spierenburg.

Sculptural and archival material by British artist Alex Farrar around his suit.

More work by Eva Spierenburg was presented in a more intimate presentation on the second floor.

 Glass piece by German artist Christine Moldrickx (above and below). 

The beautiful retrospective "Machine Spectacle" by Swiss artist Jean Tinguely was cleverly paired with Jordan Wolfson's "Manic / Love" – part 1 of his first solo show in a Dutch institution. The show premieres his newest animatronic in Europe: "Colored sculpture" (2016) and is accompanied by three other works only: the video "Raspberry poser" (2012), a series of large inkjet prints and "The Crisis" (2004), one of his earliest video works. In February a second part (Truth / Love) will follow with his first animatronic (Female Figure, 2014) and a new videoinstallation.

(Above) Two of the rooms presenting works by Jean Tinguely at Stedelijk Museum.

Jordan Wolfson's "Colored Sculpture" (2016).

San Serriffe art book shop in the red light district.

kunstverein new location in Hazenstraat 28, presented "Staples", 20 years of work by typographic artist Will Holder.

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