Latitudes / Johann König Gallery, Berlin / Tue Greenfort
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In April 2005 Irish artist Katie Holten and Tue Greenfort were invited to develop proposals. Between 24–27 October 2005 Latitudes organised a first series of site visits around London, which included visits to the blustery 34th floor ‘living roof’ of a corporate tower in Canary Wharf, roamed the desolate Greenwich Peninsula awaiting a 25-year-long regeneration project that will include flagship sustainable housing), visited an industrial recycling depot in Charlton, met up with an organisation advocating tree planting in Kennington, saw several city farms and joined an alternative tour organised by PLATFORM based around the psychogeography of oil.

In November 2005 both artists went on a two-week research trip to Accra, Ghana, together with Dillon Cohen, Mark Nash and the RSA's Michaela Crimmin, where they attended the 'II International Conference on Sub-Saharan Coastal Erosion'.

Between 11–17 May 2006 Latitudes continued site visits in London with Greenfort, and visited the new Idea Stores in the East End, learned about plans to unify London’s 16 waste authorities, spoke to Transport For London about the city’s traffic initiatives, street lighting and the congestion charge, and joined a visit to the Wetlands Centre in Barnes, where Jeremy Deller was developing a house for bats, also in conjunction with the RSA.

Greenfort had a 3-month residency during the Autumn in 2006, a first prototype for his London project was presented in the group exhibition 'Greenwashing. Environment: Perils, Promises and Perplexities' in Turin.

Greenfort's commission was finally presented in London coinciding with his participation in the 2008 edition of Frieze Art Fair projects (16–19 October) where his sculpture was sited outside the exit ramp of the fair in Regent’s Park.

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