Courtesy: Nino Kvrivishvili. Photo: Guram Kapanadze

↓   COVER STORY — JULY 2020   ↓

Nino Kvrivishvili’s silk roads: Incidents (of Travel), Tbilisi

Cover Story, July 2020

Join curator Tara McDowell and artist Nino Kvrivishvili in the latest episode of Incidents (of Travel), from Tbilisi, Georgia. A spring itinerary through the city’s former silk industry and the heart of Nino’s practice, the tour took place via a screen in Australia as Georgia emerged from lockdown. The State Silk Museum, founded in 1887 by the biologist Nikolay Shavrov, was once part of a vast complex known as the Caucasian Sericulture Station. In 2016 Nino made an exhibition here among its display cases and its extraordinary collection of exquisite things: a wall of thousands of cocoons, decorated boxes made for silkworms as they journeyed along the Silk Road. She incorporated found and gifted Soviet-era silks, repositories of a deep knowledge now lost, like this polka-dot fabric work, titled Memory. The germ theory of disease arose from studying silkworms in the 19th century: somehow Tara and Nino stumble on a prehistory of the coronavirus, and the world is infinitely interconnected.
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Courtesy: Nino Kvrivishvili. Photo: Guram Kapanadze
  • COVER STORY – JULY 2020

    Nino Kvrivishvili’s silk roads: Incidents (of Travel), Tbilisi

    Cover Story, July 2020

    Join curator Tara McDowell and artist Nino Kvrivishvili in the latest episode of Incidents (of Travel), from Tbilisi, Georgia. A spring itinerary through the city’s former silk industry and the heart of Nino’s practice, the tour took place via a screen in Australia as Georgia emerged from lockdown. The State Silk Museum, founded in 1887 by the biologist Nikolay Shavrov, was once part of a vast complex known as the Caucasian Sericulture Station. In 2016 Nino made an exhibition here among its display cases and its extraordinary collection of exquisite things: a wall of thousands of cocoons, decorated boxes made for silkworms as they journeyed along the Silk Road. She incorporated found and gifted Soviet-era silks, repositories of a deep knowledge now lost, like this polka-dot fabric work, titled Memory. The germ theory of disease arose from studying silkworms in the 19th century: somehow Tara and Nino stumble on a prehistory of the coronavirus, and the world is infinitely interconnected.
    Cover Story Archive

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