Photo: Lysiane Gauthier

↓   COVER STORY, JUNE 2024: TERENCE GOWER: DIPLOMACY, URBANISM, URANIUM   ↓

Terence Gower—Diplomacy, Urbanism, Uranium
Cover Story, June 2024
Last month, The Power Plant in Toronto opened Terence Gower’s “Embassy”, an exhibition showcasing over a decade of work exploring the diplomatic architecture of American embassy buildings in Baghdad, Havana, and Saigon, as well as an unbuilt project for Ottawa.

In 2012, Terence was one of five artists to participate in the inaugural iteration of Latitudes’ guided-tour project, “Incidents of Travel”, in Mexico City. His project, “Urban Models (Zacatenco to Tlalnepantla)”, visited several sites of universalist urbanism in the northern parts of the city, including the 1963 campus of the Instituto Politécnico Nacional and a low-density suburban-style housing development.

As featured in this month’s Cover Story, in 2017, Terence exhibited his project “Public Spirit” (2008) in the Latitudes-curated exhibition “4.543 billion. The matter of matter” at CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux. This installation, consisting of two display cases with facsimiles and documents, and a fictional promotional video titled “Wilderness Utopia”, is now part of the National Gallery of Canada’s collection, along with two aluminium sculptures. “Public Spirit” narrates the story of the interplay between uranium and urbanism, money, and modern art in 1950s Canada. Latvian-born mineral prospector Joseph H. Hirshhorn used his uranium mining fortune to amass one of the world’s largest private art collections, which later became the foundation of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, established in 1974 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Long before the Washington museum was founded, Hirshhorn envisioned a utopian community in Ontario that would integrate a permanent home for his art collection with his new uranium mine, its offices, and worker housing. In 1955, Hirshhorn hired the architect Philip Johnson to develop plans, but the project never materialised.

Embassy”, curated by Adelina Vlas and Frances Loeffler, is on show at The Power Plant until 11 August 2024.
Archivo de portadas
Photo: Lysiane Gauthier
  • COVER STORY, JUNE 2024
    Terence Gower—Diplomacy, Urbanism, Uranium
    Cover Story, June 2024
    Last month, The Power Plant in Toronto opened Terence Gower’s “Embassy”, an exhibition showcasing over a decade of work exploring the diplomatic architecture of American embassy buildings in Baghdad, Havana, and Saigon, as well as an unbuilt project for Ottawa.

    In 2012, Terence was one of five artists to participate in the inaugural iteration of Latitudes’ guided-tour project, “Incidents of Travel”, in Mexico City. His project, “Urban Models (Zacatenco to Tlalnepantla)”, visited several sites of universalist urbanism in the northern parts of the city, including the 1963 campus of the Instituto Politécnico Nacional and a low-density suburban-style housing development.

    As featured in this month’s Cover Story, in 2017, Terence exhibited his project “Public Spirit” (2008) in the Latitudes-curated exhibition “4.543 billion. The matter of matter” at CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux. This installation, consisting of two display cases with facsimiles and documents, and a fictional promotional video titled “Wilderness Utopia”, is now part of the National Gallery of Canada’s collection, along with two aluminium sculptures. “Public Spirit” narrates the story of the interplay between uranium and urbanism, money, and modern art in 1950s Canada. Latvian-born mineral prospector Joseph H. Hirshhorn used his uranium mining fortune to amass one of the world’s largest private art collections, which later became the foundation of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, established in 1974 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Long before the Washington museum was founded, Hirshhorn envisioned a utopian community in Ontario that would integrate a permanent home for his art collection with his new uranium mine, its offices, and worker housing. In 1955, Hirshhorn hired the architect Philip Johnson to develop plans, but the project never materialised.

    Embassy”, curated by Adelina Vlas and Frances Loeffler, is on show at The Power Plant until 11 August 2024.
    Archivo de portadas

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