Longitudes

Residency at the Kadist Art Foundation, San Francisco, 26 August–9 September 2015

 Kadist Art Foundation, San Francisco, 2014 (exterior view). Photo: Arash Fayez, Courtesy Kadist Art Foundation.

Between 26 August–9 September 2015 Latitudes will be in residency at Kadist Art Foundation in San Francisco. During this time, and following its two previous iterations in Mexico City (Casa del Lago, 2012) and Hong Kong (Spring Workshop, 2013), Latitudes will do a new iteration of 'Incidents of Travel'exploring San Francisco. Three specially-commissioned tours by artists Amy Balkin, the artist collective Will Brown (a collaborative project of David Kasprzak, Jordan Stein, and Lindsey White) and outsider librarians Megan and Rick Prelinger as expanded studio visits will focus on the Bay Area and link to Latitudes's current research around the carbon cycle

You can follow the tours via Kadist's Instagram as part of the 'Artist not at the Studio, Curator not at the Office' Latitudes' takeover, and as a series of posts that will be published on this channel.
 

In the afternoon of August 29, Latitudes will co-host a 'Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group', a workshop which extends the seminar recently developed in May for the International Curatorial Retreat in Bari, Italy. 

The 'Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group' is a forum for informal dialogue about megatrends and the future of contemporary art institutions

In the same way that the Internet has untethered television from fixed schedules and newspapers from print deadlines, the first meeting broadly addressed to what degree the organizational forms of art institutions are embracing or resisting similar transformations through various curatorial/editorial prototypes and prognosticative use-case scenarios.

Convened by the Barcelona-based curatorial office Latitudes together with
Kadist Art Foundation, this second meeting will bring together individuals and expertise in the Bay Area with an active interest in institutional prototyping and emergent usership. With an emphasis on cross-pollination between design thinking and curatorial thinking, the meeting will discuss, among other things, the notion of the post-disciplinary, and the question of appropriate speeds or periodicities of institutions.

In order to be conducive to freedom of interaction, the meeting is held under the Chatham House Rule. This allows participants to express personal views, to listen, reflect and gather insights with a clear distinction from the position of their employers and/or the policies of any associated organization. Participation is expected, but there will be no resolutions issued, no votes undertaken, and no policy statements proposed.



Sharjah Biennial 8 (2007) part 2 publication with transcripts of the 3-day conference organised by Latitudes and the RSA, London



Above images of the recently published catalogue of the Sharjah Biennial 8, United Arab Emirates [25º 22’N, 55º 24’E] titled 'Still Life: Art, Ecology and the Politics of Change (Part II)' which includes installation shots of the exhibition as well as transcripts of the 3-day conference Latitudes organised in collaboration with the Royal Society of Art's Arts & Ecology programme (today the RSA Arts and Ecology Centre) back in April 2007 (+ info).

The symposium
(images here) considered today’s uses and abuses of the ‘eco-’, notions of artistic agency and critical practice, as well as the role of the public realm in today’s artistic and institutional practices. How has it become fashionable (or profitable) to be seen to be eco? How has what we mean by ecology been transformed and evolved through the uses of terms such as ‘environmental’, ‘green’, ‘ethical living’, and so on?; How do some artists desire palliative results, while others offer strategies of friction or resistance? How far are the sources of materials a consideration for artists, designers and architects? And how does this relate to wider questions of resources—water, energy, oil in the Emirate and beyond?

The symposium included focused presentations by keynote speakers such as Bruce Sterling (read his paper here), critical panels with participating artists Sergio Vega or Peter Fend as well as Van Abbemuseum director Charles Esche, or Smart Museum's
Curator of Contemporary Art Stephanie Smith as well as breakout seminars with participating artists Tomás Saraceno and Michael Rakowitz.

You can download the symposium programme, exhibition guide and view press-related materials in this archive.


'Sharjah Biennial 8. Still Life: Art, Ecology and the Politics of Change (Part II)'
568 pages, 233 x 165 mm, softcover 350g. Art Matt Card

Paper: 80g. offset wood free and 135 g. Art Matt

Publisher: Sharjah Biennial,
www.sharjahbiennial.org
ISBN 978-9948-04-328-6 Part II

Bruce Sterling's Sharjah Biennial keynote

We have uploaded Bruce Sterling's keynote paper 'Ecology and the Politics of Change' presented in the Sharjah Biennial 8 symposium on 5 April. You can download the document on the SB8 archive (pdf, 404 KB).

Author, futurist and critic Bruce Sterling (b. 1954) is based in Austin, Texas and Serbia. Best known for his eight science fiction novels, he has also written short stories, book reviews, design criticism, opinion columns, and introductions for books ranging from Ernst Juenger to Jules Verne. His non-fiction works include 'The Hacker Crackdown: Law and Disorder on the Electronic Frontier' (1992), 'Tomorrow Now: Envisioning the Next 50 Years' (2003) and 'Shaping Things' (2005). He is a contributing editor of WIRED magazine. He also writes a weblog and runs a website and Internet mailing list on the topic of environmental activism and postindustrial design. In 2005, he was the Visionary in Residence at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena. He has appeared on ABC’s Nightline, BBC’s The Late Show, CBC’s Morningside, on MTV and TechTV, and in publications including Time, Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Fortune, Nature, I.D., Metropolis, Technology Review, Der Spiegel and La Repubblica.


Qui. Enter Atlas – International Symposium of Young Curators



Latitudes presented a paper entitled
MyLife/SecondSpace: A “Web 2.0” paradigm for artistic and curatorial practice? at 'Qui. Enter Atlas – International Symposium of Young Curators' under the theme 'Art in the Landscape of the Media' coordinated by artist Dara Birnbaum 3–5 June 07 GAMeC, Bergamo.
Since as recently as 2005, there has been an unprecedented surge of entrepreneurship and innovation – fuelled by vast speculative venture capital investments largely in Silicon Valley – concerning so-called Web 2.0 applications. We’ve all heard of, and probably use, facilities such as YouTube, eBay, Wikipedia, del.icio.us, Skype, MySpace, flickr, Facebook, Second Life and so on – but what are some of their common attributes? How might they be reflected in artistic practice, curatorial practice – and the art industry? Sidestepping Nicolas Bourriaud’s Relational Aesthetics (1998 – a long time ago in the wide world of the web) we looked at projects such as Allora and Calzadilla’s Radio Re-volt (2004); Rirkrit Tiravanija’s Untitled (the air between the chain-link fence and the broken bicycle wheel) (2005); the exhibition Spinning the Web – the eBay Connection; and CAC TV, the initiative of the Centre for Contemporary Art in Vilnius, through the behavioural and terminological tropes of web 2.0. As a conclusion, we addressed the technosocial definition of objects and users developed by Bruce Sterling in his book Shaping Things (2005).
The invited curators were: Binna Choi, Sebastian Cichocki, Tom Morton, Nina Zimmer, Sarah Carrington, Ovul Durmusoglu, Manuela Moscoso, Huib Haye Van Der Werf, Cecilia Alemani, Craig Buckley, Ana Vejzovic Sharp, Elena Filipovic, Nav Haq, Latitudes
Jury for the Lorenzo Bonaldi – Enter Prize: Giacinto Di Pietrantonio, Dan Cameron and Ralph Rugoff.

Founded in 2005 by Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna, Latitudes is a curatorial office based in Barcelona, Spain, that works internationally across contemporary art practices.

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2005—2019