Longitudes

15 November 2017, 4:30–8pm: 'The Return of the Earth. Ecologising art history in the Anthropocene' study day at the CAPC musée, Bordeaux

Xavier Ribas, detail of diptych num 7 'Caliche Fields' (2010), 22 Pigment prints on Harman Baryta paper 33 x 50 cm. Courtesy the artist and ProjecteSD, Barcelona.

'The Return of the Earth. Ecologising art history in the Anthropocene'
Study day
Wednesday, 15 November 2017  
4:30—8:00pm
Auditorium
CAPC musée d’art contemporain Bordeaux 
7, rue Ferrère, 33000 Bordeaux, France 


PROGRAMME

4:30—5:30 pm

Keynote by science historian Jean-Baptiste Fressoz (Paris) 
5:30—5:45 pm
Break
5:45—6:45
pm
Conversation between artists Xavier Ribas (London) and Ângela Ferreira (Lisbon)
6:45—7:45
pm
Roundtable discussion moderated by Latitudes (Barcelona)


Free event. Simultaneous translation French/English. 

Conference programmed in the context of the exhibition '4.543 billion. The matter of matter', CAPC musée d’art contemporain Bordeaux, 29 June 2017–7 January 2018. Curated by Latitudes.



The work of many of the artists in the exhibition '4.543 billion. The matter of matter' explores the shared history of human activities and Earth systems. Yet this comes with a critical and political inflexion of the universalizing notion of the Anthropocene, the proposed geological ‘epoch of humanity’ that would cast all of the mankind as being responsible for the alarming damage caused by modernizing and capitalizing nature.

With a keynote by science historian Jean-Baptiste Fressoz, and a conversation between artists
Xavier Ribas and Ângela Ferreira—the latter both featured in the exhibition—this event hosted by Latitudes ('4.543 billion' curators Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna), sees art practice and historical research intertwining with environmental and geological narratives, and vice versa. Both Ribas and Ferreira make art that resists the generalising story of the Anthropocene that Fressoz unmasks in his book 'The Shock of the Anthropocene. The Earth, History and Us' (co-authored with Christophe Bonneuil, Verso Books, 2016). Echoing the meticulous historical approach of Fressoz, both Ribas’s and Ferreira’s projects in the exhibition deal with case studies with a very specific place and politics. Addressing mineral agency and colonial extraction, the artists will discuss their approaches to work that has sprung from diamonds in South Africa (Ferreira) to nitrate in Chile (Ribas).

As Fressoz & Bonneuil have written, the Anthropocene “signals the return of the Earth into a world that Western industrial modernity, on the whole, represented to itself as above earthly foundation … Environmental history, natural anthropology, environmental law and ethics, human ecology, environmental sociology, political ecology, green political theory, ecological economics, etc., are among the new disciplines that have recently begun to renew the human and social sciences, in a dialogue with the sciences of nature.” The dialogue during the event will seek to discover what might happen when artists, curators, exhibitions and museums come into the mix of such emerging practices. What is at stake when artists venture beyond the conventional separation of humanities from sciences, and into environmental art history, cultural ecology, decolonial activism, and so on?


Entrance to the exhibition at the CAPC. Photo: Latitudes/RK.

GUESTS

Jean-Baptiste Fressoz, formerly a lecturer at Imperial College, London, is a historian of science, technology and environment. He is based at the Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Paris, the largest governmental research organisation in France and the largest fundamental science agency in Europe. He is the author, with Christophe Bonneuil, of 'The Shock of the Anthropocene' (Verso, 2016). “This bold, brilliantly argued history of the Anthropocene epoch is a corrective to cosy thinking about humanity’s grave disruptions to Earth systems. Christophe Bonneuil and Jean-Baptiste Fressoz draw on climate science, economics and technological history to reveal how, starting in eighteenth-century France, imperial narratives that saw people and planet as a ‘totality to be governed’ laid the conceptual basis for the crisis. They call for a ‘new environmental humanities’, and a shift away from market-based approaches that feed the beast.” – Barbara Kiser, Nature.

Ângela Ferreira’s works in the exhibition form part of a series titled “Stone Free” (2012) in reference to the 1966 hit song performed by Jimi Hendrix (1942–70). “Stone Free” creates correspondences between two voids below the ground, two ‘negative monuments’ as the artist has termed them: Chislehurst Caves, in southeast London, and Cullinan Diamond Mine in Gauteng Province, South Africa. 


Chislehurst Caves is a man-made network of underground tunnels mainly worked in the late 1700s yet dating back to as early as 1250. The tunnels were excavated in order to mine chalk and flint. Following their use as an air-raid shelter during the second world war, the tunnels were transformed into a venue for rock concerts in the 1960s and 1970s. The Jimi Hendrix Experience played there in 1966 and again the following year, bringing Hendrix’s unique countercultural synthesis of social realism and psychedelic spiritualism based on African and indigenous-American imagery into the literal underground.

Cullinan Diamond Mine (known as Premier Mine from its establishment in 1902 until 2003) is famed for being the source of the largest gem-quality rough diamond ever discovered, in 1905. Most of the gems cut-and-polished from this stone were used to adorn the Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom. The recent history of the diamond industry is inextricable from that of settler colonialism in southern Africa and a commodity cartel established by the De Beers corporation founded in 1888 by British imperialist Cecil Rhodes (1853–1902), two years before he became Prime Minister of the Cape Colony. De Beers owned all of the major mines in South Africa, as well as controlling global distribution until it began a recent sell-off of its less productive mines to the Petra Diamonds group, including divesting itself of Cullinan in 2008. 


Ferreira was born in Maputo, Mozambique, in 1958, and lives in Lisbon, where she teaches Fine Art at the Lisbon University.
http://angelaferreira.info

“A History of Detonations” (2014) is a glimpse at an extensive body of work by Xavier Ribas devoted to exploring the legacy of the mining of sodium nitrate in northern Chile, which boomed from the 1870s until the early-twentieth century when it was discovered how to make the compound synthetically. Comprised of photographs taken by the artist during research visits, alongside vintage postcards and press prints bought on the internet, Ribas’s poster sequence takes us from Chile to London to the surface of Mars. The mining and trade of Chilean sodium nitrate was led by a class of British ‘gentleman capitalists’—aristocrats, bankers and merchants. The extraction of the resource not only industrialized the arid Atacama Desert at one end of the commodity chain, and enriched country estates at the other, but through its use as a chemical fertilizer and a component of explosives, it would radically alter a whole series of seemingly disparate geographies, bodies and institutions.

Ribas was born in Barcelona, 1960, and lives in London.  He is a lecturer at the University of Brighton and associate lecturer at the Universitat Politècnica de València. http://www.xavierribas.com/

Latitudes is a Barcelona-based curatorial office initiated in 2005 by Max Andrews (1975, Bath, United Kingdom) and Mariana Cánepa Luna (1977, Montevideo, Uruguay). They are the curators of the CAPC exhibition ‘4.543 billion. The matter of matter’, and led the related month-long residency programme ‘Geologic Time’ that took place in September 2017 at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity. During 2009 Latitudes developed ‘Portscapes’, a series of ten public commissions in the Port of Rotterdam, the Netherlands (2009); in 2010–11 it was a partner organisation in the exhibition ‘The Last Newspaper’ (New Museum, New York) and in 2011 was the guest curator of the project space of the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Castilla y León (MUSAC) in León, Spain. More recent curatorial projects include the solo exhibition ‘José Antonio Hernández-Díez. I will fear no evil’, Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA), Barcelona (2016); ‘Compositions’, site-specific commissions for two editions of the Barcelona Gallery Weekend (2015 & 2016); and editing the online curatorial reportage initiative ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ developed in partnership with Kadist (initiated in 2016).  
www.LTTDS.org

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‘4.543 billion’ is the contribution of the CAPC musée to the cultural season Paysages Bordeaux 2017

Views of the exhibition at the CAPC musée. Photos: Latitudes / RK.

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Participants in the symposium "You're such a curator!" at de Appel Arts Centre, Amsterdam, 23–24 November 2016 and Amsterdam Art Weekend

 Above: de Appel director Niels van Tomme during his welcome speech.  
This and following photos: Carina Erdmann/De Appel.

Latitudes participated in de Appel Arts Centre two-day symposium "You are such a curator!" on 23 and 24 November 2016. Coinciding with the Amsterdam Art Weekend, the event presented lectures, discussions, performances and papers marking the conclusion of a three-year research project into the dynamics of de Appel’s curatorial programme and its position in the wider field of curatorial education.

Latitudes' presention "Following the Holy Greyhound" reflected "on the disinterment of a sculpture from 1991 – part of an exhibition by the Venezuelan artist José Antonio Hernández-Díez curated by Latitudes at MACBA, Barcelona, earlier this year – and their approach to a group exhibition in preparation for CAPC Musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux in 2017. Their point of departure was responding to the question "what does the wrongful killing of a dog in medieval France have to tell us about the micro and the macro, the hyper-specific and the universal?"  

Above: Chris Sharp during his presentation 'The Willfully Minor Anomaly of Lulu'. 
Below: Q+A session.
 
Above: Presentation by Aneta Rostkowska and Jakub Woynarowski.  
Below: Latitudes' presentation "Following the Holy Greyhound".
 
Above: galerie founders Adriano Wilfert Jensen and Simon Asencio during their presentation. 
Below: Attentive (femenine!) audience. 

Above: (Intensive) Q+A amongst speakers and audience. 
Below: Renata Cervetto during her presentation '(Art) Mediation Projects. In & Out The Museum'.

Above: Kim Nguyen during her presentation 'That's Why We Love the Moon'. 
Below: Niels van Tomme during one of the many Q+A's.

Above: Prem Krishnamurthy during a Q+A.

The two-day symposium included contributions by Mira Asriningtyas, Lucrezia Calabrò Visconti, Renata Cervetto, Mateo Chacon-Pino, Galerie (Adriano Wilfert Jensen and Simon Asencio), Natasha Hoare, Kati Ilves, Prem Krishnamurthy, Inga Lace, Latitudes (Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna), Shona Mei Findlay, Fadwa Naamna, Kim Nguyen, Emma Ines Panza, Aneta Rostkowska and Kuba Woynarowski, Chris Sharp, Niels Van Tomme and Huib Haye van der Werf.
  
We also visited a few exhibitions and attended a few events  programmed for the Art Amsterdam Weekend (24–27 November). One of the highlights was Marinus Boezem's exhibition at Oude Kerk's grand Gothic architecture, one of its finest and oldest examples in Holland. Boezem's pieces resonated with the Gothic style of the church, an architecture that has fascinated him throughout this artistic practice – he has produced several pieces using plans of cathedrals, his most famous one being "Gothic Growing Project" (1978–1987), popularly known as "The Green Cathedral" in a polder landscape near Almere, composed of 178 Italian poplars.
 
"Progetto Spaziale" (1970/2016) video works, and "Meteorieten" (2016) on the floor.

(above) "Windschaal" (Wind Scale) (1968) projected in the Holy Sepulchre chapel.
Majestic "Labyrinth" (2016) piece above and below.
(above) "New Improvisation with Bart de Kroon", one of the five performances Jeremiah Day presented at Ellen de Bruijne Projects.

And of course Friday is the big day at the Rijksakademie OPEN 2016, where we found interesting presentations by Argentinian performance artist Mercedes Azpilicueta; the Argentinian-Dutch Aimée Zito Lema; the abstracted images of Claudia Martínez Garay (below); the sculptural and archival material of British artist Alex Farrar around his suit; the glass work of German artist Christine Moldrickx; the drawings, paintings and small sculptures of Dutch artist Eva Spierenburg; the sculptural works by the also Dutch artist Marije Gertenbach and the large video work "Band Rumorose" by French artist Pauline Curnier Jardin on the Sicilian festivity devoted to San Sebastiano.


Abstracted images by Claudia Martínez Garay

(Above and below) Installation on the ground floor by Eva Spierenburg.

Sculptural and archival material by British artist Alex Farrar around his suit.

More work by Eva Spierenburg was presented in a more intimate presentation on the second floor.

 Glass piece by German artist Christine Moldrickx (above and below). 

The beautiful retrospective "Machine Spectacle" by Swiss artist Jean Tinguely was cleverly paired with Jordan Wolfson's "Manic / Love" – part 1 of his first solo show in a Dutch institution. The show premieres his newest animatronic in Europe: "Colored sculpture" (2016) and is accompanied by three other works only: the video "Raspberry poser" (2012), a series of large inkjet prints and "The Crisis" (2004), one of his earliest video works. In February a second part (Truth / Love) will follow with his first animatronic (Female Figure, 2014) and a new videoinstallation.

(Above) Two of the rooms presenting works by Jean Tinguely at Stedelijk Museum.

Jordan Wolfson's "Colored Sculpture" (2016).

San Serriffe art book shop in the red light district.

kunstverein new location in Hazenstraat 28, presented "Staples", 20 years of work by typographic artist Will Holder.

RELATED CONTENT:

A report from the symposium 'How Institutions Think' organised by the LUMA Foundation and CCS Bard College, Arles, 24–27 February 2016

All photographs: Latitudes.

[The following text was originally published on Frieze Blog on 9 March 2016].

Co-presented by the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College with the LUMA Foundation, the four-day symposium ‘How Institutions Think’ [pdf of the programme] met to reconsider the habits and rhetorics of contemporary art institutions and curatorial practice. The event, held at the Parc des Ateliers, Arles, from 24–27 February, was developed in partnership with a long list of collaborators (Valand Academy of Arts, Gothenburg, Sweden; Afterall Books and the Exhibition Histories programme at Saint Martins, London, UK; Goldsmiths, London; the V-A-C Foundation, Moscow; and de Appel art centre, Amsterdam).

Taking its title from the 1986 book by British anthropologist Mary Douglas, the symposium played out on the site of the future LUMA Arles, a 20-acre former railway yard that includes a new building designed by Frank Gehry scheduled to open in summer 2018 as exhibitions spaces, archives, residency and study facilities, as well as a restaurant, hotel and park. Introduced by CCS Bard’s Paul O’Neill and LUMA founder Maja Hoffmann, the presentations were hosted in the recently-restored L’Atelier des Forges spaces in the middle of this construction site. O’Neill took the work-in-progress status outside as an invitation for the more than 30 speakers and around 150 delegates to debate not only what the future of art institutions in general might be, but more immediately, how new ways of operating could underpin this nascent institution in the south of France. 

LUMA Arles is located in the former railway yards of Arles and includes a new building designed by Frank Gehry and the renovation of the industrial buildings on the Parc des Ateliers by Selldorf Architects.

Yet what transpired was something far more pervasive. An amplification of the noun ‘institution’ and the verb ‘instituting’ soon engulfed not only a discussion of art and academic establishments, but law, governance, and the psyche of the French state, post-November 2015 Paris attacks. The grim predicament of a Europe in the depths of the refugee crisis – as the symposium took place, at the other end of the country, Calais’s ‘Jungle’ camp was being dismantled – became the lens for considering nothing less than the spectral institution that is Western European colonial imperialism. In the first evening’s fragmented keynote by Zahia Rahmani, the writer and historian gave an account of the ‘Made in Algeria’ exhibition of colonial cartography she has curated for the MuCEM museum in Marseilles. She argued that we cannot plausibly think about the future of any institution without confronting the terrible failures and opprobrious injustices of the past, most glaringly what she characterised as the ‘toxicity’ of Western Europe’s colonial system. 


Céline Condorelli's 'All our tomorrows' (2015) hanging curtain.

‘Is institution building still desirable?’ wondered artist Céline Condorelli in her presentation the following day as she evoked All our tomorrows (2015), her installation that humbly corralled the symposium’s setting, comprised a large hanging curtain inspired by the ‘poor architecture’ of Lina Bo Bardi’s SESC Pompéia, the social and cultural centre established in São Paulo. 

Reflecting on his own transformative experiences made while directing the 2014 edition of the São Paulo Biennial, Charles Esche – Director of the Van Abbemuseum in Eindhoven, Netherlands – astutely articulated both the decisiveness of Western Imperialism’s poisonous effect on the rest of the world, and the nervousness about whether anyone can even venture to be hopeful about the future. Esche persuasively argued that Western museums must make decolonialisation fundamental to their missions and no longer a marginal issue by analysing the entrails of neoliberalism’s ‘dogged persistence’ and, soothsayer-like, intuitively sensing the ‘weak signals’ of a more just politics.
 
 Question from Mick Wilson, artist, educator and Head of the Valand Academy of Arts, University of Gothernburg, Sweden, and moderatior of one of the sessions.  

Attendees gather outside the symposium venue at the Parc des Ateliers.

Sociologists Luc Boltanski and Arnaud Esquerre spoke of France’s deep investment in what they termed the ‘economy of enrichment’ in observations that were particularly prickly given the art-destination place-making unfolding on the very site of the symposium. They submitted that the luxury brands that dominate the image of the country abroad enjoy a close but officially-unacknowledged complicity with heritage and culture. They argue that this compound myth of the French art de vivre accounts for the country consistently being the globe’s most visited tourist destination, yet also that, less innocuously, France’s defiance of normative economic rules about price and value make it both a haven for inequality as well as unusually susceptible to instability. Put candidly, the presence of refugee and terrorists is not conducive to tourism and handbag sales. Later, speaking about ‘turbo-fascism’ and a transition to ‘necropolitics’ (a term coined by philosopher Achille Mbembe regarding the politics of sovereignty over life and death), philosopher Marina Gržinić contended that we are living in a time of war in which our institutions battle to preserve this ‘good life’ at any cost. 

Céline Condorelli, Artist, Professor at Nuova Accademia di Belle Arti, Milan, and Founding Co-Director Eastside Projects, in conversation with Helena Reckitt, Senior Lecturer in Curating at Goldsmiths, University of London.  
 Clémentine Deliss, Independent Curator and Fellow of the Institute of Advanced Study (Wissenschaftskolleg).

Turning more specifically to art’s institutions, independent curator and editor Nataša Petrešin-Bachelez argued that they are so often so deeply implicated in an economy of precarity that they spawn new toothless art forms of ‘safe participation’ and ‘soft interactivity’. ‘Stubborn’ institutions thus appeared to be both the problem and the solution. Accordingly, Clémentine Deliss – recently dismissed as the Director of the Weltkulturen Museum in Frankfurt – delivered a scorching critique of the racism and intransigence persisting in ethnographic museums founded in the 19th century, particularly in Germany and France. She characterised how the hundreds of thousands of objects ‘salvaged’ from the frontline of the colonial project are now trapped in a legislative embargo, reduced to little more than dormant entries on databases. Access to these hoards of material culture and their restitution is critical she asserted, yet young curators are too afraid to deal with them – contemporary art offers an easier ride. 

In the context her work directing the SBG Gallery in Montréal, Canada, curator Pip Day discussed Canada’s settler-colonialist legacy, the evasions allowed by conceiving of decolonization as merely a metaphor, and her advocacy of the work of First Nation artists such as Maria Hupfield. Bassam El Baroni, an independent curator based in Alexandria, Egypt, later presented a paper that threaded a bewilderingly dense route through a tangle of cognitive philosophy and ‘prometheanism’. Yet Day’s case studies, as well as those discussed by Mélaine Bouteloup, curator of Paris’s Bétonsalon, regarding the recently opened Villa Vassilieff which is now the second site of that institution, helped to link such abstraction to more practical curatorial and artistic thinking-in-action that addresses the past while creating new knowledge. 

Gehry’s LUMA building will comprise presentation and exhibition spaces, archive, library, offices, seminar rooms, artist-in-residence facilities, café-restaurant and hotel and is due to open in summer 2018.

Yet it was through the presentations by writer Dave Beech and especially architect Keller Easterling that the symposium actually approached something resembling a strategy to address what had been almost uniformly painted as the shameful, broken state of the contemporary institution. According to both Beech and Easterling, we should be paying keener attention to infrastructure rather than institution per se. Following her book Extrastatecraft: The Power of Infrastructure Space (2014) Easterling’s bruising and exhilarating contention was that an enveloping urban medium (including preposterous towers, mall sprawl, special-trade-zone legal lacunae) defies consideration as a thing and is better thought of as a global operating system, a ‘disposition’ that thrives on saying one thing and doing quite another. 

Ljublijanan philosopher, theoretician and artist Marina Gržinić; writer and professor Dave Beech and curator and theorist Simon Sheikh.

At the start of the symposium artist Liam Gillick – one of LUMA’s luminary consultants alongside Tom Eccles, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Philippe Parreno and Beatrix Ruf – had asked somewhat rhetorically, ‘can an institution be thought collectively on this scale?’ It was clearly not only Charles Esche who looked out at the spine of what will be a 24,000 square metre Frank Gehry-designed tower and noticed that the institution’s die was cast already – and thanks to an architect long synonymous with the art museum as an importunate form of trophy. Following Keller’s strategic spatial repertoire of ‘counterbalances’, ‘interplays’, ‘toggles’, ‘incentives’ and ‘ratchets’, as well as her talk of heeding the dynamics of joke-telling or dough-tending, she implied that if we are going to formulate a resilient future for art institutions, we had better start feeling our way – and get a whole lot more canny. 


Max Andrews is a contributing editor of frieze and, with Mariana Cánepa Luna, runs Latitudes, an independent curatorial office based in Barcelona, Spain.
– 

 LUMA Foundation spaces under construction.

Related content:

Symposium participation, "The Shock of Victory", Glasgow, 25 September 2015


Symposium participants: In the Shadow of the Hand, Sacha Kahir, Caleb Waldorf, Max Andrews of Latitudes, Angeliki Roussou, WHW (What, How and For Whom?). 

9.30am | Arrival and coffee
10am - 10.15am | Introduction by CCA Curator Remco de Blaaij and Dr Deborah Jackson
10.15am - 11am | In the Shadow of the Hand
11am - 11.45am | Angelika Roussou
11.45am - 12.30pm | Caleb Waldorf
1pm - 2pm | Lunch (provided)
2pm - 2.45pm | Sacha Kahir
3pm - 3.45pm | Sabina Sabolovic, WHW
3.45pm - 4.15pm | Break
4.15pm - 5pm | Max Andrews, Latitudes

The Shock of Victory is a programme consisting of an exhibition, a symposium organised in partnership with the University of Edinburgh and digital publication. Taking place exactly one year after the Scottish Independence Referendum of 18 September 2014, the programme proposes artistic approaches, techniques, provocations and motivations in a post-referendum reality departing from Scotland, but certainly not constrained by it.

The programme takes its title from the pivotal essay ‘The Shock of Victory’ from 2007, by anarchist and scholar David Graeber, in which he argues that protesters often have difficulty in recognising their moments of success. Accompanying the exhibition the symposium allows for a timely re-consideration of the complexities of the relations between alternative and established (art) institutions that might have been sparked by political moments such as the Scottish Independence Referendum of 2014.

The underpinning emphasis is on the ‘organisational turn’, a shift from hierarchical to self-organised models of organisation. In particular the focus is on the potency of radical (artistic) practices and ideas, which propose imaginative ways of organising – collectivism, anarchism, activism, networks, and self-organising. Can we think of a new artistic landscape that might have been formed? How do we organise ourselves in such times?


 Article by Max Andrews published in Frieze, October 2013.

Max Andrews from Latitudes will offer a perspective on recent cultural politics in Barcelona. Looking in particular at visual art institutions, the 'open submission' format has become a pervasive tool. As an extraction of a democratic process, such an apparently accountable mechansim can nevertheless be complicit in a neo-liberal agenda, undermining institutional robustness and advocating continual 'present-ness'.

Other independent and self-organised realities do of course exist, and following recent municipal elections the political tide offers the promise of change. With reference to art practices that have connected with specific moments of Catalan social history, some contemporary case studies show a thinking around site, scale, longevity and depth – and perhaps reveal a connection with Scotland.
 

Organised in partnership with the University of Edinburgh.
Co-convened by Dr Deborah Jackson.
Funded by The University of Edinburgh’s Innovation Initiative Grant.


CCA, 350 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow G2 3JD, UK


Related content:

Two texts by Manuel Segade and Max Andrews analyse the current Spanish art scene 16 October 2013

This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
Work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Photoreport and storify of the symposium "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?", National Library of Singapore, 14 May 2014

 During the presentation of Shabbir Hussain Mustafa and Charles Lim. Photo: Latitudes.

The public symposium "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" (14 May 2014) was part of this year Curating Lab 2014 programme organised by NUS Museum. The event, convened and moderated by Heman Chong and Latitudes, counted with the participation of Shabbir Hussain Mustafa (Curator, National Gallery Singapore), Charles Lim (artist); Anca Rujoiu and Vera Mey (Curators, CCA — Centre for Contemporary Art, Singapore) and artist Shubigi Rao.

Addressing the format of the exhibition in terms of duration and process, the public symposium "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" consisted of two complimentary sessions that reflected on exhibitions' capacity to articulate its own making and incorporate its own history. In the same way that the Internet has untethered television from fixed schedules and newspapers from print deadlines, the symposium will further ponder on how the exhibition and today's art institutions are undergoing similar transformations. Should exhibitions embrace or resist becoming more like broadcasting or live-publishing? "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" considered how exhibitions produce knowledge through the format of conversations between curators and artists. 

First panel with Shabbir Hussain Mustafa and Charles Lim. Photo: Luca E.C.

Charles Lim and Shabbir Hussain Mustafa during the Q&A. Photo: Luca E.C.


 Audience. Photo: Luca E.C.

 Vera Mey, Anca Rajoiu and Shubigi Rao during the Q&A. Photo: Luca E.C.

The event was an occasion to reflect on the role of a symposium and its public within curatorial practice, and counted with the engagement of Curatorial-Intensive participants who live-tweeted proceedings, a second group mapped concepts of the discussions (see photos below), and a final group will soon publish a blog post documenting and reporting the day for those not physically present.

 Curatorial Intensive participants live-tweeting the proceedings. Photo: Luca E.C.
Group working on the mapping of concepts throughout the symposium. Photo: Luca E.C.
 Map 1 by Curatorial Intensive participants. Photo: Latitudes.
Map 2 by Curatorial Intensive participants. Photo: Latitudes.
Below archive of all the tweets produced during the presentations - via Storify.



 
Related links:

Workshop for Curating Lab 2014: Imagining an institution, 1 July 2014.

"Hauntological trajectories in “When Does An Exhibition Begin And End?”" by Amanda Lee Koe on Art Asia Pacific's blog, 23 July 2014.

"Curating Lab: When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" by Bruce Quek on Radian, 18 August 2014.



This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Public Symposium "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" on 14 June 2014 at the National Library, Singapore



"When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?"
A public symposium part of Curating Lab 2014
Saturday 14 June 2014
3–5pm 
Level 5 - Possibility, National Library Building, Singapore 
Free admission with registration, please write to [email protected]

Addressing the format of the exhibition in terms of duration and process, the public symposium "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" on June 14th, will consist of two complimentary sessions with the participation of curators and artists who will reflect on exhibitions' capacity to articulate its own making and incorporate its own history. In the same way that the Internet has untethered television from fixed schedules and newspapers from print deadlines, the symposium will further ponder on how the exhibition and today's art institutions are undergoing similar transformations.

Is an ongoing production of discourse and research accountability increasingly expected of curators? Are artists engaging differently with new channels for the documentation and distribution of their work and what contextualises it? Should exhibitions embrace or resist becoming more like broadcasting or live-publishing? "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" will consider how exhibitions produce knowledge through the format of conversations between curators and artists.


In the first session Shabbir Hussain Mustafa (Curator, National Gallery Singapore) and artist Charles Lim will talk about their ongoing professional collaboration including Lim's long-term SEA STATE project and the related solo exhibition In Search of Raffles’ Light (NUS Museum, 24 October 2013–27 April 2014). Mustafa and Lim will address these projects' engagement with the maritime history of Singapore in its intersection with the present while speculating about their approach to future exhibitions, including their forthcoming collaboration for the Singapore Pavilion at the 2015 Venice Biennale.

In the second session Anca Rujoiu and Vera Mey (Curators,
CCA — Centre for Contemporary Art, Singapore) will discuss their recent project "The Disappearance" (CCA, 5–6 April 2013), which took place during the dismantling of a previous exhibition "as a durational event unfolding over two days including a continuous series of manifestations". Rujoiu and May will be joined by participating artist Shubigi Rao to discuss her project "Visual snow" (2014), presented during "The Disappearance" as an ongoing part of her biographical study of "the reclusive S. Raoul".

Within the context of Curating Lab 2014, "When Does An Exhibition Begin and End?" will be treated as an occasion to reflect on the role of a symposium and its public within curatorial practice. It will count on the engagement of Curatorial-Intensive participants who will be live-tweeting proceedings, mapping concepts of the discussions, and devising an approach to documenting and reporting the day for those not physically present.

The symposium is convened and moderated by artist, curator and writer Heman Chong and Barcelona-based curatorial office Latitudes (Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna).

Organised by: NUS Museum
Institutional Partner: Centre for Contemporary Art, Singapore
Supported by: National Arts Council
Venue Sponsor: National Library Board, Singapore
 



This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
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Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Lead Facilitators, Curating Lab 2014–Curatorial Intensive, National University of Singapore (11–14 June), symposium (14 June, 15–17h) and field trip to Hong Kong (16–20 June)

Curating Lab 2012. Courtesy: NUS Museum.

Alongside artist, curator and writer Heman Chong, Latitudes will lead the first phase of Curating Lab 2014 (11–14 June), a curatorial intensive in which 15 participants engage with the practice of exhibition-making through lectures and tutorials concluding with a field trip to Hong Kong (16–20 June).

Curating Lab 2014 is an eight month-long programme offering final year students, recent graduates and young curators exposure into contemporary curatorial perspectives and practices. Organised by NUS Museum with support from Singapore's National Arts Council, participants are firstly involved in a week-long curatorial intensive completed with an overseas field trip to Hong Kong. This first phase is followed by internship assignments to contemporary art spaces in the city (July–December 2014), and concludes with a final exhibition project in January 2015.


Courtesy: NUS Museum.

Curating Lab 2014 will focus on contemporary art and curatorial practices that engage with the exhibition as a site of knowledge production; one that is multifarious, relational and participatory providing scopes for intents and slippages, opened to interpretative articulations and re-articulations, subjected to varying contexts of exhibition-making and the very audiences that perform and shapes its production. Lectures and workshops will be led by Heman Chong and Latitudes to explore concepts of knowledge production in the realms of art, fiction, journalism, theory and other possibilities. 

As part of Curating Lab 2014's curatorial-intensive, the public symposium "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" on 14 June (3–5pm, Level 5 of the National Library Building), will bring together Singapore-based artists and curators Shabbir Hussain Mustafa (Curator, National Gallery Singapore), artist Charles Lim; Anca Rujoiu and Vera Mey (Curators, CCA — Centre for Contemporary Art, Singapore) and artist Shubigi Rao, to discuss their recent and ongoing projects. Addressing the format of the exhibition in terms of duration and process, the symposium will consist of two complimentary sessions that will reflect on the exhibition's capacity to articulate its own making and incorporate its own history. In the same way that the Internet has untethered television from fixed schedules and newspapers from print deadlines, the symposium will further ponder on how the exhibition and today's art institutions are undergoing similar transformations.

"When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" will count on the engagement of Curating Lab 2014 participants who will be live-tweeting proceedings, mapping concepts of the discussions, and devising an approach to documenting and reporting the day for those not physically present.

The symposium is convened and moderated by Heman Chong and Latitudes.

The Asia Art Archive (AAA) library. Courtesy: Asia Art Archive.








Following on the Curatorial-Intensive, the overseas Field Trip to Hong Kong (16–20 June) aims to expose participants to international curatorial practices and situate their curatorial processes within the region. Participants will be visiting a range of private and public spaces such as Spring Workshop, Asia Art Archive, Para/Site and M+ Museum.

Follow:
#CuratingLab2014



This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Report from the 2013 congress of the International Association of Curators of Contemporary Art (IKT) in Madrid, 18–21 April

The programme of the 2013 congress of IKT, the International Association of Curators of Contemporary Art, included meetings at the Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo in Móstoles as well as at Centro Cultural Matadero Madrid and the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, where the IKT Members Forum, Symposium and General Assembly were held.

"Curating Value", the topic of this year's symposium organised by Brussels-based independent curator Zoë Gray, included the participation of Barnabás Bencsik (the recently forced-out director of the Ludwig Museum in Budapest), French artist Pierre Bismuth, Spanish curator and consultant María de Corral, London-based curator and theorist Dr. Simon Sheikh and Greek artist and Athens Biennial co-director, Poka-Yio

Following is our photo diary documenting a few moments of these five days in Madrid alongside the organisers' schedule, starting the Pre-Congress programme on Thursday afternoon with a first meeting at Espacio Trapézio at the Mercado de San Antón and ending on Monday morning with the Post-Congress programme which included studio visits to Fernando Sánchez Castillo and Cristina Lucas.

Friday, 19th April 2013
 
Buses depart from Plaza del Emperador Carlos V/ Atocha (opposite the renowned El Brillante bar) for Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo (CA2M) in Móstoles. 



IKT Members Forum. Opening of the congress, welcome and greetings.


Each of the +/- 120 members and guests had 90 seconds to introduce themselves to the rest and quickly explain what projects they were currently developing.

Exhibition visits: Pop Politics: Activismos a 33 revoluciones curated by Iván López Munuera and Hailil Altindere curated by CA2M Director, Ferran Barenblit.

Lyota Yagi, Vinyl (2005) plays the melodies of Debussy's “Clair de Lune” and “Moon River” by Johnny Mercer and Henry Mancini on a record player from a record made of ice created with a silicon mould.


Lunch offered by CA2M at the Terrace.

Buses depart for Fundación Banco Santander (Boadilla del Monte) to visit the exhibition "Out of the House. Contemporary Art Cranford Collection", curated by Anne Pontégnie and Muriel Salem.


 Sci-Fi-like building of the Fundación Banco Santander in the Ciudad Financiera, Boadilla del Monte.


The exhibition space holds a collection of Spanish currency. Here, the last pesetas notes that used to circulate before 2002.


 View of the galleries presenting London's Cranford Collection. Holdings include mostly British art (Sarah Lucas, Rachel Whiteread, Damien Hirst, Phil Collins, Paul Noble, Eva Rothschild, Rebecca Warren, Gillian Wearing), but also pieces by Franz West, Albert Oehlen, Martin Kippenberger, Pierre Huyghe and Thomas Schütte. 
You can also visit it virtually.


 More blue chip works, by Damien Hirst (Something or Nothing, 2004).


 Our Love Is Like the Flowers, the Rain, the Sea and the Hours, 2002 by Martin Boyce.

 (Foreground) Jim Lambie's Sweet Exorcist, 2005.

 (Foreground) Rebeca Warren, Log Lady, 2003.

Franz West, Appartment (2001)

Buses depart for Ivory Press. Exhibition visit: Ilya & Emilia Kabakov.


 Tour through Ivory Press' artist books production with heavy weights like Noguchi, Chillida, Kapoor, Kiefer, Bacon...


...and of course Damien Hirst (again). Here The Holy Trinity explained in percentages, a part of a much larger sculptural/archive piece produced by Ivory Press.

View of Ilya & Emilia Kabakov's show Vertical Paintings and Other Worlds.

Walk to Galería Liebre. Exhibition visit: Ideas y presupuestos. Curator: Martí Manen. 


Ideas and budgets for possible artworks by artists Sebastian Beyro, Black Tulip, Bonus Extra, Kalle Brolin, Priscila Fernandes, Guillem Juan Sancho, Sandra Paula Fernández, Ana García Pineda, Luis Pérez Calvo, Iratxe Jaio & Klaas van Gorkum, Laramascoto, Connie Mendoza, Carlos Motta, Carl Palm, Pepo Salazar, Yes.
 

Visit to the Tabacalera Espacio Promoción del Arte. Exhibition visit: José Manuel Ballester “Bosques de Luz”. Curators: María de Corral and Lorena Martínez de Corral.


Entrance to Tabacalera, Espacio Promoción de Arte.


Tabacalera also shares spaces with La Tabacalera Centro Social Autogestionado (follow @latabacalera), where over 30 organisations self-manage their own spaces sharing, garden areas, storage, a stage, bar facilities, etc.


Saturday, 20th April 2013

Caixaforum. Exhibition: 'Maestros del Caos. Artistas y Chamanes'.

Walk to Medialab Prado, Calle Alameda 15, which officially opened its doors a day before our visit.




Walk to La Casa Encendida, Ronda de Valencia 2.
Exhibitions: Generaciones 2013. Proyectos de Arte Caja Madrid.
Albert Oehlen, Moderne Farbkonzepte. Curator: Christian Domínguez.
 

Lunch offered by La Casa Encendida in their terrace.
 


Buses depart for Matadero Madrid, Plaza de Legazpi 1, 28045 Madrid. 


Manuela Villa, Head of Contents at Matadero introduces the different areas of the 80,000m2 of the former slaughterhouse and its programmes, including the Programa de Pensamiento Matadero Madrid; Intermediae Laboratory for the production of projects and social innovation and Archivo de Creadores (Documentation of 150 Madrid-based contemporary artists).


   Fernando García-Dory of Campo Adentro working at Matadero Madrid.

Archivo de Creadores de Madrid, offering "physical and online documentation on 150 young artists or collectives of 17 different nationalities with links to the city of Madrid."


 IKT Symposium “Curating Value” at the Cineteca.  

"Curating Value" symposium at the Cineteca, Matadero Madrid. 
Left to right: Zoë Gray, Pierre Bismuth, Dr. Simon Sheikh Poka-Yio, Maria de Corral and Barnabás Bencsik.

Exhibition visits. Abierto x Obras: Candela. Los Carpinteros . Curator: Manuela Villa; and Arqueológica, curated by Virginia Torrente. Followed by a dinner and party offered by Matadero Madrid.


Candela, site-specific work by Los Carpinteros at the Abierto x Obras space.


 Pedro Barateiro's piece The Negative Reader, 2012-13, included in the group exhibition Arqueológica in Nave 16.

  Mariana Castillo Deball, five dance costumes produced by artisans in Yautepec in Morelos, used to perform the Brinco de los Chinelos dance during the Carnival. Part of the group exhibition Arqueológica in Nave 16.

Sunday, 21th April 2013

IKT General Assembly in the Auditorio 200, Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía (MNCARS).  



One of the issues to discuss during the General Assembly was to decide on the next venue/city to host the IKT Congress 2014 and 2015. The members voted that CCA Derry-Londonderry would host the 2014 event (the bid included visiting the biennial Eva International in Limerick) and that Vienna's Kunsthalle Wien to host the following year.

Here Johan Lundh co-director of CCA Derry-Londonderry during his presentation for Derry-Londonderry to host the 2014 IKT Congress.

Exhibition visits: Colección I. 1900-1945; Colección II. 1945-1968; Colección III. 1962-1982; Cristina Iglesias; Robert Adams. el lugar donde vivimos. Una selección retrospectiva de fotografías; La invención concreta. Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros; and Azucena Vieites. (Programa Fisuras).


 Favourite Gego mobile, "Reticularea" (1973–76), in the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros. 

 Favourite Jesús Soto, "Pre-penetrable" from 1957 in the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros. 
 
Wonderful 1967 Tropicália by Hélio Oiticica in the "Colección III, 1962-1982" (above and below).

 
(End of congress & beginning of Post-Congress)
 

Afternoon gallery visits around c/ Doctor Fourquet:
 

NoguerasBlanchard, with the exhibition "Can’t Hear My Eyes" curated by Niekolaas Johannes Lekkerkerk.
 

MaisterraValbuena, with the exhibition "Entre lo fugitivo y lo infinito" curated by Anja Isabel Schneider.


Isidoro Valcárcel–Medina, Conducto, 2013. From the press release: "On the occasion of this exhibition project, Isidoro Valcárcel Medina proposes a site-specific intervention on the floor in the gallery’s entrance zone. With a critical, at times provocative stance towards the art market, voiced among others in Ley del Arte - Ley reguladora del ejercicio, disfrute y comercialización del Arte (1992), Valcárcel Medina’s work sees art and life interrelated, inviting the spectator above all to an experience."

García Galería with the exhibition "En la zona gris" curated by Virginia Torrente.


Joaquín García of García Galería introducing the meteorite piece by Belén Rodríguez González

Moisés Pérez Albéniz with an exhibition of Antoni Muntadas (below).
 


Helga de Alvear with an exhibition of works by Prudencio Irazabal.

Fúcares, with the exhibition "Escópico-Esconder(se)-Escaparcurated" by Juan Francisco Rueda.
 

Visit to artists studios at Rampa in the Carabanchel neighbourhood, Madrid.

Found photograph in the former car repair shop that existed before Rampa.
IKT members listening to Rampa's presentation and questions on curating and the artist-curator relationship.

Bus departs for Colección Inelcom at the Ciudad de la Imagen, Pozuelo de Alarcón, Madrid. Artistic direction of the collection: Vicente Todolí.



The circa 3,000m2 headquarters at Ciudad de la Imagen, hold 72 works by 24 artists, including Pavel Büchler, Anthony McCall, Markus Schinwald, Ernesto Neto, Sophie Calle, Kader Attia, Candice Breitz, Ceal Floyer, Fiona Tan and Fernando Bryce's 'Work in Progress' (2006) a suite of 80 ink drawings (below).


 
Monday, 22th April 2013 

Visit artists studios: Fernando Sánchez Castillo and Cristina Lucas.


How many curators can you fit in an artist studio?

Espacio Valverde group show included a work by Antonio R. Montesinos, one of the members of Rampa.


AVE back to Barcelona... end of journey.

All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)

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Latitudes participates in the fifth annual March Meeting organised by Sharjah Art Foundation, 17–19 March 2012, Dar Al Nadwa, Heritage Area, Sharjah


Latitudes' 3-month residency at the New Museum in 2010. Photo: Latitudes

 FGA month residency at the Maasvlakte in 2009. Photo: FGA

March Meeting, a three-day symposium featuring presentations by artists, art professionals and institutions on the production and dissemination of art. March Meeting 2012: Working With Artists and Audiences on Commissions and Residencies will take place March 17–19, in Sharjah's scenic Heritage Area.

Latitudes will present two case studies of commissions and residencies. Firstly, a Latitudes commission in the context of 'Portscapes' that was developed from their invitation to the Rotterdam-based artist and editorial duo Fucking Good Art (FGA). Based from a shipping container the extremity of Rotterdam port for a month, FGA initiated a temporary web radio and research station. And secondly, a commission addressed to Latitudes in the context of 'The Last Newspaper' in which the curatorial duo worked in the New Museum galleries for 3 months editing a weekly newspaper which became an incremental catalogue based on the micro-community of the exhibition. Both residencies explored editorial and curatorial approaches as well as formats of publishing or broadcasting and highlight how small organisation can operate flexibly and critically within a larger structure – whether a huge industrial infrastructure project or a museum exhibition.

Speakers of the three-day symposium include: Abed Al Ju'beh, Director, Khalil Sakakini Cultural Centre (KSCC) (Palestine); H.E. Abdul Rahman Al Owais, UAE Minister of Culture; Noura Al-Sayeh, Architect & Curator (Bahrain); Palmina D'Ascoli, Manager of Department of Residencies, Institut Français (France); Shezad Dawood, Artist; Peter Eleey, Curator, MoMA/PS1 (USA); Amal Khalaf, Edgware Road Project: Assistant Curator of Serpentine Gallery (UK); Yuko Hasegawa, Chief Curator, Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo (MOT) (Japan); Louise Hui-Juan Hsu, Curator, Museum of Contemporary Art Taipei (Taiwan); Danda J, Director, Kuona Trust Centre for Visual Arts (Kenya); Lu Jie, Founder & Director, Long March Space (China); Eungie Joo, Curator, New Museum (USA); Riyas Komu, Director of Programmes, Kochi-Muziris Biennale (India); James Lingwood, Co-Director, Artangel (UK); Salwa Mikdadi, Head of Arts & Cultural Program, Emirates Foundation (UAE); Ayeh Naraghi, Cultural Programmes Specialist, UNESCO Doha Office (Qatar); Susan Pfeffer, Curator, KW Institute for Contemporary Art (Berlin); Andrea Rose, Head of Visual Arts, British Council (UK); Beatrix Ruf, Director/Curator, Kunsthalle Zürich (Switzerland); Anri Sala, Artist; Ramin Salsali, Founder, Salsali Private Museum (UAE).

The March Meeting and related events are free and open to the public. Registration is recommended at [email protected] Read more here

March Meetings 2012
Dar Al Nadwa, Heritage Area
Sharjah
United Arab Emirates

Segunda parte de las jornadas 'PRODUCIR, EXPONER, INTERPRETAR. Estrategias y conflictos en la práctica curatorial', Matadero, Madrid, 25-27 Septiembre

Latitudes participará en las segundas jornadas de 'PRODUCIR, EXPONER, INTERPRETAR (Estrategias y conflictos en la práctica curatorial)', cuya primera parte tuvo lugar en MUSAC, León, 22–24 de mayo. 'PRODUCIR, EXPONER, INTERPRETAR' es un encuentro nacional de comisarios de arte contemporáneo, vinculados generacionalmente, cuyo objetivo es, por un lado incentivar la creación de redes sociales entre profesionales del sector; y por otro lado, poner de relieve una serie de cuestiones en torno a la práctica curatorial.

Lugar: Matadero Madrid, 25, 26 y 27 de septiembre 2009

Participan: David Arlandis / Javier Marroquí (Comisarios independientes, Valencia); David Armengol (Comisario independiente, Barcelona); María Bella (Comisaria de Intermediae, Madrid); Álex Brahim (Comisario independiente, Barcelona); Amanda Cuesta (Comisaria independiente, Barcelona); Beatriz Herráez (Comisaria, Centro Cultural Montehermoso Kulturunea, Vitoria); Latitudes (Comisarios independientes, Barcelona); Iván López Munuera (Comisario independiente, Madrid); Manuela Moscoso (Comisaria independiente, Madrid); RMS La Asociación (Comisarios independientes, Madrid); Manuel Segade (Departamento de exposiciones, CGAC, Santiago de Compostela); Virginia Torrente (Doméstico, comisaria independiente, Madrid); Leire Vergara (Comisaria independiente, Bilbao).

Véase curriculum de los participantes aquí.

Dirigen: Tania Pardo (Comisaria MUSAC); Manuela Villa (Responsable de contenidos de Matadero Madrid y Coordinadora general de La noche en blanco)

Matadero Madrid
Paseo de la Chopera 14, 28045, Madrid
T: 915 177 309
[email protected]
www.mataderomadrid.com

[Imagen: Pablo Helguera 'Artoons' published in ArtWold Salon's blog http://www.artworldsalon.com/blog]

Founded in 2005 by Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna, Latitudes is a curatorial office based in Barcelona, Spain, that works internationally across contemporary art practices.

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2005—2019