Longitudes

In pictures: Latitudes' participation in the festival TODAY IS OUR TOMORROW initiated by PUBLICS, Helsinki

Poster announcing the festival in a street in central Helsinki. Photo: Latitudes.


As partner organisation in the transdisciplinary festival ‘Today Is Our Tomorrow’ initiated by PUBLICS, Latitudes participation consisted in inviting Argentinian-born, Amsterdam-based artist Mercedes Azpilicueta, to perform at Club Kaiku on September 13, 2019.

Façade of Kaiku, Helsinki.

A day earlier, Latitudes and Mercedes maintained an open conversation introducing her artistic practice and, in particular advancing details of both her ‘Yegua-Yeta-Yuta’ performance taking place a day after, her forthcoming solo exhibition at CentroCentro, Madrid, opening October 3, 2019, and her solo presentation as part of Van Abbemuseum's Positions #5’ series, exhibiting the work of artists living and working in the Netherlands.

September 12, 2019, 5:30–6:30h: (Above and below) Mercedes, Mariana and Max (Latitudes) in conversation at Club Kaiku. Photo: Jonni Korhonen/PUBLICS.
Photo: Jonni Korhonen/PUBLICS.

Yegua-yeta-yuta’ (2015-ongoing) is an evolving solo performance by Azpilicueta that is part scripted, part improvised. Composed from a litany of hundreds of pejorative, abusive, and vulgar insults directed at women in Argentina, it transforms the everyday language of misogyny and harassment into a kind of tragicomic exorcism. Many of the words derive from the street slang of Buenos Aires, especially Lunfardo, a colloquial and cryptic dialect that first arose among working-class Italian-immigrant and tango communities in Argentina and Uruguay during the late 1800s. For example, yegua literally means a mare – a female horse, a slur for a “difficult” woman. A yeta is a person who brings bad luck, while a yuta is someone corrupt or unscrupulous, and slang for the police. Accompanied by a percussive beat, Azpilicueta reclaims the power to offend, distorting and distending the epithets into something powerful and playful rather than weak and degrading. Azpilicueta will perform to the beat of a new soundtrack produced for the occasion in collaboration with Chilean choreographer Rodrigo Sobarzo de Larraechea.



Mercedes Azpilicueta during her performance ‘Yegua-Yeta-Yuta’ (2015-ongoing) for TODAY IS OUR TOMORROW festival, organised by PUBLICS, Helsinki. Photo: Latitudes.
Photo: Jonni Korhonen/PUBLICS.
Photo: Jonni Korhonen/PUBLICS.
Photo: Kush Badhwar/PUBLICS.
Photo: Kush Badhwar/PUBLICS.
Photo: Kush Badhwar/PUBLICS.
Photo: Kush Badhwar/PUBLICS.
Photo: Latitudes.

Mercedes Azpilicueta is an Argentinian visual and performance artist based in Amsterdam. Her practice has spanned theatrical mises-en-scènes and video installations, textile sculptures and drawing, sound works and 3D animation. With a particular interest in notions of the vulnerable or collective body, and the primal or dissident voice, her works have drawn inspiration from sources as diverse as Baroque painting, text messaging, medieval tapestries, street slang, and literary fiction, as well as singular figures including the Italian art critic and feminist activist Carla Lonzi (1931–1982), the Argentine-French performance artist Lea Lublin (1929–1999), the French futurist Valentine de Saint-Point (1875–1953), and the Costa Rican-born Mexican ranchera singer Chavela Vargas (1919–2012). A major survey of Azpilicueta’s work to date, ‘Cuerpos Pájaros’ (Body-birds) was recently staged by the Buenos Aires Museum of Modern Art (November 2018–April 2019). On October 3, 2019, she presents ‘Bestiario de Lengüitas’ (Bestiaire of Tonguelets), curated by Virginie Bobin, at CentroCentro, Madrid, an exhibition which will then tour to Museion, Bozen, and CAC Brétigny in 2020. Later in 2019, she will have a solo presentation as part of ‘Positions #5’ at Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven.


(Above) Mercedes during her performance ‘Oh, Eduarda!’ on April 14, 2019, presented at the Museo de Arte Moderno in Buenos Aires. Photo: Latitudes.


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Documentación de la exposición "El Misterio de Caviria" de Antoni Hervàs en La Capella

Todas las fotos: Pep Herrero y La Capella/BCN Producció’16.

La exposición "El Misterio de Caviria" de Antoni Hervàs dibuja los escenarios para un espectáculo visual estilo copla-terror donde, siguiendo los rastros de la Barcelona canalla de los años 60–80, colisionan dos mitologías: la del cabaret barcelonés y la Grecia clásica. Una invocación a los Dioses del subsuelo siguiendo la tradición del rito cabirio en el que el fuego, la sangre y la ridiculización de lo masculino son los ingredientes esenciales que permiten conocer una historia local que es a la vez universal. Sigue leyendo...

A finales de enero se presentará una publicación conjuntamente editada por The Flames, el Ajuntament de Barcelona y La Capella que incluirá una entrevista entre el artista y Latitudes, tutores del proyecto, así como documentación fotográfica de la exposición y de las actividades programadas.

La exposición "El misterio de caviria" se puede visitar en La Capella (c/ Hospital 56, 08001 Barcelona) hasta el 13 de noviembre 2016. El proyecto se enmarca dentro de la temporada BCN Producció'16.

Fotos: Pep Herrero/La Capella-BCNProducció'16.

Antoni Hervàs (Barcelona, 1981) estudió Bellas Artes en la Universitat de Barcelona (2006) y realizó un ciclo en grabado y estampación en Escola Llotja. Entre sus recientes exposiciones individuales destacan “Hércules en la luna”, Espai Cultural Caja Madrid, Barcelona (2012); “Kakanoures i kitschades”, galería SIS, Sabadell (2015) y “Agón”, Galería ETHall, Barcelona (2016). Hervàs ha participado en numerosas colectivas entre las cuales se incluyen “Capítulo II. Huidas. La ficción como rigor” dentro del ciclo “El texto: Principios y Salidas”, Fabra i Coats Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona (2014); “PUNK. Sus rastros en el arte contemporáneo”, Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona (2016) y “Deshaciendo el texto”, La Casa Encendida (2016). Como parte de su práctica artística Hervàs ha dirigido “Fénix” (2013–16), el programa educativo del centro Sant Andreu Contemporani involucrando a diversos artistas de la ciudad en sus varias fases. Además ha realizado numerosos proyectos editoriales autogestionados como “Grapandmopotheper” (2009), “Tributo a Ray Harryhausen”, DeGénero Ediciones (2014) o “La trama” para Mataró Art Contemporani (2015). Asimismo ha comisariado exposiciones periódicas como “Doméstica” junto a Ariadna Parreu (desde 2009) y eventos performáticos como “Mercuri Splash” junto a David Bestué para la Fundació Miró (2015). En el 2010 recibió el Premio INJUVE a la Creación en la categoría de ilustración.

→ Contenidos relacionados:

Instagram takeover of Kadist Art Foundation in San Francisco


As part of Latitudes' residency at Kadist Art Foundation's instagram, we are taking over their instagram [@kadistfoundation] for the next 10 days. 

You can follow the hashtags #‎artistnotatthestudiocuratornotattheoffice‬ ‪#‎LatitudesBarcelona‬ ‪#‎IncidentsOfTravel‬ 

Today we've posted pictures of the first Incidents Of Travel artist-led day tour, a day spent with Megan and Rick Prelinger, founders of the Prelinger Library, "An appropriation-friendly collection of books, periodicals and print ephemera, open to the public in downtown San Francisco". The library "is a free-offering, an installation, a workshop, an extension of our living-room" and holds some 30,000 bound objects, 60,000 loose sheets and 10,000 zines following a unique home-made "geospatial arrangement scheme". Megan and Rick have described the project as never static and compared it to "a long-cooking pot of stew, [that] continuously takes in new ingredients while also reducing down, becoming richer and more concentrated with time".

Posts will be progressively archived in this storify.

Forthcoming events: 

29 August: Closed-door seminar 'Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group' #NFACDFG;

1 September: Launch of Latitudes' contribution to the One Sentence Exhibition online initiative;

3 September: #‎IncidentsOfTravel‬ with Amy Balkin;

4 September: #‎IncidentsOfTravel‬ with Will Brown.

This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
Work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Latitudes' re-designed website now online!


Our website is finally up and running! Take a look at www.lttds.org

After months of re-editing, digging floppy disks and analogue archives, we're proud (and relieved!) to launch our newly designed website, same address as always: http://www.lttds.org




We have improved several things. Our home page now features a "cover story", a monthly focus on an artwork, artist, book, site or trip we've experienced in our recent past, accompanied by a short text. Our first cover story centers on Wilfredo Prieto's work "Grease, Soap, Banana" presented in 2007 in the group show "Extraordinary Rendition".
  
Below this section we highlight three recent projects which are refreshed with each visit.

Yes! Each page is more tablet and mobile-friendly, yet has an even wider format for your desktop.


Each of our project pages includes a sliding photo gallery complementing our flickr sets, and has clearer access to our social media networks – such as our twitter or facebook.

At the end of each project's text, we've added "Related Content": an expandable section linking to our blog posts.
The sidebar includes details of the locations, publication (if applicable) and project supporters; a calendar of events and biography of the artist (for solo shows).

Our project page now includes tags enabling you to dynamically filter our projects by 'year', 'exhibition', 'research', 'public realm', 'with publication', etc.
From here you can also check our Index, our Publications or download the pdf 'Projects Dossier' detailing a selection of our projects.

We have revised the 'About' page and placed an accordion listing our "Lectures", "Teaching", "Awards & Affiliations", "Juries", "Residencies", "Bibliography/Press" and "Research and Field Trips".

And last, but certainly not least, we continue to report from our blog on the development of our projects as well as on our field trips, news, shows, or books worth discussing.





This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
Work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Looking back – Visiting Robert Smithson's 'Spiral Jetty' (1970) on 7 September 2004


A decade ago today (!) we were lucky enough to visit Robert Smithson's most iconic earthwork 'Spiral Jetty' (1970). The water level of the Great Salt Lake was well down and the surface of the counterclockwise spiral was not only visible but also walkable. As we walked alone in the blazing heat we felt as if we were disappearing into the black basalt, pink salt and silent haze. Our visit to the site was completed a few days later visiting his 'Retrospective Works 1955-1973' at Los Angeles' MOCA, curated by Eugenie Tsai with Connie Butler. Happy memories.
 

Related posts:

Lecture by Max Andrews "From Spiral to Spime: Robert Smithson, the ecological and the curatorial", 13 March, 2pm, Lecture Theatre 1, Royal College of Art, London (12 March 2012)

Publication "Robert Smithson: Art in Continual Movement" (Alauda Publications, 2012) includes essay by Max Andrews (28 March 2012)

Robert Smithson's 'Broken Circle/Spiral Hill Revisited' (1971–2011) and The Land Art Contemporary programme (14 September 2011)

Portscapes: Jorge Satorre returns an ice-age boulder back to Sweden (18 January 2010)



This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
This post is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Photoreport and storify of the symposium "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?", National Library of Singapore, 14 May 2014

 During the presentation of Shabbir Hussain Mustafa and Charles Lim. Photo: Latitudes.

The public symposium "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" (14 May 2014) was part of this year Curating Lab 2014 programme organised by NUS Museum. The event, convened and moderated by Heman Chong and Latitudes, counted with the participation of Shabbir Hussain Mustafa (Curator, National Gallery Singapore), Charles Lim (artist); Anca Rujoiu and Vera Mey (Curators, CCA — Centre for Contemporary Art, Singapore) and artist Shubigi Rao.

Addressing the format of the exhibition in terms of duration and process, the public symposium "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" consisted of two complimentary sessions that reflected on exhibitions' capacity to articulate its own making and incorporate its own history. In the same way that the Internet has untethered television from fixed schedules and newspapers from print deadlines, the symposium will further ponder on how the exhibition and today's art institutions are undergoing similar transformations. Should exhibitions embrace or resist becoming more like broadcasting or live-publishing? "When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" considered how exhibitions produce knowledge through the format of conversations between curators and artists. 

First panel with Shabbir Hussain Mustafa and Charles Lim. Photo: Luca E.C.

Charles Lim and Shabbir Hussain Mustafa during the Q&A. Photo: Luca E.C.


 Audience. Photo: Luca E.C.

 Vera Mey, Anca Rajoiu and Shubigi Rao during the Q&A. Photo: Luca E.C.

The event was an occasion to reflect on the role of a symposium and its public within curatorial practice, and counted with the engagement of Curatorial-Intensive participants who live-tweeted proceedings, a second group mapped concepts of the discussions (see photos below), and a final group will soon publish a blog post documenting and reporting the day for those not physically present.

 Curatorial Intensive participants live-tweeting the proceedings. Photo: Luca E.C.
Group working on the mapping of concepts throughout the symposium. Photo: Luca E.C.
 Map 1 by Curatorial Intensive participants. Photo: Latitudes.
Map 2 by Curatorial Intensive participants. Photo: Latitudes.
Below archive of all the tweets produced during the presentations - via Storify.



 
Related links:

Workshop for Curating Lab 2014: Imagining an institution, 1 July 2014.

"Hauntological trajectories in “When Does An Exhibition Begin And End?”" by Amanda Lee Koe on Art Asia Pacific's blog, 23 July 2014.

"Curating Lab: When Does an Exhibition Begin and End?" by Bruce Quek on Radian, 18 August 2014.



This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Snapshots of Münster Skulptur Project 2007

Photodocumentation of our adventures discovering this years' Münster Skulptur Project is now up on our flickr. Take a look!

The exhibition presented the works of 36 artists from all over the world. The curators are Brigitte Franzen, Kasper König and Carina Plath.

Invited Artists:

Pawel_Althamer | Michael_Asher | Nairy_Baghramian | Guy_Ben-Ner | Guillaume_Bijl | Martin_Boyce | Jeremy Deller | Michael_Elmgreen und Ingar_Dragset | Hans-Peter_Feldmann | Dora_Garcia | Isa_Genzken | Dominique_Gonzalez-Foerster | Tue_Greenfort | David_Hammons | Valérie_Jouve | Mike_Kelley | Suchan Kinoshita | Marko_Lehanka | Gustav_Metzger | Eva_Meyer und Eran_Schaerf | Deimantas_Narkevicius | Bruce_Nauman | Maria_Pask | Manfred_Pernice | Susan_Philipsz | Martha_Rosler | Thomas_Schütte | Andreas_Siekmann | Rosemarie_Trockel | Silke_Wagner | Mark_Wallinger | Clemens von Wedemeyer | Annette_Wehrmann | Pae_White

All images: Latitudes | www.lttds.org

Founded in 2005 by Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna, Latitudes is a curatorial office based in Barcelona, Spain, that works internationally across contemporary art practices.

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Latitudes
2005—2019