Longitudes

Longitudes cuts across Latitudes’ projects and research with news, updates, and reportage.

Estreno del vídeo “A knot which is not” [Un nus que no ho és] (2020–21) de Eulàlia Rovira

(📷 ↑↓) Eulàlia Rovira, “A knot which is not” [Un nudo que no lo es], 2020–21. Vídeo, 12:21min. Audio en catalán. Cortesía de la artista.

[CAT] 

Avui a les 18h (CET) s'estrena el nou vídeo d'Eulàlia Rovira “A knot which is not” [Un nus que no ho és] (2020-21), al canal Youtube de Fabra i Coats

“A knot which is not” [Un nus que no ho és] (2020-21) és fruit d’una recerca que l'artista va iniciar amb la inauguració de l’exposició “Coses que les coses diuen” (17 d’octubre de 2020 – 17 de gener de 2021), comissariada per Latitudes a Fabra i Coats: Contemporary Art Centre of Barcelona, i que es fa pública un cop s’ha clausurat i les sales del centre d'art són novament buides.

“Si bé la línia recta és còmplice de l’abaratiment i l’estandardització de molts productes, a on ens du la corba, o encara millor, el nus? Donant girs a les històries de la mateixa fàbrica tèxtil de la Fabra i Coats i als objectes que en sortien, la llengua que ens parla exercita paraules que les mans semblen haver deixat de reconèixer.” –  Eulàlia Rovira


[ES] 

Hoy a las 18h (CET) se estrena el nuevo vídeo de Eulàlia Rovira “A knot which is not” [Un nudo que no lo es] (2020-21), en el canal Youtube de Fabra i Coats

El vídeo es fruto de una investigación que la artista inició con la inauguración de “Cosas que las cosas dicen” (17 de octubre de 2020–17 de enero de 2021), la exposición comisariada por Latitudes en Fabra i Coats: Centre d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona, y que se hace pública una vez ha finalizado y las salas expositivas están nuevamente vacías. 

“Si bien la línea recta es cómplice del abaratamiento y la estandaritzación de muchos productos, ¿adónde nos lleva la curva, o aún mejor, el nudo? Dando giros a las historias de la propia fábrica textil de la Fabra i Coats y a los objetos que de ella salían, la lengua que nos habla ejercita palabras que las manos parecen haber dejado de reconocer.” – Eulàlia Rovira



[UK] 

Today at 6pm (CET) Eulàlia Rovira's new video “A Knot which is Not” [Un nudo que no lo es] (2020-21) is premiered on the YouTube channel of Fabra i Coats.

“A Knot which is Not” (2020-2021) is the result of Rovira's research that began with the opening of “Things Things Say” (17 October 2020–17 January 2021), curated by Latitudes at Fabra i Coats: Contemporary Art Centre of Barcelona, and made public once the exhibition finished and the art centre galleries are empty once again.

“Whilst the straight line is complicit in the price decrease and standardisation of many products, where does the curve, or better still, the knot, lead us? Putting a new spin on the stories of the Fabra i Coats textile factory and the objects found there, the language they speak to us uses words that our hands seem to have stopped recognising.” – Eulàlia Rovira

Fabra i Coats: Centre d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona
c/ Sant Adrià, 20
08030 Barcelona
[email protected]


→ CONTENIDO RELACIONADO:
  • ‘Things Things Say’ en las redes sociales
  • Reseñas: Exposición ‘Cosas que las cosas dicen’ en Fabra i Coats: Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona, 11 January 2021 
  • Trailer and photo documentation of the exhibition ‘Things Things Say’, 4 Nov 2020
  • 6 de noviembre, 17:45h: Proyección ‘Popcorn’ [Palomita] (90', 2012) de Adrià Julià en el Zumzeig Cinema, 29 Oct 2020
  • Exhibition ‘Things Things Say’, Fabra i Coats: Contemporary Art Center of Barcelona, 17 October 2020–17 January 2021, 9 Oct 2020
Stacks Image 39


Press Release: Co-curators of the exhibition “Panorama 21: Notes For An Eye Fire”, Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona, 22 October 2021–27 February 2022

↑ Robert Mitchell, “Plans, and Views in Perspective, with Descriptions of Buildings Erected in England and Scotland; and ... an Essay to Elucidate the Grecian, Roman and Gothic Architecture. (Plans, Descriptions Et Vues En Perspective, Etc.)”, 1801, London. Held at the British Library


PRESS RELEASE

Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA)
Plaça dels Àngels 1
08001 Barcelona
www.macba.cat

“Panorama 21: Notes For An Eye Fire”
22 October 2021–27 February 2022
Opening: 21 October 2021

Panorama 21: Notes For An Eye Fire” is a project that aims to reaffirm the commitment of the Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA) to the vitality of local production, by supporting site-specific creation and reconsidering what it can offer – and how it can be best used – through a new generation of artists and audiences. Conceived as a long-term commitment by the museum to support local practices, this is an initiative that aspires to make an enduring contribution to the resilience of Barcelona’s cultural ecosystem.

Panorama 21: Notes For An Eye Fire”, which takes its title from the third book of poems by Gabriel Ventura (“Apunts per a un incendi dels ulls”, Documents Documenta, 2020), will be co-curated by Hiuwai Chu (Curator, MACBA) together with Latitudes, the curatorial duo formed in 2005 by Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna. This type of collaborative work aims to widen institutional practices and bring independent perspectives, through a scheme that it is hoped will be maintained in the future. 

Occupying the entire second floor of MACBA’s Meier Building, it will consist of a group exhibition featuring a number of newly realised projects alongside recently produced works. Moreover, Hiuwai Chu and Latitudes conceive this inaugural edition as a curatorial, editorial and communication channel where in-venue displays encompass a wider spectrum of online programming, publishing, streaming and engagement with MACBA’s users beyond the Museum walls. 

Borrowing from the practices of an increasingly socially engaged generation of artists, “Panorama 21: Notes For An Eye Fire” is not guided by a top-down thematic focus. Instead, it is growing in a cumulative and responsive way from a ground-up perspective on Barcelona, the region and its imaginary. It aspires to amplify the voices of artists and cultural producers that are working in unprecedentedly challenging times.

The project will draw from the panoramic notion of a wide view seen from a fixed point, as well as the innovation that was the origin of the word itself – a neologism coined by the Irish artist Robert Barker from the Greek pan (all), and horama (view) to describe his paintings of Edinburgh, Scotland, at the end of the eighteenth century. Long before the invention of cinema and the proliferation of screens that now characterise contemporary life for many of us, panoramas offered one of the most surprising and popular visual spectacles. 

A panorama was an immersive combination of painting, theatre and architecture. A vast 360° depiction of a city, landscape or battle scene that was presented in a purpose-built circular building. Viewers entered through a tunnel and emerged onto a platform at the centre of the structure and into a startling wrap-around experience. Panoramas could offer a vicarious form of travel. The first such presentation opened to the public in London in 1791, yet the invention really took off in Europe during the following two decades when international travel was severely restricted due to the Napoleonic Wars. Barcelona’s 1888 Universal Exposition presented no less than three panoramas in the city, representing views of the fabled peaks of Montserrat, the Siege of Plevna and the Battle of Waterloo. 

Resonating with the trans-disciplinarity of these display devices, and their desire to inform and captivate, “Panorama 21: Notes For An Eye Fire” nevertheless turns the page on their seamless vista of past conflicts and decisive victories, to imagine instead a structure for supporting a fertile and diverse landscape of many complex artistic positions of the present. 

@macba_barcelona
#PanoramaMACBA
#macbaBCN
#apuntsperunindencidelsulls


RELATED CONTENT

Stacks Image 39


Reseñas: Exposición ‘Cosas que las cosas dicen’ en Fabra i Coats: Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona

Anuncio en e-flux de la nueva temporada de exposiciones en Fabra i Coats: Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona, 17 octubre 2020.
Clàudia Rius, “4 novetats de la Fabra i Coats”, Núvol.com, 19 octubre 2020.
Teresa Sesé, ‘Los objetos hablan: ¡escúchalos!’, La Vanguardia, 20 octubre 2020.


Montse Frisach, “Coses que les coses diuen”, catorze.cat, 21 octubre 2020.

Roberta Bosco, ‘La voz de los humanos y de las cosas’, Mirador de les Arts, 21 octubre 2020.
Ramon Casalé Soler, El Temps de les Arts, 27 octubre 2020. 

Cabe aclarar que, tal y como publicamos en Twitter el pasado 27 de octubre, ‘Cosas que las cosas dicen no se presentó anteriormente en el CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux como menciona el articulista, sino que la exposición ha sido un encargo y una producción de Fabra i Coats: Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona


Eduardo de Vicente, ‘Historias explicadas por objetos’, el periódico, 16 diciembre 2020.


c/ Sant Adrià, 20
08030 Barcelona

#CosesQueLesCosesDiuen
#CosasQueLasCosasDicen
#ThingsThingsSay

📽Tráiler 

🗺Guía 

🎧 Audioguía  
Narrada por la artista Eulàlia Rovira (click y escoge idioma)



CONTENIDO RELACIONADO:
  • ‘Things Things Say’ en las redes sociales
  • 6 de noviembre, 17:45h: Proyección ‘Popcorn’ [Palomita] (90', 2012) de Adrià Julià en el Zumzeig Cinema, 29 Oct 2020
  • Exhibition ‘Things Things Say’, Fabra i Coats: Contemporary Art Center of Barcelona, 17 October 2020–17 January 2021, 9 Oct 2020

Stacks Image 39


2020 in 11 monthly Cover Stories

Since Spring 2015, Latitudes has published a monthly cover story on its homepage www.lttds.org featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, as well as ongoing research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or travel related to our curatorial practice. Here's how 2020 looked like on our homepage.

Stacks Image 39


Premios jurado del Dart Festival de cine documental sobre arte contemporáneo 2020



La programación de la cuarta edición del Festival de Cine Documental sobre Arte Contemporáneo 2020 (26 de noviembre al 8 de diciembre) se ha mostrado por primera vez en la plataforma online Filmin, manteniendo una sesión presencial con el estreno en España de "Keith Haring: Street Art Boy" en los cines Girona en Barcelona. Esta edición ha presentado 20 documentales: 15 largometrajes –9 de los cuales se estrenan en España y 5 en Barcelona– y 5 cortos, todos estrenos en España.

Una edición más, Latitudes ha tenido el placer de ser miembro del jurado del festival junto al crítico de cine Quim Casas y el artista visual Jordi Colomer.

Dart Festival 2019 en Cinemes Girona.

Dart Festival 2020 el primer festival de cine documental dedicado al arte contemporáneo cuyo principal objetivo es entrelazar la cultura y el conocimiento con el gran público, y lo hace a través de documentales sobre fotografía, comisariado de arte, pintura, performance, arquitectura, movimientos artísticos y, en general, sobre arte contemporáneo, prestando especial atención a los artistas, sus procesos de creación y las historias que hay detrás de sus trabajos. 

La convocatoria para participar en la edición 2021 ya está abierta en filmfreeway.com

El jurado ha decidido que los documentales premiados en esta edición sean ‘Tierras Construídas’ del director de cine Arturo Dueñas como mejor producción nacional, y de la artista Jill Magid, como mejor producción internacional:

"El jurado ha elegido por unanimidad, como ganadora de la Competición Nacional, ‘Tierras construidas’ [Trailer], porque es capaz de retratar con honestidad el proceso artístico riguroso del artista Félix Cuadrado Lomas, verdadero cimiento de la película gracias a su personalidad cautivadora. Una íntima mirada cinematográfica que reflexiona sobre los paisajes castellanos con el mismo cuidado y la misma idea de construcción expresados en la pintura del protagonista."

"El jurado ha elegido por unanimidad, como ganadora de la Competición Internacional, ‘The Proposal’ [Trailer], porque su ritmo seduce durante todo el metraje, porque se aleja radicalmente de la narrativa documental tradicional y porque es capaz de profundizar en cuestiones importantes dentro del arte contemporáneo, como los derechos de autor y el legado cultural entre la contribución al discurso internacional y el contexto territorial donde tiene su origen. Una película nada convencional que es a su vez una obra artística audaz y provocadora."


España, 2019. Dir: Arturo Dueñas. 81 min. Castellano.

A finales de los años 60 un grupo de artistas decide establecerse en un pueblo de la España profunda y convertirlo en un foco cultural. Hoy allí solo queda Félix Cuadrado Lomas, que en 2017 decidió rechazar el Premio Castilla y León de las Artes por coherencia con su carrera artística. Su vida abarca una infancia de posguerra, una juventud bohemia y de resistencia, y una madurez de reconocimiento, cuando ya todos sus compañeros de generación han desaparecido. Félix sigue fiel a su estilo, empeñado en reflejar el paisaje que lo rodea: las tierras construidas por quienes las trabajan.

México, 2019. Dir: Jill Magid. 82 min. Inglés.

Conocido como «el artista entre los arquitectos», Luis Barragán es uno de los arquitectos más famosos del siglo XX. A su muerte en 1988, gran parte de su obra fue encerrada en un búnker suizo, escondida de la vista del mundo. En un intento por resucitar la vida y el arte de Barragán, la artista Jill Magid crea una propuesta audaz que se convierte en una obra de arte en sí misma, un acto de negociación que explora hasta dónde llegará un artista para democratizar el acceso al arte.


→ CONTENIDO RELACIONADO:
  • Premios de la 3a edición del Dart Festival de cine documental sobre arte contemporáneo 2019, 1 Dec 2019
  • Mariana Cánepa Luna vocal del jurado del Premi Ciutat de Barcelona 2017 en el ámbito de las Artes Visuales 1 Febrero 2018
  • Antoni Hervàs's exhibition "El Misterio de Caviria" awarded the Visual Arts prize of the Premis Ciutat de Barcelona 2016 1 February 2017
  • Jurado y equipo tutorial de Barcelona Producció 2017 – Anuncio de los proyectos ganadores 25 Mayo 2017
  • Jurado y equipo tutorial de BCN Producció 2016, La Capella, Barcelona. 2 Febrero 2016
  • Latitudes-nominee artist Annette Kelm shortlisted for the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize 2015 24 June 2015
    Resolución Convocatoria 2012 de Artes visuales y Tutorial de la Sala d'Art Jove 7 Diciembre 2011
  • Fallo Jurado Premios Casablancas 2008, 20 Junio, 20h 16 junio 2008
  • Otros jurados – véase sección "About"

Stacks Image 39


Cover Story—October 2020: Incidents (of Travel) Cabo Rojo, Puerto Rico

Latitudes' homepage www.lttds.org


The October 2020 monthly Cover Story ‘Incidents (of Travel) Cabo Rojo, Puerto Rico’ is live on our website: www.lttds.org

“Cabo Rojo and the south-westernmost part of Puerto Rico wasn’t the first area that artist Sofía Gallisá Muriente and Marina Reyes Franco, Curator at the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Puerto Rico (MAC), spoke about exploring for the latest, and 13th, episode of Incidents (of Travel).”

→ Continue reading
→ After October 2020 this story will be archived here.

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial projects and activities.


→ RELATED CONTENTS

  • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
  • Cover Story—September 2020: States of emergency—Lola Lasurt’s ‘Children’s Game’ 1 Sept 2020
  • Cover Story—August 2020: ‘Màquina possible’: going viral at Can Balaguer 1 Aug 2020
  • Cover Story—July 2020: Nino Kvrivishvili’s silk roads: Incidents (of Travel), Tbilisi 1 Jul 2020
  • Cover Story—June 2020: Mataró Chauffeur Service, since 2010 1 June 2020
  • Cover Story—May 2020: Panama, back through the lens 4 May 2020
  • Cover Story—March-April 2020: The Bolós Cabinet 3 March 2020
  • Cover Story—February 2020: Carioca Incidents 3 February 2020
  • Cover Story—January 2020: Safeguarding Gestures 2 January 2020
Stacks Image 39


Latitudes’s 15th anniversary and rebuilt and redesigned website


April marked 15 years of Latitudes’s curatorial practice. We’ve long been planning an update and redesign of our website, and with life and work on hold for the last few weeks, we’ve finally had the time to make it happen. 



The whole site has been rebuilt from the ground up using the Foundation 6 framework. It is now faster, more accessible, and more responsive (it better adapts to whether you’re viewing on a mobile, or whatever size screen). Many of the changes are under the hood, although you’ll notice the larger type size and improved navigation elementsMost importantly, you can now more easily toggle between languages throughout (Spanish ‘ES’ and English ‘EN’). Many of the images will already look much crisper, especially on retina devices, and we’ll gradually be upgrading the rest of the galleries.
Our home page https://www.lttds.org will continue to feature a Cover Story: a monthly focus on a current project, an artwork, artist, or a glimpse from our archive, accompanied by a short caption or narrative. This month the new widescreen image format features Donna Conlon, Jonathan Harker, and Sandino Scheidegger, and the latest episode of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’, accompanied by Donna’s and Jonathan’s thoughts on how life has changed in recent weeks in Panama City.


We’ve eliminated the drop down menu organising our projects by year. Instead the ‘Projects’ page becomes the main hub where tags enable you to filter by year as well as by categories such as ‘Editions’, ‘Editorial’, ‘Exhibitions’, ‘Pedagogy’, ‘Performance’, ‘Public Realm’, ‘Research’, ‘Residencies’, ‘Screenings’ ‘Talks’.


Each individual project page includes a full-width sliding photo gallery, and has clearer access to further photos (from our Flickr), publications, social media archive – accessing posts on twitter or facebook, as well as videos.


Each project now its own ‘Archive’ section reconfigured as an ‘off-canvas’ panel which swoops in to show all the relevant press reviews, as well as posts published on Longitudes, a section which cuts across Latitudes’ projects and research with news, updates, and reportage going back to 2006.



We have revised the ‘About’ page and broken it down into three further categories: ‘People’, ‘Activities’, ‘Press’.



Under ‘Activities’ there is a submenu listing ‘Writing’, ‘Lectures’, ‘Pedagogy’, ‘Awards & Affiliations’, ‘Juries’, ‘Residencies’, ‘Visitor Programmes’. And ‘Press’ is divided into ‘Press Coverage’ and ‘Latitudes in the Media’.



Newsletters is the place to sign-up for our email updates, and continues to archive our past mailings, also offering the possibility of filtering by year.


RELATED CONTENT:
Stacks Image 39


2019 in 10 monthly Cover Stories

Since our 10th anniversary in Spring 2015, Latitudes has published a monthly cover story on its website (www.lttds.org) featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, as well as research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or travel related to our curatorial work.  

2019 has been an active year of field trips. We have been lucky to visit ARCOmadrid, Buenos Aires (May 2019), Valencia (to research for an article and to participate in a conversation), Devon and Cornwall (September 2019), to Chicago and Detroit (hinted at in the September 2019 Cover Story), Helsinki (October 2019), Bilbao, Moscow (December 2019) and Amsterdam (and Reykjavík from the screen as featured in the April-May cover story).

Happy holidays and a joyful 2020!

Cover Story—December 2019: Curating and the Web of Life.
Cover Story—November 2019: ‘Fighting fires in Valencia: the 30-year story of the IVAM’.
Cover Story—October 2019: Mercedes Azpilicueta in Helsinki.
 Cover Story—September 2019: ‘Polperro to Detroit’
Cover Story—Summer 2019: Francesc Ruiz’s Brexit Bristol sequel, ten years ago.
Cover Story—June 2019: ‘Thinking like a drainage basin: Lara Almarcegui’s ‘Concrete’.
Cover Story—May 2019: Buenos Aires in Parallel.
Cover StoryMarch-April 2019: Icelandic refraction.
Cover StoryFebruary 2019: Schizophrenic Machine.
Cover Story—January 2019: "Seesaw".


RELATED CONTENT:
  • Cover Story—December 2018: "Treasures! exhibitionism! showmanship!" 1 December 2018
  • Cover Story—November 2018: "Joan Morey—postmortem judgement reenactment" 1 November 2018
  • Cover Story–October 2018: "I can’t take my eyes off you: Eulàlia Rovira and Adrian Schindler" 1 October 2018
  • Cover Story–September 2018: Harald Szeemann’s travel sculpture, 10 September 2018
  • Cover Story–August 2018: Askeaton Joyride, 2 August 2018
  • Cover Story–July 2018: No Burgers for Sale 2 July 2018
  • Cover Story—June 2018: Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group, 4 June 2018
  • Cover Story – May 2018: Shadowing Roman Ondák, 7 May 2018 
  • Cover Story – April 2018: "Cover Story—April 2018: Dates, 700 BC to the present: Michael Rakowitz" 3 April 2018 
  • Cover Story – March 2018: "Armenia's ghost galleries" 6 March 2018 
  • Cover Story – February 2018: Paradise, promises and perplexities 5 February 2018 
  • Cover Story – January 2018: I'll be there for you, 2 January 2018 
Stacks Image 39


‘6 Hours Tide Object with Correction of Perspective’ by Jan Dibbets screened in Barcelona

Production of '6 Hours of Tide Object with Correction of Perspective' (2009) by Jan Dibbets. Photo: Paloma Polo / SKOR.

The 8-minute film ‘6 Hours Tide Object with Correction of Perspective’ by Dutch artists Jan Dibbets is currently exhibited as part of "Fingers Crossed" (pdf, Spanish), a group exhibition opening December 14, 2019, curated by Blanca de la Torre and Sue Spaid, at ADN Platform in Sant Cugat (Barcelona), on view until April 4, 2020. 

The film was produced in 2009 for ‘Portscapes’, the year-long programme producing ten new commissions in and around the Port of Rotterdam, The Netherlands, curated by Latitudes


Gerry Schum's 1969 'Land Art' series of films screened on German public TV.

Jan Dibbets’ (1941) film was ‘Portscapes’ inaugural project and was filmed on February 8, 2009. Originally filmed 40 years earlier, in February 1969, in black and white and in 16 mm, it was titled ‘12 Hours Tide Object...’. The film was originally presented in 1969 as part of Gerry Schum's seminal 'Land Art' series of artists' films screened that same year on German public TV (this programme was included in Latitudes-curated touring film programme ‘A Stake in the Mud, A Hole in the Reel. Land Art’s Expanded Field 1968–2008’ which began at the Museo Tamayo in April 2008.)

The film presents the drawing of an isosceles trapezoid in the sand using a bulldozer – the shape consequently appears as a rectangle in the resultant film due to the angle of perspective. The new 2009 realisation was filmed 40 years later to the month on the beach of the Maasvlakte, an area that was soon after forever transformed with the construction of Maasvlakte 2 – a land reclamation project, realised between 2008 and 2013, that extended Europe's largest seaport and industrial area by 2,000 hectares. 


The resulting 8 minute-long film was premiered at the FutureLand Information Centre of the Port of Rotterdam in June 2009 and during Latitudes’ participation in the New York festival NO SOUL FOR SALE – A Festival of Independents (24–28 June 2009). 


Dibbets’ film presented as part of Latitudes’ participation in the festival NO SOUL FOR SALE – A Festival of Independents, New York, 24–28 June 2009. Photo: Latitudes.

Projection of Dibbets' 1969 film as part of the itinerant film programme ‘A Stake in the Mud, A Hole in the Reel. Land Art’s Expanded Field 1968–2008’ on July 11, 2008, at the barn Hongersdijk Farmstead, Wilhelminapolder, Zeeland, The Netherlands, a programme hosted by SKOR (Foundation Art and Public Space, Amsterdam). Photo: Latitudes.

‘6 Hours Tide Object with Correction of Perspective’ was produced in collaboration with SKOR | Foundation Art and Public Space (1999–2012), an organisation which initiated, curated and developed art projects in relation to the public domain that no longer exists, realising over a thousand projects in public space in the Netherlands for over a decade. Portscapes was curated by Latitudes, culminating in a display of the projects at the Museum Boijmans van Beuningen in Rotterdam in 2010.

RELATED CONTENT:

  • Portscapes commissions
  • Portscapes exhibition at the Museum Boijmans van Beuningen
  • Making of '6 Hours of Tide Object with Correction of Perspective' (2009) by Jan Dibbets – part 1 here.
  • Making of '6 Hours of Tide Object with Correction of Perspective' (2009) by Jan Dibbets – part 2 here.
Stacks Image 39


Video of Latitudes' lecture "Curating in the Web of Life" at Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow


Curating in the Web of Lifeis in a 1-hour-long lecture presented on November 7, 2019, at Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow, in the context of their group exhibition ‘The Coming World: Ecology as the New Politics 2030–2100. It is in English and a Q+A follows. You can also watch it with Russian translation (voice-over). 

 Latitudes during the lecture ‘Curating in the Web of Life’. Photo: Anton Donikov. © Garage Museum of Contemporary Art.

In the lecture, Latitudes discuss how Modern art and modernist art history largely assented to the ontological and epistemological lie which imagined humanity and the humanities making their own history by themselves, while hiding the fact that their productions, relations, and economy were always teeming with biophysical processes. The increasing violence by which the limits of the planet, its feedback loops and tipping points, are forcing themselves into world events has profound consequences for how we narrate (art) history and curate exhibitions in the web of life.


Max Andrews of Latitudes during the lecture ‘Curating in the Web of Life’. Photo: Anton Donikov. © Garage Museum of Contemporary Art.
Mariana Cánepa Luna of Latitudes during the lecture ‘Curating in the Web of Life’. Photo: Anton Donikov. © Garage Museum of Contemporary Art.
 
New disciplines are broaching the separation between human activities and Earth systems – environmental law, political ecology, ecological economics, and so on. Likewise, what is at issue when artists, curators, exhibitions, and museums venture into new formations and shared rather than adjacent perspectives? What is at stake in a curatorial ecology, an environmental art history, or in integrating socio-natural processes into an institution’s account of itself, and so on? Turning to a world-systems approach as well as the insights of micro-history, Max Andrews & Mariana Cánepa Luna presented a series of curatorial and artistic perspectives on such questions, drawing from “uncomfortable objects” and “dishonest research” [1] across their exhibitions “4.543 billion. The matter of matter” ( CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux 2017–18), ‘Hemauer Keller: United Alternative Energies’ (Kunsthal Aarhus, 2011), “Greenwashing. Environment: Perils, Promises and Perplexities” (Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, 2008) and related projects such as the residency programme “Geologic Time” (Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity, 2017).

[1] “Uncomfortable objects” is a notion borrowed from artist Mariana Castillo Deball, and “dishonest research” from artist Mercedes Azpilicueta.


Latitudes during the lecture ‘Curating in the Web of Life’. Photo: Anton Donikov. © Garage Museum of Contemporary Art

→ RELATED CONTENTS:
Stacks Image 39



Cookies Advice: We use cookies. If you continue browsing, we consider that you accept their use. Aviso de Cookies: Utilizamos cookies. Si continua navegando, consideramos que acepta su uso.