Longitudes

Partner organisation in ‘Today Is Our Tomorrow’, participation with Mercedes Azpilicueta, PUBLICS – club Kaiku, Helsinki, 12–14 September 2019

Graphic identity of the art festival. Design: julia.studio.


Today Is Our Tomorrow’ is a collaborative, collective, and transdisciplinary festival initiated by Helsinki-based curatorial agency PUBLICS, produced in partnership with local and international organisations, initiatives and institutions. The programme will include a co-commissioned and collaboratively curated programme of temporary public art commissions, live performance, music, dance, theatre, literature and symposia, and will pilot in Club Kaiku complex in Kallio, an underground music venue renowned for hosting an innovative lineup of DJs, and the neighbouring spaces Kieku and Stidilä.

The 2019 edition of ‘Today Is Our Tomorrow’ is curated, commissioned, organised in collaboration with the Finnish partners: Academy of Fine Arts, Baltic Circle, Globe Art Point, IHME Helsinki, Kohta Gallery, Live Art and Performance Studies (LAPS), and Museum of Impossible Forms, and the international partners Index Foundation from Stockholm, osloBIENNALEN from Oslo, the Latvian Centre for Contemporary Art from Riga, and Latitudes from Barcelona.

The programme looks at ‘other’ versions of the present already being lived in Finland and globally: from Alternative futures to Indigenous-futures, to Afro-futures, to Asian-futures, to Eco-futures, to Bio-futures, to Queer and Feminist futures, and to non-hegemonic futures.

Graphic identity of the art festival.


At the invitation of PUBLICS to participate in the festival, Latitudes has invited Buenos Aires-born, Amsterdam-based artist Mercedes Azpilicueta to present her performance ‘Yegua-yeta-yuta’ at Kieku (ground loor, next to Stidilä) on Friday 13 September, 11–11:30pm. A day earlier, on Thursday 12 September, Latitudes will be in conversation with the artist at 5:30h also at Kieku.

Yegua-yeta-yuta’ (2015-ongoing) is an evolving solo performance by Azpilicueta that is part scripted, part improvised. Composed from a litany of hundreds of pejorative, abusive, and vulgar insults directed at women in Argentina, it transforms the everyday language of misogyny and harassment into a kind of tragicomic exorcism. Many of the words derive from the street slang of Buenos Aires, especially Lunfardo, a colloquial and cryptic dialect that first arose among working-class Italian-immigrant and tango communities in Argentina and Uruguay during the late 1800s. For example, yegua literally means a mare – a female horse, a slur for a “difficult” woman. A yeta is a person who brings bad luck, while a yuta is someone corrupt or unscrupulous, and slang for the police. Accompanied by a percussive beat, Azpilicueta reclaims the power to offend, distorting and distending the epithets into something powerful and playful rather than weak and degrading. Azpilicueta will perform to the beat of a new soundtrack produced for the occasion in collaboration with Chilean choreographer Rodrigo Sobarzo de Larraechea


Mercedes Azpilicueta performing ‘Yegua-yeta-yuta’ during the 2017 CA2M Picnic Sessions, Móstoles (Madrid). Photo: Arantxa Boyero.


Mercedes Azpilicueta is an Argentine visual and performance artist based in Amsterdam. Her practice has spanned theatrical mises-en-scènes and video installations, textile sculptures and drawing, sound works and 3D animation. With a particular interest in notions of the vulnerable or collective body, and the primal or dissident voice, her works have drawn inspiration from sources as diverse as Baroque painting, text messaging, medieval tapestries, street slang, and literary fiction, as well as singular figures including the Italian art critic and feminist activist Carla Lonzi (1931–1982), the Argentine-French performance artist Lea Lublin (1929–1999), the French futurist Valentine de Saint-Point (1875–1953), and the Costa Rican-born Mexican ranchera singer Chavela Vargas (1919–2012). A major survey of Azpilicueta’s work to date, ‘Cuerpos Pájaros’ (Body-birds) was recently staged by the Buenos Aires Museum of Modern Art (November 2018–April 2019). In October 2019 she will present ‘Bestiario de Lengüitas’ (Bestiaire of Tonguelets), curated by Virginie Bobin, at CentroCentro, Madrid, an exhibition which will then tour to Museion, Bozen, and CAC Brétigny in 2020. Later in 2019, she will have a solo presentation as part of ‘Positions #5’ at Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven.



(Above) ‘Bestiario de lengüitas’ (2017-ongoing) pieces included in Mercedes Azpilicueta's solo show ‘Cuerpo pájaros’ recently programmed at the Museo de Arte Moderno in Buenos Aires. Photo: Latitudes.

Running parallel during the same week (9–14 September), Latitudes will attend the ‘Gathering for Rehearsing Hospitalities’, a six-day event organised by Frame Contemporary Art Finland in which artists, curators, researchers, and audiences in the field of contemporary art ‘are invited to rehearse and debate hospitality towards diverse ways of knowing and challenging of dominant knowledges’. Alongside the public programme, Frame will arrange studio visits, one-on-one meetings and networking situations.


(Two Above) Moments from the performance ‘Oh, Eduarda!’ on April 14, 2019, also presented at the Museo de Arte Moderno in Buenos Aires. Photos: Latitudes.



→ RELATED CONTENTS:

11 de julio 2019, 19h: Conversación con Lara Almarcegui en el Institut Valencià d'Art Modern (IVAM)

‘Volcán de Agras. Derechos mineros’. Fotos: Lara Almarcegui.

El próximo 11 de julio a las 19h, la artista Lara AlmarceguiMariana Cánepa Luna (comisaria, Latitudes) mantendrán una conversación abierta al público con motivo de la inauguración de exposición individual de Almarcegui ‘Volcán de Agras. Derechos mineros’ en el Institut Valencià d'Art Modern (IVAM), un proyecto coordinado por Sandra Moros, conservadora del museo valenciano. El evento es gratuito y tendrá lugar en el auditorio del museo.

A continuación de la charla, se podrá visitar la exposición en la que Almarcegui ha investigado sobre los derechos mineros del volcán de Agras en Cofrentes, lugar que fue explotado como cantera por la industria cementera desde mediados de los años setenta hasta los años ochenta. La exposición se podrá visitar hasta el 27 de octubre.  


Tapa del catálogo ‘Lara Almarcegui. Béton’ publicado por Silvana Editoriale (2019) con motivo de la exposición de Almarcegui en CAIRN Centre d'art en Digne-les-Bains, Francia.

Lara Almarcegui es seguramente la artista con la que Latitudes ha colaborado en más ocasiones. Han incluido su trabajo en la publicación ‘LAND, ART: A Cultural Ecology Handbook’ (2006) y en la revista UOVO #14 ‘Ecology, Luxury and Degradation’ (2007). Han escrito textos sobre su trabajo que han sido publicados en la revista Mousse Magazine, así como para los catálogos de los proyectos ‘Estratos’ en Murcia (2008) o ‘Sense and Sustainability’, Urdabai Arte (pdf aquí) (2012), y recientemente para el catálogo de su exposición monográfica en el CAIRN Centre d'art, France (2019). 


(Arriba y abajo) Conversación con Almarcegui y el crítico y comisario Cuauhtémoc Medina en TENT, Rotterdam, mayo 2011. Photos by Aad Hoogendoorn.


En el 2011 moderaron una conversación con la artista y el crítico y comisario Cuauhtémoc Medina en TENT, Rotterdam, y editaron su primera monografía ‘Lara Almarcegui. Projects 2005–2010’ publicada por Archive Books (2011). Asímismo le han encargado proyectos para proyectos en el espacio público como ‘Portscapes’ en el puerto de Róterdam (2009–10), el puerto más grande de Europa, y presentado su trabajo en exposiciones colectivas como ‘Greenwashing. Percoli, promesse e perplessità’ [Greenwashing. Peligros, promesas y perplejidades] en la Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo en Torino (2008) y ‘4.543 milliard. La question de la matière’ [4.543 billones. La cuestión de la materia], en el CAPC Musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux (2017–2018).


Monografía ‘Lara Almarcegui. Projects 2005–2010’ editada por Latitudes (Archive Books, 2011).

(Arriba y abajo) Febrero-mayo 2008: Obras de Almarcegui presentadas en la exposición colectiva ‘Greenwashing. Perils, promises and perplexities’, Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Torino. Fotos: Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo.

(Arriba y abajo) 8 Noviembre 2009: 80 personas se sumaron a la visita guiada a cuatro de los diecisiete terrenos baldíos documentados por Almarcegui para el proyecto Portscapes en el Puerto de Rotterdam. Fotos: Paloma Polo/SKOR. Más fotos aquí.

(Arriba, pared) Junio 2017–Enero 2018: Materiales de construcción realizadas por la artista entre el 2005 y el 2008 incluidas en la exposición colectiva ‘4.543 billion. The matter of matter’, comisariada por Latitudes en el CAPC Musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux, Francia. Foto: Latitudes/RK.


→ CONTENIDO RELACIONADO:
  • ‘Thinking like a drainage basin’ essay in the catalogue of the exhibition ‘Lara Almarcegui. Béton’(8 April 2019)
  • Report from Urdaibai: commission series 'Sense and Sustainability', Urdaibai Arte 2012 22 July 2012
  • Launch of the monograph 'Lara Almarcegui. Projects 1995–2010', edited by Latitudes at 'The Dutch Assembly', ARCOmadrid, 15 February, 19-20h 14 February 2012
  • Monograph ‘Lara Almarcegui. Projects 1995–2010’, Archive Books, 2011
  • Photos 'In conversation with Lara Almarcegui', 19 May 2011, TENT, Rotterdam 6 June 2011
  • Editing the forthcoming publication 'Lara Almarcegui. Projects 1995–2010' 18 March 2011
  • Portscapes bus tour: Lara Almarcegui wasteland tour and Christina Hemauer & Roman Keller's 'Postpetrolistic Internationale' choir performance 10 November 2009
  • Text on Lara Almarcegui's project for Expo Zaragoza 2008 and exhibition at Pepe Cobo, Madrid 28 October 2008
  • Catálogo 'Estratos', texto sobre Lara Almarcegui, PAC Murcia 2008 28 Mayo 2008
  • Lara Almarcegui in Frieze Art Fair 19 Octubre 2006

Cover Story—June 2019: ‘Thinking like a drainage basin: Lara Almarcegui’s ‘Concrete’

Latitudes' homepage www.lttds.org

The May 2019 Monthly Cover Story ‘Thinking like a drainage basin: Lara Almarcegui’s ‘Concrete’’ is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org

Lara Almarcegui’s current exhibition at the CAIRN art centre in Digne-les-Bains, southern France, focuses on the nearby Bléone river, its geology, and its exploitation. Latitudes has written an essay entitled ‘Thinking like a drainage basin’ for the accompanying catalogue. Lara’s project Béton (Concrete) has two parts. The first, seen here, involves the floor of the art centre being covered with crushed cement, gravel and sand. This raw material is the remains of several concrete structures — weirs — that were placed in the river in a failed attempt to stabilise a riverbed that had been extensively dug out over the preceding decades to produce gravel for the construction industry. The watercourse and its ecology is now being restored, and the weirs were recently removed.”

—> Continue reading
—> After May it will be archived here.


Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.


RELATED CONTENT:


Cover Story – May 2019: ‘Buenos Aires in Parallel’

Latitudes' homepage www.lttds.org

The May 2019 Monthly Cover Story ‘Buenos Aires in Parallel’ is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org

“Latitudes recently participated in the Parallel Rooms talks programme of Art Basel Cities: Buenos Aires. Developed in collaboration with the arteBA Fundación, and taking place during the arteBA art fair itself, these events transpired in four temporary domes that popped-up on the central showground of La Rural, a venue more used to hosting prize-winning cattle than forty-two curators, artists, and collectors.


—> Continue reading
—> After May it will be archived here.


Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.


RELATED CONTENT:


Cover Story—November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth"

Monthly Cover Story on http://www.lttds.org/blog/


The November 2017 Monthly Cover Story "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth" is now up on www.lttds.org – after this month it will be archived here

"On 15 November the study day The Return of the Earth: Ecologising art history in the Anthropocene takes place at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain Bordeaux in conjunction with the Latitudes-curated exhibition 4.543 billion. The matter of matter. With a keynote by science historian Jean-Baptiste Fressoz, and a conversation between artists Xavier Ribas and Ângela Ferreira—the latter both featured in the exhibition—the event will intertwine discussions of art practice and historical research, with environmental and geological narratives, and vice versa." Continue reading
 
Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities


RELATED CONTENT:
  • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
  • 15 November 2017, 4:30–8pm: 'The Return of the Earth. Ecologising art history in the Anthropocene' study day at the CAPC musée, Bordeaux 24 October 2017
  • Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
  • Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
  • Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
  • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
  • Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
  • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
  • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
  • Cover Story – March 2017: Time travel with Jordan Wolfson 1 March 2017
  • Cover Story February 2017: The Dutch Assembly, five years on 1 February 2017
  • Cover Story January 2017: How open are open calls? 4 January 2017

15 November 2017, 4:30–8pm: 'The Return of the Earth. Ecologising art history in the Anthropocene' study day at the CAPC musée, Bordeaux

Xavier Ribas, detail of diptych num 7 'Caliche Fields' (2010), 22 Pigment prints on Harman Baryta paper 33 x 50 cm. Courtesy the artist and ProjecteSD, Barcelona.

'The Return of the Earth. Ecologising art history in the Anthropocene'
Study day
Wednesday, 15 November 2017  
4:30—8:00pm
Auditorium
CAPC musée d’art contemporain Bordeaux 
7, rue Ferrère, 33000 Bordeaux, France 


PROGRAMME

4:30—5:30 pm

Keynote by science historian Jean-Baptiste Fressoz (Paris) 
5:30—5:45 pm
Break
5:45—6:45
pm
Conversation between artists Xavier Ribas (London) and Ângela Ferreira (Lisbon)
6:45—7:45
pm
Roundtable discussion moderated by Latitudes (Barcelona)


Free event. Simultaneous translation French/English. 

Conference programmed in the context of the exhibition '4.543 billion. The matter of matter', CAPC musée d’art contemporain Bordeaux, 29 June 2017–7 January 2018. Curated by Latitudes.



The work of many of the artists in the exhibition '4.543 billion. The matter of matter' explores the shared history of human activities and Earth systems. Yet this comes with a critical and political inflexion of the universalizing notion of the Anthropocene, the proposed geological ‘epoch of humanity’ that would cast all of the mankind as being responsible for the alarming damage caused by modernizing and capitalizing nature.

With a keynote by science historian Jean-Baptiste Fressoz, and a conversation between artists
Xavier Ribas and Ângela Ferreira—the latter both featured in the exhibition—this event hosted by Latitudes ('4.543 billion' curators Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna), sees art practice and historical research intertwining with environmental and geological narratives, and vice versa. Both Ribas and Ferreira make art that resists the generalising story of the Anthropocene that Fressoz unmasks in his book 'The Shock of the Anthropocene. The Earth, History and Us' (co-authored with Christophe Bonneuil, Verso Books, 2016). Echoing the meticulous historical approach of Fressoz, both Ribas’s and Ferreira’s projects in the exhibition deal with case studies with a very specific place and politics. Addressing mineral agency and colonial extraction, the artists will discuss their approaches to work that has sprung from diamonds in South Africa (Ferreira) to nitrate in Chile (Ribas).

As Fressoz & Bonneuil have written, the Anthropocene “signals the return of the Earth into a world that Western industrial modernity, on the whole, represented to itself as above earthly foundation … Environmental history, natural anthropology, environmental law and ethics, human ecology, environmental sociology, political ecology, green political theory, ecological economics, etc., are among the new disciplines that have recently begun to renew the human and social sciences, in a dialogue with the sciences of nature.” The dialogue during the event will seek to discover what might happen when artists, curators, exhibitions and museums come into the mix of such emerging practices. What is at stake when artists venture beyond the conventional separation of humanities from sciences, and into environmental art history, cultural ecology, decolonial activism, and so on?


Entrance to the exhibition at the CAPC. Photo: Latitudes/RK.

GUESTS

Jean-Baptiste Fressoz, formerly a lecturer at Imperial College, London, is a historian of science, technology and environment. He is based at the Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Paris, the largest governmental research organisation in France and the largest fundamental science agency in Europe. He is the author, with Christophe Bonneuil, of 'The Shock of the Anthropocene' (Verso, 2016). “This bold, brilliantly argued history of the Anthropocene epoch is a corrective to cosy thinking about humanity’s grave disruptions to Earth systems. Christophe Bonneuil and Jean-Baptiste Fressoz draw on climate science, economics and technological history to reveal how, starting in eighteenth-century France, imperial narratives that saw people and planet as a ‘totality to be governed’ laid the conceptual basis for the crisis. They call for a ‘new environmental humanities’, and a shift away from market-based approaches that feed the beast.” – Barbara Kiser, Nature.

Ângela Ferreira’s works in the exhibition form part of a series titled “Stone Free” (2012) in reference to the 1966 hit song performed by Jimi Hendrix (1942–70). “Stone Free” creates correspondences between two voids below the ground, two ‘negative monuments’ as the artist has termed them: Chislehurst Caves, in southeast London, and Cullinan Diamond Mine in Gauteng Province, South Africa. 


Chislehurst Caves is a man-made network of underground tunnels mainly worked in the late 1700s yet dating back to as early as 1250. The tunnels were excavated in order to mine chalk and flint. Following their use as an air-raid shelter during the second world war, the tunnels were transformed into a venue for rock concerts in the 1960s and 1970s. The Jimi Hendrix Experience played there in 1966 and again the following year, bringing Hendrix’s unique countercultural synthesis of social realism and psychedelic spiritualism based on African and indigenous-American imagery into the literal underground.

Cullinan Diamond Mine (known as Premier Mine from its establishment in 1902 until 2003) is famed for being the source of the largest gem-quality rough diamond ever discovered, in 1905. Most of the gems cut-and-polished from this stone were used to adorn the Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom. The recent history of the diamond industry is inextricable from that of settler colonialism in southern Africa and a commodity cartel established by the De Beers corporation founded in 1888 by British imperialist Cecil Rhodes (1853–1902), two years before he became Prime Minister of the Cape Colony. De Beers owned all of the major mines in South Africa, as well as controlling global distribution until it began a recent sell-off of its less productive mines to the Petra Diamonds group, including divesting itself of Cullinan in 2008. 


Ferreira was born in Maputo, Mozambique, in 1958, and lives in Lisbon, where she teaches Fine Art at the Lisbon University.
http://angelaferreira.info

“A History of Detonations” (2014) is a glimpse at an extensive body of work by Xavier Ribas devoted to exploring the legacy of the mining of sodium nitrate in northern Chile, which boomed from the 1870s until the early-twentieth century when it was discovered how to make the compound synthetically. Comprised of photographs taken by the artist during research visits, alongside vintage postcards and press prints bought on the internet, Ribas’s poster sequence takes us from Chile to London to the surface of Mars. The mining and trade of Chilean sodium nitrate was led by a class of British ‘gentleman capitalists’—aristocrats, bankers and merchants. The extraction of the resource not only industrialized the arid Atacama Desert at one end of the commodity chain, and enriched country estates at the other, but through its use as a chemical fertilizer and a component of explosives, it would radically alter a whole series of seemingly disparate geographies, bodies and institutions.

Ribas was born in Barcelona, 1960, and lives in London.  He is a lecturer at the University of Brighton and associate lecturer at the Universitat Politècnica de València. http://www.xavierribas.com/

Latitudes is a Barcelona-based curatorial office initiated in 2005 by Max Andrews (1975, Bath, United Kingdom) and Mariana Cánepa Luna (1977, Montevideo, Uruguay). They are the curators of the CAPC exhibition ‘4.543 billion. The matter of matter’, and led the related month-long residency programme ‘Geologic Time’ that took place in September 2017 at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity. During 2009 Latitudes developed ‘Portscapes’, a series of ten public commissions in the Port of Rotterdam, the Netherlands (2009); in 2010–11 it was a partner organisation in the exhibition ‘The Last Newspaper’ (New Museum, New York) and in 2011 was the guest curator of the project space of the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Castilla y León (MUSAC) in León, Spain. More recent curatorial projects include the solo exhibition ‘José Antonio Hernández-Díez. I will fear no evil’, Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA), Barcelona (2016); ‘Compositions’, site-specific commissions for two editions of the Barcelona Gallery Weekend (2015 & 2016); and editing the online curatorial reportage initiative ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ developed in partnership with Kadist (initiated in 2016).  
www.LTTDS.org

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‘4.543 billion’ is the contribution of the CAPC musée to the cultural season Paysages Bordeaux 2017

Views of the exhibition at the CAPC musée. Photos: Latitudes / RK.

RELATED CONTENT:
  • CAPC website (French, English, Spanish) http://www.capc-bordeaux.fr/programme/4543-milliards
  • Sediments of the Geologic Time 4-week residency at the Banff Centre for Arts & Creativity 10 October 2017
  • SAVE THE DATE: 29 June, 19h. Private view of the exhibition "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" at the CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux 30 May 2017
  • Cover Story – May 2017: "S is for Shale or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps" May 2017
  • Cover Story – May 2016: Material histories – spilling the beans at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux 10 May 2016.
  • Second research trip to Bordeaux 16 July 2016

Fifth episode of 'Incidents (of Travel)' – Dispatch by Simon Soon and chi too from Terengganu, Malaysia


The fifth 'Incidents (of Travel)' episode narrates an encounter between curator Simon Soon and artist chi too. Their offline day took place in April 2016, when they visited the Malaysian North Eastern state of Terengganu, where chi spent some time in 2013, surrounded by "men and women who work(ed) multiple jobs as a fishermen, house builders, boat builders, farmers, coconut pickers, food producers, and everything else that matters."


Each of the 16 photographs and videos is augmented by one or more extra assets (a brief commentary, a caption or a soundscape), accessed by clicking the words which overlay the images. 


Originally conceived by Latitudes as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City in 2012 (with five dispatches presented as part of an exhibition on Latitudes' curatorial practice at Casa del Lago) 'Incidents of Travel' had sequels in 2013 in Hong Kong (online dispatches published via twitter, instagram, and soundcloud) and San Francisco in 2015 (daily posts on Kadist' instagram as part of their #ArtistNotInTheStudioCuratorNotAtTheOffice take over initiative).


The project explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter and an extended conversation between curator/s and artist/s. Online storytelling presents and documents curatorial fieldwork and an offline day conceived by an artist for a curator.

Since April 2016 Kadist and Latitudes partnered in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)' as part of Kadist Online Projects. This new phase is developed as an online periodical that publishes regular contributions from invited curators and artists working around the world.
The series inaugurated in April 2016 with an itinerary from curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – their tour was photographed by Nabiha Khan. The second dispatch came from Jinja in Uganda, where curator Moses Serubiri invited photographer Mohsen Taha to explore Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972. The third episode took place while curator Yu Ji and poet Xiao Kaiyu hiked on Dong Shan (East Mountain), 130 km west of Shanghai, on a peninsula stretching into Tai Hu lake near the city of Suzhou, China. The fourth dispatch came from Lisbon, where Galician curator Pedro de Llano visited key locations that marked the life and work of Luisa Cunha.

Forthcoming: Marianna Hovhannisyan (Yerevan).
  

RELATED CONTENT


Flow Series #11: Conversación entre Haegue Yang y Latitudes, 3 mayo 2017, 19:30h



Conversación entre Haegue Yang y Latitudes
Miércoles 3 de mayo, 19:30h. 
Actividad gratuita. Aforo limitado. 
Reservas: [email protected] 
c/ Aragó 255, 08007 Barcelona
 
El undécimo encuentro de la Flow series, reunirá a Latitudes y la artista surcoreana afincada entre Berlin y Seoul Haegue Yang. Durante su conversación hablarán sobre cuatro de sus obras más recientes, entre las cuales destacan "An Opaque Wind" (Sharjah Biennial 12, 2015) y "An Opaque Wind Park in Six Folds" (Fundação de Serralves, Porto, 2016), a partir de una perspectiva en términos de patrones de desarrollo histórico y de las fluctuaciones cíclicas, planteadas por el economista y sociólogo italiano Giovanni Arrighi, quien cuestionaba ¿qué es acumulativo, qué es cíclico y qué es nuevo?

Flow series es un programa de encuentros impulsado por la Fundación Han Nefkens y la Fundació Antoni Tàpies cuyo objetivo es reunir diferentes agentes del mundo del arte procedentes de continentes y contextos diversos. Los encuentros en torno a un artista y sus producciones en curso son el objeto de una conversación seguida de un aperitivo. 


Vista de la instalación, "An Opaque Wind Park in Six Folds", Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art, Porto, Portugal, 2016. Fotos: Latitudes.


Haegue Yang (1971 Seúl, Corea del Sur) participó en documenta 13 en Kassel en el 2012 y en el 2009 representó a Corea del Sur en la Biennale di Venezia. Ha partipado en numerosas exposiciones, entre las que destacan: Hamburger Kunsthalle, Hamburgo, 2017; Fundaçao Serralves, Porto, 2016; Centre Pompidou, Paris, 2016; Ullens Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing, 2015; el Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art, Seúl, 2015; la Bergen Kunsthall, Bergen, 2013; Aubette 1928 y el Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art en Estrasburgo, 2013; Haus der Kunst en Munich, 2012; Kunsthaus Bregenz, 2011; Modern Art Oxford, 2011; el Aspen Art Museum, 2011; y el Walker Art Center en Minneapolis, 2009.

 
(Arriba y abajo) Instalación 'Accommodating the Epic Dispersion – On Non-cathartic Volume of Dispersion' (2012) de Haegue Yang, comisariada por Julienne Lorz en Haus der Kunst, Munich. Foto: Latitudes.


Latitudes ha colaborado con Yang en varias ocasiones a lo largo de la última década. En el 2007 encargó una entrevista entre el comisario Doryun Chong y Yang para el número 14 de la revista UOVO (leer un extracto en el blog del Walker Art Center). En el 2009 Latitudes presentó su pieza ‘Holiday for Tomorrow’ (2007) en el marco de la exposición colectiva ‘Sequelism Part 3: Possible, Probable, or Preferable Futures’ en Arnolfini, Bristol. 


(Above and below) Haegue Yang, 'Holiday for Tomorrow' (2007), Arnolfini, Bristol, 2009. Photos: Carl Newman.


Más adelante, en el 2010, Yang colaboró con una fotocopia de su rostro para la cubierta de ‘The Star Ledger’, el cuarto fascículo que formó el catálogo de la exposición ‘The Last Newspaper’ (New Museum, Nueva York), editado por Latitudes durante el transcurso de dicha exposición.

Cover of The Last Star-Ledger, issue 4 of 10 edited by Latitudes during ‘The Last Newspaper’ exhibition at the New Museum, New York, 2010.

Recientemente, con motivo de la conmemoración del 10º aniversario de Latitudes, le encargó un diseño para una edición limitada de tote bags (¡agotada!). El diseño se basó en ‘Eclectic Totemic’ – el papel pintado creado en colaboración con los diseñadores OK-RM (Oliver Knight y Rory McGrath) para su exposición individual en el Museo de Arte Moderno y Contemporáneo de Estrasburgo en el 2013. 



Fotografiando el tote bag realizado por Haegue Yang realizado en colaboración con OK-RM, que conmemora el 10º aniversario de Latitudes. Foto: Latitudes.

Además, Max Andrews de Latitudes ha escrito sobre su trabajo para el catálogo de la Carnegie International 2008 en Pittsburgh, así como la publicación que acompañó su exposición individual ‘Desigualdad simétrica’ en la Sala Rekalde en el 2008–9. En el 2012 escribió sobre su obra 'Tectonic Texture' emplazada en la Cantera de Andrabide, como parte de la serie de intervenciones ‘Sentido y Sensibilidad’ en Urdaibai.


'Tectonic Texture' (2012) de Haegue Yang en la Cantera de Andrabide, como parte de la serie de intervenciones ‘Sentido y Sensibilidad’ en Urdaibai. Foto: Latitudes.


CONTENIDO RELACIONADO:

Fourth episode of 'Incidents (of Travel)' – Dispatch by Pedro de Llano and Luisa Cunha from Lisbon, Portugal


The fourth 'Incidents (of Travel)' episode comes from Lisbon, Portugal, where Galician curator Pedro de Llano met Lisboeta artist Luisa Cunha. Their offline day took place in early December and went through key locations in the artist's life – from Ar.Co, the School of Visual Arts in Almada where she enrolled at age thirty seven, to the Largo da Academia de Belas Artes in Chiado, where she conceived a public project that never materialised. 

Each of the 23 photographs in the sequence is augmented by one or more extra assets (a brief commentary, a caption or a soundscape), and is accessed by clicking the words which overlay the images. 


Originally conceived by Latitudes as day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City in 2012 (with five dispatches presented as part of an exhibition on Latitudes' curatorial practice at Casa del Lago) 'Incidents of Travel' had sequels in 2013 in Hong Kong (online dispatches published via twitter, instagram, and soundcloud) and San Francisco in 2015 (daily posts on Kadist' instagram as part of their #ArtistNotInTheStudioCuratorNotAtTheOffice initiative). 

The project explores the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter and an extended conversation between curator/s and artist/s. Online storytelling presents and documents curatorial fieldwork and an offline day conceived by an artist for a curator.

Since April 2016 Kadist and Latitudes partnered in a new 'distributed' phase of 'Incidents (of Travel)' as part of Kadist Online Projects. This new phase is developed as an online periodical that publishes regular contributions from invited curators and artists working around the world. 

The series inaugurated with an itinerary from curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – their tour was photographed by Nabiha Khan. The second dispatch came from Jinja in Uganda, where curator Moses Serubiri invited photographer Mohsen Taha to explore Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972. The third episode took place while curator Yu Ji and poet Xiao Kaiyu hiked on Dong Shan (East Mountain), 130 km west of Shanghai, on a peninsula stretching into Tai Hu lake near the city of Suzhou, China.
Forthcoming contributions: Simon Soon (Kuala Lumpur / Sydney); Natalia Zuluaga (Pereira / Miami) and Marianna Hovhannisyan (Yerevan), all fellows who participated in the seminar ‘The Place From Where We Look’ at Kadist Paris in June 2015.  

RELATED CONTENT:

In conversation for the exhibition catalogue "Limits to Growth" by Nicholas Mangan (Sternberg Press, 2016)


Photos: Latitudes.

After much anticipation, we are elated to see (and touch!) Latitudes' five-part interview with Nicholas Mangan as part of his exhibition catalogue "Nicholas Mangan. Limits to Growth" (Sternberg Press, 2016). The publication is designed by Žiga Testen and includes newly commissioned texts by Ana Teixeira Pinto and Helen Hughes, alongside illustrations of Mangan's work and historical source material.

The five-part interview weaves together a discussion around five of his recent works ‘Nauru, Notes from a Cretaceous World’ (2009), ‘A World Undone’ (2012), ‘Progress in action’ (2013), ‘Ancient Lights’ (2015) and his newest piece ‘Limits to Growth’ (2016) commissioned for this exhibition survey. Latitudes’ dialogue with Mangan, began around a research trip to Melbourne in 2014, and continued in the form of the public conversation event that took place at the Chisenhale Gallery, London, in 2015, as well as over Skype, email, snail mail and walks.






 

The publication release coincides with Mangan's eponimous exhibition survey which began in July in Melbourne's Monash University Museum of Art and just opened this past weekend in Brisbane's IMA. The show will further tour to Berlin's KW Institute for Contemporary Art in Summer 2017.

"Nicholas Mangan. Limits to Growth" 

Publisher: Sternberg Press with the Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane; KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin; and Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne.
Editor: Aileen Burns, Charlotte Day, Krist Gruijthuijsen, Johan Lundh. 
Texts: Latitudes, Helen Hughes, Ana Teixeira Pinto 
Design: Žiga Testen;
October 2016, English;
17 x 24 cm, 246 pages + 2 inserts, edition of 1500; 

40 b/w and 102 color ill., with color poster and postcard Softcover;
ISBN 978-3-95679-252-6;
30 Euros.






















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Founded in 2005 by Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna, Latitudes is a curatorial office based in Barcelona, Spain, that works internationally across contemporary art practices.

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Latitudes
2005—2019