Longitudes

Max Andrews' text for Rasmus Nilausen's solo exhibition ‘Bluetooth’ at Copenhagen's Overgaden


Rasmus Nilausen, ‘Better Half’ (2019), oil on linen, 160x130cm. Photo: Roberto Ruiz. Courtesy: the artist.

Max Andrews of Latitudes has written a text on Rasmus Nilausen for his forthcoming solo exhibition ‘Bluetooth’ opening September 20, 5–8pm, at Copenhagen's Overgaden. Institute of Contemporary Art.

‘Bluetooth® is a two-way digital wireless standard that enables the exchange of information between computers, mobile phones, and other peripherals such as keyboards and headphones. For Rasmus Nilausen, painting is a technology that connects the communicative assets of drawing, writing, speaking, reading, and looking. The range of both protocols is typically less than 10 m. Could we mandate the capabilities of Nilausen-enabled devices, along with their encoding and specifications? Since around 2000, oil pigment on linen has provided Nilausen’s most widely adopted attributes and colour space. It has transmitted information and provided connectivity using the following parameters: idioms and fruits, vegetables and eyeballs, tongues and images, fingers and candles, sense and habits, nonsense and perspective, old masters and young slaves.’

—Max Andrews


The exhibition is on view until November 24, 2019.

Rasmus Nilausen, ‘Historie’ (2019), oil on linen, 40x50cm. Courtesy: the artist.


RELATED CONTENTS:

‘Thinking like a drainage basin’ essay in the catalogue of the exhibition ‘Lara Almarcegui. Béton’


(Above and below) Installation views of the exhibition ‘Béton’ by Lara Almarcegui at the CAIRN centre d'art, Digne-les-Bains, 2019. All photos: François-Xavier Emery.

Lara Almarcegui's exhibition ‘Béton’ opened on April 5 at CAIRN Centre d'art, in Digne-les-Bains, France, and will be on view until June 30th, 2019.

Latitudes has collaborated in the bilingual catalogue ‘Lara Almarcegui. Béton’ (French/English) recently published by Silvana Editoriale on the occasion the exhibition, with the new essay ‘Thinking like a drainage basin’. The publication includes an introduction by Giulia Pagnetti (curator of the exhibition and director of CAIRN Centre d'art), a second essay titled ‘Lara Almarcegui's building sites’ by Natacha Pugnet, and a conversation between the artist and Winfried Dallmann (Associate Professor, Department of Geosciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø) titled ‘Earth Calculation’.



As Latitudes' writes in the essay (...) ‘As part of her most recent project for CAIRN Centre d’art, Almarcegui has produced ‘Roches et Materiaux du Bassin de la Bléone’ (2019), an inventory of the different types of geological matter comprising the entire drainage basin of the Bléone river from its source near Prads-Haute-Bléone to its confluence with the Durance at Chateau-Arnaux, a terrain of some 906 km2.

In discussing how storytelling might integrate with environmental science, anthropologist Julie Cruikshank poses the rhetorical question, “are glaciers ‘good to think with’?”[1] She suggests that glaciers and glacial stories be allowed to disrupt and exceed conceptual fields and dominant frameworks of knowledge. Ecologist Aldo Leopold coined the term “to think like a mountain” in his 1949 book ‘A Sand County Almanac’, proposing that history could be narrated, or indeed art could be made, from the point of view of non-human actors. Are drainage basins good to think with? What might it entail to think like the rocks and topological forms that funnel water into a river in the Alpes-de-Haute-Provence département in southeastern France?’



‘Lara Almarcegui. Béton’
April 2019, 48 pages, 24 x 17 cm
Texts by Natacha Pugnet, Latitudes and an interview between the artist and Winfried Dallmann. 
French/English 
Published by Silvana Editoriale
Edited by CAIRN centre d'art
ISBN 9788836640904
Purchase here for 10 Euros.

RELATED CONTENT:
  • Writing archive on Latitudes' website;
  • Review – ‘Domènec. Y la tierra será el paraíso', adn galería, Barcelona, frieze.com, 13 March 2019
  • Opinion – ‘Frank Zappa’s Genre-Defying ‘Civilization Phaze III’’, frieze, January-February 2019, Issue 200, and frieze.com, 14 January 2019
  • Review – ‘Te toca a tí’ [It's your turn], Espai d'art contemporani de Castelló, art-agenda, 7 January 2019
  • art-agenda review of Frieze week 2018 15 October 2018
  • Catalogue essay – ‘The Kørner Problem’, in the monograph ‘John Kørner', ed. by Maria Nipper. Published by Roulette Russe, 2017. 19 February 2018

Cover Story – March-April 2019: Icelandic refraction


Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org

The March-April 2019 Monthly Cover Story “Icelandic refraction” is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org

“It has been speculated that Icelandic spar was at one time used for navigational purposes,” reflects curator Becky Forsythe. Her account of a short Reykjavík day spent with artist Þorgerður Ólafsdóttir is the latest episode of Incidents (of Travel), the series edited by Latitudes and produced by Kadist.”


—> Continue reading
—> After April it will be archived here.


Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.


RELATED CONTENT:

  • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
  • Cover Story–February 2019: Schizophrenic Machine (1 February 2019)
  • Cover Story—January 2019: “Seesaw” (7 January 2019)
  • Cover Story—December 2018: "Treasures! exhibitionism! showmanship!" 1 December 2018
  • Cover Story—November 2018: "Joan Morey—postmortem judgement reenactment" 1 November 2018
  • Cover Story–October 2018: "I can’t take my eyes off you: Eulàlia Rovira and Adrian Schindler" 1 October 2018
  • Cover Story–September 2018: Harald Szeemann’s travel sculpture, 10 September 2018
  • Cover Story–August 2018: Askeaton Joyride, 2 August 2018
  • Cover Story–July 2018: No Burgers for Sale 2 July 2018
  • Save the date: 13 September, 6–9pm. Latitudes-curated exhibition ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’, Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna, 21 June 2018
  • Cover Story—June 2018: Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group, 4 June 2018
  • Cover Story – May 2018: Shadowing Roman Ondák, 7 May 2018 

Mariana Cánepa Luna reviews ‘Te toca a tí! [It's Your Turn!]’ for art-agenda



‘Te toca a tí’ [It's Your Turn]
Espai d'art contemporani de Castelló, Castelló de la Plana
October 26, 2018—February 17, 2019


"Two pairs of hands play a game of cat’s cradle, forming a star from a loop of string; viewers may imagine one person pulling the string while the other interprets their instructions. This photograph, which appears on the cover of the booklet accompanying the group exhibition “Te toca a tí” [It’s your turn] at the Espai d’art contemporani de Castelló (EACC), epitomizes the exhibition’s conceptual framework. Curated by Laura Vallés Vílchez and including works by ten artists, the show asks whether a gallery can become a site of negotiation, and if so, in what ways it can be re-signified."

—> Continue reading here.

Text originally published in art-agenda on January 7, 2019.



Teresa Lanceta, selection of tapestries and sewn fabrics, 2003-2018. Variable dimensions. Courtesy of the artist and Galería Espacio Mínimo. Photo by Ester Pegueroles.


Luca Frei, ‘Simone Forti's See-Saw’, 2015. Variable dimensions. Performance with plywood see-saw. Courtesy of the artist and The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Committee on Media and Performance Funds, 2018. Photo by Luca Frei.


Céline Condorelli, ‘Models for a Qualitative Society’, 2016. Variable dimensions. Painted blackwood acacia, steel. 84 x 119 cm, Inkjet prints. Courtesy of the artist. Photo by Ester Pegueroles.

RELATED CONTENT:



    Cover Story—January 2019: “Seesaw”

    Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org

    The January 2019 Monthly Cover Story “Seesaw” is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org


    “The exhibition “Te toca a tí” (It’s your turn) continues at Espai d’art contemporani de Castelló, Castellón de la Plana, until February 17th. Curated by Laura Vallés Vílchez (editor of the journal Concreta) it includes works by ten artists within a conceptual framework that asks how a gallery space can become a site of negotiation, process, reciprocity, and empathy. Mariana Cánepa Luna’s review of this optimistic show was recently published in Art Agenda.”

    —> Continue reading
    —> After December it will be archived here.


    Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.


    RELATED CONTENT:

    • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
    • Writing archive – exhibition reviews, artists' profiles, opinion columns, interviews, and catalogue essays written by Latitudes since 2005.
    • Cover Story—December 2018: "Treasures! exhibitionism! showmanship!" 1 December 2018
    • Cover Story—November 2018: "Joan Morey—postmortem judgement reenactment" 1 November 2018
    • Cover Story–October 2018: "I can’t take my eyes off you: Eulàlia Rovira and Adrian Schindler" 1 October 2018
    • Cover Story–September 2018: Harald Szeemann’s travel sculpture, 10 September 2018
    • Cover Story–August 2018: Askeaton Joyride, 2 August 2018
    • Cover Story–July 2018: No Burgers for Sale 2 July 2018
    • Save the date: 13 September, 6–9pm. Latitudes-curated exhibition ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’, Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna, 21 June 2018
    • Cover Story—June 2018: Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group, 4 June 2018
    • Cover Story – May 2018: Shadowing Roman Ondák, 7 May 2018 

    Max Andrews reviews in frieze: ‘A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’ (LUMA Foundation, Arlès) and Pere Llobera's ‘Acció’ (Bombon Projects, Barcelona) and ‘Kill Your Darlings’ (Sis Galería, Sabadell)

    Max Andrews, co-founder of Latitudes and contributing editor to frieze, recently reviewed the group exhibition ‘A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’ at LUMA Foundation in Arlès. The exhibition is curated by artist Walead Beshty and is on view until January 6, 2019. Published on frieze.com, 20 December 2018.
    Frank Gehry's LUMA building under construction, as of October 12, 2018. Above and following photos by Latitudes. 

    Views from the exhibition ‘A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’.

    "Le Fusil Photographique" by Étienne-Jules Marey. 

    Works by Wolfgang Tillmans (vitrines) and Christopher Williams (wall).

    Hans-Peter Feldmann's "9-12 Front Page", 2001. 


    ‘PICTURE INDUSTRY: A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’, curated by Walead Beshty. Exhibition views, les Forges, Luma Arles, Parc des Ateliers, Arles, France, 2018. © Marc Domage.

    ‘PICTURE INDUSTRY: A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’, curated by Walead Beshty. Exhibition views, les Forges, Luma Arles, Parc des Ateliers, Arles, France, 2018. © Marc Domage.

    ‘PICTURE INDUSTRY: A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’, curated by Walead Beshty. Exhibition views, les Forges, Luma Arles, Parc des Ateliers, Arles, France, 2018. © Marc Domage.


    ‘PICTURE INDUSTRY: A Provisional History of the Technical Image, 1844–2018’, curated by Walead Beshty. Exhibition views, les Forges, Luma Arles, Parc des Ateliers, Arles, France, 2018. © Marc Domage.


    Also for frieze, Max Andrews reviewed two concurrent exhibitions by Pere Llobera: Acció’ at Bombon Projects (Barcelona) and ‘Kill Your Darlings’ at Sis Galería (in nearby Sabadell), ‘exploring the artist’s ever-changing styles and painterly references.’ Published online on 13 November 2018, and included in January-February 2019 print issue #200.

    “As if tormented by his own cursed hand, Llobera’s darkly fugitive shtick is his alarm at its ability to paint so adeptly so easily, despite his mind’s suspicion of painters painting to be admired.” 


     Views from Pere Llobera's exhibition ‘Acció’ at Bombon Projects, Barcelona. Courtesy the artist. Above and photos below: Roberto Ruiz.



    RELATED CONTENT:
    • Writing archive on Latitudes' website (since 2005);
    • Max Andrews reviews Lúa Coderch; "Crash Test. The Molecular Turn" and Julia Spínola for frieze 9 April 2018
    • "The Kørner problem” essay by Max Andrews in the monograph "John Kørner" published by Roulette Russe, 19 February 2018
    • Max Andrews essay on Christopher Knowles for NoguerasBlanchard at Liste 2017, 21 July 2017
    • Cover Story – January 2017: How open are open calls? 4 January 2017
    • Cover Story – December 2016: Ten years ago – Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook, 5 December 2016
    • January 2016 Monthly Cover Story: Kasper Akhøj's Eileen Gray’s E.1027, 4 January 2016
    • Review of the exhibition "What cannot be used is forgotten" in the May issue of frieze magazine, 29 April 2015
    • Review of Maria Thereza Alves' exhibition at CAAC Sevilla published in frieze magazine 9 March 2015

    Mariana Cánepa Luna reviews Frieze week 2018 for art-agenda.com

    Advertising in Pimlico. Above and below photos by Latitudes.

    London Roundup
    Various locations, London
    October 12, 2018


    Just as Frieze Art Fair opened last Wednesday, Prime Minister Theresa May gave her keynote speech—and dared to dance again—at the Conservative Party Conference in Birmingham. She announced that freedom of movement would be terminated “once and for all” by limiting access to “highly skilled workers” (in short, migrants earning over 30,000 British pounds per year). Countless art professionals earn much less (including entry-level curatorial staff at Tate, and yours truly), as well as doubtless many of the myriad gallery and museum folks involved in the city-wide jamboree of Frieze week. How do we imagine London’s contemporary art ecology post-Brexit, a scene that has grown exponentially since Tate Modern’s opening in 2000 and the first Frieze Art Fair in 2003? The question of how the 2019 edition of the fair is going to be affected was the elephant in the tent. Most people I asked shrugged: negotiations are still ongoing, consequences are yet to be seen. “It’ll be fiiiiine,” a London museum director told me. “Maybe we’ll visit a smaller fair, like the first editions—remember those days?” opined a British gallerist friend working in New York. Although one could put this upbeat denial down to the cliché of dark British humor and the spirit of “muddling through,” I nevertheless left worried that something more troubling lay behind it.

    If Frieze might have triggered the relocation of many contemporary art galleries from the East to the West of the city, two recent institutional openings are enforcing a southern axis. The new Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art in New Cross, housed in a listed Victorian bathhouse refurbished by 2015 Turner Prize winners Assemble, kicked off with a sparkling survey show of Mika Rottenberg’s absurdist film installations offering grotesque parodies of current labor conditions. The second home of the South London Gallery at Peckham Road Fire Station, elegantly renovated by 6a architects, opened with “Knock Knock,” a group show about the uses of humor—from political satire to visual puns—in contemporary art. The addition of these spaces will surely benefit Gasworks, a short bus ride away in nearby Vauxhall, whose truly international program of residencies and exhibitions over the last two decades has been a vital antidote to the dangers of isolationism in the British art scene.


    —> Continue reading here.

    Text originally published in Art-agenda on October 12, 2018.



    Lucy Dodd at Sprüth Magers, London.

    Façade of the new Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art in New Cross.
    Detail of Mika Rottenberg's show at Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art in New Cross.
    Part of Tania Bruguera’s 2018 Hyundai Commission at Tate Modern. 
    Visitor's comments on the Turner Prize 2018 board.
    Installation from Atelier E.B's show at the Serpentine Sackler Galleries, London.
    Detail from Cayetano Ferrer's solo exhibition “Demaster” at Southard Reid, London.
    Martine Syms at Sadie Coles HQ, London. 
    Judith Kopf's "Flock of Sheep" (2017) at the South London Gallery.
    Cornelia Parker Transitional "Object" (PsychoBarn) at the Royal Academy.
     Johanna Unzueta at Proyectos Ultravioleta, Focus section, Frieze Art Fair.
     (Above + below) Sam Lewitt, "Core (the "Work")", BMW Open Work commission, Frieze Art Fair.
     Ian Law at RODEO, Frieze Art Fair.
    (Above and below) Oscar Humphries' "Sèvres and Japonism" at Frieze Masters, London. 

    (Above and below) Chris Burden at Gagosian, London.  

    Lawrence Abu Hamdan at Chisenhale, London.
    Daniel Silver at Frith Street Gallery, London.
    Kemang Wa Lahulere at Marian Goodman Gallery, London.
     Alicja Kwade's work in the "Space Shifters" exhibition, Hayward Gallery, London.
     (Above and below) Elmgreen and Dragset, "This is how we bite our tongue", Whitechapel, London.
    Amy Sillman at Camden Art Center, London.

    RELATED CONTENT: 

    Cover Story–May 2018: "Shadowing Roman Ondák"

    Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org

    The May 2018 Monthly Cover Story "Shadowing Roman Ondák" is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org

    This month we revisit Roman Ondák’s exhibition ‘Some Thing’ at The Common Guild, Glasgow, in 2013, during which Latitudes was invited to give a talk. Roman’s show comprised a series of composite works in display cases. Early still-life paintings and pencil drawings from his student days in Slovakia in the 1980s were coupled with the actual objects depicted – a chair, a length of rope, a helmet, a vase (a detail of "Shadow, 1981/2013" is the work above), and so on, which were placed in a deadpan way on top of them.

    —> Continue reading
    —> After May it will be archived here.

    Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.



    RELATED CONTENT:



    Max Andrews reviews Lúa Coderch; "Crash Test. The Molecular Turn" and Julia Spínola for frieze

    Review ‘The Molecular Turn’: While Social Media Flourishes Ecological Systems are Collapsing. At La Panacée, Montpellier, Nicolas Bourriaud’s manifesto for a new movement and attempt to demarcate an artistic peer group." on frieze magazine.

    Max Andrews, co-founder of Latitudes and contributing editor to frieze, has recently reviewed the group exhibition ‘Crash Test. The Molecular Turn’ (at La Panacée, Montpellier, until May 6, 2018) as well as Lúa Coderch's solo exhibition ‘The girl with no door on her mouth’ (àngels barcelona, on view until April 13, 2018) for friezeBoth texts are available online and are included in print in the April issue.

    —> Video of Lúa Coderch presenting her work (Spanish with English subtitles).

    Review "The Girl with No Door on Her Mouth: Lúa Coderch's Acts of Making Noise. The artist explores the politics of the female voice that speaks out or is shut up, at àngels barcelona, Spain." on frieze magazine.

    A review on Julia Spínola's solo show "Lubricán" at the Centro de Arte 2 de Mayo (Móstoles, Madrid), has also just been published online and will also be included in the forthcoming May 2018 issue.

    —> Video of Julia Spínola presenting the show (in Spanish).

    Review "Julia Spínola: Twilight. At Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo, Móstoles, a crepuscular glow lends acute poignancy to simple forms and materials" on frieze magazine.


    RELATED CONTENT:
    • Writing archive on Latitudes' website (since 2005);
    • "The Kørner problem” essay by Max Andrews in the monograph "John Kørner" published by Roulette Russe, 19 February 2018
    • Max Andrews essay on Christopher Knowles for NoguerasBlanchard at Liste 2017, 21 July 2017
    • Cover Story – January 2017: How open are open calls?, 4 January 2017
    • Cover Story – December 2016: Ten years ago – Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook, 5 December 2016
    • January 2016 Monthly Cover Story: Kasper Akhøj's Eileen Gray’s E.1027, 4 January 2016
    • Symposium participation, "The Shock of Victory", Glasgow, 25 September 2015
    • Review of the exhibition "What cannot be used is forgotten" in the May issue of frieze magazine, 29 April 2015
    • Review of Maria Thereza Alves' exhibition at CAAC Sevilla published in frieze magazine 9 March 2015

    "The Kørner problem” essay by Max Andrews in the monograph "John Kørner" published by Roulette Russe

    Exhibition poster of "Altid Mange Problemer" at Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen, Summer 2017. Photo: Latitudes.

    Last Summer, Max Andrews of Latitudes was invited to contribute an essay for the forthcoming monograph of John Kørner's work published by the Danish editorial Roulette Russe and designed by Spine Studio. The publication is out now and includes essays by Max, London-based writer Oliver Basciano, and a conversation between the artist and Marie Nipper, curator of John's recent mid-career exhibition in Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen. 

    The 280-page bilingual Danish/English monograph will be launched on March 2, 2018, at 4:30pm, in Kunsthal Charlottenborg's Apollo Kantine, though it will become available for online orders from February 26.

    (Above and following): Photos: Finn Wergel Dahlgren. Courtesy Roulotte Russe. 













    In his essay, Max tries to define what "The Kørner problem” (the title of the essay) might be:

    (...) "The apparently ‘wicked’ problems and appalling catastrophes that interpenetrate Kørner’s works are manifold. The upsurge in jihadist terrorist activity in Europe since 2015 and its fallout are unavoidable (whether vestiges of the Charlie Hebdo shootings and the Bataclan attacks in Paris, suicide bombings in Brussels and Manchester; or truck attacks in Nice, Berlin, Barcelona; rampaging attacks in London, and so on). The civil war and the rise of ISIL (ISIS, Daesh) in Syria and the exacerbating effects of climate change and mega-drought that affected the region are inescapable. The European debt and migrant crisis are here. Yet elsewhere Kørner also brings to mind what at first seem like unrelated problems: the 2011 Tōhoku tsunami and the calamity of the Fukushima nuclear power plant meltdown, human trafficking, et cetera, states of exception that seem to confirm that the problem is evermore radical, atrocious, ungrounded—more diffuse while remaining intractably real. American pop star Ariana Grande knows this as well as Kørner. Released in spring 2014, three years before the suicide bombing of her concert at Manchester Arena, her most successful single to date is titled “Problem”. We are witnessing new kinds of wicked problems and Kørner paints accordingly."


    In preparation for the catalogue essay, in July 2017 Latitudes visited Kørner's impressive "Altid Mange Problemer" mid-career exhibition at Kunsthal Charlottenborg, the largest exhibition of his works to date, gathering paintings and sculptural pieces from 2004 to the present.

    (Above and following): Photos by Latitudes.


    Max has previously written on John's work for the catalogue of his 2006 exhibition "Problems" at Victoria Miro Gallery in London.

    Latitudes' first visit to Copenhagen also involved Kørner's work, as we visited his solo show 'ARoS Bank' at the ARoS Århus Kunstmuseum, Denmark (13 June–10 September 2006), which became the subject of our first blog post over a decade ago, in September 2006 (!).

    RELATED CONTENT:
    • Latitudes' writing archive
    • Latitudes' "out of office" 2016–2017 season 1 August 2017
    • Max Andrews essay on Christopher Knowles for NoguerasBlanchard at Liste 2017 21 July 2017
    • Mariana Cánepa Luna reviews Ana Jotta’s “Abans que me n’oblidi (Before I forget)” exhibition in art-agenda 11 November 2016
    • '2006 Problems' exhibition and publication by John Kørner, Victoria Miro Gallery, London 29 November 2006
    • Copenhagen trip. 'Woman with 24 problems' by John Kørner 30 September 2006

    Founded in 2005 by Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna, Latitudes is a curatorial office based in Barcelona, Spain, that works internationally across contemporary art practices.

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    Latitudes
    2005—2019