Longitudes

Longitudes cuts across Latitudes’ projects and research with news, updates, and reportage.

Cover Story, February 2023: Soil for Future Art Histories

February 2023 cover story on www.lttds.org


The February 2023 monthly Cover Story “Soil for Future Art Histories” is now up on our homepage: www.lttds.org

“Latitudes’ essay ‘Un suelo para las historias del arte del futuro’ (Soil for Future Art Histories) is included in the newly-released catalogue of Futuros Abundantes (Abundant Futures), an exhibition of works from the TBA21 Collection curated by Daniela Zyman that took place at the C3A Centro de Creación Contemporánea de Andalucía in Córdoba last year. Continue reading

After February 2023 this story will be archived here.

Cover Stories are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes’ homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial projects and activities.


→ RELATED CONTENTS

  • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
  • Cover Story, January 2023: Claudia Pagès’ ‘Gerundi Circular’, 2 Jan 2023
  • Cover Story, December 2022: “The Melt Goes On Forever. David Hammons and DART Festival, 1 December 2022
  • Cover Story, November 2022: Jorge Satorre’s Barcelona, 1 Nov 2022
  • Cover Story, October 2022: Stray Ornithologies—Laia Estruch, 3 Oct 2022
  • Cover Story, September 2021: Erratic behaviour—Latitudes in conversation with Jorge Satorre, 31 August 2021
  • Cover Story, July–August 2022:  Incidents (of Travel) from Seoul, 1 July 2022
  • Cover Story, June 2022: Cyber-Eco-Feminist Incidents in Attica, 1 June 2022
  • Cover Story, May 2022: Things Things Say in print, 2 May 2022
  • Cover Story, March 2022: The passion of Gabriel Ventura, 1 March 2022
  • Cover Story, February 2022: Rosa Tharrats’ Textile Alchemy, 1 Feb 2022
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Latitudes’ essay “Un suelo para las historias del arte del futuro” [Soil for Future Art Histories] in TBA21’s catalogue “Futuros Abundantes”

"Futuros abundantes" / "Abundant Futures" is co-published by TBA21 and Turner, 2023. Photos by Enrico Fiorese.

The exhibition catalogue “Futuros Abundantes / Abundant Futures” is now available. The book will be launched in ARCOmadrid’s section of ArtsLibris, on February 23rd at 5pm. 

With contributions from Rosemary-Claire Collard, Jessica Dempsey and Juanita Sundberg; Beatrice Forchini; Macarena Gómez-Barris; Berta Gutiérrez Casaos; Soledad Gutiérrez Rodríguez; Latitudes; Regina de Miguel; Plata; Matthew Ritchie; Jess Saxby; and Daniela Zyman. Poems by Ibn Zaydun and an artistic intervention by Abraham Cruzvillegas.

Hardcover, 16,5 x 24 cm
Spanish / English, 336 pages
Edited by Daniela Zyman and Eva Ebersberger
Book design by Matteo Guarnaccia
ISBN 978-84-18895-65-4
EUR 25
Miguel Covarrubias, “The Tree of Modern Art planted 60 Years Ago” [El árbol del arte moderno plantado hace 60 años], plantado hace 60 años], in Vanity Fair, vol. XL, n.º 3, New York, May 1933, pp. 36-37.

Edited by Daniela Zyman and Eva Ebersberger, and co-published with Editorial Turner in the context of the exhibition “Abundant Futures. Works from the TBA21 Collection” curated by Zyman, the show was co-organised by TBA21 and C3A Centro de Creación Contemporánea de Andalucía in Córdoba. 

The 336-page book includes Latitudes newly commissioned essay titled “Un suelo para las historias del arte del futuro” [Soil for Future Art Histories], which delves into how we might turn the page on the pseudo-organic root-and-branch diagrams that have underpinned the cultural narratives of the archetypical institutions of twentieth-century art, and instead consider an entity that has been largely neglected in its capacity to connect human and natural relations: soil.

The essay is published in Spanish. Below an excerpt in English: 

“Thinking and building a new logic outside of the dualism of humanity on the one hand and nature on the other necessitates new narratives, new grammar, new relational strategies, and such new explanatory figurations. History in this alternative perspective is a history where human activity has always been meshed and mulched in the web of life. Following a sense of both humanity-in-nature and nature-in-humanity, we could imagine an art history and way of making exhibitions that is both outside in and inside out.

We could better imagine a shared vocabulary—terms that easily move back and forth between aesthetic and non-aesthetic uses. And we could give more attention to categories that, like soil, already seem to refuse a distinction between cultural forms and other forms of lived experience. The present and the future likewise require reconstructing and refreshing the theoretical model of the whole genre of the exhibition, its possibilities, and conditions. Allowing a wider and deeper sense of image- and object-making lineages could create new conditions for abundance, tackling the damaging split still left between the humanities and the natural world, and the imprint that this rift has left on the institutions of knowledge which allowed art history and artistic practices to be considered an alternative order to the forces and objects of the web of life. What we then might find is not a universal and singular structure, not a unitary tree of modernity, but countless very specific perspectives, practices, systems, temporalities, and imaginations in varying states of composition as well as decomposition, active as well as lying fallow.”


Essay keywords: Ecology, Daniel D. Richter, environmental art histories, Art History, abundance, temporalities of soil, “human forcing”, Environmental collapse, exhibition-making, Dipesh Chakrabarty, diagrams, Earth system, Miguel Covarrubias, Alfred H. Barr Jr., MoMA, tree genealogy, Porphyrian trees, environmental history, rewilding art history, María Puig de la Bellacasa, Jason W. Moore, Web of Life, soil, landscape, farming, agricultural intensification, Aldo Leopold, “to think like a mountain”, Julie Cruikshank, soil-attentive ethos, humanity-in-nature, nature-in-humanity, Caroline Levine, overlapping rhythms of art institutions.


→ RELATED CONTENT:



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2022 in 11 monthly Cover Stories

Since Spring 2015 we have been publishing a monthly cover story on our homepage (www.lttds.org) featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, as well as sharing our research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or travel related to our curatorial practice.

Here are those published in 2022, which you can read again in this archive:

Cover Story, January 2022: “Rasmus’ Doubts”, 2 January 2022.

Cover Story, February 2022: Rosa Tharrats’ Textile Alchemy, 1 February 2022.

Cover Story, March 2022: The passion of Gabriel Ventura, 1 March 2022.

Cover Story, April 2022: Mix and Match. Laia Estruch at PUBLICS, 1 April 2022.

Cover Story, May 2022: Things Things Say in print, 2 May 2022.

Cover Story, June 2022: Cyber-Eco-Feminist Incidents in Attica, 1 June 2022.

Cover Story, July–August 2022: Incidents (of Travel) from Seoul, 1 Jul 2022.

Cover Story, September 2022: The means of print production: Erick Beltrán and lumbung press, 1 September 2022.

Cover Story, October 2022: Stray Ornithologies–Laia Estruch, 3 October 2022.

Cover Story, November 2022: Incidents (of Travel), Jorge Satorre’s Barcelona, 1 November 2022.

Cover Story, December 2022: “Melt Goes On Forever. David Hammons and DART Festival”, 1 December 2022.


RELATED CONTENT:


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Cover Story–June 2021: ‘Fitness food: Salim Bayri’s Amsterdam’


June 2021 cover story on www.lttds.org

The June 2021 monthly Cover Story ‘Fitness food: Salim Bayri’s Amsterdam’ is now up on our homepage: www.lttds.org

“For me, sport brings aspects that I miss in art: direct group interaction and a clear reward and penalty system”, writes artist Salim Bayri in his Itinerary for the latest edition of Incidents (of Travel), in which he devised an alternative day-long tour of Amsterdam for curator Àngels Miralda.

 Continue reading

→ After June 2021 this story will be archived here.

→ Follow: #IncidentsofTravel 

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial projects and activities.


→ RELATED CONTENTS

  • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
  • Cover Story–May 2021: RAF goes viral, 2 May 2021
  • Cover Story—April 2021: Cover Story – April 2021: Lara Almarcegui at La Panera, 2 Apr 2021
  • Cover Story—March 2021: Eulàlia Rovira's ‘A Knot Which is Not’ (2020–21), 1 mar 2021 
  • Cover Story—February 2021: ‘Straits Time: narrative smuggling in Singapore’, 1 Feb 2021
  • Cover Story–January 2021: ‘Things Things Say’: VIP's Union’, 1 Jan 2021
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2020 in 11 monthly Cover Stories

Since Spring 2015, Latitudes has published a monthly cover story on its homepage www.lttds.org featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, as well as ongoing research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or travel related to our curatorial practice. Here's how 2020 looked like on our homepage.

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Episode #12 of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Nino Kvrivishvili and Tara McDowell from Tbilisi

Browser view of episode 12 of Incidents (of Travel) from Tbilisi.

→ http://incidents.kadist.org

A new episode of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ from Tbilisi is now live! It is the latest edition of the online project produced by KADIST and edited by Latitudes exploring the chartered itinerary as a format of artistic encounter, an extended offline conversation between curator/s and artist/s

The 12th episode sets a different tone in the online series as it was programmed to take place in late May, during the COVID-19 global pandemic. The itinerary set by Tbilisi-based artist Nino Kvrivishvili to lead Melbourne-based Associate Professor Tara McDowell became a WhatsApp video tour/conversation around Nino's artistic practice and the Georgian silk industry — a production that began in Tbilisi in the 5th century and continued until the collapse of the Soviet Union in the 1990s.  

Nino led Tara to a former silk industry building, locations of former fabric shops on Rustaveli Avenue (Tbilisi’s central artery), introduced her to Aleksandre Utmazyan's unique textile shop, visited the State Silk Museum where she exhibited in 2016, and virtually followed the smell of Aleko's freshly baked Shotis Puri (the distinctive canoe-shaped Georgian flatbreads) before ending in Nino's studio in the Saburtalo district. Here they “talk about the women who came before us, who worked in these industries, under desperately hard conditions, and whose lives remain hidden, their stories untold.”

Incidents (of Travel) site presents one continuous immersive read interwoven with vertical videos and images in a new mobile-friendly format. Tap, swipe and scroll!


Incidents (of Travel)’ was conceived in 2012 when Latitudes commissioned 5 day-long artist-led tours around Mexico City in the framework of a short residency at Casa del Lago. The project had sequels in 2013 in Hong Kong with online dispatches published live via social media, including soundscapes (archived on Soundcloud), and in 2015 in San Francisco with daily posts as part of Kadist's Instagram take over “Artist Not In The Studio Curator Not At The Office”.

A year later, Kadist and Latitudes partnered in a new ‘distributed’ phase of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ extending the invitation to curators and artists working around the world and publishing their dispatches as an Online Project.

Since 2016 conversations have taken place in Tbilisi (Georgia), Panama City (Panama), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil), Reykjavík (Iceland), Buenos Aires (Argentina), Hobart (Tasmania), Yerevan (Armenia), Terengganu (Malaysia), Lisbon (Portugal), Suzhou (China), Jinja (Uganda) and Chicago (US). 


The first dispatch launched in April 2016 with an itinerary by curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – a day photographed by Nabiha Khan


The second dispatch came from Jinja in Uganda, where curator Moses Serubiri invited photographer Mohsen Taha to explore Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972.


The third episode took place while curator Yu Ji and poet Xiao Kaiyu hiked on Dong Shan (East Mountain), 130 km west of Shanghai, on a peninsula stretching into Tai Hu lake near the city of Suzhou, China.

The fourth dispatch came from Lisbon, where Galician curator Pedro de Llano visited key locations that marked the life and work of Luisa Cunha.


The fifth episode took place in April 2016, when curator Simon Soon and artist chi too visited the Malaysian North Eastern state of Terengganu, where chi spent some time in 2013, surrounded by "men and women who work(ed) multiple jobs as fishermen, housebuilders, boat builders, farmers, coconut pickers, food producers, and everything else that matters." 

The sixth episode narrates a walking itinerary conducted by curator Marianna Hovhannisyan with Vardan Kilichyan, Gohar Hosyan, and Anaida Verdyan in Yerevan, the capital of Armenia, documenting the transformed, disappeared, or permanently-closed art institutions in the city centre.


The seventh episode comes from Hobart, capital of Tasmania. It is narrated by curator Camila Marambio, following an itinerary devised by artist Lucy Bleach. They spent the day "encircling the outer limits of human understanding by visiting the histories, both past, and present, of attempts to reach beyond our sensory capacities through governance, technology, and reverie", and ended the day cooking at Lucy's home-sharing their mutual love for quinces.


In the eighth 'Incidents (of Travel' dispatch Móvil co-founder and curator Alejandra Aguado followed the itinerary devised by the artist Diego Bianchi around Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

Their exploration took them from the self-regulated community Velatropa to the buzzing commercial area of Once, identifying human and non-human flows and interactions. This became an entry point for discussing Bianchi's interests in how, as consumers, we define a particular zeitgeist and appropriate trends that enable us to affirm our identities.

In the ninth dispatch, Canadian curator Becky Forsythe and Icelandic artist Þorgerður Ólafsdóttir navigate Reykjavík's surroundings considering Þorgerður's “current interest in Icelandic Spar (a form of transparent calcite), its double refraction and light-polarizing properties. In a race with daylight, they travel between sites collecting moments and considering the ways in which geologic time surfaces in the context of human time.”


The tenth dispatch begins with an itinerary proposed by Barcelona-born, Rio de Janeiro-based artist Daniel Steegmann Mangrané and is followed by images and videos recording a day roaming Rio's natural and artistic landscapes with Bogotá-born, Mexico City-based curator Catalina Lozano, who narrates their day spent together. 

In the 11th episode, Swiss curator Sandino Scheidegger (Random Institute) visits Panama City in preparation for a solo exhibition by Donna Conlon and Jonathan Harker at Casa Santa Ana in 2021. Conlon and Harker collaboration since 2006 (while also pursuing their own individual art practices) has resulted in seventeen video works to date. The places Sandino, Donna and Jonathan visited together pointed to the origin of some of their video works, the ideas behind them, or simply served as stages in their pieces, turning into “an exercise in sneaking through fences to reach former recycling plants, imagining how things looked before the skyscrapers took over, and navigating the complex social fabric of Panama City — all while getting a taste of local food between every stop.” 

RELATED CONTENT:

Episode #11 of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Sandino Scheidegger and Donna Conlon & Jonathan Harker from Panama City
9 April 2020
https://www.lttds.org/longitudes/index.php?id=4425215029591365006/11-episode-of-incidents-of-travel

Tenth episode of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Catalina Lozano and Daniel Steegmann Mangrané from Rio de Janeiro
29 January 2020
https://www.lttds.org/longitudes/index.php?id=144735152408473327/tenth-episode-of-incidents-of-travel

The ninth episode of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Becky Forsythe and Þorgerður Ólafsdóttir, 8 February 2019
https://www.lttds.org/longitudes/index.php?id=6371927610418460689

The eighth episode of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Alejandra Aguado and Diego Bianchi, 6 September 2019
https://www.lttds.org/longitudes/index.php?id=8721104601538735691

Seventh episode of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Camila Marambio and Lucy Bleach from Hobart, Tasmania, 28 June 2018
https://www.lttds.org/longitudes/index.php?id=1055853895543348027

The sixth episode of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Marianna Hovhannisyan and students from the National Center of Aesthetics from Yerevan, Armenia, 1 March 2018
http://www.lttds.org/blog/blog.php?id=5887133486742947361

The fifth episode of 'Incidents (of Travel)' – Dispatch by Simon Soon and chi too from Terengganu, Malaysia, 26 April 2017
http://www.lttds.org/blog/blog.php?id=4083951540089486920

The fourth episode of 'Incidents (of Travel)' – Dispatch by Pedro de Llano and Luisa Cunha from Lisbon, Portugal, 2 March 2017
http://www.lttds.org/blog/blog.php?id=4185860148466062617

The third episode of 'Incidents (of Travel)' – Dispatch by Yu JI and Xiao Kaiyu reporting from Suzhou, China, 6 September 2016
http://www.lttds.org/blog/blog.php?id=1437935620149738144

Second 'Incidents (of Travel)' dispatch by Moses Serubiri and Mohsen Taha reporting from Jinja, Uganda, 30 June 2016
https://www.lttds.org/longitudes/index.php?id=2504250800654900933

Kadist and Latitudes present 'Incidents (Of Travel)' online 31 May 2016
http://www.lttds.org/blog/blog.php?id=1076947282278624159


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Cover Story–June 2020: Mataró Chauffeur Service, since 2010

Latitudes' homepage www.lttds.org

The June 2020 monthly Cover Story ‘Mataró Chauffeur Service, since 2010’ is now up, check our website www.lttds.org

“The premise was simple. Latitudes needed to get to Tate Modern and so Martí Anson was going to drive us to London and back. He would form a one-man one-car taxi company in his home town of Mataró, pick us up early in the morning in Barcelona and we’d head for the ferry. Mataró, Barcelona, Santander, Portsmouth, London, ‘No Soul for Sale’ festival, happy 10th birthday Tate Modern. Pim pam. His great-grandfather had been a taxi driver in Montevideo and his father-in-law a driver for the boss of Schweppes.”

→ Continue reading
→ After June 2020, this story will be archived here.

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.


RELATED CONTENTS



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Cover Story—January 2020: Safeguarding Gestures

Latitudes' homepage www.lttds.org

The January 2020 monthly Cover Story ‘Safeguarding Gestures’ homepage: www.lttds.org

‘‘‘Poems for Earthlings’, by Argentinian artist Adrián Villar Rojas, transforms the Oude Kerk, a monumental church in the heart of the Amsterdam’s Red-light District which dates back to 1306. Unveiled during the Amsterdam Art Weekend two months ago and continuing until April, Villar Rojas’s installation features in the recent art-agenda Roundup from the city by Latitudes' Mariana Cánepa Luna.”
 

Continue reading
→ After January 2020, this story will be archived here.

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.

 

RELATED CONTENTS
  • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
  • Cover Story—December 2019: Cover Story—December 2019: Curating in the Web of Life 3 December
  • Cover Story—November 2019: ‘Fighting fires in Valencia: the 30-year story of the IVAM’ 1 November 2019
  • Cover Story—October 2019: Mercedes Azpilicueta in Helsinki 1 October 2019
  • Cover Story—September 2019: ‘Polperro to Detroit’ 4 September 2019
  • Cover Story—Summer 2019: Francesc Ruiz’s Brexit Bristol sequel, ten years ago 1 July 2019
  • Cover Story—June 2019: Thinking like a drainage basin: Lara Almarcegui’s ‘Concrete’ 1 June 2019
  • Cover Story—May 2019: Buenos Aires in Parallel 1 May 2019
  • Cover Story—March-April 2019: "Icelandic refraction" 3 March 2019
  • Cover Story—February 2019: Schizophrenic Machine (1 February 2019)
  • Cover Story—January 2019: “Seesaw” (7 January 2019)
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Mariana Cánepa Luna's Amsterdam Roundup for art-agenda.com

https://www.art-agenda.com/features/306593/amsterdam-roundup
“Many cities have adopted the gallery weekend format, and while there is a risk that this proliferation can lead to homogeneity, the particular strength and energy of Amsterdam Art Weekend lies in its steadfast commitment to art and artists, and to not limiting its remit to the commercial sector. Now in its eighth edition, the event grew out of the Rijksakademie Open, the yearly open studio presentations by the forty-plus artists in the institution’s two-year postgraduate residency program.”

Continue reading. 

Originally published in art-agenda on December 13, 2019.

Below a broader selection of images from the exhibitions and events mentioned in the review, as well as others that couldn't fit in the 1,000-word review, such as Andrei Tarkovski’s exhibition at the Eye Filmmuseum, AKINCI’s group exhibition, Rozenstraat — a rose is a rose is a rose, more Rijksakademie artists’ studios and a short visit to Rotterdam's Witte de With and the new space of Wilfried Lentz in the Port. 

 (Above and below) Adrián Villar Rojas, “Poems for Earthlings”, 2019. Courtesy of the artist and Oude Kerk, Amsterdam. All photos by Mariana Cánepa Luna (unless otherwise specified in the photo caption).
Adrián Villar Rojas, “Poems for Earthlings”, 2019. Courtesy of the artist and Oude Kerk, Amsterdam. Photo: Jörg Baumann. 
Adrián Villar Rojas, “Poems for Earthlings”, 2019. Courtesy of the artist and Oude Kerk, Amsterdam. Photo: Jörg Baumann. 
  (Above and below) Carlos Amorales, ‘Orgy of Narcissus’, 2019. Courtesy of the artist, kurimanzutto, Mexico City / New York, and Nils Stærk Gallery. These works were developed in collaboration with the TextielLab, the professional workshop of the TextielMuseum.
 Carlos Amorales during the press tour presenting ‘Life In The Folds’ a work produced for the Pavilion of Mexico at the 57th Venice Biennale in 2017.
 Carlos Amorales, Black Cloud, 2007 (installation view). Collection of Diane and Bruce Halle.
 Carlos Amorales, Aprende a joderte (Learn to Fuck Yourself), 2019. Courtesy of the artist and kurimanzutto, Mexico City / New York. 
  (Above and below) Patricia Kaersenhout, ‘Guess Who's Coming To Dinner Too?’, 2019, installation view, De Appel, Amsterdam.

(Above and below) Installation view of Andrei Tarkovski at the Eye Filmmuseum presented an interesting curatorial challenge: how to translate the oeuvre of a filmmaker into an exhibition. In the case of Tarkovski, his limited filmography (8 feature films, plus 3 short films) reduces the challenge considerably, yet the decision of screening 20-minute clips from each film and splitting those clips on two or three large screens simultaneously raises further artistic questions—how far can the immersive experience be stretched? Tarkovski’s unique imagery and tempo multiply throughout the exhibition space far from the durational, one-image-at-a-time consumption offered by the cinematic experience (not to mention the cacophony, which must be said, was reduced here thanks to state-of-the-art hovering speakers above visitor seats). The second challenge has to do with the institutional programme. The next exhibition at the Eye Filmmuseum will be dedicated to (yet another man) Belgium-born, Mexico-based visual artist Francis Alÿs, and in March 2020 to Chantal Ackerman, the Belgian avant-garde filmmaker who passed away in 2015. This will be the first institutional solo exhibition dedicated to a woman since the museum opened in 2012, which is quite eye-opening (intended pun) and significant in the context of the low number of institutions programming female artists solos — yet it's also important to take into consideration the larger picture of female representation in the filmmaking industry.
 Sander Breure & Witte van Hulzen, "Accidents Waiting to Happen", installation, sculpture, video, performance, 2019. Prix de Rome 2019. Courtesy tegenboschvanvreden, Amsterdam.
Femke Herregraven, "Diving Reflex (Because We Learned Not to Drown, We Can Sing)", multimedia installation, 2019-ongoing. Prix de Rome 2019.
Esiri Erheriene-Essi, "The Inheritance" (or Familiar Strangers), 2019. Prix de Rome 2019.
Rory Pilgrim, "The Undercurrent", multimedia installation, 2019-ongoing. Prix de Rome 2019. Courtesy the artist and andriesse eyck galerie. Pilgrim's film received the Prix de Rome Visual Arts 2019 award for his work, receiving 40,000 euros and a residency at the American Academy in Rome.

 Studio by Shahidul Zaman during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.
  Studio by Christopher Manon during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.
  Studio by Jude Crilli during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.
 Studio by Aldo Esparza Ramos during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.
Studio by Artor Jesus Inkerö during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.
Studio by Catalina González during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.
Studio by Catalina González during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.
Studio by Salim Bayri during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.
Remco Torenbosch “Now” (2019), video, 180min, during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.
 Studio by Antonio Vega Macotela during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019. 

Studio by Anderu Immaculate Mali during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.
Studio by Dan Zhu during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.

Studio by Lotte van Geijn during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.

Studio by Özgür Atlagan during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.
Studio by Arturo Kameya during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.
  (Above and below) Claudia Martínez Ayala solo show ‘A las revoluciones, como a los árboles, se les reconoce por sus frutos’ [Revolutions, like trees, are recognized by their fruits], 2019, installation view, Courtesy the artist and GRIMM Amsterdam | New York.
Rozenstraat – a rose is a rose is a rose presented the multichannel video-installation “Beyond Index” (2017) by Dutch artist Gerald van der Kaap.

LA-artist Matthew Monahan at Fons Welters, Amsterdam.

Day trip to nearby Rotterdam to visit three unique solo shows at Witte de With, by Rossella Biscotti (above and two below).


(Above) Alejandro Cesarco and Cecilia Vicuña (below)


(Above and below) Also had a chance to visit the new venue of Wilfried Lentz in the Port area, next door to Atelier van Lieshout studio, which had a solo show of James Beckett.


(Above and below) Back in Amsterdam, kunstverein’s presented ‘Who's Werner?’ a group exhibition concerned with recognised authorship in collaborative artistic practices.


Next door, Martin van Zomeren presented a solo show of Marcel van Eeden.

Tahmina Negmat at Althuis Hofland.
Charbel-joseph H Boutros and Stéphanie Saadé at rongwrong.


Maarten Vanden Eynde's work at Cargo in Context, part of the group show "On-Trade-Off: The Weight of Wonders", an artistic trajectory initiated by the artists' initiatives Picha (DRC) and Enough Room for Space (BE).

And last but not least, the solo show presenting a site-specific sculpture by Belgian artist Leyla Aydoslu at P/////AKT.

→ RELATED CONTENT:

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Max Andrews' Valencia Feature in frieze magazine, November-December 2019

Institut Valencià d’Art Modern (IVAM), 1989. Courtesy: Institut Valencià d’Art Modern. Photograph: Juan García Rosell.

Max Andrews, co-director of Latitudes and contributing editor to frieze magazine, has written the feature-length article ‘The Rise, Fall and Reinvention of Spain’s First Modern Art Museum’ for the November–December 2019 (issue 207) of frieze
The article focuses on the rise, fall, and reinvention of the city’s trailblazing Institut Valencià d’Art Modern (IVAM) through the cultural and (often notorious) political agents that have forged its institutional history since it opened in 1989. It also touches on the roles of other important institutions in the contemporary art landscape in Valencia, such as the Centre del Carme, the galleries Luis Adelantado, espaivisor, and Rosa Santos, and the private art foundation Bombas Gens Centre d'Art, that opened in 2017 in a former 1930s hydraulic pump factory.

Fermín Jiménez Landa, ‘Salvar el foc’ (Save the Fire), 2018, public sculpture and performance documentation. Courtesy: the artist.

"On the night of 19 March 2017, artist Fermín Jiménez Landa lit a match from the embers of a smouldering monument in a square within the Spanish city of Valencia. From that flame, he lit a candle, then a lantern, then a gas heater, keeping the fire alive through various technologies for 365 days and nights, until it sparked the incineration of his own monument, a wooden representation of an apartment block. Jiménez Landa’s action was done as part of Valencia’s fabled fallas festivities, which culminate each Saint Joseph’s night with a vast spectacle of burning all over the city, as hundreds of elaborate sculptures, conventionally groups of clownish figures, go up in smoke. The fallas have long brought a satirical zest, and an irresistibly primal symbolism, to Spain’s third-largest city. They’re a searing reminder of the transience of art." 

→ Continue reading here.


View of the collection gallery ‘Matter, space and time. Julio González and the avant-gardes’, Institut Valencià d’Art Modern (IVAM). Photo: Latitudes, May 2019.
(Above and below) Views of the collection show ‘TIMES OF UPHEAVAL. Stories and microstories in the IVAM collection’, Institut Valencià d’Art Modern (IVAM). Photo: Latitudes, May 2019.
View of the exhibition ‘The Gaze of Things. Japanese Photography in the context of Provoke’ at Bombas Gens Centre d’Art, Valencia. Photo: Latitudes, May 2019. 


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