Longitudes

Cover Story–February 2019: Schizophrenic Machine

Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org

The February 2019 Monthly Cover Story “Schizophrenic machine” is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org


Schizophrenic machine, the concluding performance of the Latitudes-curated Joan Morey project COLLAPSE, took place on the freezing evening of 10 January. One hundred and thirteen pre-vetted audience members, each complying with a rigid all-black dress code, were driven by coach to the previously undisclosed location: the former La Model prison in Barcelona’s Eixample neighbourhood. More strictures were barked by a balaclava-clad doorman upon arrival: silence! single file! No mobile phones, no bathrooms, no chance to leave. The reverberation of a door slamming. More than two hours in the darkness and cold.

—> Continue reading
—> After December it will be archived here.


Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.


RELATED CONTENT:

  • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
  • Photo documentation of COLLAPSE.
  • Cover Story—January 2019: “Seesaw” (7 January 2019)
  • Cover Story—December 2018: "Treasures! exhibitionism! showmanship!" 1 December 2018
  • Cover Story—November 2018: "Joan Morey—postmortem judgement reenactment" 1 November 2018
  • Cover Story–October 2018: "I can’t take my eyes off you: Eulàlia Rovira and Adrian Schindler" 1 October 2018
  • Cover Story–September 2018: Harald Szeemann’s travel sculpture, 10 September 2018
  • Cover Story–August 2018: Askeaton Joyride, 2 August 2018
  • Cover Story–July 2018: No Burgers for Sale 2 July 2018
  • Save the date: 13 September, 6–9pm. Latitudes-curated exhibition ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’, Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna, 21 June 2018
  • Cover Story—June 2018: Near-Future Artworlds Curatorial Disruption Foresight Group, 4 June 2018
  • Cover Story – May 2018: Shadowing Roman Ondák, 7 May 2018 

‘COLLAPSE. Schizophrenic Machine’ site-specific performance by Joan Morey at the former prison La Model, Barcelona, 10 January 2019



‘Schizophrenic Machine’ site-specific performance by Joan Morey at the former Panopticon-inspired prison La Model, Barcelona, 10 January 2019. © All photographs by Noemí Jariod. Courtesy of the artist.




















Schizophrenic Machine’ was the closure to the three-part project ‘COLLAPSE’ by Joan Morey. This new site-specific performance took place on January 10, 2019, in the former prison La Modelo, a location that was kept in secret up until the 113 guests were driven in coaches from either Centre d'art Contemporani - Fabra i Coats, or the Centre d'art Tecla Sala

The audience previously registered to attend the closed-door performance and agreed to comply with the strict dress code. The performance script integrated the 1904 chilling architecture of the prison through voice and technological devices such as drones, surveillance cameras, strobe lighting, an architecture scanning laser. Each one activated and deactivated the building's memories making ‘Schizophrenic Machine’ be Morey's first performance with no human actors as protagonists. ‘Schizophrenic Machine’ continued Morey's long-standing exploration of power structures and control of the body.



Schizophrenic machine’ took the physical and discursive past of La Model as a scenario for performance where bodies were not acting and the protagonist was the architecture itself. The Panopticon-inspired prison was inaugurated on June 9, 1904, and was conceived as a model for the Spanish penitentiary system: an example of the reintegration of criminals into society through discipline, isolation and religious morality. La Model was one of the main sites of political repression and social control in the city. Followers of all political persuasion passed through its cells, aside from common criminals, yet during the long totalitarian dictatorship of General Franco (1939–1975), it was especially notorious as a site for the repression of political dissidents. La Model closed on June 8, 2017, 113 years after its inauguration


‘Schizophrenic machine’ took over the unoccupied building and created a phantasmagoric presence that activated and deactivated its own memory. Conceived as an all-encompassing experience the event took on a singular awareness of the building and the site. The sequential dramatisation of its radial spaces articulated a dystopian representational device. A cast of technological interpreters —voices, sound, lights, cameras, drones and other devices— took the place of performing bodies. Moreover, the panopticon architecture itself seemed to address spectators through a female voice that spoke on the principles of control, power and the paradigm of a surveillance society. La Model became a schizophrenic machine, an imperious disciplinary mechanism for the 21st century. 

Produced by the Contemporary Art Center of Barcelona - Fabra i Coats as the third and final part of the ‘COLLAPSE’ project.





























Share: #JoanMoreyColapso

RELATED CONTENT:

  • Wakelet archive of social media content
  • Selección de reseñas, videos y entrevistas (31 Diciembre 2018)
  • Inscripción para asistir a la performance ‘Máquina esquizofrénica’ de Joan Morey (11 Diciembre 2018)
  • December 13, 2018, 7pm: Performance reenactment of "TOUR DE FORCE. El cos utòpic" (2017) by Joan Morey 10 December 2018
  • December 13, 2018, 7 pm: Performance reenactment of "TOUR DE FORCE. El cos utòpic" (2017) by Joan Morey (10 December 2018)
  • "Joan Morey presenta "Col·lapse. Cos social", programa Taquilla Inversa, L'Hdigital Mitjans de Comunicació de L'Hospitalet, 29 Novembre 2018
  • Pía Cordero, "COL·LAPSE, o l’avenir il·limitat de l’obscenitat", www.nuvol.com, 6 Desembre 2018
  • November 29, 2018, 5–8pm: Performance reenactment of "IL LINGUAGGIO DEL CORPO. Pròleg" (2015-16) by Joan Morey 26 November 2018
  • November 15, 2018, 7 pm: Performance reenactment of "BAREBACK. Fenomenología de la comunión" (2010) by Joan Morey 12 November 2018
  • October 25, 7pm: Performance reenactment of "GRITOS Y SUSURROS" (2009) by Joan Morey 22 October 2018
  • October 11, 2018, 7pm: Performance reenactment of ‘LLETANIA APÒRIMA’ [APORIC LITANY] (2009) by Joan Morey 8 October 2018
  • Performance programme in the context of Joan Morey's exhibition ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring Machine, Working Machine’ 24 September 2018
  • Maria Palau, "Contra l'abús de poder", El Punt Avui, p. 32, 23 Setembre 2018 (Catalan)
  • Full performance programme
  • NOTA DE PRENSA: ‘Joan Morey. COLAPSO’, diversos espacios, Barcelona, 20 septiembre 2018–13 enero 2019, 19 September 2018
  • Save the date: 19 September at 7pm, opening of the solo show by Joan Morey ‘COLLAPSE. Desiring machine, working machine’, Centre d'Art Contemporani Barcelona - Fabra i Coats, 3 September 2018

Performance “One motif says to the other: I can’t take my eyes off you” by Eulàlia Rovira and Adrian Schindler in the exhibition ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’

All photos: Latitudes.

On September 14, Eulàlia Rovira and Adrian Schindler presented the performance ‘One motif says to the other: I can’t take my eyes off you’ in the context of the exhibition ‘Cream Cheese and Pretty Ribbons!’, curated by Latitudes at Galerie Martin Janda in Vienna.

The new performance comprised a series of sartorial compositions, music clips, and readings from memory that were inspired by the belts, buckles, chains, harnesses, and tassels that appear on luxury silk scarf designs by brands such as Hermès, as well as the vogue for tattoos appropriating tribal patterns. A companion series of five photographic prints are derived from the intertwining designs of the latter textiles. 


Rovira and Schindler also present another work in the exhibition. "The Feet Fixed to the Ground Betray no Impatience" (2016) features a camera-phone film based around a Barcelona park bench, as well as its sculptural reproduction. This model of street furniture is known as the ‘Romantic double’, and it inspires a narrative and a sequence of gestures that evoke the masterplans that opened up cramped European cities in the 19th-Century as well as ongoing impulses to organise public space and orchestrate the gaze. 

Eulàlia Rovira & Adrian Schindler, born 1985 & 1989, live in Barcelona.


The exhibition ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’ brings together works by David Bestué, Sean Lynch, Eulàlia Rovira & Adrian Schindler, and Batia Suter to reflect on the apparent dichotomy between the utilitarian versus the functional, and the artful, refined, decorative, adorned, of good taste. The artworks in the exhibition have managed to find a way to escape this apparent dichotomy in how they treat form and content, using wit and storytelling, and engaging with seemingly mundane things in a magical way.

Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’ is part of the curated_by Vienna gallery festival inviting international curators. In 2018 the festival examines Vienna's systems and contradictions, life between the baroque and present times.

+ info

Share:
#CreamCheeseAndPrettyRibbons 
#CuratedbyVienna 


RELATED CONTENT:

'Compositions' a programme of five artists' interventions for the second Barcelona Gallery Weekend, 29 September–2 October 2016


Compositions presents five artistic interventions in unique sites across the neighbourhoods of the city of Barcelona. Each of the commissioned artists is represented by a gallery participating in the second edition of the Barcelona Gallery Weekend.

Curated by Latitudes for the second time (see 2015 edition), the project further explores Barcelona as a rich fabric of the historic and the contemporary, the unfamiliar and the conspicuous. Resisting an overall theme, and instead developing from the artists’ responses to the specificity of each context—people as well as places—the five art projects form a temporary thread that links evocative locations and public space, running parallel to the Weekend’s exhibitions in galleries and museums. 

In its second edition, Composiciones will present interventions by Lúa Coderch (Club Billar Barcelona); Regina Giménez (Antigua Fábrica de Can Trinxet, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat); Lola Lasurt (Biblioteca Pública Arús); Robert Llimós (connecting all the participating galleries) and Wilfredo Prieto (Unitat Muntada de la Guàrdia Urbana de Barcelona). Their projects will offer moments of intermission, intimacy and bewilderment throughout the weekend, highlighting some lesser-known aspects of the city’s cultural heritage and municipal life.

Interior of the Club Billar Barcelona. Photo: Courtesy Club Billar Barcelona.
 Zoom in a map here.

Intervention by Lúa Coderch Club Billar Barcelona
Gran Via de les Corts Catalanes, 595-599
08007 Barcelona

Public transport:
Metro: Passeig de Gràcia (L2, L3, L4)
Bus: 7, 50, 54, 67, 68, H12

Opening hours:
Thursday 29 September: 5–9pm
Friday 30 September, Saturday 1 and Sunday 2 October: 11am–7pm 

Lúa Coderch’s project for the Compositions programme brings a mysterious and improbable apparition to life in the home of the Club de Billar Barcelona. Beneath the Teatre Coliseum in Gran Vía there is a rainbow. Coderch guides sunlight and a spectrum of colours down into the underground gaming space with a series of precisely positioned mirrors and prisms, as if evoking the mechanics, geometry and artistry involved in billiards. Accompanying the rainbow is a turntable and a transparent vinyl record that can be used to play an audio recording of a female voice. This voice narrates and interprets what can be seen in front of us, and the process that led to its appearance. The title of her intervention, The Rainbow Statement” (2016), refers to one of the verbal tricks used by fortune-tellers and clairvoyants in ‘cold reading’ an individual’s life or personality. Suggestively nebulous assertions maximize the chance of apparently specific and meaningful paranormal insights hitting the mark. The Rainbow Statement” is either an experiment of the imagination or a phenomenon of optical science with which Coderch seems to have invented a form of psychic meteorology, or spectral physics.

Sunday 2 October, 12am: 
Free guided visit by the Lúa Coderch and Latitudes at the Club Billar Barcelona, Gran Via de les Corts Catalanes, 595-599.

Interior of the Biblioteca Pública Arús.
Zoom in a map here.

Intervention by Lola Lasurt  –  Biblioteca Pública Arús
Passeig de Sant Joan, 26
08010 Barcelona

Opening hours:
Thursday 29 September: 5–9pm;
Friday 30 September: 11am–7pm;
Saturday 1 October: 11am–2pm;
Sunday 2
October: CLOSED;
Monday 3
October: 11am–6pm;
Tuesday 4
October: 11am–6pm.
 
Public transport:
Metro: Arc de Triomf (L1)
Rodalies: R1, R3, R4 Arc de Triomf
Bus: 19, 51, 55, B20, B25, N4, N11


For her intervention for the Compositions programme, Lola Lasurt has collaborated with the Biblioteca Pública Arús, a study centre founded in 1895 with an outstanding collections related to the labour movement, anarchism, Freemasonry and Sherlock Holmes. The project centres on a series of grisaille paintings that form a pictorial frieze that hangs from the balcony above a presentation of books in the Arús’s display cases. Under the title Donació” (Donation), 2016, Lasurt departs from 135 publications that once formed the personal library of Assumpta Corbera Santanach that were gifted in 2010 to the Arús after her death. Corbera Santanach identified as a feminist and a Freemason; she was not a public figure. Yet the impulse of Lasurt’s project is not primarily biographic or historiographic, but bibliographic and pictorial. Accordingly, Donació” attempts to narrate changes in social and cultural attitudes through the selection and redrafting of images that appear on the pages of the bibliographic bequest. Treating the publications as an intimate accumulation of ‘alternative’ knowledge and a representation of a self-education, Lasurt is interested in the portrayal of a private political imagination in the midst of what is now a public collection. – Latitudes

Thursday 29 September, 6pm: 
Free guided visit by Lola Lasurt and Latitudes at the Biblioteca Pública Arús, Passeig de Sant Joan, 26.

 Interior of Can Trinxet factory in L'Hospitalet de Llobregat.
 Zoom in a map here.
Intervention by Regina Giménez will take place at the Antigua fábrica textil Can Trinxet
c/ Santa Eulàlia 182–212
08902 L’Hospitalet de Llobregat (Barcelona)

Opening hours:
Thursday 29 September: 5–8pm

Friday 30 September, Saturday 1 and Sunday 2 October: 11am–7pm

Public transport:
Metro: Santa Eulàlia o Torrassa (L1)
Bus: L16, L52, L82, L85, LH1, N13

The manufacturing and printing of textiles formed the basis of the industrial revolution in Catalunya. Beyond the actual fabric, it is the machinery of its production and the people who operated it—especially women—that underpins Regina Giménez’s presentation of her graphic works as part of the Compositions programme. Taking place in one of the buildings that comprises Can Trinxet, a former textile factory complex that once employed the largest workforce in L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, Giménez’s intervention comprises painted compositions that are derived from schematic representations of machines and their components. Her abstractions have been applied on transparent panels that lean against a scarred factory wall, becoming devices that reanimate the marks and memories embedded in the building. An accompanying poster evokes the clamour that once would have filled the workshop in typographic form. Giménez has titled her project "La Constancia" (2016) in tribute to the labor union that called a general strike in 1913 to protest the conditions of the female and child workers who undertook the textile industry’s most monotonous and arduous tasks. – Latitudes

Friday 30 September, 12am:
Free guided visit by Regina Giménez and Latitudes at Can Trinxet, c/ Santa Eulàlia 182–212, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat.

Zoom in map here.

Robert Llimós' intervention will connect all the participating galleries of the Barcelona Gallery Weekend. 

Hours:
Thursday 29 September: 5–9pm
Friday 30 September, Saturday 1 and Sunday 2 October: 11am–7pm

Robert Llimós presents a new version of an action that was originally created in the summer of 1972. One of the very few performative works of an artist primarily known for his paintings and sculptures, "Los Corredores" (The Runners) was first realized as part of the legendary avant-garde art festival known as Los Encuentros de Pamplona (The Pamplona Encounters). On that occasion, three people dressed in identical running gear speed-walked throughout the city, connecting the various venues of the festival. As his project for the Composiciones programme, Llimós’s Los Corredores is now restaged on the streets of Barcelona. Three athletes criss-cross the city, seemingly rushing to see every venue of the Gallery Weekend. As in Pamplona, the white sports kits have been adorned by Llimós with black diagonal brushstrokes that symbolize the idea of painting. At times the speed-walking trio carry flowers, or have their ankles joined with elastic ribbon—a painting-as-workout that has left the studio for the street with decoration, discipline, and a dynamic sense of urgency. – Latitudes 

Friday 30 September, 5pm:  
Free guided visit by Robert Llimós and Latitudes. Meeting point: BlueProject Foundation, c/Princesa 57.
Façade of the Unitat Muntada de la Guàrdia Urbana de Barcelona in Parc de la Ciutadella.
Location of the Unitat Muntada in the southeastern part of the Parc de la Ciutadella. Zoom in a map here.

The intervention by Wilfredo Prieto will take place at the Unitat Muntada de la Guàrdia Urbana de Barcelona (Barcelona City Police Stables)
c/ Wellington s/n 
08018 Barcelona

Public transport:
Metro: Vil·la Olímpica (L4)  
Tram: Ciutadella–Vil·la Olímpica (just opposite)
Bus: 36, 59, 92, N0, V21, V27

Opening hours:
Thursday 29 September: CLOSED
Friday 30
September, Saturday 1 and Sunday 2 October: 11–12am*
[*] Doors open daily at 10:30am. Kindly note that a photo ID (DNI or passport) is required to enter.]
  
Conceived by Wilfredo Prieto as his project for the Composiciones programme, "Pantalones rotos" (Torn Jeans), 2012, is realised by the horses of the Guàrdia Urbana de Barcelona. The action-sculpture takes place at the Mounted Unit’s stables, a historic venue next to the city zoo that is not normally open to the public and whose exercise paddock is overlooked by the twin towers of the Torre Mapfre and Hotel Arts. In his work Prieto makes reference to an image which appears on the tag of every pair of classic Levi’s denim jeans—two horses trying in vain to break a pair of the reinforced trousers. Since their invention in 1873, Levi Strauss & Co.’s famous copper-riveted denim has become synonymous with the working people of the western United States—cowboys, lumberjacks, and railroad workers. Yet in "Pantalones rotos", this symbol of the American frontier myth has been already torn apart with bathos as two harnessed horses each drag one half of a torn pair of jeans. – Latitudes  

Saturday 1 October, 12am:
Free guided visit by Latitudes at the Unitat Muntada de la Guàrdia Urbana. Meeting point: c/ Wellington s/n. (Opposite the tram stop Ciutadella–Vil·la Olímpica) 

Follow + Share: 
@Barcelona_Gallery_Weekend
#BarcelonaGalleryWeekend
#Composiciones2016
#LosCorredores1972   
@LTTDS 
#LatitudesBarcelona  



The Barcelona Gallery Weekend is an initiative of the de Art Barcelona and is supported by the Ajuntament de Barcelona (ICUB), the Generalitat de Catalunya (ICEC), the Ajuntament de L’Hospitalet de Llobregat and Acción Cultural Española (AC/E), as well as by private sponsors and individual patrons. http://www.barcelonagalleryweekend.com/


Related content:

  • Composiciones 2015 commissions;
  • Storify – 2015 social media archive;
  • Instagram of the Barcelona Gallery Weekend;
  • PRESS RELEASE: Latitudes curates "Composiciones", a series of five artists' commissions for the first Barcelona Gallery Weekend, 1–4 October 2015; 
  • NOTA DE PRENSA: Comisariado de "Composiciones", cinco intervenciones artísticas para el primer Barcelona Gallery Weekend, 1–4 Octubre 2015;

Barcelona Gallery Weekend 2016 – Artists and locations of the programme "Composiciones" announced


A "Save The Date" press release (scroll down for different languages) has been sent out with information of the participating galleries and spaces and their exhibitions for the forthcoming Barcelona Gallery Weekend (29 September–2October 2016)

Returning for its second edition in 2016, Latitudes will curate "Compositions" (Composiciones), a series of artistic interventionsin unique sitesacross the neighbourhoods of the city. Each of the commissioned artists is represented by a gallery participating in the Barcelona Gallery Weekend. 

Resisting an overall theme, and instead developing from the artists’ responses to the specificity of each context—people as well as places—the five art projects form a temporary thread that links evocative locations and public space, running parallel to the Weekend’s exhibitions in galleries and museums.  

The invited artists are Lúa Coderch  (Iquitos, Perú, 1982), Regina Giménez (Barcelona, 1966), Lola Lasurt  (Barcelona, 1983), Robert Llimós  (Barcelona, 1943), and Wilfredo Prieto (Santi Spiritus, Cuba, 1978), and the spaces where their interventions will take place are: 
The full schedule of routes, guided tours and parallel programming will be announced in September.

'Composiciones', five new commissions for the Barcelona Gallery Weekend, 1–4 October 2015.

"Compositions" is a programme of artists’ interventions originally conceived and curated by Latitudes for the first Barcelona Gallery Weekend in 2015, when it produced five projects by David Bestué (in the former ceramics factory Cosme Toda, L'Hospitalet); Dora García (at the Biblioteca del Campo Freudiano de Barcelona); Jordi Mitjà (in the Museu Geològic del Seminari de Barcelona); Rasmus Nilausen in collaboration with Pere Llobera (at the house of the former priest, gardens of La Central del Raval) y Daniel Steegmann Mangrané (in the Umbracle – Shadehouse – at the Parc de la Ciutadella). 

#BarcelonaGalleryWeekend
#Composiciones2016

Related content:

  • Composiciones 2015 commissions;
  • Storify – 2015 social media archive;
  • Instagram of the Barcelona Gallery Weekend;
  • PRESS RELEASE: Latitudes curates "Composiciones", a series of five artists' commissions for the first Barcelona Gallery Weekend, 1–4 October 2015; 
  • NOTA DE PRENSA: Comisariado de "Composiciones", cinco intervenciones artísticas para el primer Barcelona Gallery Weekend, 1–4 Octubre 2015;

Photodocumentation of the five commissions 'Composiciones' now on flickr

'Composiciones', five new commissions for the Barcelona Gallery Weekend, 1–4 October 2015.

We just uploaded photos of the five new commissions "Composiciones" on Latitudes' flickr. These projects by artists active in the Barcelona art scene complemented the first Barcelona Gallery Weekend (1–4 October 2015) programme of exhibitions and events

Each intervention responded to site and context-specific private and public location outside the contemporary art circuit – a private psychoanalytic library, the former home of the director of a ceramics factory, a public botanical collection, the home of a former priest and an invertebrate fossile collection.

Pinpointing some lesser-known aspects of the city's cultural history and municipal life, Composiciones offered moments of interruption, intimacy and immersion throughout the weekend.


 Map of the five locations for the temporary projects. 

Also on our website (highlighted in yellow where to locate it) you'll find the links to the audio and video documentation of the three talks led by Dora García as part of her intervention at the Biblioteca del Campo Freudiano. We recommend you read a nicely written account of these three sessions (in Spanish) by two of its participants.



On the same page and under 'Related content' you will find links to the press coverage related to 'Composiciones'. The most extensive and in depth review so far has been this considered and detailed blog entry by Barcelona-based art critic and curator Fede Montornés, which of course made us really happy

And last but not least, we gathered the many tweets, instagram, press links, etc. that appeared in the last few weeks in Storify.






#BarcelonaGalleryWeekend
#Composiciones

Related content:


Storify – Social media archive 

Details of the Barcelona Gallery Weekend programme

Instagram of the Barcelona Gallery Weekend
 
PRESS RELEASE: Latitudes curates "Composiciones", a series of five artists' commissions for the first Barcelona Gallery Weekend, 1–4 October 2015 


NOTA DE PRENSA: Comisariado de "Composiciones", cinco intervenciones artísticas para el primer Barcelona Gallery Weekend, 1–4 Octubre 2015



This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).

Work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

'Compositions' a programme of five artists' interventions for the first Barcelona Gallery Weekend, 1–4 October 2015

'Save the date' cards of the Barcelona Gallery Weekend. Graphic design: Hey Studio.

Latitudes is curating Compositions a programme of five newly commissioned temporary interventions specially produced for the first Barcelona Gallery Weekend (1–4 October 2015).

With the aim of distinguishing the Barcelona gallery weekend from similar initiatives, Latitudes' project Compositions compliments the existing calendar of exhibitions in galleries and museums by commissioning six artists active in the Barcelona art scene, to develop a series of public interventions responding to singular locations – sites significant for their architecture or their history. Here's a map of the five locations.

Latitudes has invited artists David Bestué (Barcelona, 1980. Lives in Barcelona); Dora García (Valladolid, 1965. Lives in Barcelona), Jordi Mitjà (Figueres, 1970. Lives between Lladó and Banyoles); Rasmus Nilausen (Copenhagen, 1980. Lives in Barcelona) & Pere Llobera (Barcelona, 1970. Lives in Barcelona) and Daniel Steegmann Mangrané (Barcelona, 1977. Lives in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) to produce site-specific temporary installations and one-off performances. Pinpointing some lesser-known aspects of the city's cultural history and municipal life, Compositions offers moments of interruption, intimacy and immersion throughout the weekend. 



Cosme Toda factory complex. 
Home of the former director of the ceramic factory Cosme Toda. c/Enric Prat de la Riba 60, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat.
Opening hours: Thursday 1 October, 5–9pm;  
Friday 2, Saturday 3 and Sunday 4: 11am–8pm.

David Bestué is primarily a sculptor who is fascinated by architecture – not with its hubristic icons or celebrity heroism, but by the very normality with which architectonic tropes underpin an emotional understanding of form.

For Compositions Bestué is producing a new installation in the form of a sculptural timeline defined by ignition and invention, fat and oil, obsolescence, fluorescence, luminescence and incandescence – a history of humanity from antiquity to the present day told through the evolution and refinement of lighting technology. Sited in the domestic setting of the Director’s house within the former Cosme Toda ceramics and tile factory, the installation is companioned by a sculptural intervention recuperating pieces found in the factory, linking to Bestué's ongoing interest in the evolution of architectural materials and building techniques.



Freudian Field Library in Barcelona located at Avinguda Diagonal 333, 3º 1ª. Opening hours: Thursday 1 and Friday 2 October 5–9pm; Saturday 3 October 10am–2pm. Sunday 4 October closed.

Dora García's collaborations and performances engage with radicalism, inadequacy and the marginal. Her contribution to Compositions consists in pointing out the wealth of information and the activites programmed by the Freudian Field Library in Barcelona, an organisation founded in 1977 by Argentinean Oscar Masotta (1930–1979). García's intervention considers the library as a knot which ties together art, psychoanalysis and literature.

A display of publications drawn from the library shelves and three conversations will activate the space over consecutive days. The first talk (1 October, 7pm), a "solo" by García, will focus on the library's holdings of literary fiction. The second talk on October 2nd, at 7pm will be a group conversation moderated by García, amongst Miquel Bassols, Enric Berenguer, Rosa Calvet, Estela Paskvan and Montserrat Rodríguez, who will discuss the founding of the library and its ongoing role in Barcelona, and the final event on October 3 at 10am will be a conversation around the work of Irish novelist James Joyce and French psychiatrist and psichologist Jacques Lacan, between García and psychoanalyst Xavier Esqué and Patrick Bohan, who has worked at the James Joyce Center in Dublin. 


Former priest house, Gardens of La Central del Raval, located at Carrer d'Elisabets 8. Opening hours: Thursday 1 October, 5–9pm; Friday 2, Saturday 3 and Sunday 4: 11am–8pm.

Rasmus Nilausen and Pere Llobera are painters that approach painting with a respect – at times melancholic, sometimes parodic – for its traditional genres and its ancient integrity as a craft. Nilausen’s canvases have often taken on ‘minor’ or anecdotal subjects such as candles or vegetables. Llobera frequently addresses the perils virtuosity and painterly heroism in his paradoxical, restless works. Nilausen and Llobera share a workspace in the Salamina studios in L’Hospitalet de Llobregat – which they cofounded – yet the invitation to collaborate in a presentation for Compositions is the first time they are exhibiting together.

In the Gardens of La Central del Raval their works occupy a former priest's house and explore "acheiropoietic" images – those that have supposedly come into being not by human hand, but miraculously. The Veil of Veronica, for example, refers to various Catholic relics and icons which tell of a piece of cloth said to have been imprinted with the image of the face of Jesus.


 

 Geological Museum of the Seminary of Barcelona is in Carrer de la Diputació, 231.
Opening hours: Thursday 1 October, 5–9pm; 
Friday 2, Saturday 3 and Sunday 4: 11am–8pm.

Jordi Mitjà’s recent “povera” approach to sculpture, has comprised works utilizing discarded wood, metal, burned paper and clay. His contribution to Compositions takes place in the Geological Museum of the Seminary of Barcelona – an institution dedicated to paleontology and the study of fossils since 1874.


Mitjà considers the borders between evolutionary biology and the ancient geology of Catalonia in an installation which focusses on a primitive relationship between materials and morphology. A series of overheard projectors illuminate the central space of the museum with a panoply of images, shadows and geometries – layers that are unearthed by Mitjà’s exploration of the geospatial taxonomy of this unique collection of 70,000 specimens.


 
Opening hours: Thursday 1 October, 5–9pm;
Friday 2, Saturday 3 and Sunday 4: 11am–8pm.

The art of Daniel Steegmann Mangrané hinges on the natural and the geometric, often splicing the unfathomable dimension of the forests of his adopted home Brazil with the clear lines of abstraction and man-made order.

His contribution to Compositions takes place amongst the subtropical plants of the 1887 Umbracle (shade house) in the Parc de la Ciutadella and centres on the acoustic installation “Surucuá, Teque-teque, Arara” (2012). We hear sounds that were recorded along a 60 metre transect through a section of the Atlantic Rainforest of Brazil, the tropical forest that Portuguese colonists would have encountered on their arrival in the year 1500. The sound loop reproduces the disembodied calls of colourful birds such as trogons and macaws which merge with the ambient sounds of the city. As if a 1:1 scale collage, the artifice of an urban botanical collection becomes intertwined with an acoustic slice of the authentically wild.

Follow + Share:
#Composiciones
#BarcelonaGalleryWeekend
@Barcelona_Gallery_Weekend


Calendar of Related Events and Guided Visits

Thursday 1 October, 5pm:
Guided tour of the intervention by Jordi Mitjà at the Museu Geològic del Seminari de Barcelona by the artist and Latitudes.
c/ Diputació, 231

Thursday 1 October, 7pm:
Guided tour of the intervention and talk by Dora García on the library holdings of literary fiction, Biblioteca del Campo Freudiano de Barcelona (Library of the Freudian Field).
Avda. Diagonal 333, 3º 1ª
Limited seating. Reservations: [email protected]

Friday 2 October, noon:
Guided tour of the intervention by Daniel Steegmann Mangrané at the Umbracle del Parc de la Ciutadella by the artist and Latitudes.
Passeig Picasso, 13

Friday 2 October, 7pm:
Conversation moderated by Dora García with Miquel Bassols, Enric Berenguer, Rosa Calvet, Estela Paskvan and Montserrat Rodríguez, on the origins of the Biblioteca del Campo Freudiano de Barcelona, its founder Óscar Masotta and the Barcelona of 1977.
Avda. Diagonal 333, 3º 1ª
Limited seating. Reservations:
[email protected]

Friday 2 October, 7:30pm:
Guided tour of the intervention by David Bestué at the house of the former director of the Cosme Toda factory by the artist and Latitudes.
c/ Enric Prat de la Riba, 60
L’Hospitalet de Llobregat

Saturday 3 October, 10am:
Conversation between Dora García and the psychoanalyst and psychologist Xavier Esqué at the Biblioteca del Campo Freudiano around James Joyce and Jacques Lacan.
Avda. Diagonal 333, 3º 1ª
Limited seating. Reservations:
[email protected]

Sunday 4 October, noon:
Guided tour of the intervention by Rasmus Nilausen and Pere Llobera at the Jardines de La Central del Raval by the artists and Latitudes.
c/ Elisabets, 8

Additionally, ARCO Foundation offers ARCO Gallery Walks, five free guided tours around the galleries throughout the weekend. Limited places. Pre-registration required: [email protected]

Thursday 1 October
Route Eixample South
Meeting place: Galería Joan Prats at 5pm

Friday 2 October
Route Ciutat Vella – Born
Meeting place: Galería Senda at 11am

Route Montjuïc – L’Hospitalet
Meeting place: Galería Carles Taché at 5pm

Saturday 3 October
Route Ciutat Vella – Raval
Meeting place: etHALL at 11am

Route Eixample North
Meeting place: ADN Galería at 5pm

The Barcelona Gallery Weekend is an initiative of the Asociación de Galerías de Arte Contemporáneo Art Barcelona and is supported by the Ajuntament de Barcelona (ICUB), the Generalitat de Catalunya (ICEC), the Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte; and the Ajuntament de L’Hospitalet de Llobregat.

http://www.barcelonagalleryweekend.com/

Archive Cover Story (May): Here’s to horseshoes: Lawrence Weiner and Sergi Aguilar


May 2015 Cover Story dedicated to Lawrence Weiner and Sergi Aguilar.


Related Content:

Cover Story #2: Beneath the Connaught Road West flyover, Hong Kong, 19 January 2013 (4 May 2015)

Cover Story #1: Wilfredo Prieto's work "Grease, Soap, Banana" (2 April 2015)

Latitudes participates in the "Readers Circle: 100 Notes–100 Thoughts" programme organised by the Maybe Education and Public Programs of dOCUMENTA (13) (31 August 2012)

dOCUMENTA (13) artists and Latitudes (24 August 2012)

Lawrence Weiner, 'Under the Sun', Espai d'Art Contemporani de Castelló (25 October 2009)

Latitudes' "out of office" photo album 2008-9 (30 July 2009)

SAVE THE DATE: 8 October, Lawrence Weiner, Fundació Suñol, Barcelona (29 August 2008)

'UN PAÑO DE ALGODÓN ...' de Lawrence Weiner (22 September 2008)




This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
Work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

It's our 10th anniversary!


We find it hard to believe, but April 2015 marked our 10th anniversary!

In October last year we started working on our new website so that it would be ready to mark the decade of our two-person self-organisation. We submerged ourselves in the exercise of looking back and consolidating our physical and digital archives. The last decade has certainly been marked by the transition towards the latter, and hence files and hard drives now hold the most voluminous evidence of our activity, with all manner of USB-sticks and obsolescent CDs (remember those?) having fallen by the wayside.

We devised a plan for what we wanted to improve with a website conceived as a place for reportage as well as a publicly-accessible archive. This process included developing more extensive, and larger-format, photo galleries, cross-referencing to previously "buried" texts, making descriptions more concise, adding a related content section to cross-reference project information with blog posts, and consolidating locations as well as events. After six months of work, and some down-the-rabbit-hole endless weekends with the intricacies of CSS, we had re-edited ten years of our professional life online. Ta-da!



But we also hold on to physical archives and printer matter and they continue to delight! They also bear witness to something of what has been lost. The decline of the post as a means for distributing video (VHS! DVDs!) with the rise of DropBox, or Vimeo, for example, has meant no more of those sweet hand-written notes that used to accompany artists' packages. Exhibition invitations are frankly a rarity now too, and these are filed alongside various postcards, discarded fragments of artists' work and other amusing ephemera. 

Since we commissioned our mail-and-stamp graphic identity from More Associates back in April 2005, we have seeped more-and-more online to document and communicate: our first newsletter (November 2005), our first website, our early blog posts (starting in September 2006!), our Facebook page in early 2009 started with the presentation of Jan Dibbets' filming for Portscapes, our Flickr photo archive (also in 2009, now with nearly 4,000 photos online), followed by our first tweets in 2010, and sporadically YouTube, Issuu, Storify, Soundcloud followed.


 Presentation of 7 years of practice as part of the programme "La Sucursal" at Casa del Lago, Mexico City, September 2012. This invitation gave us the opportunity to begin the series 'Incidents of Travel' commissioning artists tours in Mexico and Hong Kong. Photo: Latitudes.

This "ecstasy of communication" as Dieter Roelstraete has ironically put it, a day-to-day reality, has certainly defined our practice and how we have come to produce, document and disseminate our projects. We always stress this rapid digital transition when presenting our practice, as adapting to it has certainly been crucial as a two person spaceless self-organisation. Not running a regular programme of exhibitions or events has meant we have found the need to communicate the duration of what we are working on while being seemingly offline. Sometimes the standard drop-in question, "What are you working on?", is not so straightforward to answer. Back to Roelstraete – "getting organised" could often be the most suitable answer. "Getting organised" for the next project, reflecting on a recently concluded activity, anticipating the one after that, sorting out finances, seeing how we might put together the next research trip, finding it a challenge to find the time to read a book from beginning to end, watching life and work go by in 'likes' and 'retweets' and 'regrams'... Yet far than being nostalgic, this transition has itself given us great food for thought. For example, we dedicated over a year to discussing the consequences of online presence for art practice and curating with colleagues from Hong Kong to Minneapolis in the #OpenCurating interview series. 


 In 2010 we were awarded the inaugural Curatorial Prize given by the Catalan Gallery Association, recognising our "curatorial work and especially for their involvement in the local context and their efforts to disseminate national art in an international context." Photo: Latitudes.

We are thankful to the many artists and other creative people who have supported us throughout this past decade. Some projects started with innocuous conversations that eventually led to ongoing collaborations and friendships, and we are also grateful to colleagues willing to offer critical feedback and words of encouragement in those moments in which we most needed to regain trust. A huge thanks too to the institutions and organisations for financing our projects

Very soon more news on a commemorative project we've been cooking up...
 
Related content:

Latitudes' 4th anniversary (April 2009)
Newsletter #22 – April 2010 


This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
Work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

(Part 2/3) "The Encyclopedic Palace", 55th Venice Biennale in tote bags

Courtesy: Tucano, Milan

The biennale tote bag. Merely light and foldable marketing freebees in the form of non-rigid containers for the carrying of catalogues, innumerable press releases and checklists? Or ironic critiques of an increasingly capitalist and permissive society? Austere, poetic and challenging invitations to revalue familiar things and refocus our perceptions?

Now ever-present at the most vital and visible sites for the production, distribution, and public discourse around contemporary art, these large and often alarmingly unfastened cloth bags – typically with parallel handles that emerge from the sides of its pouch – have in the span of a few decades quietly become the unquestioned handmaiden of biennalisation. In Venice this year few dared to break with the tote's canvassed hegemony. The Dutch stuck their head above the parapet with a risky choice of clear plastic bags to accompany Mark Manders' pavilion – a whimsically aggressive engagement with issues of indispensability, and, perhaps with typically Dutch straightforwardness, transparency. 

Even if a pavilion or Eventi Collaterali can fly in Michelin-starred chefs for their dinners or legendary DJs from the South Bronx instrumental in the early development of hip hop for their parties, getting the tote bag right nevertheless remains a perilous balance of form and content, of prestige and patriarchy, greenwashing brinkmanship and sheer design cojones.

So was 2013 acqua alta for tote bags in Venice? Did any of them attain the understated brilliance of the Canadian Pavilion bag at the 52nd Venice Biennale in 2007? (David Altmejd's noir classic in heavy twill boasted a separately tailored gusset.) Or did they match the game-changing 48 x 48 cm tote bag for Ayşe Erkmen's Turkish Pavilion in 2011? (designed by Konstantin Grcic, it featured an inner pocket made to fit the catalogue, and its own section on the pavilion website). There's a big wide world of tote bags out there...



This year, the Biennale organisation brought in the Milan-based Tucano to design the official tote – they've been working with the film festival for a decade or more – and they spurned the traditional heavy cloth in favor of a lightweight synthetic "skin" and webbing straps which lend the item the air of a piece of technical camping equipment. The extra-long straps allow for a certain dynamic freedom of movement that is a clear reference to the Futurists, although they may impede the shorter visitor on a busy vaporetto. Its uncompromising blackness seems to suggest mourning, yet with a vital rather than dour spirit –  "time and space died yesterday" as F.T. Marinetti once said. Good effort.


Le pavillon français opted for a nocturne in Parisian fog grey for its bag accompanying Anri Sala's "Ravel Ravel Unravel". The rawness of the medium-weight cotton – or is it hemp? – speaks of torrid emotional intensity while the contrastingly spare and delicately-kerned typography attempts to echo the phasing-in and out of the pianists in Sala's grand video installation. Only printed on one side however – a note of uncertainty?


Being in part based in Alvar Aalto's masterpiece pavilion in the Giardini, Finland's representation at the Biennale has wisely shied away from grand gestures with its bag for the exhibition "Falling Trees". The exhibition was put together with "a sinuous curating process" the organisers reveal, and their serene bag prompts us, with its ample volume and unadorned reilu meininki tailoring, to weave our way through its "contingent encounter between art and nature". Onneksiolkoon! Pidän siitä todella!


The Tuvalu Pavilion pluckily represents the third-least populous sovereign state in the world, and likely the first in line to disappear underwater as sea levels rise due to climate change. The exhibition itself, by "sensational Taiwanese artist Vincent J.F. Huang" reportedly features "a sea turtle and a group of penguins belonging to an underwater mafia ring seeking revenge on capitalism and the effects this is having on their natural habitat". Wow. More understated – though no less imaginative – the cream-and-azure coloured tote bag bears the coat of arms of Tuvalu: a shield decorated in a pattern with mussel shells and banana leaves, a hut and stylized waves. A Tuvaluan inscription reads “Tuvalu mo te Atua” (Tuvalu for the Almighty). Made from silkscreened Polyfabric™ (an environmentally-friendly cloth) it hits all the right notes for ecologically-sensitive micro-nation enthusiasts. Child-safe and odor/mildew resistant.


The tote for Jeremy Deller's British Pavilion, entitled "English Magic", was manufactured in 100% 135gsm cotton by a company based, ironically enough, in Welshpool, Wales. The reverse side depicts a line drawing of the British Pavilion which has been a staple on the British bags since at least Chris Ofili's 2003 exhibition. Given the inspiration that William Morris provides in Deller's exhibition, and the fact that Morris was a prolific type designer, it is perhaps a missed opportunity that the slogan text appears in the all-too-familiar Times New Roman. British Council directives? Nevertheless it does lend it a kind of appropriate DIY quality, and the highlighter orange colour (wondering though why it wasn't pink considering how much the artist loves to wear this colour) gives it the so-wrong-its-right touch that will secure its place on the sturdy shoulders of Deller fans, Bowie fans, cyclists, birdwatchers, tea-drinkers, stone-hand-axe experts, etc., for posterity. Not likely to appear on the Christmas list of Harry, His Royal Highness Prince Henry Charles Albert David of Wales. Or autocratic Russian billionaires.


2013 saw the United Arab Emirates present the work of Mohammed Kazem in the Arsenale's Sale d’Armi. "Walking on Water" comprised a projection of the sea and illuminated GPS coordinates within an chamber, but the quality of the tote bag alone was already leaving visitors feeling like they were walking on water with its speckled blue background recalling the waves of the Persian gulf. Assalaam alaykum!


Jesper Just's Danish Pavilion had to suffer the cruel injustice of technical difficulties with its complex five-screen video installation during the opening days. And to be frank, the gloomy black-on-black tote accompanying an exhibition burdened with the icky title "Intercourses" cannot have lifted the mood. An uncharacteristic error from the style-conscious Danes? In fact the design was headed by the usually-impeccable New York based Project Projects. Nevertheless, the bag looks more suited to a Bulgarian goth club or an inner tube manufacturers' convention than something to accessorize an exhibition that "challenges the viewer’s preconceived notions of space and time". Interesting pavilion. Charismatic artist. Woeful tote. Even difficult to re-gift this one.

 
Photo courtesy: Graphical House
 
Scotland! A typography-forward triumph! Impactful use of the three artists surnames in a highly refined neo-grotesque sans serif which appears not at all restrained by an attempt at upholding historical accuracy or formalities. The clarity, poise and symmetry of the white letterforms, combined with the discerning deep-blue cotton base, and the cheeky short handles say "hey, let's celebrate everything that's good about Scottish creativity!" If there was a Golden Lion for totes, this would surely be in with a roar. 


"See Venice and die," is what they say? Or is it Rome? Whatever, once you've experienced the bag for Lawrence Weiner's THE GRACE OF A GESTURE, organized by the Written Art Foundation and presented at the Palazzo Bembo near the Rialto bridge, you may have witnessed the pinnacle of totes. Or something pretty close. Weiner has already produced some bag legends – check out his audacious design for Printed Matter – yet this multilingual canvas produced in Westphalia is a perky filet mignon of a bag that makes the competition look like cheap mince. As Weiner says: “Art is the empirical fact of the relationships of objects to objects in relation to human beings and not dependent upon historical precedent for either use or legitimacy". Who can argue? 


Related posts: 
(Post 1/3) The 55th Venice Biennale: "The Encyclopedic Palace" in pictures and as seen by the critics, 1 June–24 November 2013 
(Post 3/3) The 55th Biennale di Venezia: National Pavilions and Collateral Events in pictures and as seen by the critics, 1 June–24 November 2013

 
All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
 

Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Founded in 2005 by Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna, Latitudes is a curatorial office based in Barcelona, Spain, that works internationally across contemporary art practices.

More about us. Browse projects. Read Longitudes. Receive newsletters.

Contact us. 
All content
Latitudes
2005—2019