Longitudes

Longitudes cuts across Latitudes’ projects and research with news, updates, and reportage.

Profile on Crystal Bennes for the Freelands Foundation Artists programme

Detail of Crystal Bennes’ Jacquard piece in progress, 2023. Produced in the context of the Freelands Artist Programme. Courtesy of the artist.

In February 2023, Latitudes was commissioned to write a text on the artistic practice of Crystal Bennes“Betwixt 2024”, the next iteration of publications of the Freelands Artist Programme, will be out in February 2024, coinciding with an exhibition of Bennes’ work alongside 19 other artists based in Belfast, Cardiff, Edinburgh and Sheffield.

Involving tapestry, sculptural installation, video, and performance, Bennes’ new project will be exhibited at Talbot Rice Gallery, Edinburgh, in March 2024. It addresses the rapaciousness and sophistry of commodities trading, an arena in which financial instruments are used to bet on the future value of raw materials and natural resources including crude oil, metals, coffee, and cotton. 

The Freelands Artist Programme supports and grows regional arts ecosystems by fostering long-term relationships and collaborations between emerging artists and arts organisations around the UK. Between 2022–24, Freelands is working with four organisations – g39 in Cardiff, PS2 in Belfast, Site Gallery in Sheffield, and Talbot Rice Gallery in Edinburgh. Over the two years, each of these venues is supporting a cohort of five artists to take part each year – each artist participating in the programme receives an annual grant of £5k, as well as the opportunity to take part in talks, workshops and other programmed events and a budget for travel, additionally, some organisations offer studio space and/or exhibitions. 


(Above and below) Stills from Crystal Bennes’ film that will accompany her forthcoming work produced in the context of the Freelands Artist Programme (2023). Courtesy of the artist.


Dr Crystal Bennes is an American artist, researcher, writer, and educator based in Edinburgh, Scotland. Her practice is grounded in long-term projects that foreground archival research, durational fieldwork, and material experimentation. Recent bodies of work include an ongoing photographic exploration of an artificial island in Sweden created entirely out of radioactive waste from industrially-produced synthetic fertiliser and the experimental recreation of a nineteenth-century hay meadow based on a myth of unintentional plant migration from Italy to Denmark.

Klara and the Bomb, her first photobook—charting connecting threads between the U.S.’s nuclear weapons research, women programmers, the invention of modern computers, and nuclear colonialism—was published by The Eriskay Connection in 2022. She recently completed an AHRC-funded practice-based PhD in fine art at Northumbria University researching the histories and uses of gendered representations of nature in the sciences and exploring feminist critiques of physics. Between 2022 and 2024 she is a resident at Talbot Rice Gallery as part of a Freelands Foundation Artists programme. Together with Tom Jeffreys, she edits The Peninent Review.

Detail of Crystal Bennes’ Jacquard piece in progress, 2023. Courtesy of the artist.

Freelands Foundation is a London-based non-profit organisation set up in 2015 by Elisabeth Murdoch, supporting UK-based artistic practice through residencies, workshops, screenings, and resources for teachers and educators; an annual Freelands Award to an organisation championing mid-career women artists. 

Title: “Betwixt 2024”

PublisherFreelands Foundation

Release date: February 2024

Writers: include Precious Adesina, Alice Bucknell, Susannah Dickey, Rosalie Doubal, Lara Eggleton, Colette Griffin, Maria Howard, Beth Hughes, LatitudesIngrid Lyons, Khanyisile Mbongwa, Zakiya McKenzie, Theo Reeves-Evison, Jenny Richards, Lucy A. Sames, Cindy Sissokho, Jamie Sutcliffe, Kandace Siobhan Walker, Sunshine Wong, and Mark Peter Wright.


RELATED CONTENT:

  • Latitudes’ writing since 2005.
  • Latitudes’ essay “Un suelo para las historias del arte del futuro” [Soil for Future Art Histories] in TBA21’s catalogue “Futuros Abundantes”, 22 Jan 2023
  • Nueva publicación: “Passió i cartografia per a un incendi dels ulls” (MACBA, 2022), 2 Mar 2022
  • New publication: “Things Things Say” now available, 28 Feb 2022
  • Mariana Cánepa Luna’s Amsterdam Roundup for art-agenda, 17 December 2019
  • Max Andrews’ Valencia Feature in frieze magazine, November-December 2019, 2 November 2019
  • Max Andrews’ text for Rasmus Nilausen's solo exhibition ‘Bluetooth’ at Copenhagen's Overgaden, 16 September 2019
  • “Thinking like a drainage basin” essay in the catalogue of the exhibition “Lara Almarcegui. Béton”, 8 April 2019
Stacks Image 39


Cover Story–June 2020: Mataró Chauffeur Service, since 2010

Latitudes' homepage www.lttds.org

The June 2020 monthly Cover Story ‘Mataró Chauffeur Service, since 2010’ is now up, check our website www.lttds.org

“The premise was simple. Latitudes needed to get to Tate Modern and so Martí Anson was going to drive us to London and back. He would form a one-man one-car taxi company in his home town of Mataró, pick us up early in the morning in Barcelona and we’d head for the ferry. Mataró, Barcelona, Santander, Portsmouth, London, ‘No Soul for Sale’ festival, happy 10th birthday Tate Modern. Pim pam. His great-grandfather had been a taxi driver in Montevideo and his father-in-law a driver for the boss of Schweppes.”

→ Continue reading
→ After June 2020, this story will be archived here.

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.


RELATED CONTENTS



Stacks Image 39


Lawrence Weiner's THE CREST OF A WAVE tote bag in the Tate Archive and exhibited at The McManus Museum and Galleries, Dundee

Limited edition tote bag designed by Lawrence Weiner in 2015. Photo: Latitudes.


We're delighted to share that Latitudes' limited edition tote bag, exclusively designed by Lawrence Weiner to commemorate Latitudes' 10th anniversary in 2015, is now part of Tate Archive.

Latitudes' donation is presented as part of Tate's "ARTIST ROOMS: Lawrence Weiner" exhibition, on view from November 2, 2018, at The McManus Museum and Galleries in Dundee, Scotland, until February 17, 2019.

ARTIST ROOMS is a touring collection of over 1,600 works of modern and contemporary art. The collection is displayed in museums and galleries across the UK and is jointly owned by the National Galleries of Scotland and Tate.

Photos: Latitudes.
Weiner's tote silkscreening process. Photo: Print Workers.

The Dundee presentation will include the limited edition tote bag and three sugar sachets with the striking typographic rendition of the statement "A CLOTH OF COTTON WRAPPED AROUND A HORSESHOE OF IRON TOSSED UPON THE CREST OF A WAVE" in Catalan, Spanish, and English, the latter first commissioned in 2008 as part of Weiner's solo exhibition at the Fundació Suñol, Barcelona.

A booklet of the exhibition, the invitation card, and an audio rendition of the statement (the track can be listed to here) based on a track by Ned Sublette and The Persuasions are also featured in Dundee.

(Above and below) Installation of Lawrence Weiner's "THE CREST OF A WAVE" at Fundació Suñol, Barcelona, October–November 2008. Photo: Latitudes.

Weiner with his work at the Fundació Suñol. Photo: Jean-Pierre Moulis.

One part of Lawrence Weiner's ‘THE CREST OF A WAVE’ project at the Fundació Suñol in 2008 consisted of an ephemeral sculpture distributed a few days prior to the exhibition opening. 300,000 7-gram sachets of sugar were printed and distributed throughout the most emblematic cafes around Barcelona. Photo: Latitudes.

100,000 sugar sachets ready for distribution. Photo: Latitudes.

Front and back of the 7-gram sugar sachet with Weiner's statement. 
(Above and below) The last element of the project manifested as an intimate event realised by the sea during the opening week: an iron horseshoe was wrapped in a cotton cloth and was tossed upon a wave’s crest. Photos: Jean-Pierre Moulis.


"Influential conceptual artist, Lawrence Weiner uses language as his medium. His text work takes many forms, but the core principle remains the same – his ideas should not be confined to the gallery but taken up by the viewer.

Adopting this principle, The McManus has worked with the artist to present his texts in different forms. One cycle of wall texts will be presented in Scots – translated by distinguished author James Robertson. Texts, a selection of posters, drawings, artist books, and ephemera will also be installed within museum displays around the building – the text resonating alongside Dundee’s rich collections of natural history, archaeology, world cultures, industrial machinery and the spectacular architecture of The McManus itself." (text from Tate's website)

Latitudes' full set of artists' totes were exhibited in 2015 at the Asia Art Archive in Hong Kong as part of Ingrid Chu's 15th-anniversary programme "15 Invitations | a short history of the art book bag". Photo: Asia Art Archive.

RELATED CONTENT:
Stacks Image 39


Mariana Cánepa Luna's London Roundup of Frieze week 2018 for art-agenda.com

Advertising in Pimlico. Above and below photos by Latitudes.

London Roundup
Various locations, London
October 12, 2018


Just as Frieze Art Fair opened last Wednesday, Prime Minister Theresa May gave her keynote speech—and dared to dance again—at the Conservative Party Conference in Birmingham. She announced that freedom of movement would be terminated “once and for all” by limiting access to “highly skilled workers” (in short, migrants earning over 30,000 British pounds per year). Countless art professionals earn much less (including entry-level curatorial staff at Tate, and yours truly), as well as doubtless many of the myriad gallery and museum folks involved in the city-wide jamboree of Frieze week. How do we imagine London’s contemporary art ecology post-Brexit, a scene that has grown exponentially since Tate Modern’s opening in 2000 and the first Frieze Art Fair in 2003? The question of how the 2019 edition of the fair is going to be affected was the elephant in the tent. Most people I asked shrugged: negotiations are still ongoing, consequences are yet to be seen. “It’ll be fiiiiine,” a London museum director told me. “Maybe we’ll visit a smaller fair, like the first editions—remember those days?” opined a British gallerist friend working in New York. Although one could put this upbeat denial down to the cliché of dark British humor and the spirit of “muddling through,” I nevertheless left worried that something more troubling lay behind it.

If Frieze might have triggered the relocation of many contemporary art galleries from the East to the West of the city, two recent institutional openings are enforcing a southern axis. The new Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art in New Cross, housed in a listed Victorian bathhouse refurbished by 2015 Turner Prize winners Assemble, kicked off with a sparkling survey show of Mika Rottenberg’s absurdist film installations offering grotesque parodies of current labor conditions. The second home of the South London Gallery at Peckham Road Fire Station, elegantly renovated by 6a architects, opened with “Knock Knock,” a group show about the uses of humor—from political satire to visual puns—in contemporary art. The addition of these spaces will surely benefit Gasworks, a short bus ride away in nearby Vauxhall, whose truly international program of residencies and exhibitions over the last two decades has been a vital antidote to the dangers of isolationism in the British art scene.


—> Continue reading here.

Text originally published in Art-agenda on October 12, 2018.



Lucy Dodd at Sprüth Magers, London.

Façade of the new Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art in New Cross.
Detail of Mika Rottenberg's show at Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art in New Cross.
Part of Tania Bruguera’s 2018 Hyundai Commission at Tate Modern. 
Visitor's comments on the Turner Prize 2018 board.
Installation from Atelier E.B's show at the Serpentine Sackler Galleries, London.
Detail from Cayetano Ferrer's solo exhibition “Demaster” at Southard Reid, London.
Martine Syms at Sadie Coles HQ, London. 
Judith Kopf's "Flock of Sheep" (2017) at the South London Gallery.
Cornelia Parker Transitional "Object" (PsychoBarn) at the Royal Academy.
 Johanna Unzueta at Proyectos Ultravioleta, Focus section, Frieze Art Fair.
 (Above + below) Sam Lewitt, "Core (the "Work")", BMW Open Work commission, Frieze Art Fair.
 Ian Law at RODEO, Frieze Art Fair.
(Above and below) Oscar Humphries' "Sèvres and Japonism" at Frieze Masters, London. 

(Above and below) Chris Burden at Gagosian, London.  

Lawrence Abu Hamdan at Chisenhale, London.
Daniel Silver at Frith Street Gallery, London.
Kemang Wa Lahulere at Marian Goodman Gallery, London.
 Alicja Kwade's work in the "Space Shifters" exhibition, Hayward Gallery, London.
 (Above and below) Elmgreen and Dragset, "This is how we bite our tongue", Whitechapel, London.
Amy Sillman at Camden Art Center, London.

RELATED CONTENT: 
Stacks Image 39


Report: Trip to London and Oxford in pictures


 (Above and four below) Cinthia Marcelle's "The Family in Disorder" (2018) at Museum and Modern Art Oxford.


(Above and below) The magnificent main hall of the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford.

 An example of Micronesian currency – we're reminded of our extended conversation with Melbourne-based artist Nicholas Mangan published in his 2016 Sternberg Press publication "Limits to growth" (and also during Chisenhale's live conversation and while chasing Ancient Lights).


(Above and below) These column capitals are the main reasons we visited Oxford. They were carved for the Oxford Museum of Natural History in 1859-60 by Irish brothers James and John O'Shea, along with their nephew Edward Whelan. Commissioned by John Ruskin, all the works were carved freestyle, without previous sketches, using only plant specimens from the botanical garden, and their sheer imagination, as references.

They are the protagonists of Sean Lynch's 2013 piece "A Blow by Blow Account of Stonecarving in Oxford", which we have been discussing with Sean for a while and finally saw in 2015 in Bordeaux. We continued learning more about this piece and its making during our joint adventure in Banff's "Geologic Time" residency programme last Fall. 


 (Above) Apostolos Georgiou, "FROM MY HEART" at Rodeo Gallery.

 (Above and 3 below) Leonor Antunes's "a thousand realities from an original mark" at Marian Goodman.
 Polycarbonate and brass screens and rope sculptures. Each screen corresponds to the exact measurements of one of the glass panels in the Upper Lawn Pavilion in Wiltshire, built between 1959 and 1962 by the British architects Alison and Peter Smithson (1928-1993 and 1923-2003).


(Above) Tacita Dean's "Landscape" exhibition premiered "Antigone", a new 1-hour long film and cloud paintings at The Royal Academy. Part 2 and 3 in the National Portrait Gallery (a retrospective of portrait films works) and at the National Gallery a two-room exhibition curated by the artist presents a selection of historical and contemporary still lives. 

 Fantastic assembly of square-format paintings by Markus Lüperz at Michael Werner Gallery, which the artist painted at age 24 using distemper on canvas.

 (Above and below) Batia Suter's work at The Photographers' Gallery. One of the nominees for the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2018.

(Above) The 2018 awardee was Luke Willis Thompson with his striking film "Autoportrait" (also nominated for this year's Turner Prize).

 Nicolas Lamas (above and immediately below) and Petra Feriancová (two following) two-person show "Becoming animal" at Tenderpixel
(Above) "Pregnant Landscape" by Phoebe Unwin at Amanda Wilkinson Gallery in SoHo.

 (Above and below) Wilhelm Sasnal at Sadie Coles.

  (Above and below) August Sander's "Men without masks" at Hauser & Wirth included an extensive selection of rare large-scale photographs made between 1910 and 1931. The photographs were printed in a unique oversize format for inclusion in an exhibition at the Mannheimer Kunstverein in 1973.
  (Above) Group exhibition curated by Gianni Jetzer at Hauser & Wirth. 


  (Above and detail below) Rose Wiley's "Lolita's House"three-floor solo show at David Zwirner.

  (Above and below) 1960s vinyl sculptures by South Korean Seung-taek Lee at White Cube (Mayfair). Works have been recreated for the exhibition using urethane vinyl to achieve greater durability whilst retaining a similar visual quality.

  (Above and below) Abigail Reynolds mid-career survey at Peer.

  (Above) Visiting Ian White and Sadie Benning (photographed) at Camden Art Center with Antoni Hervàs.


  (Above and 2 below) Last day to see Magali Reus solo show at South London Gallery. 

   (Above and two below) Osías Yanov's "Orphan Dance" at Gasworks.

   (Above and below) Antoni Hervàs studio at Gasworks, his 3-month residency is supported by Acción Cultural Española (AC/E)
   (Above and 2 below) Joan Jonas exhibition at Tate Modern.

   (Above) View of Trafalgar Square with Michael Rakowitz's "The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist" featuring on the Fourth Plinth commission.


On the way to see Tacita Dean's-curated exhibition "STILL LIFE" at the National Gallery, a much-obliged stop in the room with Vermeer and Dutch still life. Jacob van Walscapelle (1644-1727) and Jan van Huysum (1682–1749) masters in flower painting.


(Above) English singer-songwriter, record producer and humanitarian Peter Gabriel during the internet interspecies symposium "The Shape of a Circle in the Mind of a Fish" curated by Lucia Pietroiusti and Filipa Ramos for the Serpentine Gallery at the London Zoo.

Not photographed but also visited: Chisenhale Gallery, Matt's Gallery, Spruth Magers, Blain Southern, Pilar Corrias, Frith Street Gallery (both locations), Hollybush Gardens, Josh Liley Gallery, Kate McGarry, Mother's Tankstation, Modern Art (unexpectedly closed when it should have been open!, and so was Project Native Informant – which had a broken lift so had to go up 3 flights of stairs). 

RELATED CONTENT:
Stacks Image 39


Cover Story—April 2018: Dates, 700 BC to the present: Michael Rakowitz

Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org


The April 2018 monthly Cover Story "Dates, 700 BC to the present: Michael Rakowitz" is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org

"As Michael Rakowitz’s fourth plinth commission is unveiled in London’s Trafalgar Square, this month’s cover story image revisits Return (2004-ongoing) a related project by the artist that also speaks about the turbulent history of Iraq. And dates. In London, Michael has deployed thousands of date syrup cans to make a 1:1 scale recreation of Lamassu, the fantastic winged bull that graced the gates of the city of Nineveh from 700 BC until it was destroyed by Isis in 2015."

—> Continue reading
—> After April it will be archived here.

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.

RELATED CONTENT:

  • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
  • Cover Story – March 2018: "Armenia's ghost galleries" 6 March 2018
  • Cover Story – February 2018: Paradise, promises and perplexities 5 February 2018
  • Cover Story – January 2018: I'll be there for you, 2 January 2018
  • Cover Story – December 2017: "Tabet's Tapline trajectory", 4 December 2017
  • Cover Story – November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
  • Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
  • Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
  • Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
  • Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
  • Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
  • Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
  • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017

Stacks Image 39


Locating Ancient Lights signs around London with Nicholas Mangan

Nicholas Mangan’s show “Ancient Lights” recently opened at London’s Chisenhale Gallery, where Latitudes had a conversation with the artist on 7 July. The title of the show refers to a long-established English planning law enshrining the “right to light” by restricting the construction of buildings that would block sunlight reaching the windows of neighboring properties. If the sun has shined through a window for more than twenty years, there is legal protection for it not to be blocked. 

In the spirit of our tour project Incidents of Travel (which has involved artist-led explorations of Mexico City, Hong Kong, and soon San Francisco) on 3 July we set out with Nick to track down some of these esoteric signs in central London.


We started with a set of signs that – thanks to Wikipedia’s entry on the Right to light – are probably the best-known examples. The back windows of houses on Albemarle Way are visible from the Memorial Garden of the Priory Church of the Order of Saint John just off the Clerkenwell Road. (Here is a map of some Ancient Lights signs in London, if you know of more let us know!). We made our way on foot to a spot at the south end of Hatton Gardens (an address now notorious for the April 2015 heist) but failed to find the rumored sign there. It was a little early in the day for a pint at the nearby Ye Olde Mitre.



Heading in to Chinatown, we found ourselves scouring the bizarrely-named Horse & Dolphin Yard, a dead-end alleyway with a pagoda-like construction where several restaurants from Gerrard Street and Shaftesbury Avenue have there back entrances. We eventually spotted the sign, which appears to have been moved from its original location as it doesn’t mark any window, just a bare brick wall.



Nearby there is a cute sign above the diminutive Rupert Court, at the back of The Blue Posts pub. (If we were going to stop for a drink it would have to be somewhere far more thematically appropriate – the Sun Tavern in Covent Garden, The Sun and 13 Cantons in Soho or the Rising Sun in Bloomsbury, would hit the spot). 

Later in the week we found the huge and typographically-distinguished Ancient Lights sign in Newman Passage, a little connecting street perhaps most famous for its starring role in the murderous opening scene of the film Peeping Tom (1960).


The more modest sign that can be seen next to the lamp of The Hope pub, just near Goodge Street tube station, is a palimpsest still bearing visible traces of an earlier sign underneath. Thus endeth the tour!


RELATED CONTENT:

Latitudes conversation with Nicholas Mangan on 7 July 2015 at Chisenhale Gallery, London;


Cover Story, July 2015: Nicholas Mangan’s ‘Ancient Lights’;

Max Andrews, Feature on Nicholas Mangan, 'Landscape Artist', Frieze, Issue 172, Summer 2015;

Mariana Cánepa Luna, 'What Lies Underneath', interview with Nicholas Mangan, Mousse Magazine #47, February–March 2015.


This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Stacks Image 39


In conversation with the artist Nicholas Mangan at Chisenhale Gallery, London, 7 July 2015, 19h.

  Nicholas Mangan, Still from 'Ancient Lights', 2014–5. Courtesy LABOR, Mexico City; Sutton Gallery, Melbourne; and Hopkinson Mossman, Auckland.

On July 7 at 19h Latitudes will lead a conversation with the Melbourne-based artist Nicholas Mangan on the occasion of his solo show 'Ancient Lights' (3 July–23 August 2015) at Chisenhale Gallery. They will discuss his ongoing investigations into the relationship between energy and social transformation as well as his latest film installation premiered in the exhibition and powered entirely by on-site solar panels placed on the roof of the gallery building.

'Ancient Lights' is produced in partnership with Artspace, Sydney, where it will be presented as part of his solo exhibition, Other Currents, in September 2015.  

Nicholas Mangan (1979) lives and works in Melbourne, Australia. Recent exhibitions include 'Art in the Age of…', Witte de With, Rotterdam; 'Anthropocene Moment', Les Abattoirs, Toulouse (both 2015); 'Octopus', Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne; 'Concrete', Monash Museum of Art, Melbourne; 'Melbourne Now', National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (all 2014). He participated in the '2015 New Museum Triennial: Surround Audience', New York; 9th Bienal do Mercosul, Porto Alegre; and the 13th Istanbul Biennial (both 2013).


This event is free. Reserve a place via Chisenhale's Eventbrite.

   
RELATED CONTENT:

Interview 'What Lies Beneath' between Nicholas Mangan and Mariana Cánepa Luna of Latitudes, Mousse Magazine #47, February–March 2015.  

Max Andrews' of Latitudes feature article 'Landscape Artist', Frieze #172, June–August 2015.


This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
Work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Stacks Image 39


Report from London's Frieze week 2014 now on Storify


Stacks Image 39


2012 "Frieze week" in pictures

A report in pictures from Frieze London (now in its 10th year!) & the inaugural Frieze Masters (11–14 October) as well as concurrent shows in London.


Rirkrit Tiravanija light box at Koo Jeog A floor at the stand of Pilar Corrias.

"Colosseum of the Consumed" by Grizedale Arts & Yangjiang Group was one one of the six Frieze Projects this year. (Unfortunately we didn't get a photo of the tomato battles.) There's a nice article about the endeavor over at Another Magazine.
Colosseum of the Consumed: Various advanced pickled food, kimchi and pickled eggs. Would make an interesting breakfast.
Too distracted by the boomerangs and Inuit carvings at Frieze Masters to take many photos, but the stand of Sfeir-Semler presenting works by the Emirati conceptualist Hassan Sharif was a highlight.
Back in the main tent, Geoffrey Farmer – he of the 'leaves of grass' Life magazine work at dOCUMENTA (13) – presented a solo booth with Casey Kaplan.
Chantal Crousel's stands are always immaculate ("What a Load of Rubbish" is by Claire Fontaine, the lamps by Haegue Yang). In the foreground is the seating area with Thomas Bayrle's "La vache qui rit" motif, another of the Frieze Projects.
The Modern Institute/Toby Webster: Simon Starling in the back, Jeremy Deller in the front (a work which refers to this relevation.)


 Adrián Villar Rojas's wonderful concrete and wood sculptures at kurimanzutto.
Aslı Çavuşoğlu's Frieze Project: ""Murder in Three Acts" was inspired by the representation of art in popular media, particularly in television crime series in which the artworks don’t solely exist in the background of the show, but become a vital part of the script: exhibitions function as crime scenes and art works act as murder weapons."
Vitamin Creative Space, with works by Pak Sheung Chuen, was awarded the Best Stand prize. Here, some left hand / right hand peanuts. 


 Thomas Bayrle's funky carpet salutes visitors entering Frieze Art Fair.
And elsewhere in London...
 
Tino Sehgal's Unilever series commission at Tate Modern's Turbine Hall (above and below). Go see it, photos don't do justice to the piece!

Gagosian (Britannia Street): works by the recently departed Franz West.
Detail of Franz West's show at Gagosian (Britannia Street)
 Bjarne Melgaard: A House to Die In until 18 November at ICA London.
Thomas Houseago at Hauser & Wirth
Thomas Houseago at Hauser & Wirth
Fischli & Weiss at Sprüth Magers. More installation shots here.
Sarah Lucas & Franz West at Situation / Sadie Coles (First Floor, 4 New Burlington Place). One of the most interesting shows in town.
Stuart Shave/Modern Art presented David Noonan, nine new silkscreen works on linen.
Ian Kiaer at Alison Jacques Gallery

Theaster Gates at White Cube Bermondsey. The Shard in the background. More info and images of the show (as photos were not allowed inside the gallery) in this Domus interview with Martina Angelotti.
Artist Placement Group 1966-79 at Raven Row. Always beautiful galleries and great shows.
Falke Pisano at Hollybush Gardens.
Mike Bouchet at Hotel.
Klaus Weber at Herald St.
Maureen Paley with the work of Liam Gillick.
The Drawing Room presented the first major exhibition by Paul Sietsema in the UK.
SUNDAY was organised by three of the participating galleries: Croy Nielsen (Berlin), Limoncello (London) and Tulips & Roses (Brussels).
Work by Spartacus Chetwynd at the Turner Prize show at Tate Britain.
And last but not least, a shot from the amazing Tarek Atoui-led musical extravaganza at the Serpentine on 12 October.

All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)


Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Stacks Image 39



Cookies Advice: We use cookies. If you continue browsing, we consider that you accept their use. Aviso de Cookies: Utilizamos cookies. Si continua navegando, consideramos que acepta su uso.