Longitudes

Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna in Art Basel Cities: Buenos Aires' Parallel Rooms programme on 13 April 2019


Art Basel Cities: Buenos Aires in collaboration with arteBA Fundación will host a Talks Programme between April 12–14, 2019. Forty-two speakers from across the cultural sphere will discuss salient topics with the Buenos Aires audience. 

Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna of Latitudes will each participate in Parallel Rooms, an Art Basel programme format that began in 2017 allowing attendees to choose from and roam among multiple conversations happening simultaneously. Check the full events programme here (in Spanish).


Parallel Rooms takes place at arteBA, Pista Central de la Rural, Palermo, and are free and open to the public.


Parallel Rooms | Session 2 | Room 3
"First Things First: Making Exhibitions for a General Audience"

Saturday 13 April 2019
6:30
7:30pm

In this conversation, curators Max Andrews and Lara Marmor will discuss the challenges around what has become their primary job: curating and positioning an exhibition for a non-expert audience. Together they discuss: Are there curatorial strategies for speaking to a larger public? What can we do to encourage novices to visit an exhibition and help them enjoy it?

This session is free and open to the public and will be held in Spanish.


Parallel Rooms | Session 3 | Room 2
"Beyond the Museum: New Institutional Frames for Art"
Saturday 13 April 2019
7:30—8:30pm


Art is no longer confined to just museums; we can enjoy exhibitions in abandoned buildings, parks, and other unconventional spaces. But the contexts for art are also changing in another sense, as new curatorial narratives shift traditional definitions of art and allow artists to engage in refreshing interactions with the culture at large. In this talk, curators Mariana Cánepa Luna and Solana Molina Viamonte discuss the transformation of traditional art spaces and the evolving relationship between the art lover and the curator.

This session is free and open to the public and will be held in Spanish.
+ info


RELATED CONTENT:


Barcelona Gallery Weekend 2016 – Artists and locations of the programme "Composiciones" announced


A "Save The Date" press release (scroll down for different languages) has been sent out with information of the participating galleries and spaces and their exhibitions for the forthcoming Barcelona Gallery Weekend (29 September–2October 2016)

Returning for its second edition in 2016, Latitudes will curate "Compositions" (Composiciones), a series of artistic interventionsin unique sitesacross the neighbourhoods of the city. Each of the commissioned artists is represented by a gallery participating in the Barcelona Gallery Weekend. 

Resisting an overall theme, and instead developing from the artists’ responses to the specificity of each context—people as well as places—the five art projects form a temporary thread that links evocative locations and public space, running parallel to the Weekend’s exhibitions in galleries and museums.  

The invited artists are Lúa Coderch  (Iquitos, Perú, 1982), Regina Giménez (Barcelona, 1966), Lola Lasurt  (Barcelona, 1983), Robert Llimós  (Barcelona, 1943), and Wilfredo Prieto (Santi Spiritus, Cuba, 1978), and the spaces where their interventions will take place are: 
The full schedule of routes, guided tours and parallel programming will be announced in September.

'Composiciones', five new commissions for the Barcelona Gallery Weekend, 1–4 October 2015.

"Compositions" is a programme of artists’ interventions originally conceived and curated by Latitudes for the first Barcelona Gallery Weekend in 2015, when it produced five projects by David Bestué (in the former ceramics factory Cosme Toda, L'Hospitalet); Dora García (at the Biblioteca del Campo Freudiano de Barcelona); Jordi Mitjà (in the Museu Geològic del Seminari de Barcelona); Rasmus Nilausen in collaboration with Pere Llobera (at the house of the former priest, gardens of La Central del Raval) y Daniel Steegmann Mangrané (in the Umbracle – Shadehouse – at the Parc de la Ciutadella). 

#BarcelonaGalleryWeekend
#Composiciones2016

Related content:

  • Composiciones 2015 commissions;
  • Storify – 2015 social media archive;
  • Instagram of the Barcelona Gallery Weekend;
  • PRESS RELEASE: Latitudes curates "Composiciones", a series of five artists' commissions for the first Barcelona Gallery Weekend, 1–4 October 2015; 
  • NOTA DE PRENSA: Comisariado de "Composiciones", cinco intervenciones artísticas para el primer Barcelona Gallery Weekend, 1–4 Octubre 2015;

Locating Ancient Lights signs around London with Nicholas Mangan

Nicholas Mangan’s show “Ancient Lights” recently opened at London’s Chisenhale Gallery, where Latitudes had a conversation with the artist on 7 July. The title of the show refers to a long-established English planning law enshrining the “right to light” by restricting the construction of buildings that would block sunlight reaching the windows of neighboring properties. If the sun has shined through a window for more than twenty years, there is legal protection for it not to be blocked. 

In the spirit of our tour project Incidents of Travel (which has involved artist-led explorations of Mexico City, Hong Kong, and soon San Francisco) on 3 July we set out with Nick to track down some of these esoteric signs in central London.


We started with a set of signs that – thanks to Wikipedia’s entry on the Right to light – are probably the best-known examples. The back windows of houses on Albemarle Way are visible from the Memorial Garden of the Priory Church of the Order of Saint John just off the Clerkenwell Road. (Here is a map of some Ancient Lights signs in London, if you know of more let us know!). We made our way on foot to a spot at the south end of Hatton Gardens (an address now notorious for the April 2015 heist) but failed to find the rumored sign there. It was a little early in the day for a pint at the nearby Ye Olde Mitre.



Heading in to Chinatown, we found ourselves scouring the bizarrely-named Horse & Dolphin Yard, a dead-end alleyway with a pagoda-like construction where several restaurants from Gerrard Street and Shaftesbury Avenue have there back entrances. We eventually spotted the sign, which appears to have been moved from its original location as it doesn’t mark any window, just a bare brick wall.



Nearby there is a cute sign above the diminutive Rupert Court, at the back of The Blue Posts pub. (If we were going to stop for a drink it would have to be somewhere far more thematically appropriate – the Sun Tavern in Covent Garden, The Sun and 13 Cantons in Soho or the Rising Sun in Bloomsbury, would hit the spot). 

Later in the week we found the huge and typographically-distinguished Ancient Lights sign in Newman Passage, a little connecting street perhaps most famous for its starring role in the murderous opening scene of the film Peeping Tom (1960).


The more modest sign that can be seen next to the lamp of The Hope pub, just near Goodge Street tube station, is a palimpsest still bearing visible traces of an earlier sign underneath. Thus endeth the tour!


RELATED CONTENT:

Latitudes conversation with Nicholas Mangan on 7 July 2015 at Chisenhale Gallery, London;


Cover Story, July 2015: Nicholas Mangan’s ‘Ancient Lights’;

Max Andrews, Feature on Nicholas Mangan, 'Landscape Artist', Frieze, Issue 172, Summer 2015;

Mariana Cánepa Luna, 'What Lies Underneath', interview with Nicholas Mangan, Mousse Magazine #47, February–March 2015.


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Founded in 2005 by Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna, Latitudes is a curatorial office based in Barcelona, Spain, that works internationally across contemporary art practices.

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2005—2019