Longitudes

Report: Latitudes' participation in the festival TODAY IS OUR TOMORROW initiated by PUBLICS in Helsinki

Poster announcing the festival in a street in central Helsinki. Photo: Latitudes.



As partner organisation in the transdisciplinary festival ‘Today Is Our Tomorrow’ initiated by PUBLICS, Latitudes participation consisted in inviting Argentinian-born, Amsterdam-based artist Mercedes Azpilicueta, to perform at Club Kaiku on September 13, 2019.

Façade of Kaiku, Helsinki.

A day earlier, Latitudes and Mercedes maintained an open conversation introducing her artistic practice and, in particular advancing details of both her ‘Yegua-Yeta-Yuta’ performance taking place a day after, her forthcoming solo exhibition at CentroCentro, Madrid, opening October 3, 2019, and her solo presentation as part of Van Abbemuseum's Positions #5’, a series of exhibitions presenting the work of artists working in the Netherlands.

September 12, 2019, 5:30–6:30h: (Above and below) Mercedes, Mariana and Max (Latitudes) in conversation at Club Kaiku. Photo: Jonni Korhonen/PUBLICS.
Photo: Jonni Korhonen/PUBLICS.
Photo: Aman Askarizad/PUBLICS.

Azpilicueta performed ‘Yegua-yeta-yuta’ (2015-ongoing), an evolving solo performance that is part scripted, part improvised. Composed from a litany of hundreds of pejorative, abusive, and vulgar insults directed at women in Argentina, it transforms the everyday language of misogyny and harassment into a kind of tragicomic exorcism. Many of the words derive from the street slang of Buenos Aires, especially Lunfardo, a colloquial and cryptic dialect that first arose among working-class Italian-immigrant and tango communities in Argentina and Uruguay during the late 1800s. For example, yegua literally means a mare – a female horse, a slur for a “difficult” woman. A yeta is a person who brings bad luck, while a yuta is someone corrupt or unscrupulous, and slang for the police. Accompanied by a percussive beat, Azpilicueta reclaims the power to offend, distorting and distending the epithets into something powerful and playful rather than weak and degrading. Azpilicueta performed to the beat of a new soundtrack produced for the occasion in collaboration with Chilean choreographer Rodrigo Sobarzo de Larraechea.



Photo: Aman Askarizad/PUBLICS.
Mercedes Azpilicueta during her performance ‘Yegua-Yeta-Yuta’ (2015-ongoing) for TODAY IS OUR TOMORROW festival, organised by PUBLICS, Helsinki. Photo: Latitudes.

Photo: Jonni Korhonen/PUBLICS.
Photo: Aman Askarizad/PUBLICS.
Photo: Kush Badhwar/PUBLICS.
Photo: Kush Badhwar/PUBLICS.
Photo: Kush Badhwar/PUBLICS.
Photo: Kush Badhwar/PUBLICS.
Photo: Latitudes.

Mercedes Azpilicueta is an Argentinian visual and performance artist based in Amsterdam. Her practice has spanned theatrical mises-en-scènes and video installations, textile sculptures and drawing, sound works and 3D animation. With a particular interest in notions of the vulnerable or collective body, and the primal or dissident voice, her works have drawn inspiration from sources as diverse as Baroque painting, text messaging, medieval tapestries, street slang, and literary fiction, as well as singular figures including the Italian art critic and feminist activist Carla Lonzi (1931–1982), the Argentine-French performance artist Lea Lublin (1929–1999), the French futurist Valentine de Saint-Point (1875–1953), and the Costa Rican-born Mexican ranchera singer Chavela Vargas (1919–2012). A major survey of Azpilicueta’s work to date, ‘Cuerpos Pájaros’ (Body-birds) was recently staged by the Buenos Aires Museum of Modern Art (November 2018–April 2019 — see Latitudes' Buenos Aires report). On October 3, 2019, she presents ‘Bestiario de Lengüitas’ (Bestiaire of Tonguelets), curated by Virginie Bobin, at CentroCentro, Madrid, an exhibition which will then tour to Museion, Bozen, and CAC Brétigny in 2020. Later in 2019, she will have a solo presentation as part of ‘Positions #5’ at Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven.


(Above) Mercedes during her performance ‘Oh, Eduarda!’ on April 14, 2019, presented at the Museo de Arte Moderno in Buenos Aires. Photo: Latitudes.



→ RELATED CONTENTS

Longitudes cuts across Latitudes’s projects and research with news, updates, and reportage.

Latitudes | www.LTTDS.org (except when otherwise noted).

Latitudes 2006–2019

Previous posts

Nov 2019 (4)
Oct 2019 (2)
Sep 2019 (6)
Aug 2019 (5)
Jul 2019 (1)
Jun 2019 (2)
May 2019 (3)
Apr 2019 (1)
Mar 2019 (3)
Feb 2019 (1)
Jan 2019 (3)
Dec 2018 (5)
Nov 2018 (3)
Oct 2018 (5)
Sep 2018 (7)
Aug 2018 (5)
Jul 2018 (2)
Jun 2018 (2)
May 2018 (3)
Apr 2018 (3)
Mar 2018 (2)
Feb 2018 (4)
Jan 2018 (3)
Dec 2017 (3)
Nov 2017 (3)
Oct 2017 (4)
Sep 2017 (3)
Aug 2017 (2)
Jul 2017 (2)
Jun 2017 (2)
May 2017 (2)
Apr 2017 (3)
Mar 2017 (3)
Feb 2017 (3)
Jan 2017 (2)
Dec 2016 (2)
Nov 2016 (3)
Oct 2016 (3)
Sep 2016 (2)
Aug 2016 (6)
Jul 2016 (2)
Jun 2016 (3)
May 2016 (5)
Apr 2016 (2)
Mar 2016 (2)
Feb 2016 (6)
Jan 2016 (3)
Dec 2015 (1)
Nov 2015 (1)
Oct 2015 (3)
Sep 2015 (1)
Aug 2015 (4)
Jul 2015 (5)
Jun 2015 (3)
May 2015 (3)
Apr 2015 (4)
Mar 2015 (2)
Feb 2015 (2)
Jan 2015 (2)
Dec 2014 (2)
Nov 2014 (3)
Oct 2014 (2)
Sep 2014 (2)
Aug 2014 (2)
Jun 2014 (3)
May 2014 (3)
Apr 2014 (2)
Mar 2014 (3)
Feb 2014 (1)
Jan 2014 (1)
Dec 2013 (4)
Nov 2013 (3)
Oct 2013 (6)
Sep 2013 (4)
Aug 2013 (2)
Jul 2013 (1)
Jun 2013 (3)
May 2013 (4)
Apr 2013 (2)
Mar 2013 (4)
Feb 2013 (2)
Jan 2013 (5)
Dec 2012 (5)
Nov 2012 (4)
Oct 2012 (4)
Sep 2012 (6)
Aug 2012 (4)
Jul 2012 (2)
Jun 2012 (3)
May 2012 (8)
Apr 2012 (7)
Mar 2012 (5)
Feb 2012 (5)
Jan 2012 (4)
Dec 2011 (4)
Nov 2011 (3)
Oct 2011 (6)
Sep 2011 (4)
Aug 2011 (7)
Jul 2011 (3)
Jun 2011 (8)
May 2011 (10)
Apr 2011 (6)
Mar 2011 (7)
Feb 2011 (9)
Jan 2011 (3)
Dec 2010 (8)
Nov 2010 (9)
Oct 2010 (6)
Sep 2010 (11)
Aug 2010 (6)
Jun 2010 (4)
May 2010 (5)
Apr 2010 (11)
Mar 2010 (4)
Feb 2010 (6)
Jan 2010 (7)
Dec 2009 (6)
Nov 2009 (3)
Oct 2009 (7)
Sep 2009 (11)
Aug 2009 (11)
Jul 2009 (2)
Jun 2009 (10)
May 2009 (7)
Apr 2009 (5)
Mar 2009 (6)
Feb 2009 (4)
Jan 2009 (5)
Dec 2008 (6)
Nov 2008 (5)
Oct 2008 (5)
Sep 2008 (5)
Aug 2008 (3)
Jul 2008 (3)
Jun 2008 (5)
May 2008 (4)
Apr 2008 (5)
Mar 2008 (3)
Feb 2008 (7)
Jan 2008 (5)
Dec 2007 (5)
Nov 2007 (5)
Oct 2007 (6)
Sep 2007 (8)
Aug 2007 (3)
Jul 2007 (5)
May 2007 (8)
Apr 2007 (8)
Mar 2007 (8)
Feb 2007 (3)
Jan 2007 (1)
Dec 2006 (8)
Nov 2006 (2)
Oct 2006 (6)
Sep 2006 (10)
Aug 2006 (1)
Founded in 2005 by Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna, Latitudes is a curatorial office based in Barcelona, Spain, that works internationally across contemporary art practices.

More about us. Browse projects. Read Longitudes. Receive newsletters.

Contact us. 
All content
Latitudes
2005—2019