Longitudes

Cover Story—June 2019: ‘Thinking like a drainage basin: Lara Almarcegui’s ‘Concrete’

Latitudes' homepage www.lttds.org

The May 2019 Monthly Cover Story ‘Thinking like a drainage basin: Lara Almarcegui’s ‘Concrete’’ is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org

Lara Almarcegui’s current exhibition at the CAIRN art centre in Digne-les-Bains, southern France, focuses on the nearby Bléone river, its geology, and its exploitation. Latitudes has written an essay entitled ‘Thinking like a drainage basin’ for the accompanying catalogue. Lara’s project Béton (Concrete) has two parts. The first, seen here, involves the floor of the art centre being covered with crushed cement, gravel and sand. This raw material is the remains of several concrete structures — weirs — that were placed in the river in a failed attempt to stabilise a riverbed that had been extensively dug out over the preceding decades to produce gravel for the construction industry. The watercourse and its ecology is now being restored, and the weirs were recently removed.”

—> Continue reading
—> After May it will be archived here.


Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.


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‘Thinking like a drainage basin’ essay in the catalogue of the exhibition ‘Lara Almarcegui. Béton’


(Above and below) Installation views of the exhibition ‘Béton’ by Lara Almarcegui at the CAIRN centre d'art, Digne-les-Bains, 2019. All photos: François-Xavier Emery.

Lara Almarcegui's exhibition ‘Béton’ opened on April 5 at CAIRN Centre d'art, in Digne-les-Bains, France, and will be on view until June 30th, 2019.

Latitudes has collaborated in the bilingual catalogue ‘Lara Almarcegui. Béton’ (French/English) recently published by Silvana Editoriale on the occasion the exhibition, with the new essay ‘Thinking like a drainage basin’. The publication includes an introduction by Giulia Pagnetti (curator of the exhibition and director of CAIRN Centre d'art), a second essay titled ‘Lara Almarcegui's building sites’ by Natacha Pugnet, and a conversation between the artist and Winfried Dallmann (Associate Professor, Department of Geosciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø) titled ‘Earth Calculation’.



As Latitudes' writes in the essay (...) ‘As part of her most recent project for CAIRN Centre d’art, Almarcegui has produced ‘Roches et Materiaux du Bassin de la Bléone’ (2019), an inventory of the different types of geological matter comprising the entire drainage basin of the Bléone river from its source near Prads-Haute-Bléone to its confluence with the Durance at Chateau-Arnaux, a terrain of some 906 km2.

In discussing how storytelling might integrate with environmental science, anthropologist Julie Cruikshank poses the rhetorical question, “are glaciers ‘good to think with’?”[1] She suggests that glaciers and glacial stories be allowed to disrupt and exceed conceptual fields and dominant frameworks of knowledge. Ecologist Aldo Leopold coined the term “to think like a mountain” in his 1949 book ‘A Sand County Almanac’, proposing that history could be narrated, or indeed art could be made, from the point of view of non-human actors. Are drainage basins good to think with? What might it entail to think like the rocks and topological forms that funnel water into a river in the Alpes-de-Haute-Provence département in southeastern France?’



‘Lara Almarcegui. Béton’
April 2019, 48 pages, 24 x 17 cm
Texts by Natacha Pugnet, Latitudes and an interview between the artist and Winfried Dallmann. 
French/English 
Published by Silvana Editoriale
March 2019
Edited by CAIRN centre d'art
ISBN 9788836640904
Purchase here for 10 Euros.

RELATED CONTENT:
  • Writing archive on Latitudes' website;
  • Review – ‘Domènec. Y la tierra será el paraíso', adn galería, Barcelona, frieze.com, 13 March 2019
  • Opinion – ‘Frank Zappa’s Genre-Defying ‘Civilization Phaze III’’, frieze, January-February 2019, Issue 200, and frieze.com, 14 January 2019
  • Review – ‘Te toca a tí’ [It's your turn], Espai d'art contemporani de Castelló, art-agenda, 7 January 2019
  • art-agenda review of Frieze week 2018 15 October 2018
  • Catalogue essay – ‘The Kørner Problem’, in the monograph ‘John Kørner', ed. by Maria Nipper. Published by Roulette Russe, 2017. 19 February 2018

"The Kørner problem” essay by Max Andrews in the monograph "John Kørner" published by Roulette Russe

Exhibition poster of "Altid Mange Problemer" at Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen, Summer 2017. Photo: Latitudes.

Last Summer, Max Andrews of Latitudes was invited to contribute an essay for the forthcoming monograph of John Kørner's work published by the Danish editorial Roulette Russe and designed by Spine Studio. The publication is out now and includes essays by Max, London-based writer Oliver Basciano, and a conversation between the artist and Marie Nipper, curator of John's recent mid-career exhibition in Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen. 

The 280-page bilingual Danish/English monograph will be launched on March 2, 2018, at 4:30pm, in Kunsthal Charlottenborg's Apollo Kantine, though it will become available for online orders from February 26.

(Above and following): Photos: Finn Wergel Dahlgren. Courtesy Roulotte Russe. 













In his essay, Max tries to define what "The Kørner problem” (the title of the essay) might be:

(...) "The apparently ‘wicked’ problems and appalling catastrophes that interpenetrate Kørner’s works are manifold. The upsurge in jihadist terrorist activity in Europe since 2015 and its fallout are unavoidable (whether vestiges of the Charlie Hebdo shootings and the Bataclan attacks in Paris, suicide bombings in Brussels and Manchester; or truck attacks in Nice, Berlin, Barcelona; rampaging attacks in London, and so on). The civil war and the rise of ISIL (ISIS, Daesh) in Syria and the exacerbating effects of climate change and mega-drought that affected the region are inescapable. The European debt and migrant crisis are here. Yet elsewhere Kørner also brings to mind what at first seem like unrelated problems: the 2011 Tōhoku tsunami and the calamity of the Fukushima nuclear power plant meltdown, human trafficking, et cetera, states of exception that seem to confirm that the problem is evermore radical, atrocious, ungrounded—more diffuse while remaining intractably real. American pop star Ariana Grande knows this as well as Kørner. Released in spring 2014, three years before the suicide bombing of her concert at Manchester Arena, her most successful single to date is titled “Problem”. We are witnessing new kinds of wicked problems and Kørner paints accordingly."


In preparation for the catalogue essay, in July 2017 Latitudes visited Kørner's impressive "Altid Mange Problemer" mid-career exhibition at Kunsthal Charlottenborg, the largest exhibition of his works to date, gathering paintings and sculptural pieces from 2004 to the present.

(Above and following): Photos by Latitudes.


Max has previously written on John's work for the catalogue of his 2006 exhibition "Problems" at Victoria Miro Gallery in London.

Latitudes' first visit to Copenhagen also involved Kørner's work, as we visited his solo show 'ARoS Bank' at the ARoS Århus Kunstmuseum, Denmark (13 June–10 September 2006), which became the subject of our first blog post over a decade ago, in September 2006 (!).

RELATED CONTENT:
  • Latitudes' writing archive
  • Latitudes' "out of office" 2016–2017 season 1 August 2017
  • Max Andrews essay on Christopher Knowles for NoguerasBlanchard at Liste 2017 21 July 2017
  • Mariana Cánepa Luna reviews Ana Jotta’s “Abans que me n’oblidi (Before I forget)” exhibition in art-agenda 11 November 2016
  • '2006 Problems' exhibition and publication by John Kørner, Victoria Miro Gallery, London 29 November 2006
  • Copenhagen trip. 'Woman with 24 problems' by John Kørner 30 September 2006

In conversation for the exhibition catalogue "Limits to Growth" by Nicholas Mangan (Sternberg Press, 2016)


Photos: Latitudes.

After much anticipation, we are elated to see (and touch!) Latitudes' five-part interview with Nicholas Mangan as part of his exhibition catalogue "Nicholas Mangan. Limits to Growth" (Sternberg Press, 2016). The publication is designed by Žiga Testen and includes newly commissioned texts by Ana Teixeira Pinto and Helen Hughes, alongside illustrations of Mangan's work and historical source material.

The five-part interview weaves together a discussion around five of his recent works ‘Nauru, Notes from a Cretaceous World’ (2009), ‘A World Undone’ (2012), ‘Progress in action’ (2013), ‘Ancient Lights’ (2015) and his newest piece ‘Limits to Growth’ (2016) commissioned for this exhibition survey. Latitudes’ dialogue with Mangan, began around a research trip to Melbourne in 2014, and continued in the form of the public conversation event that took place at the Chisenhale Gallery, London, in 2015, as well as over Skype, email, snail mail and walks.






 

The publication release coincides with Mangan's eponimous exhibition survey which began in July in Melbourne's Monash University Museum of Art and just opened this past weekend in Brisbane's IMA. The show will further tour to Berlin's KW Institute for Contemporary Art in Summer 2017.

"Nicholas Mangan. Limits to Growth" 

Publisher: Sternberg Press with the Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane; KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin; and Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne.
Editor: Aileen Burns, Charlotte Day, Krist Gruijthuijsen, Johan Lundh. 
Texts: Latitudes, Helen Hughes, Ana Teixeira Pinto 
Design: Žiga Testen;
October 2016, English;
17 x 24 cm, 246 pages + 2 inserts, edition of 1500; 

40 b/w and 102 color ill., with color poster and postcard Softcover;
ISBN 978-3-95679-252-6;
30 Euros.






















RELATED CONTENT:

Interview with Nicholas Mangan for his forthcoming catalogue ‘Limits to Growth’

Nicholas Mangan, ‘Ancient Lights’ (2015). Installation views, Chisenhale Gallery, 2015. Co-commissioned by Chisenhale Gallery, London and Artspace, Sydney. Courtesy the artist; Labor Mexico; Sutton Gallery, Melbourne; and Hopkinson Mossman, Auckland. Photo: Andy Keate.

We have just wrapped-up an interview with Melbourne-based artist Nicholas Mangan to be published by Sternberg Press as the catalogue of his forthcoming solo exhibition ‘Limits to Growth’, co-produced by Monash University Museum of Art (MUMA), Melbourne (opening July 20) and Institute of Modern Art (IMA), Brisbane (where it will be on view from October 29), it will later travel to Kunst-Werke Institute of Contemporary Art in Berlin (summer 2017)

The five-part interview weaves together a discussion of his recent works ‘Nauru, Notes from a Cretaceous World’ (2009), ‘A World Undone’ (2012), ‘Progress in action’ (2013), ‘Ancient Lights’ (2015) and his newest piece ‘Limits to Growth’ (2016), to be premiered at Monash University Museum of Art (MUMA). Part of an ongoing dialogue with Mangan, it developed from a public conversation event that took place at Chisenhale Gallery, London on 7 July 2015. 

‘Limits to Growth’ references a 1972 report commissioned by the Club of Rome that analysed a computer simulation of the Earth and human systems: the consequences of exponential economic and population growth given finite resource supplies. The overlapping themes and flows of energies in the five of Mangan’s projects discussed in the interview might be read as an echo of the modelling and systems dynamics used by the simulation in order to try and better understand the limits of the world’s ecosystems. 

Mangan is presenting Ancient Lights’ (2015) at his Mexico City gallery LABOR on April 22, a work co-commissioned by Chisenhale Gallery in London and Artspace in Sydney.

In conversation between Latitudes and Nicholas Mangan, Chisenhale Gallery, 7 July 2015. Photos: Manuela Barczewski.

RELATED CONTENT:


Colaboración en el catálogo digital de la exposición "7.000.000.000" de Arlandis/Marroquí para el Espai d'art Contemporani Castelló (EACC)

El próximo 31 de enero inaugura en el Espai d'art Contemporani Castelló (EACC) la exposición colectiva "7.000.000.000", un proyecto que parte de la idea de desarrollo sostenible. La exposición está comisariada por David Arlandis y Javier Marroquí.  

Arlandis y Marroquí han invitado a una serie de autores a contribuir textos para el catálogo digital, entre ellos a Mariana Cánepa Luna de Latitudes que ha escrito sobre Time/Bank, el sistema económico alternativo creado en el 2009 por los artistas Anton Vidokle y Julieta Aranda. Podéis leer o descargar la publicación desde este enlace.

Para la ocasión, como avanzan los comisarios en este texto, Time/Bank abrirá una sucursal "y colaborará con otra iniciativa similar, la Ecoxarxa, que se está desarrollando fuera del ámbito artístico. Time/Bank es un proyecto que consta de una instalación en la que podemos ver material diverso y documentación relacionada con las primeras iniciativas de banco de tiempo. La segunda parte trata de poner en marcha esa sucursal de banco de tiempo, con voluntad de continuidad, en la ciudad. Lo que se persigue es favorecer la implantación real de un modelo económico alternativo donde se intercambia con el tiempo como moneda."

Time/Bank en dOCUMENTA (13), 2012.
A continuación un extracto del texto de Cánepa Luna que se incluye en la publicación:

"Como acertadamente señala el antropólogo teórico David Graeber en su ensayo “The Sadness of Post-Workerism” (La tristeza del post-laboralismo), una de las ideas más ignoradas y, sin embargo, más poderosas y perdurables del marxismo, es que el mundo no solo consiste en la producción de mercancías que puedan ser compradas y vendidas, sino en acciones y procesos.[1] El sistema económico alternativo Time/Bank, de Anton Vidokle y Julieta Aranda, que utiliza el tiempo como unidad de cambio, se concretó en 2009, un año después de que la crisis actual llegara a su punto álgido. Time/Bank evolucionó de forma natural a partir de PAWNSHOP (2007), su negocio de préstamos a corto plazo para obras de arte, situado en un local comercial de la calle Ludlow, en Nueva York. Ambas iniciativas median inquietudes en torno a la circulación y la distribución, temas que siguen presentes en sus prácticas artísticas, y que posiblemente estén mejor ejemplificadas en e-flux, el servicio de mensajes por correo electrónico que fundaron conjuntamente en 1999, y que se utiliza dentro del mundo del arte para difundir información sobre acontecimientos relacionados con el arte, exposiciones y proyectos, entre sus más de 90.000 suscriptores electrónicos.

La creciente desconfianza hacia los sistemas económicos y financieros existentes creó la tormenta perfecta para que se materializara su propuesta Time/Bank, aunque Vidokle y Aranda insisten en situarlo en el contexto de otros casos previos de moneda alternativa o local, y de estructuras financieras basadas en la reciprocidad, como Ithaca HOUR, la moneda creada por el organizador de comunidades Paul Glover en 1991 en el norte del estado de Nueva York, que todavía está en funcionamiento y se ha convertido en la moneda local que más tiempo lleva en circulación en Estados Unidos. Vidokle y Aranda crearon Time/Bank con la intención de fomentar un sentimiento de valor cultural dentro de la comunidad cultural, donde a menudo se ha dado un intercambio de aptitudes y productos al margen de los sistemas monetarios –por ejemplo, intercambio de obras, ayuda durante la instalación, traducción, etc. Como sostiene Vidokle, "Time/Bank puede potencialmente convertirse en la base de una economía diferente, capaz de soportar nuevas y distintas formas de relaciones sociales y prácticas culturales... Esperamos ir más allá y crear una estructura económica que pueda ser compartida por otros y que sea capaz, hasta cierto punto, de atender a sus necesidades". [2]

[1] David Graeber, “The Sadness of Post-Workerism or“Art And Immaterial Labour” Congreso: A Sort of Review (Tate Britain, sábado 19 de enero de 2008)”. Editado en The Commoner, 5 de diciembre de 2013.  
[2] Jolien Verlaek, "Working With That 'We-Feeling'”, Metropolis M núm.1, 2011.

Billetes Time Bank diseñados por Lawrence Weiner.

"7.000.000.000" permanecerá abierta hasta el 27 de abril 2014.
Artistas participantes: ANETTA MONA CHIŞA & LUCIA TKÁČOVÁ, BASURAMA, CARLOS MOTTA, DANIELA ORTIZ Y XOSÉ QUIROGA, JOHAN GRIMONPREZ, JULIETA ARANDA Y ANTON VIDOKLE, JUAN JOSÉ MARTÍN ANDRÉS, NÚRIA GÜELL, TUE GREENFORT, REGINA JOSÉ GALINDO, OLIVER RESSLER, OLIVER RESSLER Y ZANNY BEGG, THE OTOLITH GROUP, URSULA BIEMANN
 
Posts relacionados:
dOCUMENTA (13) in pictures & as seen by the critics, 9 June–16 September 2012 (12 June 2012)



This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Further update: Contents of the forthcoming publication 'Amikejo' – Available in April 2012

We are currently finalising and proof-reading the 'Amikejo' publication (see previous posts here and here), which concludes the year-long exhibition cycle at the Laboratorio 987, MUSAC (Fermín Jiménez Landa & Lee Welch's show is on view until 15 January 2012). The volume will be available in Spring 2012 and will be distributed by Mousse Publishing.

Below an excerpt of Theo Beckers's essay 'Free time: The rise and fall of a social project', commissioned by 'Amikejo' artists Iratxe Jaio and Klaas van Gorkum to complement the publication section dedicated to their multi-part project 'Producing time in between other things' (2011), which revolves around the changing values of labour and property:


"Have you ever heard the story of the African fisherman? In the early light of dawn, he would set out to sea in his little boat, fish for a few hours, return to port, sell his catch and then spend the rest of the day in the shade of a tree on the beach, contemplating the meaning of life and other pleasant thoughts. An economist from the World Bank appeared one day and asked him why he didn’t take advantage of all that spare time by fishing longer, and going further out to sea with a larger boat. This would bring in more fish and thus more profit. In the long run, this would enable the fisherman to buy more and even bigger boats, and even hire people to do the work for him. Eventually, he could make so much money that he wouldn’t need to work anymore and could afford to lie on the beach the whole day. At which the fisherman laughed and asked the economist, “Why would I go through all that trouble?” The history of Western society’s relationship with time clearly illustrates, however, that it is the economist who had the last laugh, not the fisherman."


Theo Beckers was Professor of Leisure Studies at Tilburg University and is now on the faculty of the Tilburg Sustainability Center, the Netherlands, and Visiting Professor at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing. Translated from the Dutch by Klaas van Gorkum.


Further publication details:



Title | Título 

'Amikejo'



Editor | Edita

Latitudes



Publisher & Distributor | Publica y distribuye


Mousse Publishing and MUSAC



Format | Formato 


22,5x15,5cm, 216 pp., hardcover
 


Language | Idiomas 


English/Spanish

 

Editorial Coordination | Coordinación editorial

Latitudes and Carlos Ordás
 



Production | Producción

Bruna Roccasalva 


Graphic design | Diseño gráfico

Studio Mousse — Marco Fasolini, Fausto Giliberti, Andrea Novali, Francesco Valtolina
 
 


Texts | Textos

Giorgio Agamben, Theo Beckers, Latitudes, Prof. Peter Osborne, Georges Perec, Prof. Dr. Menno Schilthuizen, Ryszard Zelichowski
 


Translation | Traducción

Marzena Beata Guzowska (Polish—English); Klaas van Gorkum (Dutch—English); e-verba (English—Spanish)
 
   


Copy-editing | Correcciones

Latitudes

Johanna Bishop
English proof-reading of Ryszard Zelichowski’s text (unabridged version) Martin Blaszk
 
   


Distribution | Distribución

Mousse Publishing
 
 


Printing and binding | Impresión y encuadernación

Grafiche Artigianelli, Brescia
 
   


Print-run | Tiraje

1,200 copies
  



ISBN

9788896501832

Robert Smithson's 'Broken Circle/Spiral Hill Revisited' (1971–2011) and The Land Art Contemporary programme

 
Land Art Contemporary year-long initiative showcases works of art located in the countryside of Drenthe, a province in the northeastern Netherlands, which will be complemented with an international events programme dealing with the contemporary aspects of Land art. Starting on 17 September 2011, the programme is linked to the 40th anniversary of the creation of Robert Smithson's film Broken Circle/Spiral Hill in Emmen for the exhibition Sonsbeek 1971.  

Coinciding with the anniversary, Land Art Contemporary kicks off with the exhibition 'Robert Smithson – Broken Circle/Spiral Hill Revisited', at the Centre for Visual Arts (CBK) in Emmen. The exhibition's star piece will be the recently completed film 'Breaking Ground: Broken Circle/Spiral Hill' (1971–2011), uncompleted due to Smithson's untimely death in 1973, which is now finally produced, following his instructions for direction and editing, by his widow Nancy Holt in collaboration with SKOR. The film will also be screened once on 22 September at the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. Holt will introduce the video.

Parallel to this major exhibition, SKOR is also organising The Ultraperiferic (17 September – 27 November 2011), an exhibition that will feature the work of Lara Almarcegui (ES/NL), Jorge Satorre (MX/NL) and Cyprien Gaillard (FR/DE), three artists with whom Latitudes has worked in the recent past and whose work will also be featured in Max Andrews' essay "'A Dark Spot of Exasperation: From Smithson to the Spime'" in the forthcoming publication 'Robert Smithson: Art in Continual Movement' (ISBN 9789081531481) to be published by Alauda Publications in early 2012. The essay and The Ultraperiferic both feature Jorge Satorre's 'The erratic. Measuring compensation' (2009) which was produced in the context of 'Portscapes' and recently featured in his exhibition at Labor, Mexico City.


The project will continue in 2012–13, with a series of 'assignments' to contemporary artists "a number of artists will be set the assignment of creating a work in the spirit of Smithson, whereby the landscape is viewed as a continual process that is constantly in a state of transformation due to the interaction between man and nature", to be curated by SKOR's curators Nils van Beek and Theo Tegelaers. + info...


Land Art Contemporary is an initiative of STICHTING LACDA, Drenthe, a foundation established in 2011 by the Sanders-Ten Holte family. The program has been made possible thanks to (content and financial) support from SKOR | Foundation for Art and Public Domain, Province of Drenthe, European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development: Europe Investing in Rural Areas (LEADER), Municipality of Coevorden, Municipality of Emmen, Cultuurfonds BNG and the Sanders-Ten Holte family.

'The Last Newspaper' available for purchase and distribution from Motto in Berlin

Image: Motto Distribution announcement.

'The Last Newspaper' exhibition catalogue is now available for purchase (€15, to buy email [email protected] ) as well as for distribution from Motto Berlin.

'The Last Newspaper' was a hybrid exhibition inspired by the ways artists approach the news and respond to the stories and images that command the headlines. Co-curated by Richard Flood and Benjamin Godsill, the exhibition was held at the New Museum, New York, from 6 October 2010 to 9 January 2011.

Alongside the exhibition, a number of partner organisations, including Latitudes, used on-site offices to present their research and stage public dialogues. ‘THE LAST POST’ / ‘THE LAST GAZETTE’ / ‘THE LAST REGISTER’… was an 12-page free weekly newspaper and an incremental exhibition catalogue edited during a 10 week editorial residency byLatitudes .

This published record, designed by Chad Kloepfer and Joel Stillman, is the surrogate catalogue of The Last Newspaper. Featuring over 100 contributors, including essays and interviews with participating artists, the compilation also brings together articles and special features around an expanded selection of work that addresses the news, the newspaper, and its evolving form and function.

Motto Berlin, a store dedicated to magazines, books and self published printed matter. Various presentations and publication launches take place every month.

Motto Berlin
Skalitzer Str. 68, im Hinterhof
10997 Berlin
U1 Schlesiches Tor
Ph: +49 (0)30 75442119
Fax: +49 (0)30 75442120

Open Monday – Saturday: 12h-20h

[email protected]


Installation views of 'Christina Hemauer | Roman Keller: United Alternative Energies', Århus Art Building, Århus, Denmark, until 3 April 2011

Above and below: Installation view. Photo: Jens Møller Sørensen. Courtesy the artists.


—> Slideshow of the publication.
—> Slideshow of the exhibition.

The exhibition 'Christina Hemauer | Roman Keller: United Alternative Energies', is the most comprehensive exhibition of the Swiss duo's work to date, presenting ten works of which four are new productions.

Hemauer | Keller has investigated the concept of energy for several years. One of their main areas of interest is the history of oil and its competing alternatives, notably solar energy. Often involving historical research, remembrance, performance and film, their projects focus in particular on the politics of oil, energy crises, and the pursuit of new technology. (+ info...)

A 36 full-colour page booklet can be purchased from the Århus Art Building for 35 DKK (aprox. €4,70). Exhibition remains on view until 3 April 2011.


Photos and texts accompanying images: Latitudes | www.lttds.org

Longitudes cuts across Latitudes’s projects and research with news, updates, and reportage.

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Founded in 2005 by Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna, Latitudes is a curatorial office based in Barcelona, Spain, that works internationally across contemporary art practices.

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