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Cover Story—January 2020: Safeguarding Gestures

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The January 2020 monthly Cover Story ‘Safeguarding Gestures’ homepage: www.lttds.org

‘‘‘Poems for Earthlings’, by Argentinian artist Adrián Villar Rojas, transforms the Oude Kerk, a monumental church in the heart of the Amsterdam’s Red-light District which dates back to 1306. Unveiled during the Amsterdam Art Weekend two months ago and continuing until April, Villar Rojas’s installation features in the recent art-agenda Roundup from the city by Latitudes' Mariana Cánepa Luna.”
 

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→ After January 2020, this story will be archived here.

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.

 

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Mariana Cánepa Luna's Amsterdam Roundup for art-agenda.com

https://www.art-agenda.com/features/306593/amsterdam-roundup
“Many cities have adopted the gallery weekend format, and while there is a risk that this proliferation can lead to homogeneity, the particular strength and energy of Amsterdam Art Weekend lies in its steadfast commitment to art and artists, and to not limiting its remit to the commercial sector. Now in its eighth edition, the event grew out of the Rijksakademie Open, the yearly open studio presentations by the forty-plus artists in the institution’s two-year postgraduate residency program.”

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Originally published in art-agenda on December 13, 2019.

Below a broader selection of images from the exhibitions and events mentioned in the review, as well as others that couldn't fit in the 1,000-word review, such as Andrei Tarkovski’s exhibition at the Eye Filmmuseum, AKINCI’s group exhibition, Rozenstraat — a rose is a rose is a rose, more Rijksakademie artists’ studios and a short visit to Rotterdam's Witte de With and the new space of Wilfried Lentz in the Port. 

 (Above and below) Adrián Villar Rojas, “Poems for Earthlings”, 2019. Courtesy of the artist and Oude Kerk, Amsterdam. All photos by Mariana Cánepa Luna (unless otherwise specified in the photo caption).
Adrián Villar Rojas, “Poems for Earthlings”, 2019. Courtesy of the artist and Oude Kerk, Amsterdam. Photo: Jörg Baumann. 
Adrián Villar Rojas, “Poems for Earthlings”, 2019. Courtesy of the artist and Oude Kerk, Amsterdam. Photo: Jörg Baumann. 
  (Above and below) Carlos Amorales, ‘Orgy of Narcissus’, 2019. Courtesy of the artist, kurimanzutto, Mexico City / New York, and Nils Stærk Gallery. These works were developed in collaboration with the TextielLab, the professional workshop of the TextielMuseum.
 Carlos Amorales during the press tour presenting ‘Life In The Folds’ a work produced for the Pavilion of Mexico at the 57th Venice Biennale in 2017.
 Carlos Amorales, Black Cloud, 2007 (installation view). Collection of Diane and Bruce Halle.
 Carlos Amorales, Aprende a joderte (Learn to Fuck Yourself), 2019. Courtesy of the artist and kurimanzutto, Mexico City / New York. 
  (Above and below) Patricia Kaersenhout, ‘Guess Who's Coming To Dinner Too?’, 2019, installation view, De Appel, Amsterdam.

(Above and below) Installation view of Andrei Tarkovski at the Eye Filmmuseum presented an interesting curatorial challenge: how to translate the oeuvre of a filmmaker into an exhibition. In the case of Tarkovski, his limited filmography (8 feature films, plus 3 short films) reduces the challenge considerably, yet the decision of screening 20-minute clips from each film and splitting those clips on two or three large screens simultaneously raises further artistic questions—how far can the immersive experience be stretched? Tarkovski’s unique imagery and tempo multiply throughout the exhibition space far from the durational, one-image-at-a-time consumption offered by the cinematic experience (not to mention the cacophony, which must be said, was reduced here thanks to state-of-the-art hovering speakers above visitor seats). The second challenge has to do with the institutional programme. The next exhibition at the Eye Filmmuseum will be dedicated to (yet another man) Belgium-born, Mexico-based visual artist Francis Alÿs, and in March 2020 to Chantal Ackerman, the Belgian avant-garde filmmaker who passed away in 2015. This will be the first institutional solo exhibition dedicated to a woman since the museum opened in 2012, which is quite eye-opening (intended pun) and significant in the context of the low number of institutions programming female artists solos — yet it's also important to take into consideration the larger picture of female representation in the filmmaking industry.
 Sander Breure & Witte van Hulzen, "Accidents Waiting to Happen", installation, sculpture, video, performance, 2019. Prix de Rome 2019. Courtesy tegenboschvanvreden, Amsterdam.
Femke Herregraven, "Diving Reflex (Because We Learned Not to Drown, We Can Sing)", multimedia installation, 2019-ongoing. Prix de Rome 2019.
Esiri Erheriene-Essi, "The Inheritance" (or Familiar Strangers), 2019. Prix de Rome 2019.
Rory Pilgrim, "The Undercurrent", multimedia installation, 2019-ongoing. Prix de Rome 2019. Courtesy the artist and andriesse eyck galerie. Pilgrim's film received the Prix de Rome Visual Arts 2019 award for his work, receiving 40,000 euros and a residency at the American Academy in Rome.

 Studio by Shahidul Zaman during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.
  Studio by Christopher Manon during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.
  Studio by Jude Crilli during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.
 Studio by Aldo Esparza Ramos during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.
Studio by Artor Jesus Inkerö during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.
Studio by Catalina González during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.
Studio by Catalina González during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.
Studio by Salim Bayri during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.
Remco Torenbosch “Now” (2019), video, 180min, during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.
 Studio by Antonio Vega Macotela during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019. 

Studio by Anderu Immaculate Mali during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.
Studio by Dan Zhu during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.

Studio by Lotte van Geijn during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.

Studio by Özgür Atlagan during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.
Studio by Arturo Kameya during the RijksakademieOPEN 2019.
  (Above and below) Claudia Martínez Ayala solo show ‘A las revoluciones, como a los árboles, se les reconoce por sus frutos’ [Revolutions, like trees, are recognized by their fruits], 2019, installation view, Courtesy the artist and GRIMM Amsterdam | New York.
Rozenstraat – a rose is a rose is a rose presented the multichannel video-installation “Beyond Index” (2017) by Dutch artist Gerald van der Kaap.

LA-artist Matthew Monahan at Fons Welters, Amsterdam.

Day trip to nearby Rotterdam to visit three unique solo shows at Witte de With, by Rossella Biscotti (above and two below).


(Above) Alejandro Cesarco and Cecilia Vicuña (below)


(Above and below) Also had a chance to visit the new venue of Wilfried Lentz in the Port area, next door to Atelier van Lieshout studio, which had a solo show of James Beckett.


(Above and below) Back in Amsterdam, kunstverein’s presented ‘Who's Werner?’ a group exhibition concerned with recognised authorship in collaborative artistic practices.


Next door, Martin van Zomeren presented a solo show of Marcel van Eeden.

Tahmina Negmat at Althuis Hofland.
Charbel-joseph H Boutros and Stéphanie Saadé at rongwrong.


Maarten Vanden Eynde's work at Cargo in Context, part of the group show "On-Trade-Off: The Weight of Wonders", an artistic trajectory initiated by the artists' initiatives Picha (DRC) and Enough Room for Space (BE).

And last but not least, the solo show presenting a site-specific sculpture by Belgian artist Leyla Aydoslu at P/////AKT.

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Report: Trip to Vienna Art Week and Amsterdam Art Weekend 2018

A snowy Belvederegarten. All photos (unless stated otherwise): Latitudes.

As part of this year’s VIENNA ART WEEK, Latitudes was invited to get to know Vienna's art scene over the course of three days (19–21 November). On Tuesday 19 November, the visiting group of curators and artists participated in the panel ‘Some Current Positions of Curating’ at das weisse haus. The panel, chaired by Alexandra Gausman of das weisse haus, briefly introduced recent projects by Argentinian artists Guillermo Faivovich & Nicolás Goldberg; soon-to-be Paris-based curator Claire Hoffmann (Centre Culturel Suisse de Paris); artists and curators FICTILIS from San Francisco; Avi Lubin (Faculty at Jerusalem’s Beit Berl College); and Stephanie Weber (Curator of Contemporary Art at Lembachhaus in München).

Above and below photos: eSeL.


Grand staircase of the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna.

(Above and nine below) Views from the exhibition ‘Spitzmaus Mummy in a Coffin and other Treasures’ guest curated by filmmaker Wes Anderson and writer and illustrator Juman Malouf, in collaboration with Jasper Sharp (Kunsthistorisches Museum) and Mario Mainetti (Fondazione Prada). ‘Anderson and Malouf have assembled more than 400 objects drawn from all fourteen of the museum’s historical collections. Among them are Egyptian, Greek and Roman antiquities, Old Master paintings, selections from the Kunstkammer and the Imperial Treasury, items from the Imperial Armoury, Coin Collection, and Collection of Historic Musical Instruments, as well as pieces from the Theatermuseum, the Weltmuseum, the Imperial Carriage Museum, and Schloss Ambras Innsbruck. A handful of special guests from the Natural History Museum are also included. Particular attention was given to the museum’s storage: more than 350 of the objects have been brought from depots, with many of them on public display for the very first time. (...) The gathering and arrangement of these treasures – from the earliest, a necklace of ceramic beads strung together in Ancient Egypt, to the most recent, a wooden monkey carved in Indonesia almost 5,000 years later – suggest the spectacular breadth, depth, history and complexity of the Kunsthistorisches Museum’s collections.’ (from the venue website)



(Above and below) Donna Huanca exhibition ˝Piedra quemada˝ at the Lower Belvedere.

 (Above and two below) One of the rooms at the Naturhistorisches Museum (NHM). Below Faivovich and Goldberg intervention ˝In Search of Mesón de Fierro˝, part of their long-term research on meteorites at El Chaco region in northern Argentina. For the exhibition, they presented a 19-gram fragment in a meteorite in the collection of the NHM Vienna, which they were able to trace quite convincingly to Mesón de Fierro.


(Above and three below) On our own time, we arranged a visit to the artist-run-space Guimarães. Hugo Canoilas, one of the artists that run it alongside Nicola Pecoraro and Christoph Meier, gave us a detailed tour of the show which explored the concept of excessive sentimentality. ‘SCHMALTZ’ showcased unique editions, amusing finds, objects that accompany artists in their studio, as well as artworks by over 50 artists. 
A special edition of Luisa Gardini's photos. 

(Above and four below) Views from ‘55 dates. Highlights of the MUMOK collection’, presenting 55 works with exhibition design by (Portscapes artist) Hans Schabus.
(Above and below) Also at MUMOK, "a photographic journey through Austrian history from 1918 to the present" was the focus of ‘Photo/Politics/Austria’ this time with exhibition design by Markus Schinwald.

 (Above and two below) Views from Asier Mendizábal's solo exhibition at Galerie Martin Janda.


 At the nearby Kunsthalle Wien, Vanessa Joan Müller and Nicolas Schafhausen curated ‘Antarctica. An Exhibition on Alienation’, showing works by Viltė Bražiūnaitė / Tomas Sinkevičius, Burak Delier, Buck Ellison, Isabella Fürnkäs, Eva Giolo, Thibaut Henz, Jan Hoeft, Hanne Lippard, Joanna Piotrowska, Jeroen de Rijke / Willem de Rooij, Jana Schulz, Andrzej Steinbach, Ingel Vaikla, Peter Wächtler, Ian Wallace and Tobias Zielony. ˝The exhibition explores how the term “alienation” functions in our world today. In doing so, it also addresses the following question: What other forms of relationship to the self and to the world do we need? Before we can even begin to create something like a space supportive of self-determination and self-realization?" (from the venue website)
 One of the nine studio visits at Prater Ateliers. Here with Christian Kosmas Mayer. 
Studio visit with Judith Fegerl at Prater Ateliers.


 Tour by curator Moritz Stipsicz of Tomás Saraceno's intervention in the baroque Karlskirche in Karlsplatz. 
 Views of Karlsplatz and Vienna skyline from the cupola.


 (Above and three below) Ed Ruscha's ‘Double Americanisms’ at Secession
(Above) Detail from Philipp Timischl's ‘Artworks For All Age Groups’ in the downstairs galleries of Secession.
(Above) View of Kris Lemsalu's ‘Keys Open Doors’ in the upper Secession gallery.

On November 22, we took off to Amsterdam taking advantage of the Amsterdam Art Week events which included the Rijksakademie open, the opening of two exhibitions at Stedelijk Museum (a solo show by Raquel van Haver and the biannual group exhibition presenting Amsterdam’s Municipal Art Acquisitions, ‘Freedom of Movement’). We also visited De Appel, kunstverein, Rongwrong, a few galleries that opened jointly.


(Above and below) De Appel exhibited Ben Russel's film ‘Good luck’ (2017) premiered during documenta 13. ‘Accompanying the installation, the artist created a sculptural analogue to process and portraiture, Good Luck (Echo) that turns a sheet of copper into a resonant, speaking subject.’ (from the venue website)
 Mr Peanut exhibition at kunstverein Amsterdam, gathering material from Vincent Trasov who became Mr. Peanut in 1971. In 1974 he ran for mayor of Vancouver. ‘The exhibition traces the history of Trasov’s revolutionary alias and includes historical documents, publications, correspondence, video footage as well as more recent drawings of Mr. Peanut and paintings by Vincent Trasov. A major retrospective on Image Bank will follow in the summer of 2019 at Kunst-Werke in Berlin.’


 (Above and below) Works by Cees Mogami de Haas.

 (Above and below) Works by Riet Wijnen.


 (Above and below) Works by Marieke Zwart.


 (Above and below) Works by Morgan Courtois.
  (Above and below) Works by Marina Xenofontos.

 (Above and below) Works by Mire Lee.


  (Above and below) Works by Omar A. Chowdhury.

 (Above and below) Works by Maurice van Es.


  (Above and below) Works by Isabelle Andriessen.

  (Above and below) Works by Omar Vega Macotela.

   (Above and below) A film by Tyna Adebowale.

 (Above and below) Works by Josse Pyl. 

  (Above and below) Works by Gaëlle Choisne.

  (Above and below) Works by Dan Zhu.

  (Above and below) Works by Danielle Dean.


 (Above and below) Works by Polina Kani.


  (Above and below) Works by Femke Herregraven.


  (Above and below) Works by Kévin Bray.


  (Above and below) Library display initiated by Anna Dasovic. 


(Above) Exhibition by Paul Kooiker at the tegenboschvanvreden gallery.

 Gabriel Lester exhibition at Fons Welters, Amsterdam. 

 Lara Almarcegui's video at Ellen de Bruijne. 
 Rory Pilgrim exhibition at andriesse eyck.

 Conversation with Janet Cardiff at Oude Kerk. Below her work, with Georges Bures Miller, an intervened mellotron ‘The Instrument of Troubled Dreams˝ (2018), with 72 keys each of them programmed with a sound effect, a vocal track or a musical fragment.


(Above and four below) Stedelijk Collection in the basement of the museum. 

 (Above and two below) Metahaven exhibition at the Stedelijk Museum.


Merlin Carpenter exhibition at Rongwrong.



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Participants in the symposium "You're such a curator!" at de Appel Arts Centre, Amsterdam, 23–24 November 2016 and Amsterdam Art Weekend

 Above: de Appel director Niels van Tomme during his welcome speech.  
This and following photos: Carina Erdmann/De Appel.

Latitudes participated in de Appel Arts Centre two-day symposium "You are such a curator!" on 23 and 24 November 2016. Coinciding with the Amsterdam Art Weekend, the event presented lectures, discussions, performances and papers marking the conclusion of a three-year research project into the dynamics of de Appel’s curatorial programme and its position in the wider field of curatorial education.

Latitudes' presention "Following the Holy Greyhound" reflected "on the disinterment of a sculpture from 1991 – part of an exhibition by the Venezuelan artist José Antonio Hernández-Díez curated by Latitudes at MACBA, Barcelona, earlier this year – and their approach to a group exhibition in preparation for CAPC Musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux in 2017. Their point of departure was responding to the question "what does the wrongful killing of a dog in medieval France have to tell us about the micro and the macro, the hyper-specific and the universal?"  

Above: Chris Sharp during his presentation 'The Willfully Minor Anomaly of Lulu'. 
Below: Q+A session.
 
Above: Presentation by Aneta Rostkowska and Jakub Woynarowski.  
Below: Latitudes' presentation "Following the Holy Greyhound".
 
Above: galerie founders Adriano Wilfert Jensen and Simon Asencio during their presentation. 
Below: Attentive (femenine!) audience. 

Above: (Intensive) Q+A amongst speakers and audience. 
Below: Renata Cervetto during her presentation '(Art) Mediation Projects. In & Out The Museum'.

Above: Kim Nguyen during her presentation 'That's Why We Love the Moon'. 
Below: Niels van Tomme during one of the many Q+A's.

Above: Prem Krishnamurthy during a Q+A.

The two-day symposium included contributions by Mira Asriningtyas, Lucrezia Calabrò Visconti, Renata Cervetto, Mateo Chacon-Pino, Galerie (Adriano Wilfert Jensen and Simon Asencio), Natasha Hoare, Kati Ilves, Prem Krishnamurthy, Inga Lace, Latitudes (Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna), Shona Mei Findlay, Fadwa Naamna, Kim Nguyen, Emma Ines Panza, Aneta Rostkowska and Kuba Woynarowski, Chris Sharp, Niels Van Tomme and Huib Haye van der Werf.
  
We also visited a few exhibitions and attended a few events  programmed for the Art Amsterdam Weekend (24–27 November). One of the highlights was Marinus Boezem's exhibition at Oude Kerk's grand Gothic architecture, one of its finest and oldest examples in Holland. Boezem's pieces resonated with the Gothic style of the church, an architecture that has fascinated him throughout this artistic practice – he has produced several pieces using plans of cathedrals, his most famous one being "Gothic Growing Project" (1978–1987), popularly known as "The Green Cathedral" in a polder landscape near Almere, composed of 178 Italian poplars.
 
"Progetto Spaziale" (1970/2016) video works, and "Meteorieten" (2016) on the floor.

(above) "Windschaal" (Wind Scale) (1968) projected in the Holy Sepulchre chapel.
Majestic "Labyrinth" (2016) piece above and below.
(above) "New Improvisation with Bart de Kroon", one of the five performances Jeremiah Day presented at Ellen de Bruijne Projects.

And of course Friday is the big day at the Rijksakademie OPEN 2016, where we found interesting presentations by Argentinian performance artist Mercedes Azpilicueta; the Argentinian-Dutch Aimée Zito Lema; the abstracted images of Claudia Martínez Garay (below); the sculptural and archival material of British artist Alex Farrar around his suit; the glass work of German artist Christine Moldrickx; the drawings, paintings and small sculptures of Dutch artist Eva Spierenburg; the sculptural works by the also Dutch artist Marije Gertenbach and the large video work "Band Rumorose" by French artist Pauline Curnier Jardin on the Sicilian festivity devoted to San Sebastiano.


Abstracted images by Claudia Martínez Garay

(Above and below) Installation on the ground floor by Eva Spierenburg.

Sculptural and archival material by British artist Alex Farrar around his suit.

More work by Eva Spierenburg was presented in a more intimate presentation on the second floor.

 Glass piece by German artist Christine Moldrickx (above and below). 

The beautiful retrospective "Machine Spectacle" by Swiss artist Jean Tinguely was cleverly paired with Jordan Wolfson's "Manic / Love" – part 1 of his first solo show in a Dutch institution. The show premieres his newest animatronic in Europe: "Colored sculpture" (2016) and is accompanied by three other works only: the video "Raspberry poser" (2012), a series of large inkjet prints and "The Crisis" (2004), one of his earliest video works. In February a second part (Truth / Love) will follow with his first animatronic (Female Figure, 2014) and a new videoinstallation.

(Above) Two of the rooms presenting works by Jean Tinguely at Stedelijk Museum.

Jordan Wolfson's "Colored Sculpture" (2016).

San Serriffe art book shop in the red light district.

kunstverein new location in Hazenstraat 28, presented "Staples", 20 years of work by typographic artist Will Holder.

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Report: Amsterdam Art Weekend, 27–30 November 2014 now on Storify

 Amsterdam Art Weekend advertising.

Below the thread of tweets and Instagram posts we published during our trip, now archived on Wakelet:


Below some more photos that didn't make it to our live reporting posts:

View of De Appel's group show "When Elephants Come Marching In", through which guest curator Mark Kremer investigates "the ongoing influence that Psychedelia and Conceptualism still have in contemporary Western art".

We also visited the solo show of Dutch conceptual artist Marinus Boezem at Upstream Gallery. The show focused on "the significance of the artist’s physical presence and absence for the concept of his artworks" and included jewels like this 1969 "Piss Project" piece, which was too difficult to capture as it's a sequence of photographs, hence the photo taken from the catalogue available at the gallery.

 

On our last few hours, we paid a visit to Jeanine Hofland which had a group show with works by Andrea Kvas, Mohamed Namou, Alek O., Gino Saccone, Yonatan Vinitsky and Jessica Warboys revolving around the idea of painting without paintings.




And to end our Amsterdam Art Week, we went back to the Stedelijk Museum to see Marlene Dumas's retrospective properly as well as the exhibition 'How Far How Near. The World at the Stedeljk' curated by SMBA's Director Jelle Bouwhuis, which included a great film work by Godfried Donkor 'The Currency of Ntoma' on the symbolism and the financial value that textiles (Dutch Wax, batik, kente cloth and lace) have for women in Ghana.


View of the first room of 'How Far How Near. The World at the Stedeljk'.

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