Longitudes

Jurado y tutores de Barcelona Producció – Anuncio de los proyectos ganadores temporada 2017–2018

Fotos de Pep Herrero para Barcelona Producció/La Capella.

Después de una intensísima semana de lectura de las 230 solicitudes recibidas, otra semana de debate entre los miembros del jurado y una tercera semana entrevistando a los 31 candidatos pre-seleccionados, el jurado de la temporada 2017–2018 de Barcelona Producció formado por David Armengol, Alexandra Laudo, Mónica Bello, Joan Caselles, Mireia Sallarès y Latitudes junto a Oriol Gual, director de La Capella (con voz, sin voto), ha decidido seleccionar los siguientes 17 proyectos para su producción y presentación a lo largo de la temporada:

Sala Grande – Exposición individual

  • "Synthesis" de David Mutiloa
  • "Talk trouble" de Claudia Pagès
  • "El Gafe i la Revolució" de Dani Montlleó
Sala pequeña – Exposición individual
  • "Remover con una vara de madera" de Matteo Guidi
  • "ARTENGO2000" de Camille Orny y Magda Vaz
  • "SSSSSSSilex" de Paco Chanivet
Sala Gran – Comisariado
  • "A break can be what we are aiming for" de Irina Mutt
Sala pequeña – Comisariado
(Modalidad desierta)

Proyectos deslocalizados

  • "Són els microorganismes els que tindran l’última paraula" de la Associació Cultural Nyamnyam
  • "En frontera" de Marco Noris
Investigación
  • "El Peso de mis Vecinas - La Poesía y el Cante como Dispositivos Estratégicos" de Christina Schultz
  • "El mal alumne. Pedagogia crítica per a intel·ligències artificials" de Taller Estampa
Publicación
  • "The Drowned Giant" de Anna Moreno
Acción en vivo
  • "Chroma" de Quim Pujol
  • "The Reading Room #3 presenta: Aparatos del habla – Materialismo histórico" de Eliana Beltrán
  • "Fine Cherry" de Victoria Macarte
Entornos digitales
  • "Eixams" de Alex Muñoz
  • "Notes on a novel (that I am not going to write), or the swimming pool, or the hair, the herb and the bread or the tomato plant" de Irene Solà
Latitudes tutorizará los proyectos de David Mutiloa (Sala Grande, 18 julio– 25 septiembre 2017), Anna Moreno (Proyecto de publicación, noviembre 2017) y Magda Vaz y Camille Orny (Sala pequeña, 23 enero–1 abril 2018).

La undécima convocatoria introduce varias novedades: se han doblado el número de categorías pasando de nueve a dieciocho y se suman tres nuevos tutores (las comisarias Alexandra Laudo y Mónica Bello, y el artista Joan Casellas). La otra novedad es que el "Espai Cub" desaparece para transformarse en una sala más amplia con paredes blancas de 4×8m situado a la entrada de La Capella ("sala pequeña").

Las nuevas líneas que se han introducido se destinan a la producción de un proyecto curatorial para la sala pequeña para formatos reducidos o de archivo (1 proyecto), edición de una publicación (1 proyecto), proyectos en entornos digitales (2 proyectos), proyectos en vivo (3 proyectos), y se ha recuperado la añorada beca de investigación (2 proyectos).

El calendario preliminar de exhibición será en siguiente:

18 de julio–25 de septiembre 2017
Sala Gran (individual 1) + Sala Petita (individual 1)

11 de octubre–7 de enero 2017
Sala Gran (individual 2) + Sala Petita (individual 2)

23 de enero 2017–1 de abril 2018
Sala Gran (individual 3) + Sala Petita (individual 3)

27 de abril–24 de junio 2018
Sala Gran (comisariado) + Sala Petita (comisariado)

Los proyectos deslocalizados, de edición, de acción en vivo, digitales y de investigación se producirán y presentarán a lo largo de la temporada.



Barcelona producció es una convocatoria anual dirigida a la comunidad artística de Barcelona y su área de influencia. Es una iniciativa del Institut de Cultura de Barcelona (ICUB) del Ajuntament de Barcelona.

CONTENIDO RELACIONADO:


Artist-run art schools – which educational models might work in Spain?

A few days ago Rachel Spence of the Financial Times published an interesting article on "Artist-run art schools". It features a range of initiatives that are being developed with different profiles and results: from Ryan Gander's Fairfield International, a residency for artists set to open in 2015 (with business partner, creative consultant Simon Turnbull), to Wael Shawky's MASS in Alexandria or Marina Abramovic's eponymous institute with a focus on 'long durational work' (and her ego?) in upstate New York for which she has already raised more than $660,000 through a crowdfunding campaign. 

Rendering of the Fairfield International art school to open in a former Victorian primary school building in Suffolk. Photo: Fizzy Dawson Mayer.

In the article, Spence makes an interesting point about the differences between the Gander and the Shawky approach: a key element of Shawky’s Independent Art Studio & Study Programme are the trips abroad "as the contemporary art scene is still limited in Egypt". Last year its participants worked as interns at the Sharjah Biennial and visited Documenta 13 in Germany, initiatives that helped them think “about the concept of the work rather than how they craft it. The discussions they have when they come back about what they have seen are really important", as Shawky explained.

At Gander's Fairfield International – read more about his plans in this Artforum '500 words' feature – there will be a sense of it being a retreat and its by the seaside, away from "all the art world distractions that don’t help an artist work". As Gander explains, “the two most valuable elements for artists are time and space with no need to earn money”. Here residents will be chosen according to both artistic excellence and financial needs, becoming "something between an art academy and a residency, entirely free to the [12] students who are also provided with a living stipend."

The article also highlights the common reasons for starting such projects: the failure of the public sector to provide a service [artistic education] and, secondly their sense that "artists who have enjoyed certain opportunities, have a duty to fill the gap". 

This makes us think about which artistic-led educational model could be more applicable in a Spanish context – Shawky's "outwards" or Gander's "inwards"? A mixture of both? And in particular, which financial models could make it happen in a context with little philanthropic tradition or the luxury of a "sense of duty" to fill the very same gap Gander and Shawky talked about? Perhaps what we are really missing the most is an internal debate within the artistic community about if such models are desirable and if so, how can they be taken forward. 

In summer 2011, we initiated Campus at the Espai Cultural Caja Madrid in Barcelona as a tuition-free, unaccredited, pilot art school. Four one-week working sessions were held during consecutive weeks, each under the guidance of international artists. This was a one-off temporary project (the Espai closed later in December 2012) which in part aimed to provoke such a debate in the context of the diminishing arts infrastructure of Barcelona and the upsurge in artists leaving the city to pursue careers abroad.

Work space during week 1. Photo: Latitudes

Having visited Glasgow and Dublin in recent months, two cities more-or-less comparable in size to Barcelona, and visited a wealth of artists, impressively well-equipped studio facilities, and numerous artist-run-spaces, one can clearly trace back the importance of generating a robust artistic community from a strong basis of residency-based models and art schools [Glasgow School of Art's Master in Fine Art being a particularly key example of this]. These feed directly back into the artistic capacity and ambition of the type of work being produced, as well as creating exchange, an influx of new blood, aweness of the work of international peers, and generating curatorial discourse.

Related reading on artist-run / self-organised art schools initiatives: 

– In 2012, frieze featured 'New Schools' profiling artist-run art academies and education programmes The Silent University, The School of Global Art, The External Program, MASS Alexandria, SOMA in Mexico City and Islington Mill Art Academy.

– 2010 frieze also featured Piero Golia and Eric Wesley's The Mountain School of Art in Los Angeles. 

– Most recently, David Batty of The Guardian [@David_Batty] wrote 'Alternative art schools: a threat to universities?' profiling the tuition-free OpenSchoolEast, which began last September in London, backed by c. £110,000 from the Barbican and Create London. In return for a year's free tuition and studio space, their 12 participants give one day a month of their time to community activities in the borough.

 
This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Rita McBride "Public Tender" at MACBA and "Blind Dates" programme with Barcelona-based artists

Bartomeu Marí and Rita McBride (right) in front of the audience seating at McBrides' 'Arena' (1997).

Coinciding with the opening of Rita McBride's solo exhibition "Oferta Pública / Public Tender" (18 May–24 September 2012) that opened last night at MACBA, Bartomeu Marí, director of the museum and curator of the exhibition, was in conversation with the artist in the second floor galleries, where McBride's "Arena" (1997) has been installed.

Below the stream of @LTTDS' tweets posted during their conversation (chronologically from bottom to top):


One of the activities programmed around the exhibition is "Blind Dates", with the participation of Barcelona-based artists who will intervene in McBride's "Arena" once a month: Tamara Kuselman (20 June, 16–19.30h), Laia Estruch (18 July, 20h), Jordi Ferreiro (August, during museum opening hours), Ryan Rivadeneyra (19 September, 20h), Miguel Noguera (20 September, 20h). + info here.

Some of them made it to the talk...

From top to bottom, left to right: Jordi Ferreiro, Ryan Rivadeneyra, Tamara Kuselman and Laia Estruch.

All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org

6th Berlin Biennale 2010 'What is Waiting Out There'

All Photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org

The 6th Berlin Biennale is on view between 11 June and 8 August at the following venues:
Berlin-Mitte:
KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Auguststraße 69, 10117 Berlin
Alte Nationalgalerie / Old National Gallery (Museum Island), Bodestraße 1–3, 10178 Berlin

Berlin-Kreuzberg:
Oranienplatz 17, 10999 Berlin
Dresdener Straße 19, 10999 Berlin
Kohlfurter Straße 1, 10999 Berlin
Mehringdamm 28, 10961 Berlin

Exhibiting artists:
Bernard Bazile (*1952 in Tulle/France), Mark Boulos (*1975 in Boston/USA), Mohamed Bourouissa (*1978 in Blida/Algeria), Olga Chernysheva (*1962 in Moscow/Russia), Phil Collins (*1970 in Runcorn/Great Britain), Minerva Cuevas (*1975 in Mexico City/Mexico), Shannon Ebner (*1971 in Englewood/USA), Nir Evron (*1974 in Herzliya/Israel), Marcus Geiger (*1957 in Muri/Switzerland), Ion Grigorescu (*1945 in Bucharest/Romania), Friedl vom Gröller (Kubelka) (*1946 in London/Great Britain), Nilbar Güreş (*1977 in Istanbul/Turkey), Petrit Halilaj (*1986 in Skenderaj/Kosovo), Marlene Haring (*1978 in Vienna/Austria), Cameron Jamie (*1969 in Los Angeles/USA), Sven-Åke Johansson (*1943 in Mariestad/Sweden), Thomas Judin (*1982 in Frankfurt am Main/Germany), George Kuchar (*1942 in New York/USA), Andrey Kuzkin (*1979 in Moscow/Russia), Thomas Locher (*1956 in Munderkingen/Germany), Adrian Lohmüller (*1977 in Gengenbach/Germany), Armando Lulaj (*1980 in Tirana/Albania), Renzo Martens (*1973 in Sluiskil/The Netherlands), Adolph Menzel (*1815 in Breslau, † 1905 in Berlin), Avi Mograbi (*1956 in Tel-Aviv/Israel), Henrik Olesen (*1967 in Esbjerg/Denmark), Roman Ondák (*1966 in Zilina/Slovak Republic), Marion von Osten (*1963 in Dortmund/Germany), Ferhat Özgür (*1965 in Ankara/Turkey), Margaret Salmon (*1975 in New York/USA), Hans Schabus (*1970 in Watschig/Austria), Michael Schmidt (*1945 in Berlin/Germany), Ruti Sela (*1974 in Jerusalem/Israel) & Maayan Amir (*1978 in Hadera/Israel), Gedi Sibony (*1973 in New York/USA), John Smith (*1952 in London/Great Britain), Michael Stevenson (*1964 in Inglewood/New Zealand), Sebastian Stumpf (*1980 in Würzburg/Germany), Ron Tran (*1972 in Saigon/Vietnam), Danh Vo (*1975 in Saigon/Vietnam), Marie Voignier (*1974 in Ris-Orangis/France), Vincent Vulsma (*1982 in Zaandam/The Netherlands), Anna Witt (*1981 in Wasserburg am Inn/Germany), Pleurad Xhafa / Sokol Peçi (both *1984 in Albania).

Curated by: Kathrin Rhomberg

www.kw-berlin.de
www.berlinbiennale.de


Photo tour of galleries, studios, project spaces during BB6.

Latitudes partner platform for the Future Generation Art Prize

PinchukArtCentre has named Latitudes as one of a number of non-profit arts organizations acting as platform partners, who will support the Prize by communicating with artists and arts professionals in their regions.

The Future Generation Art Prize is a world-wide art prize of 100,000 USD. It is open to all artists up to the age of 35. The prize is established to discover and provide long-term support for a generation of emerging artists, wherever they may live and work.
The biennial Prize is distinguished by its global dimension; its focus on a young generation of artists; its open and democratic online application process; the long-term commitment of leading artists of our time; a distinguished Board, Jury and Selection Committee; an exhibition of shortlisted artists at the PinchukArtCentre in Kiev, one of the largest and most active new contemporary art institutions in Europe; and an award of 100,000 USD, to be conferred by a respected international jury.

The jurors are:
Daniel Birnbaum (Sweden) — Director of the Städelschule Art Academy, Frankfurt am Main; Director of the Venice Biennale 2009 Okwui Enwezor (Nigeria) — Director of Documenta XI; Former Dean of Academic Affairs and Senior Vice President at San Francisco Art Institute Yuko Hasegawa (Japan) — Chief Curator of the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo (MOT); former Chief Curator of the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa Ivo Mesquita (Brazil) — Chief Curator at the Pinacoteca do Estado de São Paulo; Curator of the 2008 São Paolo Biennial, Eckhard Schneider (Germany) — General Director of the PinchukArtCentre Robert Storr (USA) — Dean of the Yale University School of Art; Director of the Venice Biennale 2007 Ai Weiwei (China) — artist.

The application procedure opened on January 18 and will last
until April 18, 2010. 20 shortlisted artists will show their work in an exhibition at the PinchukArtCentre. The jury will select one main Prize winner who will receive a total of 100,000 USD (60,000 USD as a cash award, and 40,000 USD toward the production of new work). An additional 20,000 USD will be allotted to fund artist-in-residency programs for up to five other special prize winners. Images of works by all the shortlisted artists will be posted on the PAC website, and the public will be invited to vote via the Internet for People's Choice Prize.
Partner platforms (evolving list):
ArtHub, China arthubasia.org
Capacete, Brazil
www.capacete.net
Via Farini, Milan
www.viafarini.org
Laxart, Los Angeles
www.laxart.org
L'apartement 22, Maroc
www.appartement22.com
ARTIS, Israel
www.artisrael.org
BAIBAKOV, Moscow
baibakovartprojects.com/en/
Loop, Seoul
www.galleryloop.com
KHOJ, India
www.khojworkshop.orga
San Art, Vietnam
www.san-art.org
Para/Site, Hong Kong
www.para-site.org.hk
Latitudes, Barcelona www.lttds.org


Gertrude Contemporary Art Spaces, Melbourne www.gertrude.org.au
Las Orejas Rojas, Colombia www.orejaroja.net
Lugar a Dudas, Cali, Colombia www.lugaradudas.org

Longitudes cuts across Latitudes’s projects and research with news, updates, and reportage.

Latitudes | www.LTTDS.org (except when otherwise noted).

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Founded in 2005 by Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna, Latitudes is a curatorial office based in Barcelona, Spain, that works internationally across contemporary art practices.

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2005—2019