Longitudes

Longitudes cuts across Latitudes’ projects and research with news, updates, and reportage.

2022 in 11 monthly Cover Stories

Since Spring 2015 we have been publishing a monthly cover story on our homepage (www.lttds.org) featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, as well as sharing our research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or travel related to our curatorial practice.

Here are those published in 2022, which you can read again in this archive:

Cover Story, January 2022: “Rasmus’ Doubts”, 2 January 2022.

Cover Story, February 2022: Rosa Tharrats’ Textile Alchemy, 1 February 2022.

Cover Story, March 2022: The passion of Gabriel Ventura, 1 March 2022.

Cover Story, April 2022: Mix and Match. Laia Estruch at PUBLICS, 1 April 2022.

Cover Story, May 2022: Things Things Say in print, 2 May 2022.

Cover Story, June 2022: Cyber-Eco-Feminist Incidents in Attica, 1 June 2022.

Cover Story, July–August 2022: Incidents (of Travel) from Seoul, 1 Jul 2022.

Cover Story, September 2022: The means of print production: Erick Beltrán and lumbung press, 1 September 2022.

Cover Story, October 2022: Stray Ornithologies–Laia Estruch, 3 October 2022.

Cover Story, November 2022: Incidents (of Travel), Jorge Satorre’s Barcelona, 1 November 2022.

Cover Story, December 2022: “Melt Goes On Forever. David Hammons and DART Festival”, 1 December 2022.


RELATED CONTENT:


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Cover Story, November 2022: Jorge Satorre’s Barcelona

November 2022 cover story on www.lttds.org

The November 2022 monthly Cover Story “Jorge Satorre’s Barcelona” is now up on our homepage: www.lttds.org

“Below the Tibidabo Amusement Park, just where the BV-1418 and BP-1417 roads meet, there are some stairs that go up into the forest. Climbing them, a few meters up on the right, we will find a large stone hidden among the trees. Continue reading 

After November 2022 this story will be archived here.

Cover Stories are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes’ homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial projects and activities.


→ RELATED CONTENTS

  • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
  • Cover Story, September 2021: Erratic behaviour—Latitudes in conversation with Jorge Satorre, 31 August 2021
  • Web of the artist about ‘The Erratic. Measuring Compensation
  • Publication "Robert Smithson: Art in Continual Movement" (Alauda Publications, 2012) includes an essay by Max Andrews, 28 Mar 2012
  • Lecture by Max Andrews "From Spiral to Spime: Robert Smithson, the ecological and the curatorial", 13 March, 2pm, Lecture Theatre 1, Royal College of Art, London, 12 March 2012
  • Interview with Erick Beltrán & Jorge Satorre publ 'Atlántica' magazine #52, 13 Feb 2012
  • Proyecto producido por Jorge Satorre para 'Portscapes' (2009) expuesto en la exposición colectiva 'Fat Chance to Dream', Maisterravalbuena, Madrid, 29 Mar 2011
  • 2009 Video of the making of Jorge Satorre's project
  • Portscapes news: Jorge Satorre's billboard on the A15 and Paulien Oltheten's small exhibition at the visitor centre Futureland and surroundings, 2 October 2009
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20th and concluding dispatch of “Incidents (of Travel)” from Barcelona, Spain

📲 TAP, SCROLL, SWIPE and 📖 READ on incidents.kadist.org 


In the twentieth and concluding dispatch of Incidents (of Travel), Latitudes, the curators and editors of the project, are led by Mexican-born, Bilbao-based artist Jorge Satorre in something of a “voyage around our room”. Manifested itself all over the world since 2016 through the perspectives of other invited curators and artists, Incidents (of Travel) now takes place in our own home: Barcelona, latitude 41° 23' 19.64" N.

Satorre’s itinerary follows a route from the north to the south of the city – from Collserola to Montjuïc – tracing wild boars, two mysterious dolmens, and the devil’s hoof prints along the way.

By chance, this episode takes place on September 19, 2022, exactly ten years later to the day of the first tour commissioned for the first phase of Incidents (of Travel), a day we spent with Minerva Cuevas around Mexico City’s city centre on the 27th anniversary of the deadly 1985 earthquake

Episode #20 culminates Latitudes’ collaboration with KADIST, producers of 20 wonderful episodes published online between 2016 and 2022 as part of their online projects. In 2015, KADIST hosted another three tours during Latitudes’ residency at their San Francisco hub. In 2013, Spring Workshop in Hong Kong produced four itineraries within the frame of the long-term multi-part project “Moderation(s)” in partnership with (then known as) Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art in Rotterdam, and in 2012, at the invitation of UNAM’s Casa del Lago, Latitudes commissioned the first five itineraries around Mexico City



The first dispatch launched in April 2016 with an itinerary by curator Yesomi Umolu and artist Harold Mendez from Chicago – a day photographed by Nabiha Khan.


The second dispatch came from Jinja in Uganda, where curator Moses Serubiri invited photographer Mohsen Taha to explore Jinja's Indian architectural legacy and Idi Amin's notorious expulsion of Uganda's Asian minority in 1972.


The third episode took place while curator Yu Ji and poet Xiao Kaiyu hiked on Dong Shan (East Mountain), 130 km west of Shanghai, on a peninsula stretching into Tai Hu lake near the city of Suzhou, China.


The fourth dispatch came from Lisbon, where Galician curator Pedro de Llano visited key locations that marked the life and work of Luisa Cunha.


The fifth episode took place in April 2016, when curator Simon Soon and artist chi too visited the Malaysian North Eastern state of Terengganu, where chi spent some time in 2013, surrounded by “men and women who work(ed) multiple jobs as fishermen, housebuilders, boat builders, farmers, coconut pickers, food producers, and everything else that matters.”


The sixth episode narrates a walking itinerary conducted by curator Marianna Hovhannisyan with Vardan Kilichyan, Gohar Hosyan, and Anaida Verdyan in Yerevan, the capital of Armenia, documenting the transformed, disappeared, or permanently-closed art institutions in the city centre.


The seventh episode comes from Hobart, the capital of Tasmania. It is narrated by curator Camila Marambio, following an itinerary devised by artist Lucy Bleach. They spent the day "encircling the outer limits of human understanding by visiting the histories, both past, and present, of attempts to reach beyond our sensory capacities through governance, technology, and reverie", and ended the day cooking at Lucy's home-sharing their mutual love for quinces.


In the eighth 'Incidents (of Travel)' dispatch Móvil co-founder and curator Alejandra Aguado followed the itinerary devised by the artist Diego Bianchi around Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

Their exploration took them from the self-regulated community Velatropa to the buzzing commercial area of Once, identifying human and non-human flows and interactions. This became an entry point for discussing Bianchi's interests in how, as consumers, we define a particular zeitgeist and appropriate trends that enable us to affirm our identities.


In the ninth dispatch, Canadian curator Becky Forsythe and Icelandic artist Þorgerður Ólafsdóttir navigate Reykjavík's surroundings considering Þorgerður's “current interest in Icelandic Spar (a form of transparent calcite), its double refraction and light-polarizing properties. In a race with daylight, they travel between sites collecting moments and considering the ways in which geologic time surfaces in the context of human time.”



The tenth dispatch begins with an itinerary proposed by Barcelona-born, Rio de Janeiro-based artist Daniel Steegmann Mangrané and is followed by images and videos recording a day roaming Rio's natural and artistic landscapes with Bogotá-born, Mexico City-based curator Catalina Lozano, who narrates their day spent together. 


In the 11th episode, Swiss curator Sandino Scheidegger (Random Institute) visits Panama City in preparation for a solo exhibition by Donna Conlon and Jonathan Harker at Casa Santa Ana in 2021. 

The places Sandino, Donna and Jonathan visited together pointed to the origin of some of their video works, the ideas behind them, or simply served as stages in their pieces, turning into “an exercise in sneaking through fences to reach former recycling plants, imagining how things looked before the skyscrapers took over, and navigating the complex social fabric of Panama City — all while getting a taste of local food between every stop.” 


The 12th episode from Tbilisi, Georgia, set a different tone in the online series as it was programmed to take place in late May 2020, during the Covid-19 pandemic. 

The itinerary set by Tbilisi-based artist Nino Kvrivishvili to lead Melbourne-based Associate Professor Tara McDowell became a WhatsApp video tour/conversation around Nino's artistic practice and the Georgian silk industry — a production that began in Tbilisi in the 5th century and continued until the collapse of the Soviet Union in the 1990s. 

 

Incidents (of Travel) from Cabo Rojo

In the 13th dispatch, and on week 23 of lockdown, Sofía Gallisá and Marina Reyes begin their day together driving to the Cabo Rojo Salt Flats where Sofía researched her 2018 film ‘Assimilate & Destroy I’. They later end up in Poblado de Boquerón, the queer capital of Puerto Rico's south where a large public beach and a usually busy street still show traces of 2017’s devastating Hurricane Maria.

Incidents (of Travel) from Singapore.

In the 14th dispatch, Singapore-based curator Kathleen Ditzig joins artists Fyerool Darma and Nurul Huda Rashid nearby ‘Safe Entry‘ (2020), a mural presented at the Singapore Art Museum (SAM) by the artist Heman Chong that repeats a single, enlarged QR code, “the new digital skin of the city”, as Nurul points out. From there, they head towards the boardwalk connecting Harbourfront with Sentosa Island, the pleasure island home to many tourist attractions. Fyerool and Nurul weave in stories of past pirates and deities against the backdrop of the glass-green waters that stage the “blue aesthetics against the imported sands [from Indonesia] of reclaimed lands.”

In the 15th dispatch curator Àngels Miralda (current participant of de Appel's Curatorial Programme 2020-21) and artist Salim Bayri (current resident at Rijksakademie van beeldende kunsten 2019–21) follow a tour created during the winter 2021 Covid-19 restrictions in the Netherlands. 

Their day in Amsterdam together features public sports locations as social meeting spaces, as well as urban architecture, a visit to a supermarket chain, and a food takeaway. 


In the 16th dispatch, curator Marie-Nour Hechaime navigates Beirut with artist-filmmaker Panos Aprahamian a year after the August 2020 explosion, when hundreds of tons of ammonium nitrate stored for six years without safekeeping in the port of the Lebanese capital were set on fire and exploded. The blast killed more than 200 deaths, 6,500 wounded, 300,000 displaced and great destruction in the city [1]. “I say that I am living with ghosts—of people, places, memories, stories”, she reflects. “He answers that Beirut is disintegrating in front of our very eyes.”


In the 17th dispatch, curator Inga Lāce and artist Linda Boļšakova forage for environmental histories in Riga. The day that takes them from manicured park lawns to a thicket of sea buckthorn bushes near a “post-apocalyptic” sauna, and from a housing project allotment to the laboratories of the National Botanic Garden of Latvia. 


In the 18th dispatch, curator Xenia Kalpaktsoglou and artist Pegy Zali conceive an itinerary and a screenplay-like commentary that takes us through the Attica peninsula, from a mysterious inscription sprayed at the site of a railway sabotage that transpired near Piraeus Port in 2010, to the vestiges of an enormous wildfire that consumed the forest around Alepochori in 2021. Formed through their long-standing friendship and shared research interests, this episode flows around Greece’s links with the emerging infrastructure of China’s New Silk Road, and the “cyber-eco-feminist” traces of the goddess Gaia.


In the 19th episode of Incidents (of Travel), curator Sooyoung Leam reports on a day exploring Yongsan-gu, a district at the heart of Seoul, and the neighbourhood of artist Jeong Yeoreum. Documented by photographer and videographer Swan Park, Sooyoung and Jeong explore this conflicted territory that served as the headquarters of the Imperial Japanese Army between 1910 and 1945, and subsequently as a US military base. 


→ RELATED CONTENT:

Episode #19 of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by curator Sooyoung Leam and artist Jeong Yeoreum from Seoul, 22 June 2022

Episode #18 of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by curator Xenia Kalpaktsoglou and artist Pegy Zali from Attica, 18 April 2022

Episode #17 of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by curator Inga Lāce and artist Linda Boļšakova from Riga, 28 December 2021

Episode #16 of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Marie-Nour Hechaime and Panos Aprahamian from Beirut, 3 October 2021

Episode #15 of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Àngels Miralda and Salim Bayri from Amsterdam, 13 May 2021

Episode #14 of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Kathleen Ditzig and artists Fyerool Darma and Nurul Huda Rashid from Singapore, 21 December 2020

Episode #13 of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Marina Reyes and Sofía Gallisá from Cabo Rojo, Puerto Rico, 27 Sep 2020

Episode #12 of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Nino Kvrivishvili and Tara McDowell from Tbilisi, 25 Jun 2020 
https://www.lttds.org/longitudes/index.php?id=7159211982397983135/episode-12-of-incidents-of-travel

Episode #11 of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Sandino Scheidegger and Donna Conlon & Jonathan Harker from Panama City, 9 April 2020
https://www.lttds.org/longitudes/index.php?id=4425215029591365006/11-episode-of-incidents-of-travel

Tenth episode of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Catalina Lozano and Daniel Steegmann Mangrané from Rio de Janeiro, 
29 January 2020
https://www.lttds.org/longitudes/index.php?id=144735152408473327/tenth-episode-of-incidents-of-travel

The ninth episode of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Becky Forsythe and Þorgerður Ólafsdóttir, 8 February 2019
https://www.lttds.org/longitudes/index.php?id=6371927610418460689

The eighth episode of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Alejandra Aguado and Diego Bianchi, 6 September 2019
https://www.lttds.org/longitudes/index.php?id=8721104601538735691

The seventh episode of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Camila Marambio and Lucy Bleach from Hobart, Tasmania, 28 June 2018
https://www.lttds.org/longitudes/index.php?id=1055853895543348027

The sixth episode of ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ – Dispatch by Marianna Hovhannisyan and students from the National Center of Aesthetics from Yerevan, Armenia, 1 March 2018
http://www.lttds.org/blog/blog.php?id=5887133486742947361

The fifth episode of 'Incidents (of Travel)' – Dispatch by Simon Soon and chi too from Terengganu, Malaysia, 26 April 2017 
http://www.lttds.org/blog/blog.php?id=4083951540089486920

The fourth episode of 'Incidents (of Travel)' – Dispatch by Pedro de Llano and Luisa Cunha from Lisbon, Portugal, 2 March 2017 
http://www.lttds.org/blog/blog.php?id=4185860148466062617

The third episode of 'Incidents (of Travel)' – Dispatch by Yu JI and Xiao Kaiyu reporting from Suzhou, China, 6 September 2016 
http://www.lttds.org/blog/blog.php?id=1437935620149738144

Second 'Incidents (of Travel)' dispatch by Moses Serubiri and Mohsen Taha reporting from Jinja, Uganda, 30 June 2016 
https://www.lttds.org/longitudes/index.php?id=2504250800654900933

Kadist and Latitudes present 'Incidents (Of Travel)' online, 31 May 2016
http://www.lttds.org/blog/blog.php?id=1076947282278624159


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2021 in eleven monthly cover stories

Since Spring 2015, Latitudes has published a monthly cover story on its homepage www.lttds.org featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, as well as ongoing research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects, or travel related to our curatorial practice. Here's how 2021 looked like on our homepage.

Cover Story–January 2021: ‘Things Things Say’: ‘VIP's Union’, 1 Jan 2021


Cover Story—February 2021: ‘Straits Time: narrative smuggling in Singapore’, 1 Feb 2021


Cover Story—March 2021: Eulàlia Rovira's ‘A Knot Which is Not’ (2020–21), 1 mar 2021 
Cover Story – April 2021: Lara Almarcegui at La Panera, 2 Apr 2021
Cover Story–May 2021: RAF goes viral, 2 May 2021

Cover Story–June 2021: Fitness food: Salim Bayri's Amsterdam, 31 May 2021.

Cover Story, July–August 2021: A wide view from a fixed point, 1 July 2021.

Cover Story–September 2021Cover Story, September 2021: Erratic behaviour—Latitudes in conversation with Jorge Satorre

Cover Story–October 2021: Fear and Loathing in Lebanon, 1 Oct 2021

Cover Story–November 2021: Notes for an Eye Fire, 2 Nov 2021 

 Cover Story, December 2021: Between Meier and Meller: Toni and Pau at the Teatre Arnau, 1 Dec 2021


→ RELATED CONTENT

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Conversación en línea con Jorge Satorre, 22 de septiembre a las 19h UTC

Jorge Satorre, “The Erratic. Measuring Compensation” (2009). Cortesía del artista.


El 22 de septiembre 2021 a las 19h (UTC -5) se transmitirá a través de Facebook Live del Museo Amparo una conversación que mantuvimos con el artista Jorge Satorre (Ciudad de México, 1979). La conversación quedará registrada en el canal Youtube del museo. 

Programada dentro del ciclo ‘‘Diálogos con artistas de la Colección de Arte Contemporáneo”, la conversación se enmarca dentro de la programación de la exposición “El tiempo en las cosas” curada por Tatiana Cuevas en las Salas de Arte Contemporáneo del Museo Amparo en Puebla, México.

La conversación giró entorno al proceso de producción de “The Erratic. Measuring Compensation” (2010), actualmente incluída en la exposición “El tiempo en las cosas”, realizada por Satorre y comisionada por Latitudes como uno de los diez proyectos producidos a lo largo del 2009 en el espacio público del Puerto de Rotterdam, en los Países Bajos.

Durante el verano de 2009, Satorre buscó y localizó una de las gigantescas rocas que los glaciares llevaron a los Países Bajos desde Escandinavia durante la última Edad de Hielo. A raíz de la fascinación del artista por los proyectos de compensación medioambiental que se llevaron a cabo durante el proyecto de ampliación portuaria Maasvlakte 2 (2008–13), Satorre con la ayuda de un equipo de científicos identificó el lugar de origen de un bloque errático y lo devolvió a su lugar de origen, un acto de restitución sintética y compensación escultórica transnacional. 

El gesto geológico inverso de Satorre además de reflejar la construcción monumental de Maasvlakte 2 como una escultura de la forma de la tierra que, como la acción del deshielo pero en un tiempo mucho más corto, está alterando para siempre la morfología de los Países Bajos. La acción también se refleja en el hecho de que gran parte de la defensa marítima existente y futura en la zona portuaria se hará con roca traída de Escandinavia. Satorre ofrece un relato del proceso de devolución a través de dibujos que incorporan detalles reales e imaginarios. Uno de estos detalles representa una protesta imaginada al comienzo del viaje de vuelta a casa de la roca y fue presentado a modo de prólogo del proyecto en una valla publicitaria en el Puerto de Rotterdam, el puerto más grande de Europa.

Portscapes fue un encargo de la Autoridad Portuaria de Rotterdam con el asesoramiento y apoyo de la desaparecida organización SKOR (Fundación Arte y Espacio Público, Ámsterdam), y fue curado por Latitudes. En este contexto se encargaron proyectos a Lara Almarcegui, Bik van der Pol, Jan Dibbets, Marjolijn Dijkman, Fucking Good Art, Ilana Halperin, Christina Hemauer & Roman Keller, Paulien Oltheten, Hans Schabus y a Jorge Satorre, quien realizó “The Erratic. Measuring Compensation” (2010).

Jorge Satorre, “The Erratic. Measuring Compensation” (2009). Cortesía del artista. Foto: B. Wind.



CONTENIDO RELACIONADO

  • Cover Story, September 2021: Erratic behaviour—Latitudes in conversation with Jorge Satorre, 31 August 2021
  • Portscapes project page
  • Portscapes photo documentation
  • Web of the artist about ‘The Erratic. Measuring Compensation
  • Review of the exhibition "What cannot be used is forgotten" in the May issue of frieze 29 April 2015
  • Publication "Robert Smithson: Art in Continual Movement" (Alauda Publications, 2012) includes essay by Max Andrews, 28 Mar 2012
  • Lecture by Max Andrews "From Spiral to Spime: Robert Smithson, the ecological and the curatorial", 13 March, 2pm, Lecture Theatre 1, Royal College of Art, London, 12 March 2012
  • Interview with Erick Beltrán & Jorge Satorre publ 'Atlántica' magazine #52, 13 Feb 2012
  • Proyecto producido por Jorge Satorre para 'Portscapes' (2009) expuesto en la exposición colectiva 'Fat Chance to Dream', Maisterravalbuena, Madrid, 29 Mar 2011
  • 2009 Video of the making of Jorge Satorre's project
  • Portscapes news: Jorge Satorre's billboard on the A15 and Paulien Oltheten small exhibition at the visitor centre Futureland and surroundings, 2 October 2009

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Cover Story, September 2021: Erratic behaviour—Latitudes in conversation with Jorge Satorre

September 2021 cover story on www.lttds.org

The September 2021 monthly Cover Story “Erratic behaviour—Latitudes in conversation with Jorge Satorre” is now up on our homepage: www.lttds.org

“In 2008 the Port of Rotterdam in the Netherlands, the largest in Europe, began a dramatic project to extending its land by 20% into the sea. Known as Maasvlakte 2, the construction involved bringing more than 5 million tons of rock from Scandinavia for the construction of dikes and dams, alongside a programme of ecological offsetting. ”

 Continue reading

→ After September 2021 this story will be archived here.

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial projects and activities.


→ RELATED CONTENTS

  • Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
  • Cover Story–July-August 2021: Panorama: a wide view from a fixed point, 2 July 2021
  • Cover Story–June 2021: ‘Fitness food: Salim Bayri’s Amsterdam’, 1 June 2021
  • Cover Story–May 2021: RAF goes viral, 2 May 2021
  • Cover Story—April 2021: Cover Story – April 2021: Lara Almarcegui at La Panera, 2 Apr 2021
  • Cover Story—March 2021: Eulàlia Rovira's ‘A Knot Which is Not’ (2020–21), 1 mar 2021 
  • Cover Story—February 2021: ‘Straits Time: narrative smuggling in Singapore’, 1 Feb 2021
  • Cover Story–January 2021: ‘Things Things Say’: VIP's Union’, 1 Jan 2021
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Review of the exhibition "What cannot be used is forgotten" in the May issue of frieze


Entrance to the group exhibition "Ce qui ne sert pas s'oublie".

As reported earlier in this channel, at the end of last January we visited the exhibition 'Ce qui ne sert pas s’oublie' (What Cannot be Used is Forgotten)' (on view until 3 May 2015) at CAPC musée d'art coontemporain in Bordeaux.

Curated by Mexico-based Colombian-born curator Catalina Lozano, the exhibition presents the work of Mathieu K. Abonnenc, Sven Augustijnen, Mariana Castillo Deball, Sean Lynch, Pauline M’Barek, Museo Comunitario del Valle de Xico, Wendelien van Oldenborgh, Uriel Orlow, Beatriz Santiago Muñoz and Jorge Satorre.

Below is a fragment of Max Andrews' frieze review, published in the May 2015 issue of frieze magazine (#171):

‘What cannot be used is forgotten’ proposed a biographical approach to objects and the histories and allegiances they can constitute. With an emphasis on eroding the legacy of colonial-era ethnography and archaeology, the exhibition comprised the contributions of ten artists who emphasized the accrual and dispersal of objects' meaning over time. Objects were broken apart, animated, revered, rumoured, memorized, melted; or – as in Pauline M’Barek’s sculptures mimicking display stands for imagined wooden masks – missing altogether. Sometimes, objects were not comfortably objects at all, but textiles or techniques. Occasionally they were alibis employed to provoke historical revision and necessitate textual commentary. In Uriel Orlow’s A Very Fine Cast (110 years) (2007), works ingested past traces of such commentary (captions taken from European museums’ descriptions of the Benin Bronzes robbed by the British punitive Benin Expedition of 1897).

– Max Andrews


  Installation view of Sean Lynch's 'A blog-by-blow account of stone-carving in Oxford' (2014).

General view of the exhibition. (Right Wall) Museo Comunitario del Valle de Xico (Community Museum of the Xico Valley).

Related content:

Report from Bordeaux: Visit to CAPC/Musée d'Art Contemporain's shows of Franz Ehrard Walther and the group show "Ce qui ne sert pas s'oublie" (27 January 2015)

Review of Maria Thereza Alves' exhibition at CAAC Sevilla published in frieze magazine (9 March 2015) 

art-agenda review on Andrea Büttner show "Tische", at NoguerasBlanchard, Barcelona  (21 July 2014)


This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
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Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
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Report from Bordeaux: Visit to CAPC/Musée d'Art Contemporain's shows of Franz Ehrard Walther and the group show "Ce qui ne sert pas s'oublie"

 Views of Franz Erhard Walther's show "Le Corps décide" from CAPC's mezzanine.

The exhibition 'Franz Erhard Walther: Le Corps décide' was initiated by WIELS Centre d’Art Contemporain, in Brussels – see a video of its iteration here – and has been co-produced together with CAPC musée d'art contemporain in Bordeaux, alongside The Franz Erhard Walther Foundation. The exhibition is accompanied by a beautiful publication that includes brightly colored pop up shapes that spread throughout the book. 

From Wiels' website... "Franz Erhard Walther’s exhibition offers an in-depth look at an influential German artist whose pioneering work straddles minimalist sculpture, conceptual art, abstract painting, and performance all while positing fundamental questions about the conventional idea of the artwork as an immutable, obdurate pedestal or wall-bound thing. Bringing together pivotal works made between the 1950s and the present, this exhibition focuses on Walther’s ability to transform notions of object-hood and perception through drawings, paintings, fabric sculptures, participatory forms, language-based works, photographic documentation and archival material."



On the second floor, CAPC just opened 'Ce qui ne sert pas s’oublie' (What Cannot be Used is Forgotten) (22 January–3 May 2015) a group show curated by Mexico-based Colombian-born curator Catalina Lozano, that includes works by Mathieu K. Abonnenc, Sven Augustijnen, Mariana Castillo Deball, Sean Lynch, Pauline M’Barek, Museo Comunitario del Valle de Xico, Wendelien van Oldenborgh, Uriel Orlow, Beatriz Santiago Muñoz and Jorge Satorre.

The exhibition "deals with the mutating statuses of objects in relation to the possible historical narratives, especially those related to colonial past an present and the layers of cultural, spiritual and identity production that stem from them. Objects carry a wealth of immaterial aspects in and around their materiality, constituted by means of the relations they form with others, both human and non-human... This exhibition seeks to understand how our relation to the material world entails endless processes of assimilation, acculturation, re-appropriation, ritualisation which in their complexity whiteness and embody the historical binds in which they are caught." [this and following quotations describing each work are taken from the exhibition leaflet].


The exhibition is accompanied by a French/Spanish publication (Les Presses du Réel, 2015) with contributions by Mathieu K. Abonnenc, Mariana Castillo Deball, Catalina Lozano, Beatriz Santiago Muñoz and Jorge Satorre.

Entrance to the group exhibition "Ce qui ne sert pas s'oublie".


The first room of the exhibition featured 'Killing Pots' (2013–14), a series of sculptural works by Jorge Satorre (1979, Mexico). Information about these pieces can be found in this extensive text by curator Caterina Riva.


 
Sean Lynch (1978, Ireland), 'A blog-by-blow account of stone-carving in Oxford', (2014) an installation composed of photographs, sculptures and a video projection "exploring the oeuvre of nineteenth-century stone-carvers John and James O’Shea, who carved monkeys, cats, owls and parrots on buildings in Oxford and Dublin."

Sean Lynch, 'A blog-by-blow account of stone-carving in Oxford' (2014). 

(Left) 'Nocturne' (2015) a video by Beatriz Santiago Muñoz (1972, Puerto Rico); (right) Mathieu K. Abonnenc (1977, French Guyana) 'Sas titre (des corps entassés'), (2012) and 'Names and surnames' (2012-13).

(Left) Sven Augustijnen (1970, Belgium) series of photographs 'L'Histoire Belge' (2007) "question the monumentality of Belgium's history and any optimistic relation to its past, including its colonial incursions in Africa"; (right) 'Nocturne' (2015) a video by Beatriz Santiago Muñoz (1972, Puerto Rico) focusing on syncretic religions from the Caribbean, namely Haitian Vodou, characterised by the flexibility they show towards drastic change, be it geographical, social, material or natural".

  (Detail of) Sven Augustijnen (1970, Belgium) series of photographs 'L'Histoire Belge' (2007).

General view of the exhibition. (Right wall) Museo Comunitario del Valle de Xico (Community Museum of the Xico Valley), a community organisation founded in 1996 "entrusted with the safeguard and display of pre-colonial remains found by the neighbours of the locality over the past few decades."

(Above) Detail of Mariana Castillo Deball (1975, Mexico) "Le Problème de Molyneux" (2001) "addressing the immediacy of experiencing an object without seeing it and the subjective construction of its image".

Room with "Showcase" (2012), "Rope" (2013), "Trophy stands" (2011) and "Semiophores" (2013), all works by Pauline M'barek (1979, Germany).

(Above) Wendelien van Oldenborgh (1972, The Netherlands), "La Javaise" (2012). "Shot in the former Colonial Institute in Amsterdam, explores the links between colonialism and globalisation through the example of Vlisco, a Dutch firm producing textiles for the African market."


The show closes with two works produced in 2007 by Uriel Orlow (1973, Switzerland): "Lost Wax" and "A Very Fine Cast (110 Years)". The first deals with the production of brass-casting artefacts in Benin City, Nigeria, produced via this already out of use technique. The latter (below) is a series of 28 engravings displaying descriptions of artefacts from museum cataloguing systems, revealing the racist and colonial narratives that lie within the looted objects that are now part of European museum collections.




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Publication "Robert Smithson: Art in Continual Movement" (Alauda Publications, 2012) includes essay by Max Andrews

 Cover of the publication.

We just received a copy of the wonderful and long-awaited publication "Robert Smithson: Art in Continual Movement" (Alauda Publications, 2012) for which Max Andrews of Latitudes contributes the essay "A Dark Spot of Exasperation: From Smithson to the Spime" (an essay which was the basis of his recent lecture at the Royal College of Art in London).

Pages 44-45, with the section "Art, Research, Ecology".

Robert Smithson's seminal Land Art work Broken Circle/Spiral Hill (Emmen, The Netherlands, 1971) is treated as a case study that opens up to a number of topics, still relevant in contemporary art: 'Models of Spectatorship', 'Art, Research, Ecology', 'Documentation', 'Museum, Media, Society' and 'The Cinematic'." 

 Above: pages with Max Andrews' essay "A Dark Spot of Exasperation: From Smithson to the Spime".

Max Andrews' essay "A Dark Spot of Exasperation: From Smithson to the Spime". 

In his text, Andrews stresses that Smithson's innovations in terms of post-studio practice are not about "the question where, or what is the work of art?", but about investigating the structure of the multiple elements which constitute the form of an art project and its place in the world. According to Andrews, the essential feature of Smithson's kinship to post-studio practice is not so much his institutional critique, but a move away from the museum and the curator as existing power structures to a "curatorial function which incorporates a social ecology: a new meaning- and value-generating system in and around art." In his essay, Andrews traces the points of congruence between Smithson and the practices of contemporary artists like Lara Almarcegui, Jorge Satorre and Cyprien Gaillard.

 Documentation pages, clippings from 1987.

  Pages 150-151, Section "A Living Archive – Film"

 Page 194-195, Section "A Living Archive"

 Pages 208-209, Section "A Living Archive"

The 240-page monograph publication will be launched on 30 March 2012 in The Hague during the symposia Rethinking Robert Smithson organised by the publishers in cooperation with Leiden University Institute for Cultural Disciplines.

Initiator and publisher: Alauda Publications
Edited by: Ingrid Commandeur and Trudy van Riemsdijk-Zandee
Authors: Max Andrews, Eric C.H. de Bruyn, Stefan Heidenreich, Sven Lütticken, Anja Novak, Vivian van Saaze
Design: Esther Krop
ISBN: 9789081531481
Price: 39,95 Euro
Available in bookshops or order online: alaudapublications.nl


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Lecture by Max Andrews "From Spiral to Spime: Robert Smithson, the ecological and the curatorial", 13 March, 2pm, Lecture Theatre 1, Royal College of Art, London

Poster announcement at the Royal College of Art galleries.

On Tuesday 13 March (2pm, Lecture Theatre 1), Max Andrews of Latitudes will give the lecture "From Spiral to Spime: Robert Smithson, the ecological and the curatorial" as part of the "Art and Globalisation" lecture series programmed by MA Curating Contemporary Art by Jean Fisher and Michaela Crimmin.

Starting out from Robert Smithson's Broken Circle / Spiral Hill (1971), this lecture looks at projects by Lara Almarcegui, Jorge Satorre and Cyprien Gaillard to speculate on the 'when' and the 'shape' of art after Smithson in relation to synchronic concepts of post-environmental ecological thinking, and the flux between work and curatorial context. Based on an essay in the forthcoming publication 'Robert Smithson: Art in Continual Movement' (Alauda Publications, 2012).

Robert Smithson, Broken Circle/Spiral Hill. Opening September 17, 2011. Emmen, The Netherlands. Photo by Jan Anninga. Courtesy SKOR.

Following the lecture, Andrews will lead a seminar to first years students of the MA Curating Contemporary Art, Royal College of Art. 

[Please note that the lecture is only open to students and staff of the college.]

Tuesday 13 March 2012, 2pm
Lecture Theatre 1
Royal College of Art
Kensington Gore 
London SW7 2EU, UK


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