Longitudes

Review of the exhibition "What cannot be used is forgotten" in the May issue of frieze


Entrance to the group exhibition "Ce qui ne sert pas s'oublie".

As reported earlier in this channel, at the end of last January we visited the exhibition 'Ce qui ne sert pas s’oublie' (What Cannot be Used is Forgotten)' (on view until 3 May 2015) at CAPC musée d'art coontemporain in Bordeaux.

Curated by Mexico-based Colombian-born curator Catalina Lozano, the exhibition presents the work of Mathieu K. Abonnenc, Sven Augustijnen, Mariana Castillo Deball, Sean Lynch, Pauline M’Barek, Museo Comunitario del Valle de Xico, Wendelien van Oldenborgh, Uriel Orlow, Beatriz Santiago Muñoz and Jorge Satorre.

Below is a fragment of Max Andrews' frieze review, published in the May 2015 issue of frieze magazine (#171):

‘What cannot be used is forgotten’ proposed a biographical approach to objects and the histories and allegiances they can constitute. With an emphasis on eroding the legacy of colonial-era ethnography and archaeology, the exhibition comprised the contributions of ten artists who emphasized the accrual and dispersal of objects' meaning over time. Objects were broken apart, animated, revered, rumored, memorized, melted; or – as in Pauline M’Barek’s sculptures mimicking display stands for imagined wooden masks – missing altogether. Sometimes, objects were not comfortably objects at all, but textiles or techniques. Occasionally they were alibis employed to provoke historical revision and necessitate textual commentary. In Uriel Orlow’s A Very Fine Cast (110 years) (2007), works ingested past traces of such commentary (captions taken from European museums’ descriptions of the Benin Bronzes robbed by the British punitive Benin Expedition of 1897).

– Max Andrews


  Installation view of Sean Lynch's 'A blog-by-blow account of stone-carving in Oxford' (2014).

General view of the exhibition. (Right wall) Museo Comunitario del Valle de Xico (Community Museum of the Xico Valley).

Related content:

Report from Bordeaux: Visit to CAPC/Musée d'Art Contemporain's shows of Franz Ehrard Walther and the group show "Ce qui ne sert pas s'oublie" (27 January 2015)

Review of Maria Thereza Alves' exhibition at CAAC Sevilla published in frieze magazine (9 March 2015) 

art-agenda review on Andrea Büttner show "Tische", at NoguerasBlanchard, Barcelona  (21 July 2014)


This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
Work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.


Report from Bordeaux: Visit to CAPC/Musée d'Art Contemporain's shows of Franz Ehrard Walther and the group show "Ce qui ne sert pas s'oublie"

 Views of Franz Erhard Walther's show "Le Corps décide" from CAPC's mezzanine.

The exhibition 'Franz Erhard Walther: Le Corps décide' was initiated by WIELS Centre d’Art Contemporain, in Brussels – see a video of its iteration here – and has been co-produced together with CAPC musée d'art contemporain in Bordeaux, alongside The Franz Erhard Walther Foundation. The exhibition is accompanied by a beautiful publication that includes brightly colored pop up shapes that spread throughout the book. 

From Wiels' website... "Franz Erhard Walther’s exhibition offers an in-depth look at an influential German artist whose pioneering work straddles minimalist sculpture, conceptual art, abstract painting, and performance all while positing fundamental questions about the conventional idea of the artwork as an immutable, obdurate pedestal or wall-bound thing. Bringing together pivotal works made between the 1950s and the present, this exhibition focuses on Walther’s ability to transform notions of object-hood and perception through drawings, paintings, fabric sculptures, participatory forms, language-based works, photographic documentation and archival material."



On the second floor, CAPC just opened 'Ce qui ne sert pas s’oublie' (What Cannot be Used is Forgotten) (22 January–3 May 2015) a group show curated by Mexico-based Colombian-born curator Catalina Lozano, that includes works by Mathieu K. Abonnenc, Sven Augustijnen, Mariana Castillo Deball, Sean Lynch, Pauline M’Barek, Museo Comunitario del Valle de Xico, Wendelien van Oldenborgh, Uriel Orlow, Beatriz Santiago Muñoz and Jorge Satorre.

The exhibition "deals with the mutating statuses of objects in relation to the possible historical narratives, especially those related to colonial past an present and the layers of cultural, spiritual and identity production that stem from them. Objects carry a wealth of immaterial aspects in and around their materiality, constituted by means of the relations they form with others, both human and non-human... This exhibition seeks to understand how our relation to the material world entails endless processes of assimilation, acculturation, re-appropriation, ritualisation which in their complexity whiteness and embody the historical binds in which they are caught." [this and following quotations describing each work are taken from the exhibition leaflet].

The exhibition is accompanied by a French/Spanish publication (Les Presses du Réel, 2015) with contributions by Mathieu K. Abonnenc, Mariana Castillo Deball, Catalina Lozano, Beatriz Santiago Muñoz and Jorge Satorre.

Entrance to the group exhibition "Ce qui ne sert pas s'oublie".


The first room of the exhibition featured 'Killing Pots' (2013–14), a series of sculptural works by Jorge Satorre (1979, Mexico). Information about these pieces can be found in this extensive text by curator Caterina Riva.


 
Sean Lynch (1978, Ireland), 'A blog-by-blow account of stone-carving in Oxford', (2014) an installation composed of photographs, sculptures and a video projection "exploring the oeuvre of nineteenth-century stone-carvers John and James O’Shea, who carved monkeys, cats, owls and parrots on buildings in Oxford and Dublin."

Sean Lynch, 'A blog-by-blow account of stone-carving in Oxford' (2014). 


(Left) 'Nocturne' (2015) a video by Beatriz Santiago Muñoz (1972, Puerto Rico); (right) Mathieu K. Abonnenc (1977, French Guyana) 'Sas titre (des corps entassés'), (2012) and 'Names and surnames' (2012-13).


(Left) Sven Augustijnen (1970, Belgium) series of photographs 'L'Histoire Belge' (2007) "question the monumentality of Belgium's history and any optimistic relation to its past, including its colonial incursions in Africa"; (right) 'Nocturne' (2015) a video by Beatriz Santiago Muñoz (1972, Puerto Rico) focusing on syncretic religions from the Caribbean, namely Haitian Vodou, characterised by the flexibility they show towards drastic change, be it geographical, social, material or natural".

  (Detail of) Sven Augustijnen (1970, Belgium) series of photographs 'L'Histoire Belge' (2007).


General view of the exhibition. (Right wall) Museo Comunitario del Valle de Xico (Community Museum of the Xico Valley), a community organisation founded in 1996 "entrusted with the safeguard and display of pre-colonial remains found by the neighbours of the locality over the past few decades."


(Above) Detail of Mariana Castillo Deball (1975, Mexico) "Le Problème de Molyneux" (2001) "addressing the immediacy of experiencing an object without seeing it and the subjective construction of its image".

Room with "Showcase" (2012), "Rope" (2013), "Trophy stands" (2011) and "Semiophores" (2013), all works by Pauline M'barek (1979, Germany).


(Above) Wendelien van Oldenborgh (1972, The Netherlands), "La Javaise" (2012). "Shot in the former Colonial Institute in Amsterdam, explores the links between colonialism and globalisation through the example of Vlisco, a Dutch firm producing textiles for the African market."



The show closes with two works produced in 2007 by Uriel Orlow (1973, Switzerland): "Lost Wax" and "A Very Fine Cast (110 Years)". The first deals with the production of brass-casting artifacts in Benin City, Nigeria, produced via this already out of use technique. The latter (below) is a series of 28 engravings displaying descriptions of artifacts from museum cataloging systems, revealing the racist and colonial narratives that lie within the looted objects that are now part of European museum collections.




Related Content:


This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
Work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Publication "Robert Smithson: Art in Continual Movement" (Alauda Publications, 2012) includes essay by Max Andrews

 Cover of the publication.

We just received a copy of the wonderful and long-awaited publication "Robert Smithson: Art in Continual Movement" (Alauda Publications, 2012) for which Max Andrews of Latitudes contributes the essay "A Dark Spot of Exasperation: From Smithson to the Spime" (an essay which was the basis of his recent lecture at the Royal College of Art in London).

Pages 44-45, with the section "Art, Research, Ecology".

Robert Smithson's seminal Land Art work Broken Circle/Spiral Hill (Emmen, The Netherlands, 1971) is treated as a case study which opens up to a number of topics, still relevant in contemporary art: 'Models of Spectatorship', 'Art, Research, Ecology', 'Documentation', 'Museum, Media, Society' and 'The Cinematic'." 

 Above: pages with Max Andrews' essay "A Dark Spot of Exasperation: From Smithson to the Spime".



Max Andrews' essay "A Dark Spot of Exasperation: From Smithson to the Spime". 
In his text Andrews stresses that Smithson's innovations in terms of post-studio practice ar not about "the question where, or what is the work of art?", but about investigationg the structure of the multiple elements which constitute the form of an art project and its place in the world. According to Andrews, the essential feature of Smithson's kinship to post-studio practice is not so much his institutional critique, but a move away from the museum and the curator as existing power structures to a "curatorial function which incorporates a social ecology: a new meaning- and value–generating system in and around art." In his essay Andrews traces the points of congruence between Smithson and the practices of contemporary artists like Lara Almarcegui, Jorge Satorre and Cyprien Gaillard.

 Documentation pages, clippings from 1987.

  Pages 150-151, Section "A Living Archive – Film"

 Page 194-195, Section "A Living Archive"

 Pages 208-209, Section "A Living Archive"

The 240 page monograph publication will be launched on 30 March 2012 in The Hague during the symposia Rethinking Robert Smithson organised by the publishers in cooperation with Leiden University Institute for Cultural Disciplines.

Initiator and publisher: Alauda Publications
Edited by: Ingrid Commandeur and Trudy van Riemsdijk-Zandee
Authors: Max Andrews, Eric C.H. de Bruyn, Stefan Heidenreich, Sven Lütticken, Anja Novak, Vivian van Saaze
Design: Esther Krop
ISBN: 9789081531481
Price: 39,95 Euro
Available in bookshops or order online: alaudapublications.nl


Related links: 
September 2011 blog post on The Land Art Contemporary programme in Denthe, The Netherlands.

All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org

Lecture by Max Andrews "From Spiral to Spime: Robert Smithson, the ecological and the curatorial", 13 March, 2pm, Lecture Theatre 1, Royal College of Art, London

Poster announcement at the Royal College of Art galleries.

On Tuesday 13 March (2pm, Lecture Theatre 1), Max Andrews of Latitudes will give the lecture "From Spiral to Spime: Robert Smithson, the ecological and the curatorial" as part of the "Art and Globalisation" lecture series programmed by MA Curating Contemporary Art by Jean Fisher and Michaela Crimmin.
Starting out from Robert Smithson's Broken Circle / Spiral Hill (1971), this lecture looks at projects by Lara Almarcegui, Jorge Satorre and Cyprien Gaillard to speculate on the 'when' and the 'shape' of art after Smithson in relation to synchronic concepts of post-environmental ecological thinking, and the flux between work and curatorial context. Based on an essay in the forthcoming publication 'Robert Smithson: Art in Continual Movement' (Alauda Publications, 2012).

Robert Smithson, Broken Circle/Spiral Hill. Opening September 17, 2011. Emmen, The Netherlands. Photo by Jan Anninga. Courtesy SKOR.

Following the lecture, Andrews will lead a seminar to first years students of the MA Curating Contemporary Art, Royal College of Art. 

[Please note that the lecture is only open to students and staff of the college.]

Tuesday 13 March 2012, 2pm
Lecture Theatre 1
Royal College of Art
Kensington Gore 
London SW7 2EU, UK


All photos: Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Interview with Erick Beltrán & Jorge Satorre, 'Atlántica' magazine #52

Installation view of 'Modelling Standard' at Galeria Joan Prats, Barcelona. Jorge Satorre and Erick Beltrán (Illustrations by Jorge Aviña), “Modelling Standard”, 2010. 58 photocopies pasted on the wall. Variable dimensions. Courtesy of the artists.

In the current issue of the 'Atlántica' magazine #52 (to be launched on 16 February at 4pm, at the Sala de Amigos, Hall 8, ARCOmadrid), there is an interview between Erick Beltrán, Jorge Satorre and Latitudes conducted in November 2011 during the installation week of the exhibition at Galeria Joan Prats, Barcelona. Below an abstract of the 4,000 words on phantom limbs, microhistory, devil's drool, apophenia, collaboration, information systems, Sigmund Freud's dog Jo-Fi, collage, döppelgangers, Fantomas, mirror neurons, unorthodox research methods, validation...

– PART I –
Latitudes (L): Your exhibition at Galería Joan Prats in Barcelona is the latest instalment of your ModellingStandardproject, as well as being a group show which includes the work of other artists. [1] Where should we begin the story, where does it start for you?

Jorge Satorre (JS): At the core of Modelling Standardis our interest in the methodology proposed by Italian microhistory during the seventies as well as its precedents. Specifically, the essay of Carlo Ginzburg ‘Clues: Roots of an Evidential Paradigm’, which was published in 1979, functioned as one of the main pillars of our project. In the text, he tried to explain a new way of making history in which there are three basic methods to follow: first, reducing scale; second, in-depth investigations of the few sources at hand; and third, exploitation of hints and traces – working like a detective. [2]Ginzburg supported his theory by alluding to the fathers of this paradigm: Sigmund Freud, Arthur Conan Doyle and Giovanni Morelli. These three people worked in very different fields, though they shared a medical background and operated in the manner of a detective: deciphering clues through symptoms and finding hidden meaning in details. From this trigger Erick and I started opening up a web of relations.

L: It is now a fascinatingly complex project which involves a whole host of characters and has evolved through an exhibition at FormContent in London in 2010, and a comic book which you produced for Casa Vecina in Mexico City earlier this year. Integral to the project are the amazing drawings of Jorge Aviña, who we’ll come onto specifically in a moment, which you commissioned as illustrations of certain concepts. But as Charles Fort said, ‘one measures a circle, beginning anywhere’... so, let’s pick one drawing and one character – Vilayanur Ramachandran?
Erick Beltrán and Dr. Vilayanur Ramachandran. Courtesy the artist.

Erick Beltrán (EB):Ramachandran represents a really curious phenomena that gets further explored in the comic – the analyses of the phantom limb and mirror neurons. He found out that there are cells in the brain that possess a representative image of our body. If those cells are electrically stimulated, one starts to feel different parts of the body. Via Wilder Penfield’s understanding of the part of the brain called the cortical homunculus, neuroscientists concluded that this representation is distorted, it’s not to scale with how the body really is. Some parts have more sensory neurons than others, hence they appear bigger in the brain’s body image: for instance the hands of ‘Penfield’s homunculus’ are too big and the torso is way too small. 

L: What is the relation between the individual line drawings and the comic?

JS:For instance, the misperception Erick mentioned really became the centre of the comic, which is titled El Hallazgo del Miembro Fantasma (The Discovery of the Phantom Limb). The 58individual drawings were the first part of the project and are pasted on the wall like posters here in Barcelona as they were similarly in London. Their structure and relations are set out more like a draft. The comic is basically a story talking about the power of the images in which we incorporated some of the characters from the first part of the project. 

L: The comic format must have posed a different challenge; rather than jumping from drawing-to-drawing as with the talk-performances you have done during the openings of the projects, a narrative has to be set out and digested in a linear way?

EB:We made a sort of ‘game of shadows’ with the comic by encompassing the narrative and the visual part. A novel however is something we are going to do at some point.

JS:The whole project has also set out a new problem for us: we began with the analysis of microhistory, yet as we mentioned before, now we realise this has evolved into considering the power of images. All the characters somehow tackle this problem in one way or another, and with the comic we created a detective story where the characters are victims and perpetrators around a crime related to images.It has been a ping-pong of ideas between us, but we have also let chance be a part of the process. We have had to confront our decisions and integrate characters. Jorge Aviña is the illustrator who, as you said, has produced all the drawings for the project, and we realised that he had a lot to do with Fantomas, a fictional character in a Mexican comic series of the 1960s, based on the French character Fantômas. One of the writers of Fantomas, Gonzalo Martré, who is now 84, becomes the criminal in our comic and also is the cowriter of El Hallazgo del Miembro Fantasma.  

EB: By then we had realised we had gathered a sort of ‘dream team’ of what Fantomas could represent today. 

Jorge Satorre and Erick Beltrán (Illustrations by Jorge Aviña), “Modelling Standard”, 2010
58 photocopies pasted on the wall. Variable dimensions. Courtesy of the artists.


[1]  Modelling Standard, an exhibition organized by Jorge Satorre and Erick Beltrán. Also participating: Christoph Keller, Raphaël Zarka, Paloma Polo, Bernardo Ortiz, Efrén Álvarez, Meris Angioletti, Jose Antonio Vega Macotela, Vilayanur Ramachandran, Jorge Aviña and Florian Göttke. Galería Joan Prats, Barcelona, November–December 2011.
[2]  Carlo Ginzburg, ‘Clues: Roots of an Evidential Paradigm’, in Clues, Myths, and the Historical Method , translated by John Tedeschi and Anne C. Tedeschi (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1989), p. 102. The Italian edition is ‘Spie: Radici di un paradigma indizario’, in Aldo Gargani and Carlo Ginzburg, Crisi della ragione. (Einaudi, 1979).

Erick Beltrán and Jorge Satorre's 'Modelling Standard' evolving project and forthcoming interview with the artists for 'Atlántica' magazine

Invitation card to the exhibition at Galeria Joan Prats.


Opening: 17 November 2011, 19.30h (the artist will do a talk at 20h)

Exhibition organised by: Jorge Satorre and Erick Beltrán

With works by: Christoph Keller, Raphaël Zarka, Paloma Polo, Bernardo Ortiz,
Efrén Álvarez, Meris Angioletti, Jose Antonio Vega Macotela, Vilayanur Ramachandran,
Jorge Aviña and Florian Göttke.

The presentation at Galeria Joan Prats is the third iteration of the project which began in September 2010 at FormContent, London and continued in March 2011 at Casa Vecina, México DF. 

"Modelling Standard takes as a point of departure the radical historiographic turn introduced by Carlo Ginzburg in the 1970s who focused on localised, popular and disregarded micro-histories rather than universal, over-arching versions. The title Modelling Standard references the scientific concept of the Standard Model used in physics to explain the almost invisible interactions occurring between subatomic particles.

Erick Beltrán and Jorge Satorre use both micro-historical methods and the metaphor borrowed from physics to create connections between small, insignificant hints and traces. These are taken from their heterogeneous references to build seemingly unlikely connections between literary references, personal experiences, historical data, trivia and scientific facts through the construction of a diagram. The result is a series of caricatures and texts through which the artists will construct a detective plot where Sigmund Freud, Carlo Ginzburg, Giovanni Morelli, Aby Warburg, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Joe Orton are the protagonists." (taken from FormContent's press release)

In Casa Vecina, Modelling Standard expanded with the inclusion of a comic also with drawings by illustrator and project collaborator Jorge Aviña, which will also be presented in Galeria Joan Prats alongside, as the artists have stated, the "input from a number of artists, illustrators and guest researchers, whose personal research work adds new links to the chain that stretches and lengthens ... like the devil's drool".

Installation process of the exhibition. Photo taken the day we began the interview for 'Atlántica' magazine.

In relation to 'Modelling Standard' Latitudes is currently working on an interview with Satorre and Beltrán for the Spanish magazine 'Atlántica' (to be published in February 2012), where there will be an opportunity to read more about their thread of ideas for this project as well as the process of their collaborative work – the latter being one of the focus of Latitudes' interests developed in exhibition projects such as 'Amikejo' (four exhibitions at MUSAC, León, 2011) or 'The Garden of Forking Paths' (Maisterravalbuena, Madrid, 2009). More news to follow...

Related posts:
 


  



Galeria Joan Prats
Rambla de Catalunya, 54
08007 Barcelona, Spain

Participación en el simposio 'Antimonumentos: Crítica en el Espacio Público', Espai d'Art Contemporani de Castelló, Sábado 22 Octubre 2011

Programa simposio

10.30 h: Ángela Molina Climent, Organizadora del simposio: 'ANTIMONUMENTOS: CRÍTICA EN EL ESPACIO PÚBLICO'

Más allá de su papel como sitey depósito de obras de arte, el museo como instrumento cultural –que se ha ido desarrollando paralelamente a la museización de la propia cultura– es una institución normalizadora y disciplinaria. Como repositorios de objetos del pasado, los museos dan sentido a la historia, pero también construyen activamente las relaciones entre la producción de la subjetividad y la producción de objetos materiales. Durante los últimos años, con la tendencia a fusionar los lugares de producción y exhibición (lugares discursivos), todo el aparato institucional que rodea a la obra participa en la creación de nuevos valores y significados estéticos. El activismo y el arte han transformado sus estrategias para producirgrupos de artivistas favorables a una concepción educativa y participativa de la institución. En este simposio, artistas, comisarios, historiadores y urbanistas hablarán de la necesidad de una crítica independiente desde el espacio público, con el fin de perturbar una cultura dominante que depende de un sistema de valores y líneas de autoridad aparentemente incólumes.

Ángela Molina Climent es Licenciada en Filología Española y doctora en Teoría de la Literatura y Literatura Comparada por la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), ejerció la crítica de arte en el suplemento de cultura del diario ABChasta 2000. Desde 2001 colabora en las secciones de arte y literatura de los suplementos culturales Babeliay Quadern (El País), y en publicaciones especializadas (LARS, Revista de Libros). Ha dirigido la revista de arte y pensamiento Art&Co, y es especialista en teoría feminista y estudios de género. Editora del libro Los Lugares de la Crítica(Ed. Universidad Pública de Navarra, 2011) y autora de La máquina de las solterasde próxima publicación (Ed. Periférica). 

11 h: Iria Candela: 'LATINOAMÉRICA: LA CALLE COMO EXPERIMENTO' 

El arte en Latinoamérica de las dos últimas dos décadas viene ensayando formas de intervención poético-políticas en la ciudad que difieren de las prácticas subversivas y anti-institucionales de las dos décadas anteriores, caracterizadas por el represivo contexto de las dictaduras. Estas nuevas formas se insertan en los diversos procesos de democratización y desdemocratización que experimenta el continente, cuestionando ciertos modelos culturales de la globalización y apuntando nuevos desafíos en el interfaz entre estética y política. Se discutirán algunos ejemplos destacados, como las intervenciones recientes de Héctor Zamora en Bogotá o Regina José Galindo en Guatemala.  

Iria Candela es curadora adjunta en la Tate Modern de Londres desde 2009, donde ha trabajado en exposiciones de artistas como Theo van Doesburg, Gabriel Orozco, Alejandro Cesarco y, actualmente, Tacita Dean y Roy Lichtenstein, entre otros. Es doctora en Historia del Arte por la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid y máster en Arte Moderno por Columbia University de Nueva York.Autora de los libros Sombras de Ciudad. Arte y transformación urbana en Nueva York 1970-1990 (Alianza, 2007) y Joan Miró(Tate, 2011), ha realizado la edición crítica del catálogo Francesc Torres. Da Capo(Macba, 2009). Ha escrito sobre arte para publicaciones como The Burlington Magazine, Lápiz,Tate EtcyEl País, y ha impartido ponencias en las universidades de Harvard, Oxford y Sorbonne. Miembro del Comité de Adquisiciones Latinoamericanas de la colección de la Tate, actualmente ultima la publicación de un libro sobre arte contemporáneo en América Latina.

12.30 h: Patricia Esquivias: 'LIEBE FRAU'  
Patricia Esquivias observa Castellón a la distancia y reflexionará en torno a su identidad geográfica. Compuesto de pequeños monólogos dirigidos a una señora alemana, que ocupa en la obra el papel de censora, Liebe Frauexpone los problemas que supone hablar de realidades estrambóticas. Al igual que en otros trabajos de la serie Folklore(videos seudoeducativos sobre España), la artista elaborará exquisitas asociaciones entrelazando referencias personales, cotidianas e históricas. En Liebe Frau, Esquivias llevará un paso más allá la naturaleza subjetiva de su trabajo, y pondrá en evidencia la limitación del lenguaje para explicar ciertas idiosincracias.

Patricia Esquivias nació en Caracas y creció en Madrid. Estudió arte en Londres y San Francisco.  En Madrid trabajó junto con Manuela Moscoso en la programación de los29enchufes.  Desde el 2005 trabaja en video y ha expuesto sus trabajos entre otros en Madrid (Museo Nacional Reina Sofía, Galería Maisterravalbuena, Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo), Alemania (Frankfurter Kunstverein, 5th Berlin Biennale), Nueva York (White Columns, Murray Guy, New Museum), Italia (Arcos Museum, Artissima) y en Inglaterra (East International, Royal College of Art). Actualmente disfruta de una beca en la Akademie Schloss Solitude en Stuttgart.

[Pausa almuerzo]

16h: Latitudes (Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna): 'PORTSCAPES: ITINERARIOS Y DESTINACIONES EN EL PUERTO DE RÓTERDAM' 
'Making of' de Jan Dibbets '6 hours tide object with correction of perspective' (2009).

Con la participación de diez artistas de diversos países (Lara Almarcegui, Bik van der Pol, Jan Dibbets, Marjolijn Dijkman, Fucking Good Art, Ilana Halperin, Roman Keller and Christina Hemauer, Paulien Oltheten, Jorge Satorre y Hans Schabus (web: Maria Barnas (poesía) y Markus Miessen (entrevistas)), el proyecto Portscapesexaminó las implicaciones físicas y conceptuales de los nuevos horizontes del Maasvlakte 2, la extensión de la zona portuaria e industrial de Róterdam, la más extensa de Europa, que entre el 2008 y 2013 robará 2.000 hectáreas de terreno al mar. Portscapes giró entorno al leitmotifitinerarios y destinaciones, creando proyectos de escala y temporalidad variable (performances, excursiones, esculturas efímeras y proyecciones), con la intención de desarrollarse como una guía de la zona portuaria que se extiende a lo largo 40 kilómetros. En el simposio se analizarán cuatro proyectos de Portscapes, los realizados por Jan Dibbets, Jorge Satorre, Lara Almarcegui y Cyprien Gaillard (no realizado), y se pondrá en cuestión la noción de anti-monumento y específicamente las negociaciones y retos que se plantearon a nivel artístico y curatorial. 

Latitudeses una oficina curatorial independiente dirigida por Max Andrews y Mariana Cánepa Luna, fundada en el 2005 y con sede en Barcelona. En el 2009 comisariaron Portscapes, una serie de diez proyectos públicos en el Puerto de Róterdam producidos en el contexto de la expansión del puerto, la zona portuaria e industrial más extensa de Europa. Latitudes ha participado en el festival de organizaciones independientes NO SOUL FOR SALE(X Initiative, Nueva York, 2009 y Tate Modern, Londres, 2010); fue organización asociada en la exposición The Last Newspaper, New Museum, Nueva York (2010–11) para la que publicó un periódico semanal durante la exposición. Durante la temporada 2011 ha comisariado el ciclo Amikejoen el Laboratorio 987, MUSAC, León.

17.15h: Racons Públics (Sara Dauge y Alejandro Giménez): "ARTE Y MICROCIRUGÍA URBANA"
La constante transformación de nuestras ciudades deja atrás espacios residuales, huecos y rincones. En el paisaje urbano actual, esos rincones ponen de manifiesto la falta de atención al detalle en el acelerado proceso de desarrollo que transforma nuestras ciudades. Son problemas de pequeña escala que quedan enquistados en los intersticios de la gran metrópoli: roces entre tejidos, en los perímetros y en el contacto con las infraestructuras, las dificultades de adaptación al relieve, las discontinuidades en las tramas, la desertización de la ciudad abierta, los monocultivos funcionales, las medianeras desnudas como evidencia de los conflictos internos de los crecimientos compactos, los cambios normativos, las imprecisiones del planeamiento, la desafección del promotor privado y la falta de recursos materiales o técnicos. El concurso de participación ciudadana en el diseño de la ciudad Racons Públicses una iniciativa que plantea la recuperación y dinamización de lugares degradados, olvidados o desaprovechados, para su uso público. Sus objetivos son abrir la disciplina urbanística a otras áreas del conocimiento, de las ciencias y de las artes al tiempo que se recuperan ocho enclaves significativos de la ciudad de Castellón.

Sara Dauge es historiadora urbana. Estudió en la Universidad de París Panthéon Sorbonne. En su doctorado investigó las formas de sociabilidad en Barcelona desde 1833 hasta 1844. Se dedicó a la investigación histórica y urbana dentro del despacho de arquitectura, urbanismo y paisaje de Beth Gali, Barcelona. Fue comisaria de la exposición Urbanismo y ocio en la Barcelona de 1850, casa Elizalde, Barcelona 1999. Desde 1998 en colaboración con Alejandro Giménez se dedica al comisariado y coordinación del concursode participación ciudadana Racons Públics, organizado en Barcelona en 2004 y 2010 porel FAD (Foment de les arts i del disseny) y con el apoyo del Ayuntamiento de Barcelona. Desde 2006 es secretaria ponente de la comisión de esculturas del Ayuntamiento de Barcelona, encargada de establecer un diálogo entre el arte contemporáneo y el espacio público.
Alejandro Giménez es arquitecto por la Escuela Técnica Superior de Arquitectura de Barcelona, donde es profesor en el Departamento de Urbanística y Ordenación del Territorio desde 1998. Es profesor en la Universidad de Salamanca, máster de Diseño de Interiores, desde 2004y profesor en la Universidad Pompeu Fabra, máster de Nuevos Formatos Expositivos. Ha colaborado con arquitectos de Barcelona: Beth Galí, Enric Miralles, Oriol Bohigas, y otros. Desde 1998 forma estudio propio, con proyectos de espacio público para el centro de Dublín, edificación y rehabilitación en Barcelona y otras poblaciones catalanas. Es comisario y coordinador del concurso Racons Públicsde participación ciudadana en el diseño urbano. 

18.30h: MESA REDONDACON LA PARTICIPACIÓN DE TODOS LOS PONENTES
    INSCRIPCIÓN AL SIMPOSIO
    Precio: 20 €
    Precio Amigos del EACC: 14 €
    Forma de pago: mediante depósito en BANCAJA, nº de cuenta 2077 0583 87 3101700604
    Al realizar el ingreso, es necesario colocar el nombre y apellidos e indicar el nombre del Simposio para el cual se hace el ingreso.
    Fin de la inscripción: 21 de octubre o cuando se cubran las plazas
    Plazas limitadas
    Para más información: [email protected]/ tel. 964 72 35 40

    Espai d'art contemporani de Castelló
    c/ Prim s/n
    12003 Castelló
    Tel +34 964 72 35 40
    Fax +34 964 26 07 71
    [email protected]

    www.eacc.es

    Robert Smithson's 'Broken Circle/Spiral Hill Revisited' (1971–2011) and The Land Art Contemporary programme

     
    Land Art Contemporary year-long initiative showcases works of art located in the countryside of Drenthe, a province in the northeastern Netherlands, which will be complemented with an international events programme dealing with the contemporary aspects of Land art. Starting on 17 September 2011, the programme is linked to the 40th anniversary of the creation of Robert Smithson's film Broken Circle/Spiral Hill in Emmen for the exhibition Sonsbeek 1971.  

    Coinciding with the anniversary, Land Art Contemporary kicks off with the exhibition 'Robert Smithson – Broken Circle/Spiral Hill Revisited', at the Centre for Visual Arts (CBK) in Emmen. The exhibition's star piece will be the recently completed film 'Breaking Ground: Broken Circle/Spiral Hill' (1971–2011), uncompleted due to Smithson's untimely death in 1973, which is now finally produced, following his instructions for direction and editing, by his widow Nancy Holt in collaboration with SKOR. The film will also be screened once on 22 September at the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. Holt will introduce the video.

    Parallel to this major exhibition, SKOR is also organising The Ultraperiferic (17 September – 27 November 2011), an exhibition that will feature the work of Lara Almarcegui (ES/NL), Jorge Satorre (MX/NL) and Cyprien Gaillard (FR/DE), three artists with whom Latitudes has worked in the recent past and whose work will also be featured in Max Andrews' essay "'A Dark Spot of Exasperation: From Smithson to the Spime'" in the forthcoming publication 'Robert Smithson: Art in Continual Movement' (ISBN 9789081531481) to be published by Alauda Publications in early 2012. The essay and The Ultraperiferic both feature Jorge Satorre's 'The erratic. Measuring compensation' (2009) which was produced in the context of 'Portscapes' and recently featured in his exhibition at Labor, Mexico City.


    The project will continue in 2012–13, with a series of 'assignments' to contemporary artists "a number of artists will be set the assignment of creating a work in the spirit of Smithson, whereby the landscape is viewed as a continual process that is constantly in a state of transformation due to the interaction between man and nature", to be curated by SKOR's curators Nils van Beek and Theo Tegelaers. + info...


    Land Art Contemporary is an initiative of STICHTING LACDA, Drenthe, a foundation established in 2011 by the Sanders-Ten Holte family. The program has been made possible thanks to (content and financial) support from SKOR | Foundation for Art and Public Domain, Province of Drenthe, European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development: Europe Investing in Rural Areas (LEADER), Municipality of Coevorden, Municipality of Emmen, Cultuurfonds BNG and the Sanders-Ten Holte family.

    Proyecto producido por Jorge Satorre para 'Portscapes' (2009) expuesto en la exposición colectiva 'Fat Chance to Dream', Maisterravalbuena, Madrid

    Jorge Satorre, 'The Erratic. Measuring Compensation’ (2009–10).
    Cortesía del artista y Labor, México DF.

    El próximo 2 abril,
    la galería Maisterravalbuena inaugura la exposición 'Fat Chance to Dream', comisariada por Tania Pardo con motivo de la iniciativa Jugada a 3 bandas. La exposición incluye dos guaches (véase arriba) de Jorge Satorre, producidos en el contexto de 'Portscapes', la serie de proyectos producidos con motivo de la ampliación del puerto de Rotterdam, Holanda, encargados por la autoridad portuaria en el 2009 y comisariados por Latitudes.


    A continuación una sección del texto de Mariana Cánepa Luna de Latitudes sobre el proyecto, recientemente publicado en el catálogo de la exposición 'Antes que todo':

    "...Éste es el caso del proyecto ‘The Erratic. Measuring Compensation’ (2009–10) realizado en el contexto de una serie de proyectos iniciados con motivo de la ampliación del puerto de Róterdam, Holanda. En una granja en Erica, al norte del país, Satorre encontró un bloque errático [1] de 3 toneladas que se desplazó hasta allí durante la última glaciación. Después de un largo y complejo proceso de trámites y análisis geológicos, Satorre lo devolvió al sur de Suecia, de donde vino originalmente según el estudio científico. Este ‘gesto geológico al inverso’ se convierte en un acto de restitución simbólica dadas las complejas medidas de compensación medioambiental que se están implementando en la ampliación de puerto, así como el uso de cinco millones de toneladas de bloques escandinavos que se están utilizando para la construcción de nuevos diques. En la exposición del proyecto Satorre presentó dos dibujos a modo de storyboards del viaje de la piedra a su nuevo emplazamiento y un dibujo a modo de guión con ‘gestos compensatorios’ que han tenido lugar en la historia."

    El proyecto se presentó recientemente en Labor, México DF, aunque es la primera vez que se presenta en España.

    Entrada blog del proyecto | Galería de fotos | Cronología 'Portscapes'
    'Making of' del proyecto (video de Het Kader):



    [1] “En geología, un bloque errático es cualquier material movido por fuerzas geológicas de un lugar a otro, generalmente por un glaciar. Los «erráticos» toman su nombre de la palabra latina errare, y fueron transportados por el hielo de los glaciares, a menudo a distancias de cientos de kilómetros, quedando depositados cuando se fundió el hielo.” www.wikipedia.es

    Installation views of the 'Portscapes' exhibition, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, on view until 25 April. Free entrance.

    View of the outside of the Richard Serra Hall / Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen

    (Above and below) Ilana Halperin, "A Brief History of Mobile Landmass", 2009–2010.


    Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, "The Postpetrolistic Internationale", 2009–2010
    Video and audio installation with wooden stage.
     General view of the exhibition.
    Bik Van der Pol, "Facts on the Ground", 2010. Video. Duration: 23 min.

    Exhibition of the documentation material produced during the year-long commissioning series of works in and around Rotterdam's port extension project Maasvlakte 2, with works by Lara Almarcegui, Bik van der Pol, Jan Dibbets,Marjolijn Dijkman, Fucking Good Art, Ilana Halperin, Christina Hemauer & Roman Keller,Paulien Oltheten, Jorge Satorre, and Hans Schabus (website collaborators: Maria Barnas (poetry) and Markus Miessen (interviews)).


    On view at the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen until 25 April. Entrance free.

    More images of the exhibition here.
    More images of each commission here.
    'Making of' videos here.

    Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Museumpark 18-20, 3015 CX Rotterdam, The Netherlands
    Opening hours: Tue–Sun 11.00 to 17.00

    All images: Latitudes | www.lttds.org

    Founded in 2005 by Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna, Latitudes is a curatorial office based in Barcelona, Spain, that works internationally across contemporary art practices.

    More about us. Browse projects. Read Longitudes. Receive newsletters.

    Contact us. 
    All content
    Latitudes
    2005—2019