Longitudes

Latitudes' "out of office": wrap up of the 2017–2018 season

This is possibly our favourite post of the year. Not just because it means we’ll shortly be taking a deserved summer break. But also because it brings a sense of accomplishment to look back at what has happened during the last twelve months — to remember the many conversations we’ve had, the places we’ve been privileged to visit and to refresh all those ideas and plans we intended to move forward. Onwards!

September 11—October 6, 2017
: Lead Faculty of the month-long "Geologic Time" residency at The Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity in Alberta, Canada.


In this blog post, we shared some lithic impressions of the four weeks we spent leading a programme in Alberta's Rocky Mountains.

One of the epic moments of the month: hike to Stanley Glacier.
At the base of Mount Stanley, we found 505-million-year-old Burgess Shale trilobites, soft-body fossils from the Eldon formation.
Snow surprised us on our final week in Banff.
Welcome coffee with third week Guest faculty Sean Lynch.
A fun evening at High Rollers bowling alley in Banff town.

The closing event of "Geologic Time" was conceived as a two-hour infiltration into the pages, shelves, and display possibilities of The Banff Centre library. Featuring storytelling, documentation, annotation, sculpture, video, conversation and other live situations, the event presented some sediments of the ten participants’ ongoing research and geological collaborations. Pdf of the event programme.

Posters communicating some of the seminars and excursions programmed during the four weeks. Design/Photos: Latitudes.
Intervention by Semâ Bekirovic, based in Amsterdam. Bekirovic employed a number of external hard drives to act as pedestals for small stones. How many terabytes can a hunk of rock hold? What fragments of data detritus, chunks and grains of documents, broken off images, or weathered files, might be read and written, stored or retrieved?

Intervention by Caitlin Chaisson based in Vancouver. Chaisson has been researching a former experimental farm station in Agassiz, British Columbia, and a forgotten centennial time capsule buried under a granite marker there. Caitlin also presented a cut-and-paste station on the table next to the photocopier, and a display for the tall vitrine just behind it.

Intervention by Caroline Loewen, based in Calgary. Caroline delves deep into the story of sandstone in Alberta, a rock that gained widespread favour for building and decorative use following Calgary’s Great Fire of 1886. The black-and-brown Rundle Rock that was once quarried at the base of Banff-Centre-neighbour Mount Rundle and was used extensively in creating the Banff Springs Hotel also joins a conversation that anticipates an exhibition scheduled for next summer at Lougheed House in Calgary.
Intervention by Justy Phillips & Margaret Woodward (A Published Event) based in Hobart. Described by the Hobart-based duo as “an accumulative event of mineralogical, metaphysical and metallurgical telling”, the books that have come into the world to date have been incorporated into the library’s holdings alongside a glossary and can be found in the geology section upstairs.

An audio narration drafted by Penelope Smart was also heard on the upper floor, near the “memoirs and narrative” section. Here, an image of the exquisite marble bust by Giovanni Strazza animated Penny’s writing during the last weeks. It came to St.John’s, Newfoundland, in 1856. Ring the bell to the right of the main door of the Presentation Convent adjoining the Basilica in St.John’s and maybe one of the sisters will let you see it.

Remnants of the 2-hour event.

For the final event on October 5th, participants Becky Forsythe and Camila Sposati decided to collaborate through a performance using the library photocopier on the main floor. ‘"Receding Agate" and "Receding Rhodochrosite" was a collection of pages produced during a procedural artwork that slowly and methodically extracted copies of Agate and Rhodochrosite from Roger Caillois' "The Writing of Stones". Each page is a copy of the last, so text begins to harden into pebble-like shapes, and images begin to simplify as darker forms in an experiment of accumulation and sedimentation.’


Far Afield, the artistic-curatorial initiative led by the also participant Caitlin Chaisson, hand-bound the resulting two-part publication for Far Afield's library, a platform for "collecting and sharing publications that support experimental art practices".

      Photos by Far Afield's library.

27 October 2017: Cabaret at the Capella space, a public programme organised by the Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona in the context of their Joan Brossa exhibition. The Capella space was decorated with fragments of Antoni Hervàs "El Misterio de Caviria" scenography, presented only a year earlier at the other La Capella space as part of the 2016 BCN Producció season. The project was mentored by Latitudes. Following Hervàs’s interests in Barcelona’s dwindling cabaret scene, he invited Gilda Love and castanets master Juan de la Cruz "el Rosillo" (who sadly passed away a few months after) to interpret a moving repertoire of popular Spanish copla, against the backdrop of parts of his scenography. 



Gilda Love and castanets master Juan de la Cruz "el Rosillo". Photos by Dani Cantó/MACBA.

5 November 2017: The 1878 painting by Alfred Roll "The Old Quarryman" is exchanged with Alfred Smith's "The Grave Docks" (1884) in the Latitudes-curated exhibition "4.543 billion" at the CAPC musée. The show remains on view another two more months, until January 7, 2018.

Photo: Lysian Gauthier © Musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux.

Photo: Alice Cavender.

(Unframed) Alfred Smith's (Bordeaux, 1854–Paris, 1936) “Le Quai de la Grave” [The Grave Docks] (1884). Collection of the Musée des Beaux-Arts, Bordeaux.

15 November 2017: Study day at CAPC musée "The Return of the Earth. Ecologising Art History in the Anthropocene." With a keynote by science historian Jean-Baptiste Fressoz, and a conversation between artists Xavier Ribas and Ângela Ferreira—the latter both featured in the exhibition—the event convened by '4.543 billion'-curators Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna, saw art practice and historical research intertwining with environmental and geological narratives, and vice versa.

(Top) Left to right: Max Andrews, Xavier Ribas, Jean-Baptiste Fressoz and Ângela Ferreira during the debate. (Below) Ângela discussing her work in the exhibition. Photos (Above and below): Latitudes.

22 November 2017: Launch of Anna Moreno's "The Drowned Giant" publication at the Col·legi d'Arquitectes de Catalunya alongside architect and researcher Lluis A. Casanovas. Moreno's project is part of the BCN Producció 2017–18 programme of which Latitudes' is a jury member and mentor. 

Video of the presentation (in Catalan).

Photos (this and following): Pep Herrero / La Capella—Barcelona Producció 2017.
(Above) Photo: Anna Moreno.

Earlier that week we spent two intense mornings unpacking, hand spraying, numbering, inserting poster and booklet and re-packaging the limited edition of 300 vinyl records in the former Escola Massana, nearby La Capella. 

A short video on the project was screened on betevé tv (in Catalan, starting 04:24min).


Photos (Above and below): Latitudes.




1 December 2017: Latitudes introduces the documentary "Harald Szeemann. The Life of a Dreamer" premiered at Cinemes Girona as part of the first edition of Dart Festival 2017, the Festival of Documentary Cinema on Contemporary Art.


Photo: Latitudes.

9 December 2017: Mariana of Latitudes led the first "Parlem" [Let's talk] guided tour around the exhibition "Rosemarie Castoro. Focus at infinity", curated by Tanya Barson, MACBA's Chief Curator, a free event repeated on March 10 and March 31st.

Photo: Latitudes.

December 2017: Transition from Storify to Wakelet to archive all the social media stories related to Latitudes' projects.
Latitudes' Wakelet profile.

20 December 2017: Max Andrews of Latitudes (and Contributing Editor of frieze magazine) looks back at 2017 from Barcelona and beyond, at some art highlights from a tumultuous 2017, including Amie Siegel, Pierre Huyghe, Lúa Coderch, Francesc Torres, Adrià Julià, Jordi Mitjà, Eulàlia Rovira & Adrian Schindler, Joan Morey, and Claudia Pagès. 

2017 from Barcelona and beyond.

23 January 2018: Opening of the exhibition "Artengo2000" by Magda Vaz and Camille Orny at the sala petita of La Capella. This is the third and final Barcelona Producció project mentored by Latitudes.


(Above and below) View from "Artengo2000", an exhibition by Camille Orny and Magda Vaz at the Sala Petita in La Capella. Photo: Pep Herrero / La Capella.


23 January 2018: The online platform arteinformado.com publishes three artist recommendations by five Spanish-based curators. Mariana Cánepa of Latitudes selected Gerard Ortín, Martín Llavaneras and Anna Moreno.

25 January 2018: Print proofs of the forthcoming John Kørner's monograph published by Roulette Russe with texts by Oliver Basciano, Marie Nipper and Max Andrews' of Latitudes, published on the occasion of his recent mid-career retrospective "Altid Mange Problemer" at Kunsthal Charlottenborg in Copenhagen (17 June–13 August 2017).



2 February 2018: Roulette Russe publish an image of John Kørner's book hot off the press.




















9–10 February 2018: Trip to Montpellier to attend the opening of "Crash Test" at La Panacée/Centre d'art Contemporain MoCo.

16 February 2018: Max Andrews of Latitudes wrote a review of the show for frieze magazine published online and in the printed issue in April.

Installation piece by Alice Channer.
Work by Agnieszka Kurant (foreground) and Aude Pariset (background).

Detail of a vitrine piece by Bianca Bondi.
15 February 2018: Award ceremony of the 2017 Premis Ciutat de Barcelona, of which Mariana was a jury member in the Visual Arts category. Joan Morey was the awarded visual artist.

20–23 February 2018: Trip to ARCOmadrid fair, below some social media posts.





Photo: Roberto Ruiz.

Lola Lasurt presented ‘Donació’ (Donation) in the Galeria Joan Prats booth, a body of work produced for the ‘Composiciones’ commissioning series Latitudes curated for the Barcelona Gallery Weekend 2016. Lasurt was also exhibiting as part of La Casa Encendida's "Generación 2018".

22 February 2018: Max Andrews' review of Lúa Coderch's solo show "The girl with no door on her mouth" at àngels barcelona, is published online. The text is also be included in the printed issue in April. 
Review of Lúa Coderch's solo show "The girl with no door on her mouth" at àngels barcelona.

26 February 2018: After nearly two years in development, the sixth ‘Incidents (of Travel)dispatch from Yerevan, Armenia, is finally live! 

In her day-long tour Yerevan-born, San Diego-based curator and researcher Marianna Hovhannisyan extended the invitation to Vardan Kilichyan, Gohar Hosyan, and Anaida Verdyan, three students from the studio college at the National Center of Aesthetics. The purpose was to document transformed, disappeared, or permanently-closed art institutions in the city centre. The shared inquiry was based on how knowledge transmission and generational exchanges in the Armenian contemporary art field could be approached—particularly in terms of exploring the fragmented histories of its institutional work. As they were putting together the touches on this online version of the offline day, the studio-college itself closed down permanently at the end of 2017.

http://incidents.kadist.org/yerevan

2 March 2018: Book launch of John Kørner's monograph in Copenhagen. Published by Roulette Russe with texts by Oliver Basciano, Marie Nipper and Max Andrews.


 (Above and below). Courtesy Roulette Russe. Photos by Finn Wergel Dahlgren.


March 10 and 31, 2018: Second and third guided visits to Rosemarie Castoro's exhibition at MACBA led by Mariana Cánepa Luna of Latitudes.

MACBA's Instagram story announcing the talk.

March 20, 2018: Mariana Cánepa Luna of Latitudes reviews ‘Allora & Calzadilla’ at the Fundació Tàpies, Barcelona, for art-agenda."A piercing whistle punctuates the blaring of a trumpet. But in the columned central space of the Fundació Antoni Tàpies, the only visible instrument is a grand piano. For three days a week throughout the course of the exhibition, the instrument is played—and, one could say, worn—by a pianist who stands in a hole cut into its center."

Mariana Cánepa Luna of Latitudes reviews ‘Allora & Calzadilla’ at the Fundació Tàpies, Barcelona, for art-agenda.

The same day, we send the Spring newsletter to our contacts, in English and in Spanish.

12—14 April 2018: Three performances by Les Brontë, Quim Pujol and Eliana Beltrán over three consecutive evenings at La Capella, part of the BCN Producció 2017–18 programme of which Latitudes' is a jury member and mentor.



(Above and below) "Fine Cherry" performance by Les Brontë. Photos: Latitudes.
"Verde Croma" by Quim Pujol. Photos: Latitudes.
"Reading Room #3" by Eliana Beltrán. Photos: Latitudes.


1 May 2018: Max Andrews' profile on Madrid-based artist Teresa Solar Abboud goes online on frieze website.



28 April–4 May 2018: Trip to Berlin during the Gallery Weekend, and later to Cologne to visit Haegue Yang's mid-career retrospective ‘ETA 1994–2018’ at Museum Ludwig, and Ana Jotta's first solo exhibition in Germany at the Temporary Gallery. More on this blog post and on this Wakelet feed.





23–29 May 2018: Trip to London to visit +35 exhibitions, friends, and family – highlights below, full photo report here. Short day trip to Oxford's Pitt Rivers Museum (a favourite of ours), the Natural History Museum and Modern Art Oxford. 

 (Above and below) Cinthia Marcelle's "The Family in Disorder" (2018) at Museum and Modern Art Oxford.
(Above) The incredible main hall of the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford.
 (Above) The opening of Leonor Antunes's "a thousand realities from an original mark" at Marian Goodman.Polycarbonate and brass screens and rope sculptures. Each screen corresponds to the exact measurements of one of the glass panels in the Upper Lawn Pavilion in Wiltshire, built between 1959 and 1962 by the British architects Alison and Peter Smithson (1928-1993 and 1923-2003). 

 Fantastic assembly of Markus Lüperz's tent paintings at Michael Werner Gallery, which the artist painted at age 24 using distemper on canvas.
 Batia Suter's work at The Photographers' Galery. One of the nominees for the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2018, finally won by Luke Willis Thompson with his striking film "autoportrait".
   (Above) Antoni Hervàs studio at Gasworks during his 3-month residency.
   (Above) View of Trafalgar Square with Michael Rakowitz's "The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist" featuring on the Fourth Plinth commission.
(Above) Peter Gabriel discussing his during the internet interspecies symposium "The Shape of a Circle in the Mind of a Fish" curated by Lucia Pietroiusti and Filipa Ramos for the Serpentine Gallery at the London Zoo.

Things that make us very happy: when a friend travels half the world to find one of our publications (Amikejo catalogue by Mousse Publishing in 2011) in the library of TEORética in Costa Rica and shares a snapshot on Twitter. :-)

28 June 2018: The seventh ‘Incidents (of Travel)’ dispatch from Hobart, Tasmania, goes live on http://incidents.kadist.org/ On this occasion, the offline conversation took place between curator Camila Marambio and artist Lucy Bleach. We're also working on the eighth destination: Buenos Aires.
Throughout June–July 2018: Intense writing period in preparation of two forthcoming exhibitions: ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’ (Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna, opening on September 13 and, on view until October 14) and ‘COLLAPSE’, a solo exhibition by Joan Morey opening on September 19 over two floors of the Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats, with following chapters at the Centre d'Art Tecla Sala (23 November 2018–13 January 2019) and a new commission at a yet-undisclosed location (10 January 2019).


18–29 July 2018: Two days in Dublin followed by a 10-day residency in Askeaton, as part of Askeaton Contemporary Art's (ACA) thirteenth annual event "Welcome to the neighbourhood". In 2018 ACA invited artists Matt Calderwood, Jonny Lyons, Ruth Clinton and Niamh Moriarty, alongside curators Gareth Bell-Jones (Flat Time House, London) and Latitudes. More on this post.

Desmore castle undergoing restoration.
Artists and POW workers after the tour.
RUSAL Aughinish alumina plant from afar, this is the largest alumina refinery in Europe.
Group trip to Lismore Castle upper garden in County Waterford.
The gardens featured works by Franz West (above) and Rashid Johnson (below).

The Grange Stone circle.

During the residency, we learnt of the story of ‘the Pilgrim’, a merchant from Barcelona who arrived in Askeaton around 1767 and who lived out his life in the Franciscan friary, dying there in 1784. Digging further in the local library, we came across a 1984 article written by Tim Kelly in a back issue of the ABC News, Askeaton’s local publication of record. The story reveals a dramatic narrative bringing to life a cryptic inscription found in the cloister that reads “Beneath lies the Pilgrim’s body, who died January 17, 1784”. The tale involves an Italian, a Spaniard, and a morbid blood-hunt that links Barcelona with Askeaton and is read aloud by artist Carl Doran. 


Matt Calderwood's boat ready to sail on the River Deel.
Making of Jonny Lyons’ "Joyride" on the River Deel.
"Welcome to the neighbourhood" Open day.


August 2018: Aaaand we’re out of office! Kinda.

Save the following dates:

13 September, 6–9pm: Opening of ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’ at Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna. 


14 September, 6pm: Performance “One motif says to the other: I can’t take my eyes off you” by Adrian Schindler and Eulàlia Rovira. Followed by the artist lecture: “A Blow by Blow Account of Stonecarving in Oxford” by Sean Lynch. Part of the exhibition ‘Cream cheese and pretty ribbons!’ at Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna.

19 September, 19h: Opening of ‘Joan Morey. COLLAPSE’, Centre d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona - Fabra i Coats.




RELATED CONTENT:


2017 in 12 monthly Cover Stories

Another year has gone by!

Revisit some of Latitudespast–present–future–ongoing projects through our online archive of Monthly Cover Stories, a chance to focus on an artwork, article, event, film, exhibition, excursion or ongoing train of thoughts. 


Cover Story January 2017: "How open are open calls?", 4 January 2017

Cover Story February 2017: "The Dutch Assembly, five years on", 1 February 2017

Cover Story – March 2017: "Time travel with Jordan Wolfson", 1 March 2017

Cover Story – April 2017: "Banff Geologic Time", 3 April 2017

Cover Story – May 2017: "S is for Shale or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps", 1 May 2017 

Cover Story – June 2017: "Moth light—Absent Forms", 1 June 2017
Cover Story – July 2017: "4.543 billion", 3 July 2017 


Cover Story – August 2017: "Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern", 1 August 2017  


Cover Story – September 2017: "Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis'", 1 September 2017

Cover Story – October 2017: "Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier", 11 October 2017

Cover Story—November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
Cover Story—December 2017: "Tabet’s Tapline trajectory", 4 December 2017

RELATED CONTENT:
Latitudes' Cover Story archive,
Latitudes' writing archive,
Latitudes' newsletters.

Cover Story—October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier

October 2017 Monthly Cover Story on http://www.lttds.org


The October 2017 Monthly Cover Story "Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier" is now up on www.lttds.org – after this month it will be archived here

"We are looking for glimpses of life as it was over half a billion years ago. In sight of the snout of the Stanley Glacier in Kootenay National Park, lie deposits of Burgess Shale, a rock famous for its exceptional preservation of hitherto unknown, and frankly bizarre, soft-bodied marine creatures." Continue reading  

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities. 

RELATED CONTENT:

Sediments of the Geologic Time 4-week residency at the Banff Centre for Arts & Creativity




September 11, 2017:
Banff is a town located within Banff National Park in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, Alberta. Elevation: 1,383 m. We'll be spending four weeks at The Banff Centre, at the foot of Sleeping Buffalo Mountain (Tunnel Mountain) overlooking the Bow Valley. 


The programme conceived by Latitudes (Lead Faculty), and with the participation of Irish artist Sean Lynch as Guest Faculty, asked how a geologic lens might affect artistic and curatorial practice.

Participants: Justy Phillips & Margaret Woodward (A Published Event) based in Hobart; Semâ Bekirovic, based in Amsterdam; Caitlin Chaisson based in Vancouver; Becky Forsythe, based in Reykjavik; Chloe Hodge, based in London; Shane Krepakevich, based in Toronto; Caroline Loewen, based in Calgary; Penelope Smart, based in St. John's, Newfoundland; and Camila Sposati, based in São Paulo.



Views of the Banff Centre campus from the Vistas dining centre, the trees slowly starting to turn yellow.


 

Group photo of 'Geologic Time' 10 participants and Lead Faculty – participant Penelope Smart and Guest Faculty artist Sean Lynch are camera shy.


 

The door to Latitudes' Studio 317 in Glyde Hall.



Stunning views towards the Banff Springs Hotel and Sulphur Mountain from the GH 317 studio.



'Geologic Time' dedicated section in the library.



Campus tour with local legend Jim Olver, Customer Service at Banff Centre for Arts & Creativity, "passionate about river canoeing, geology, ski-touring & curling!"



September 16, 2017: Hike up to Tunnel Mountain, with panoramic views of the town, the Bow and Spray River valleys, and the Banff Springs Hotel site. The Stoney people (indigenous people of Western Canada) had long called the mountain "Sleeping Buffalo", as it resembles a sleeping buffalo when viewed from the north and east. The name Tunnel Mountain was given in 1882 when a proposed route for the Canadian Pacific Railway was to be blasted through. An alternate route costing much less money was put around the mountain, but the name Tunnel Mountain remained.



September 17, 2017: (Above and below) Hoodoos Trail descends to the river and follows it east and north under the cliff face of Tunnel Mountain. We were interrupted by a herd of elk (wapiti) so decided to turn around.





September 19, 2017: Lecture by the legendary Rocky Mountains expert Ben Gadd, 71 (pictured above), one of Canada’s better-known naturalists, geologists, and mountain writers.



Some of the rock specimens brought by Ben Gadd to his lecture – including some very fetching custom cushions sewn by his wife.



Ben Gadd during his Q&A with Geologic Time participants.



Gadd holding a 170-95 million-year-old coast mountains granite.



September 20, 2017: Morning visit to the archive of the Whyte Museum in Banff, a museum that collects, preserves, and exhibits all kinds of materials related to the cultural heritage of the Canadian Rocky Mountains.



September 20, 2017: Afternoon visit to Bankhead and Lake Minnewanka ("Water of the Spirits" in Nakoda).

Bankhead is an abandoned coal mining town in Banff National Park. The mine began in 1903 and ceased operations in 1922 when it was generally understood that mining had not been profitable. In 1926, many of the town's buildings were moved to Banff and Canmore. Bankhead was located at the foot of Cascade Mountain, which contains high-grade anthracite coal deposits. The Bankhead coal mine was operated by the Pacific Coal Company, a subsidiary of the Canadian Pacific Railway, which needed the coal to fuel its steam engines.





Air powered (fireless) locomotive on display at Bankhead, Alberta.



(Above) Rhubarb grows out of jet-black anthracite: high-grade coal formed 100 million years ago. At its peak in 1911, the Bankhead mine that once stood on this site at the base of Cascade Mountain employed 480 men. Its tunnels produced half a million tonnes of coal that year, destined for the furnaces of the Canadian Pacific Railway. Miners came mostly from Poland, Italy, Britain, and Russia, while a group of 90 Chinese men were brought to Canada to sort rock from coal for minimal wages. Unwelcome in the town, they set up on the far side of the slag heaps, where they made a shanty town from scrap wood. They also created a kitchen garden, where they cultivated, among other plants, the hardy rhubarb that still thrives today.

Apart from it being forbidden to remove plants from what has been a part of Banff National Park since its designation in 1930, the whole site is contaminated with dioxins from waste oil. So no crumble today.



'Wave Sound' (2017) piece by Anishinaabe artist Rebecca Belmore commissioned by @landmarksreperes2017



Rocky Mountains beauty by Lake Minnewanka.



A Jeff Wall-esque shot of the group by Lake Minnewanka.



September 21, 2017: (Above and below) Geology tour around campus with Jim Olver (Director of Customer Service, Banff Centre) "reading" the campus, its formations and fossils. Olver has worked at the Banff Centre for 35 years.





(A
bove) A well rounded composite rock and (below) finding rocks around campus.


September 23, 2017: (below and following six) Stunning Bow Lake hike with independent curator and BICI resident, Heidi Rabben.













September 24, 2017: (Below) Visual Arts + Digital department excursion to Lake Louise, named 'Lake of the Little Fishes' by the Stoney Nakota First Nations people.

Lake Louise's impressive emerald colour of the water is due to the silt-like rock flour continually being carried into the lake by melt-water from the surrounding glaciers. The tiny and uniform particles become suspended in the water, refracting blue and green wavelengths of light.









September 25, 2017: (Below) Monday weekly meeting and afternoon group seminar led by Caroline Loewen, Shane Krepakevich and Semâ Bekirovic around Don McKay's essay “Ediacaran & Anthropocene: poetry as a reader of deep time” inducing imaginative speculation through geopoetry. Guest Faculty
Sean Lynch arrives from Ireland.





September 26, 2017: (Below) Afternoon lecture by "Geologic Time" Guest Faculty Sean Lynch on the value of conversations, Bardic traditions, stone-carvers James and John O'Shea, and fried chicken.





September 27, 2017: (Below) 1:1 sessions with Sean Lynch and a bit of time to dig into the library and read the beautifully written book "The Writing of Stones" by Roger Caillois (1970) with an introduction by Marguerite Yourcenar: "Those fusions, pressures, ruptures, imprints of matter in matter have left traces inside and out which sometimes almost exactly resemble writing and which actually do transcribe events from millions of years ago."





September 28, 2017: Evening seminar in the Banff Upper Hot Springs, elevated at 1,585 meters it's the highest hot water bathing in Canada.



September 29, 2017: (Below) "Geologic Time" hike to the Stanley Glacier in the Kootenay National Park in British Columbia, led by guides Rona Schneberger and Jane Whitney. At the base of Mount Stanley, we turned over some rocks and found 505-million-year-old Burgess Shale trilobites, soft-body fossils from the Eldon formation.





















September 30, 2017: Second screening night led by Sean Lynch.

 
October 2, 2017: (Below) Final week of the programme. Last Monday weekly meeting, this time under the snow. Third and final afternoon workshop led by 'Geologic timers' Becky Forsythe, Caitlin Chaisson and Chloe Hodge around Hito Steyerl's text "In Free Fall: A Thought Experiment on vertical perspective" (e-flux journal #24, April 2011).






October 3 and 4, 2017: Final 1:1 conversations with participants, and open studios by the Independent artists.
 
October 5, 2017, 5—7pm: (photos below) The Open event of
Geologic Time in the library, followed by a visit to Illuminations, "a participative artwork experience by Sarah Fuller, Moment Factory and Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity".

The closing event of Geologic Time was conceived as a two-hour infiltration into the pages, shelves, and display possibilities of The Banff Centre library. Featuring storytelling, documentation, annotation, sculpture, video, conversation and other live situations, the event presented some sediments of the ten participants’ ongoing research and lithic collaborations. Pdf of the event programme here.


Caitlin Chaisson has been researching a former experimental farm station in Agassiz, British Columbia, and a forgotten centennial time capsule buried under a granite marker there. Caitlin also presented a cut-and-paste station on the table next to the photocopier, and a display for the tall vitrine just behind it. If you plan on attending the Agassiz Fall Fair and Corn Festival around September 14, 2018, Caitlin will be there, lending an extra hand in the rocky relay that is the shape of time. Pickles may be involved. 

Meanwhile read her reflections on her "Geologic Time" experience.


Also on the main floor, Chloe Hodge made an arrangement of book spreads and purloined texts on a large desk on the side of the library that faces Sulphur Mountain. From 1956–1981 the latter peak was the site of a high altitude geophysical laboratory, a Cosmic Ray Station. Chloe’s presentation filters the macro-perspective enabled by this buoyant micro-history through into a speculative research-workshop around freefall, the loss of perspective, and groundlessness. 



Becky Forsythe has been making plans for a future exhibition inspired by the artist and naturalist known as Petra, who spent decades collecting stones and minerals from the mountains in Stöðvarfjörður, Iceland. Camila Sposati has been reflecting on the various “extractions” of a residency and exhibition that took place in the Amazon in 2004, gradually turning them into a script for a play. Becky and Camila are collaborating for this event on a procedural work using the library photocopier on the main floor (Receding Agate and Rhodochrosite). On the upper floor, they present two further collaborations via the media of “chairs and view” – Looking at the mountains and The mountain at my back – that recontextualize the interior space with respect to vistas of Mt Bourgeau, the Massive Range, Pilot Mountain, and so on.


Chloe is also one of eight 'Geologic Time' narrators whose readings can be heard through speakers on the main floor. What we are hearing are excerpts from Lost Rocks (2017–21), a growing library of short fiction books commissioned by Justy Phillips & Margaret Woodward (A Published Event). Described by the Hobart-based duo as “an accumulative event of mineralogical, metaphysical and metallurgical telling”, the books that have come into the world to date have been incorporated into the library’s holdings alongside a glossary and can be found in the geology section upstairs.



Caroline Loewen has put together documentation at the top of the stairs, along the narrow “bar”. Caroline delves deep into the story of sandstone in Alberta, a rock that gained widespread favour for building and decorative use following Calgary’s Great Fire of 1886. The black-and-brown Rundle Rock that was once quarried at the base of Banff-Centre-neighbour Mount Rundle and was used extensively in creating the Banff Springs Hotel also joins a conversation that anticipates an exhibition scheduled for next summer at Lougheed House in Calgary. (The same Lougheed dynasty lends its name to the Jeanne and Peter Lougheed Building (JPL), the Banff Centre’s media headquarters.) 



For these two hours in the library Semâ Bekirovic employed a number of external hard drives to act as pedestals for small stones. How many terabytes can a hunk of rock hold? What fragments of data detritus, chunks and grains of documents, broken off images, or weathered files, might be read and written, stored or retrieved? We might ponder this as we stand by the “bar” looking towards Sulphur Mountain. 


An audio narration drafted by Penelope Smart was also heard on the upper floor via a Bluetooth speaker in the stacks, near “memoirs and narrative”. Here, an image of the exquisite marble bust by Giovanni Strazza animated Penny’s writing during the last weeks. It came to St.John’s, Newfoundland, in 1856. Ring the bell to the right of the main door of the Presentation Convent adjoining the Basilica in St.John’s and maybe one of the sisters will let you see it.



Shane Krepakevich has been prototyping an exhibition display system, or running a 1:1 scale artist-run research institute, in his studio overlooking Mike MacDonald’s butterfly garden. Shane has been thinking about design impulses, transparency, support structures, and the refraction of light through glass, sometimes during the hours he has spent sanding and polishing a series of bronze paperweights, or prospecting the library for textual gems. For the library presentation, Shane made 8.5"×11" arrangements of found sentences, printed them, and then squirrelled them away inside selected library books, alongside images he has photocopied for his display system project.



A number of commemorative posters by Latitudes are presented in the meeting room upstairs. These mark some of the excursions and talks that have formed a part of the last weeks through the motif of the human hand as a geologic scale device. 



Finally, if we ever need reminding about the mystery and power of geological formations, 'Picnic at Hanging Rock', the 1975 Australian film directed by Peter Weir, was screened on a monitor on the upper floor.

Special thanks to Mark Black, Brandy Dahrouge, Peta Rake, and Angela Schenstead. 

October 6, 2017: Exit interviews, pack up, and departures.

'Geologic Time' participants: Justy Phillips & Margaret Woodward (A Published Event), based in Hobart; Semâ Bekirovic, based in Amsterdam; Caitlin Chaisson based in Vancouver; Becky Forsythe, based in Reykjavik; Chloe Hodge, based in London; Shane Krepakevich, based in Toronto; Caroline Loewen, based in Calgary; Penelope Smart, based in St. John’s, Newfoundland; and Camila Sposati, based in Sao Paulo.

'Geologic Time' was a residency programme of the Banff International Curatorial Institute (BICI), organised by the Banff Centre for Art and Creativity in Alberta, Canada. The 2017 residency took place between September 11–October 6 within the framework of the group exhibition 4.543 billion. The matter of matter curated by Latitudes at CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux, France, on view until January 7, 2018.


RELATED CONTENT:

“Thinking with” geology at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity


Greetings from the Banff Centre in the Canadian Rockies!

For the next four weeks, Latitudes will be Lead Faculty of the residency programme "Geologic Time" organised by the Banff International Curatorial Institute (BICI) at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity

Curators, artists and writers Justy Phillips & Margaret Woodward (A Published Event) based in Hobart; Sema Bekirovic, based in Amsterdam; Caitlin Chaisson based in Vancouver; Becky Forsythe, based in Reykjavik; Chloe Hodge, based in London; Shane Krepakevich, based in Toronto; Caroline Loewen, based in Calgary; Penelope Smart, based in St. John's, Newfoundland; and Camila Sposati, based in Sao Paulo, are here for a month to discuss geological formations and timescales, while speculating about a more expansive and longer-term view of art, exhibitions, and their institutions. 

Through fieldwork, seminars, and independent study, 'Geologic Time' we will be thinking with geology as a potential way to consider non-conventional, deep-time perspectives on curating, exhibition making, programming, and fieldwork within contemporary art.

Programme on Banff's website.

On September 12, 4 pm, Latitudes will give a lecture presenting their practice at the Jeanne & Peter Lougheed Building 204. Everyone is welcome!

"Geologic Time" is a thematic residency programme of the Banff International Curatorial Institute (BICI), Visual + Digital Arts organised by the Banff Centre for Art and Creativity in Alberta, Canada. Within the framework of the residency, Latitudes curated the group exhibition "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux, France, on view until January 7, 2018.  


Entrance to one of the two wings of the exhibition "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux, France, on view until January 7, 2018. Photo: Latitudes / RK.

RELATED CONTENT:

"Geologic Time" thematic residency programme at the Banff Centre for Art and Creativity in Alberta, Canada

Julius von Schoppe (1795–1868), Illustration of giant stone near the Rauenschen Mountains near Furstenwalde, 1827, Lithograph, von Tempeltey.

Between September 11 and October 6, 2017, ten artists, researchers, writers and curators from around the world will ponder geological formations and stratigraphy, minerals, and resource extraction to speculate about a more expansive, slower and longer-term view of art, exhibitions, and institutions. The spectacular Rocky Mountains will not only be the backdrop, but the active participants.

Through
fieldwork, seminars, and independent study, 'Geologic Time' participants will be “thinking with” geology (beyond the depiction of landscape) as a potential way to consider non-conventional, deep-time perspectives on curating, exhibition making, programming, and fieldwork within contemporary art. 

Lead faculty: Latitudes  
Guest Faculty: Sean Lynch

"Geologic Time" is a thematic residency programme of the Banff International Curatorial Institute, Visual + Digital Arts organised by the Banff Centre for Art and Creativity in Alberta, Canada. Within the framework of the residency Latitudes curated the group exhibition "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux, France, on view until January 7, 2018.   


View of the Banff Centre campus. Photo: Latitudes.

RELATED CONTENT:

  • "4.543 billion. The matter of matter" in pictures.
  • Guest Faculty of the Thematic Residency 'Blueprint for Happiness' at The Banff Centre, Canada, 27 July–8 August 2015 16 July 2015
  • Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
  • Cover Story December 2016: Ten years ago – Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook 5 December 2016 
  • Cover Story – May 2016: Material histories – spilling the beans at the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux 10 May 2016.
  • Second research trip to Bordeaux 16 July 2016 

Cover Story – April 2017: "Banff Geologic Time"

The April 2017 Monthly Cover Story "Banff Geologic Time" is now up on www.lttds.org after April it will be archived here.  

"Johann Wolfgang von Goethe spent a great deal of time worrying about stones. Not least, he was troubled by a giant 700-tonne granite rock that lay near the otherwise flat land near Berlin. What on earth was this alien to the region’s geology doing there? Goethe’s realisation that the strange mineral object must have been displaced by glaciers helped instigate the theory of ice ages and deep time. Stone provokes us to recalibrate our concept of the past and our place in the world. Rock is radical." Continue reading by clicking the grey bar underneath the image.

We remind artists, researchers, cultural writers and curators interested in slower and longer-term view of art, exhibitions, and their institutions (as well as rocks of course!) that the call for the Banff thematic residency programme "Geologic Time" (September 11–October 6, 2017) led by Latitudes and artists Sean Lynch as Guest Faculty, is open until May 24 (11:59pm MST).




Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities, and are archived here.

Related content:

Latitudes' "out of office" 2014–2015 season

It's that end-of-the-season time of the year again. It has become a tradition for Latitudes (see the 2008-9, 2009-10, 2010-11, 2011-12, 2012–13, 2013–14 posts) to mark the summer break, not by presenting a written memo of activities or a financial statement, but with a 'behind the scenes' post filled with photos revisiting moments from the year gone by. So here are some glimpses from September 2014 to August 2015.

Slowing down is rather relative this Summer, as at the end of July we embarked on a two-week trip to The Banff Centre in Canada to be Guest Faculty of one of its thematic residencies, 'Blueprint for Happiness' led by British artists Heather & Ivan Morison. At the end of August, we will be in residency at Kadist Art Foundation in San Francisco for another two weeks. 

Milestones during the first part of 2015 were two-fold: after months of technical tweaking and editorial wrangling, we launched our newly designed website in February and secondly, this Spring Latitudes celebrated its 10th anniversary.

Have a great holiday, más en septiembre! 

7 October 2014: Latitudes hosted the second year students of the MA Curating Contemporary Art at the Royal College of Art, London, and took the opportunity of presenting and reflecting on our collaborations with three Catalan artists – Martí Anson, Ignasi Aballí and Francesc Ruiz
 Francesc Ruiz presenting his work to the RCA students.

Trip reporting: We reported from the field including at Madrid's Apertura in September, London's Frieze week in October, David Jablonowski's "Hype Cycle" at Fons Welters during Amsterdam's Art Weekend in November, and from Bordeaux in January, to Bari in May.

Writing: This year Max Andrews has joined Frieze as Contributing Editor – where he has been writing since 2004. His writing has been more visible in recent months as Frieze have published reviews on Maria Thereza Alves at CAAC in Sevilla, the group show "What cannot be used is forgotten" at CAPC Bordeaux, a profile of Nicholas Mangan and a review of the Spanish and Latin American Pavilions at the Venice Biennale. Mariana Cánepa Luna also published an interview with Mangan in Mousse Magazine last February.

New website: Our homemade website finally saw the light of day in February. As explained in this post, the website features new elements such as the 'Cover Story' (more on that in the next paragraph), sliding photo galleries, a tidied-up sidebar with a calendar of events, tags to filter projects by 'year' or 'exhibition', etc.

'Cover Story': More writing has emerged through the new monthly section "Cover Story" on our home page (check out the archive of this section):

March 2015: Focused on a single artwork: Wilfredo Prieto's ‘Grasa, jabón y plátano’ (2006); 

April 2015: Revisited a peculiar site: the Connaught Road West flyover, in Hong Kong;


April 2015 Cover Story.

May 2015: Honoured two artistazos: Lawrence Weiner and Sergi Aguilar and a whisky-enhanced chat on the Barcelona shore in October 2008; 


June 2015: Visited Ignasi Aballí at his Raval studio.

Summer 2015: Orbited around Australian artist Nicholas Mangan, an artist with whom Latitudes just did an in conversation in the context of his solo exhibition "Ancient Lights" at Chisenhale, London and whose work has been the focus in Max Andrews' Frieze text as well as in Mariana Cánepa Luna's interview in the February-March issue of Mousse Magazine


 Summer 2015 Cover Story (plus the archive here).

26 February, ARCOmadrid: On jury duty visiting the galleries participating in the #Opening section of the art fair, in order to select its best stand. The award was given to Barcelona-based gallery etHALL which presented works by Martin Vitaliti and Sergio Prego.

 

Spring, celebration time! Later in May we celebrated our 10th anniversary (well, officially it was in April!) launching a series of limited editions in the form of tote bags by four artists that have a special place in our hearts and with whom we have collaborated with in the past: Lawrence Weiner (New York, 1942), Haegue Yang (Seoul, 1971), Ignasi Aballí (Barcelona, 1958) and Mariana Castillo Deball (Mexico City, 1975). Below is a glimpse from the making of the tote bags at Print Workers Barcelona, and here's where you can place your order.
 Photolith design for the tote bag by Haegue Yang – realised in collaboration with OK-RM. 
 Silkscreen process of Lawrence Weiner's design. Photo: Print Workers.
 Silkscreening Ignasi Aballí's tote. Photo: Print Workers.
 Silkscreening Mariana Castillo Deball tote. Photo: Print Workers.
 Silkscreening the credit for each bag in the inside pocket. Photo: Print Workers.
Homemade photo studio documenting the totes. Results of the photo shoot here.

9–13 May 2015: After an intense week of Biennale overdose in Venice, we traveled to Bari to join Vessel and MADA's 2015 International Curatorial Retreat as two of its tutors. The week was far from being a retreat, it was more like an "intensive" – though it certainly was a "treat". Highly interesting debates and conversations on-and-off the scheduled activities of lectures and break-out sessions emerged in places such as a cave or in the nearby town Monopoli – no direct link to the property trading board game. Here a report from fellow tutor Dr. Alexandra Ross
  
 Visiting the market. Photo: Piero Percoco.
Market stall selling tomatoes of all kinds and origins.
 Chef Boris Portnoy doing some dinner prep at Doppelgaenger gallery/home.
 Due to a fire in Rome's airport, our flight was cancelled and we had to rearrange our travel, spending another day in Bari. We therefore visited (we were in fact their only visitors) the Palazzo dell'Acquedotto Pugliese di Bari, decorated by roman designer Duilio Cambellotti
A food detour to purchase delightful spicy rucola in the Mercato ex Manifattura Bari, in the Quartiere Libertà.


3–5 June 2015: Max Andrews participated in the annual 'Invest Conference 2015' organised by Stroom den Haag, in The Hague, consisting of "an incentive for the artistic development of recently graduated artists who have received the PRO Invest subsidy in the year before. A group of ten international curators is asked to visit these artists in their studios and meet with the art scene of The Hague." 
  Above (visiting Machteld Rullens) and following photographs by Myung Feyen. Courtesy Stroom den Haag.

7 July 2015: For our last public event of the year we joined Melbourne artist Nicholas Mangan for an in conversation in the context of his solo show 'Ancient Lights' that opened a few days earlier at Chisenhale Gallery in London. Mint and Lime Films video documented the talk – watch it from Chisenhale's website / Vimeo.

Vinyl listing the exhibition events.
 (Above) Photos by Manuela Barczewski.


27 July–7 August 2015: Guest Faculty of the Thematic Residency 'Blueprint for Happiness' at The Banff Centre, Canada. We joined the group in the middle two weeks of the six week programme led by British artists Heather and Ivan Morison

View of The Banff Centre from our bedroom in Lloyd Hall.
Banff TV announcing Latitudes' talk on 28 July, 4pm. 

 Blueprint for Happiness' participants.
 Views from Latitudes' studio in the Jeanne & Peter Lougheed Building.
 Studio visit with "Blueprint for Happiness" participant Vanessa Kwan.
 Studio visit with "Blueprint for Happiness" participant Robert Cram.
Inevitable photo of a deer walking around Banff.
Stunning evening sunset over the Bow River after a storm with a double rainbow.

While in Banff, Latitudes led three seminars bringing forward a series of case studies as well as focussing on a number of artists whose practice has dealt with public space in different geographical contexts. We also undertook studio visits with each of the 11 resident artists, and participated in a field trip to Calgary to visit the HQ of art construction company Heavy Industries and the Esker Foundation Contemporary Art Gallery


 (School) Field trip to Calgary to visit Heavy Industries fabricators and the Esker Foundation. 
 Even though the school bus seats were no longer in scale to our adult bodies, interesting chats happened over the 2 hours of each trajectory.

On Sunday 2 August, Latitudes hosted a closed-door evening film programme screening works by Spanish artist Emilio Moreno, Irish artist Sean Lynch and Australian artist Nicholas Mangan. The three films share a focus on public sculptures, monuments or buildings that have been displaced from their original context. 

 Flicking through some of the 4,000 artist books at Banff library.

Most of this past months' activity has been invested in preparing for 2015–16 projects: Firstly, 'Compositions' a series of five artistic interventions by six artists active in the Barcelona art scene: David Bestué (Barcelona, 1980. Lives in Barcelona); Dora García (Valladolid, 1965. Lives in Barcelona), Jordi Mitjà (Figueres, 1970. Lives between Lladó and Banyoles); Rasmus Nilausen (Copenhagen, 1980. Lives in Barcelona) & Pere Llobera (Barcelona, 1970. Lives in Barcelona) and Daniel Steegmann Mangrané (Barcelona, 1977. Lives in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), which will take place in the context of the first Barcelona Gallery Weekend (1–4 October 2015). 

Façade of Cosme Toda in L'Hospitalet municipality (Barcelona) part of a 1920s factory complex where David Bestué will present his intervention in the context of the first Barcelona Gallery Weekend, 1–4 October 2015.
Site visit to the Umbracle with Daniel Steegmann Mangrané.


Secondly, we've been working on the forthcoming solo exhibition of Venezuelan-born, Barcelona-based artist José Antonio Hernández-Díez which will be on view at La Capella MACBA from March 2016. Onwards!


Digging through documentation in MACBA library in preparation for José Antonio Hernández-Díez exhibition.

RELATED CONTENT:

Latitudes 'Out of office' 2013–14, 31 July 2014;
Latitudes' "out of office" photo album, 2012–2013 season, 31 July 2013;
Latitudes' "out of office" photo album 2011–2012, 31 July 2012;
Latitudes 'out of office' photo album 2010–11 season, 1 August 2011;
Latitudes 'out of office' photo album 2009–10 season, 30 July 2010;
Latitudes' "out of office" photo album 2008-9, 30 July 2009.


This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Latitudes publications acquired by the Paul D. Fleck Library & Archives, The Banff Centre

The Paul D. Fleck Library & Archives is on the second floor of the Kinnear Centre building at The Banff Centre.
Views from the Paul D. Fleck Library & Archives.

We are delighted that a large selection of Latitudes'-edited publications is now available for public consultation at the Paul D. Fleck Library and Archives in The Banff Centre, Banff, Canada. Banff becomes the second location to host the set of Latitudes’s publications, which are also available for reference at the Library of the MACBA Study Centre, Barcelona.


Latitudes publications and others from the reading list of the 'Blueprint for Happiness' Thematic Residency, featured shelf at the Banff Library.


The following publications can be found in Banff's library online catalogue:

Amikejo
Catalogue of the exhibition series, Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Castilla y León (MUSAC), León
April 2012

United Alternative Energies
Christina Hemauer & Roman Keller
Catalogue of the exhibition, Aarhus Art Building, Centre for Contemporary Art, Århus
January 2012

Campus
Catalogue of the project, Espai Cultural Caja Madrid, Barcelona
July 2011


Martí Anson, Mataró Chauffeur Service
Catalogue of the project, 'No Soul For Sale', Tate Modern, London
January 2011


Portscapes
Catalogue of the commission series and exhibition 'Portscapes', Port of Rotterdam / Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam
February 2010

The Last Newspaper
Catalogue of the exhibition 'The Last Newspaper', New Museum, New York
October–December 2010

Simon Fujiwara: The Incest Museum–A Guide
Artist book published in the context of the exhibition 'Provenances', Umberto di Marino Arte Contemporaneo, Naples
May 2009

Ignasi Aballí: 没有,有 Nothing, or Something
Catalogue of the exhibition, Suitcase Art Projects, Beijing
July 2009


Greenwashing. Ambiente: Pericoli, Promesse e Perplessità (Greenwashing. Environment: Perils, Promises and Perplexities)
Catalogue of the exhibition, Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin
February 2008


Lawrence Weiner: THE CREST OF A WAVE
Booklet of the exhibition, Fundació Suñol, Barcelona
October 2008


Ecology, Luxury & Degradation
UOVO #14
Summer 2007

  
LAND, ART: A Cultural Ecology Handbook

RSA and Arts Council England
December 2006


Book shelves at the Paul D. Fleck Library & Archives.

RELATED CONTENT:

Where to find the publications edited by Latitudes? 22 April 2012



This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org 


Guest Faculty of the Thematic Residency 'Blueprint for Happiness' at The Banff Centre, Canada, 27 July–8 August 2015

(First) Views from the Vistas restaurant in the Sally Broden Building; (below) View from the Lloyd Hall building.

As Guest Faculty of the Visual + Digital Art thematic residencyBlueprint for Happiness’ – a five week programme starting July 13 led by British artists Heather and Ivan Morison – Latitudes will join the group in the middle two weeks of the programme (27 July–7 August). 

 Participants of the Blueprint for Happiness Thematic Residency.

 Some art-as-research tips for reference on one of the Glyde Hall fridges.

In Banff, Latitudes will lead a series of focused workshops bringing forward a series of case studies of (realised and unrealised) projects they have worked on as well as focusing on a number of artists whose practice has dealt with issues around public space in different geographical contexts. 

Latitudes will also undertake studio visits with each of the 11 resident artists, participate in field trips and organise a closed-door evening film programme with films by Spanish artist Emilio Moreno, Irish artist Sean Lynch and Australian artist Nicholas Mangan. The three films share a focus on public sculptures, monuments or buildings that have been displaced from their original context.


Ignasi Aballí, AM-4826 Digital Anemometer from Taking Measures (2009). Installation of 9 measuring devices. Courtesy of the artist and Galería Estrany–De la Mota, Barcelona.

Tuesday 28 July 2015, 16–17:30h: Public Lecture, Presentation of Latitudes’ curatorial practice as part of the Visual Art Lecture Series. Jeanne and Peter Lougheed Building, 204. Free event.
 
For the Public Lecture Latitudes will forgo a chronological account of its projects of the last decade, and instead attempt various transects through its curatorial projects determined by raw materials and their transformation. From the zinc which led to an Esperanto micro-nation, to the air of a Beijing shopping centre, or the dead trees of printed news, Latitudes will try and join some traits and ideas around extractive modernity, obsolescence and the carbon cycle.


 Music huts around campus.
 The creek around The Banff Centre.

RELATED CONTENT:

In conversation with the artist Nicholas Mangan at Chisenhale Gallery, London, 7 July 2015, 19h. 22 June 2015


Tutors of the 2015 International Curatorial Retreat, 9–13 May, Bari (Italy) 17 May 2015





This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
All photos:
Latitudes | www.lttds.org 

Founded in 2005 by Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna, Latitudes is a curatorial office based in Barcelona, Spain, that works internationally across contemporary art practices.

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2005—2019