Longitudes

Cover Story—Summer 2019: Francesc Ruiz’s Brexit Bristol sequel, ten years ago

Latitudes' homepage www.lttds.org

The July 2019 monthly Cover Story ‘Francesc Ruiz’s Brexit Bristol sequel, ten years ago’ is now up on Latitudes' homepage: www.lttds.org

The British political system has collapsed… Once the high streets merely declined with their pound shops, gold traders, and bargain basements… Then they slumped as the "major downturn" began to bite… Yet as the economy finally plunged into the devastating recession, countless properties and businesses across the city of Bristol already lay in ruins… Widespread rioting and looting… Shortages of food and medicines… Spiralling inflation rates and a currency crash… The troops now struggle to enforce the state of emergency… The traitors flock to the southern ports, desperately seeking safe passage to Brussels…

→ Continue reading
→ After this month it will be archived here.


Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage featuring past, present or forthcoming projects, research, texts, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.


RELATED CONTENT:


Lawrence Weiner tote bag and sugar sachets at the McManus Museum and Galleries in Dundee

Following on our earlier post from October 26, 2018 announcing our donation of Lawrence Weiner's limited edition tote bag to Tate Archive, we now share some images of its presentation as part of Tate's "ARTIST ROOMS: Lawrence Weiner" currently on view at the McManus Museum and Galleries in Dundee, Scotland, until February 17, 2019.

Photo: Lawrence Weiner. ARTIST ROOMS. National Galleries of Scotland and Tate. ©Lawrence Weiner.

The Dundee presentation includes the limited edition tote bag and three sugar sachets with the striking typographic rendition of the statement "A CLOTH OF COTTON WRAPPED AROUND A HORSESHOE OF IRON TOSSED UPON THE CREST OF A WAVE" in Catalan, Spanish, and English, the latter first commissioned in 2008 as part of Weiner's solo exhibition at the Fundació Suñol, Barcelona.

Thank you Valentina Ravaglia (Assistant Curator, Exhibitions & Displays, Tate Modern) for facilitating the inclusion of these ephemera into Tate's collection, and to Lili Bartholomew (Curatorial Assistant, Leisure and Culture Dundee) for liaising from Dundee and sharing the images.


Photo: Creative Learning Team McManus.

RELATED CONTENT:

Cover Story—February 2018: Paradise, Promises and Perplexities


Latitudes' home page www.lttds.org 

The February 2018 Monthly Cover Story "Paradise, Promises and Perplexities" is now up on www.lttds.org – after this month it will be archived here.

"This month marks ten years since the opening of Greenwashing, curated by Latitudes and Ilaria Bonacossa. Subtitled Environment: Perils, Promises and Perplexities, this exhibition at the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin, addressed the melding of corporate agendas and individual ethics in the wake of the exhaustion of traditional environmentalism." Continue reading

Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, writing, artworks, exhibitions, films, objects or field trips related to our curatorial activities.

RELATED CONTENT:


Archive of Monthly Cover Stories
Cover Story – January 2018: I'll be there for you, 2 January 2018
Cover Story – December 2017: "Tabet's Tapline trajectory", 4 December 2017
Cover Story – November 2017: "Mining negative monuments: Ângela Ferreira, Stone Free, and The Return of the Earth", 1 November 2017
Cover Story – October 2017: Geologic Time at Stanley Glacier 11 October 2017
Cover Story – September 2017: Dark Disruption. David Mutiloa's 'Synthesis' 1 September 2017
Cover Story – August 2017: Walden 7; or, life in Sant Just Desvern 1 August 2017
Cover Story – July 2017: 4.543 billion 3 July 2017
Cover Story – June 2017: Month Light–Absent Forms 1 June 2017
Cover Story – May 2017: S is for Shale, or Stuart; W is for Waterfall, or Whipps 1 May 2017
Cover Story – April 2017: Banff Geologic Time 3 April 2017
Cover Story – March 2017: Time travel with Jordan Wolfson 1 March 2017
Cover Story — February 2017: The Dutch Assembly, five years on 1 February 2017
Cover Story – January 2017: How open are open calls? 4 January 2017


    Cover Story – December 2016: Ten years ago – Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook


    The December Monthly Cover Story is now up on www.lttds.org after this month it will be archived here

    "The publication Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook is ten years old. Commissioned by the Arts & Ecology programme of The Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures & Commerce (RSA), in partnership with Arts Council England, this book was one of Latitudes’s first projects. Through the inspirational contributions of people as varied as Lucy Lippard, Stephanie Smith, Amy Balkin, or the late Wangari Maathai – to mention just a few – the compendium charted the twin legacies of Land Art and the environmental movement while proposing how the critical acuity of art might remain relevant in the face of the dramatic ecological consequences of human activity. The research and reflection involved set Latitudes on a course that led to several further projects engaging with ecology, explicitly or otherwise." Continue reading...

    Cover Stories' are published on a monthly basis on Latitudes' homepage and feature past, present or forthcoming projects, research, exhibitions and field trips related to our activities.  

    Related content:

    30% off Latitudes' tote bag limited editions

     

    In Spring 2015 Latitudes launched a limited edition of tote bags to mark its 10th anniversary. These four specially commissioned silkscreened tote bags feature designs by four artists with whom Latitudes has collaborated over the past decade: Lawrence Weiner (New York, 1942), Haegue Yang (Seoul, 1971), Ignasi Aballí (Barcelona, 1958) and Mariana Castillo Deball (Mexico City, 1975).

    We are now offering a 30% discount, a special sale price of 35 Euros per tote (+shipping) valid throughout December 2016 (usually €50 + shipping). 

    Edition: 35 + 5 A.P. (Haegue Yang's tote is ed. 20 + 10 AP)
    Measurements: 38 high × 40 width × 14 base (in cm)
    Fabric: 475 gsm natural chlorine-free cotton canvas
    Strap: Adjustable Capacity: 15 litres
    Weight: 420 gr aprox.
     

    Each bag is made from natural durable cotton canvas with a reinforced base. They feature a press-stud closure, an internal pocket with a zip (never loose your keys again!), an adjustable shoulder strap, as well as smaller handles for carrying like a briefcase.

    Each bag have been hand silkscreened in Print Workers, Barcelona; this is an artisanal process and each printing results in slight variations.

    Place your order(s) from our website. Here some nice pics of our happy customers with their totes:





    Related content:


    Latitudes contribution to Kadist Art Foundation's 'One Sentence Exhibition'


    To visit the exhibition,
    please check ose.kadist.org

    Recognizing that not everyone can visit Kadist Art Foundation venues in Paris or San Francisco, Kadist recently inaugurated a series of online projects with artists and curators around the world.

    First of these initiatives is the One Sentence Exhibition (OSE), for which the foundation invites curators to write or choose a single sentence, making each word in the sentence a hyperlink to an image, video, text or website. As a result, the One Sentence Exhibition becomes a compact architecture, accompanying the reader as they explore far-reaching corners of the internet. 

    Following on from the contributions by Rudolf Frieling (Media Arts Curator at SFMOMA) and Nato Thompson (Chief Curator at Creative Time) to OSE series, Latitudes has chosen the statement "A CLOTH OF COTTON WRAPPED AROUND A HORSESHOE OF IRON TOSSED UPON THE CREST OF A WAVE" by Lawrence Weiner in English, Spanish and Catalan, commissioned for his 2008 solo exhibition THE CREST OF A WAVE at the Fundació Suñol in Barcelona.

    Sugar packets where freely distributed during the duration of the exhibition around Barcelona. Photo: Pierre-Jean Moulis.

    Originally distributed as a free ephemeral sculpture on 300,000 sugar sachets and presented on the wall of the exhibition space, Weiner’s striking typographic rendition of the statement triggers a chronicle of mercantile, maritime and equestrian power, of trade and occupation, of spheres of influence and change, a memory of matter and of language.
     
    Lawrence Weiner tote bag. Available from http://www.lttds.org/totes/weiner/

    The statement is also silkscreened on the commemorative limited edition tote bag that celebrated Latitudes' 10th anniversary in Spring 2015.

    As elaborated by Latitudes in the exhibition guide, "A CLOTH OF COTTON WRAPPED AROUND A HORSESHOE OF IRON TOSSED UPON THE CREST OF A WAVE indicates an object record of early human technologies (woven textiles, reusable protection for the hooves of working animals) and a marine setting. Weiner’s phrase facilitates a richly ambiguous material and symbolic universe. Why is the horseshoe wrapped? What story, personal or historical, might account for the event that is described? The artist’s statement leaves such questions open for us to consider. It is known that muslin and calico was brought to Spain by the Arab traders in the 1st Century. After the Conquest of Hispania during the 7th Century, facilitated by the Muslim cavalry’s more agile horses, cotton was cultivated by the Moors in Spain. Barcelona’s industrialization in the late 1700s and early 1800s was driven by the printing of calico and later the spinning and weaving of cotton. [1]


    Poster of the exhibition at Fundació Suñol's Nivell Zero space, Barcelona.

    In the manner of a biography of substances, such as Mark Kurlansky’s books Cod and Salt, A CLOTH OF COTTON... thus triggers a chronicle of mercantile, maritime and equestrian power, of trade and occupation, of spheres of influence and change, a memory of matter and of language. [2]" (...) 

    (...) The statement is distributed on a sugar packet throughout a selection of Barcelona bars and cafés during the city's Mercè Festival and for the duration of the exhibition – a sweet gift to accompany one’s café con leche,
    cortado, carajillo, or conversation. Printed on hundreds of thousands of standard 7 gram white sugar sachets – sugar production technology too was spread into Spain by Moorish occupation – Weiner’s striking typographic rendition of the phrase in red and yellow (the colours of both the Catalan and the Spanish flag) is accompanied by an emblem which evokes the trajectory of a certain horseshoe over a wave in diagrammatic form.


    View of Lawrence Weiner's piece at the patio space of Fundació Suñol, Barcelona.

    (...) On the five metre-high wall of the exterior space [of  Fundació Suñol’s Nivell Zero] we read A CLOTH OF COTTON WRAPPED AROUND A HORSESHOE OF IRON TOSSED UPON THE CREST OF A WAVE painted in Catalan, Spanish and English. The use of the same stencil font as the sugar packet layout suggests a method of functional and clear application which reinforces the fact that Weiner is dealing with the language in terms of modification and use. [3] The word for a company which produces typefaces – a foundry – neatly preserves a link to a time when type was cast from metal, in much the same way as horseshoes are made from iron."

    Ceremony of the 2008 ACCA (Art Critics Association) awards which granted Fundació Suñol the best art programme of the year – a season that included two projects curated by Latitudes.

    [1] See J.K.J. Thomson, A Distinctive Industrialization: Cotton in Barcelona 1728-1832, Cambridge University
    Press, 2003.

    [2] Salt: A World History, Walker and Co., 2001; Cod: A Biography of the Fish That Changed the World, Walker
    and Co., 1997.

    [3] The font is FF Offline Regular, designed by Roelof Mulder in 1988.

    This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
    All photos:
    Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption)
    Work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

    Limited Edition Tote Bags Commemorating Latitudes' 10th Anniversary

    As announced on an earlier post, this Spring we celebrate our 10th Anniversary! 

    Many of you know of our love for tote bags – as we made it clear on one of our 2013 Venice biennale posts! Well, this time we have produced our very own totes: we are delighted to mark the special occasion by presenting limited editions of four specially commissioned silkscreened tote bags featuring designs by four artists with whom Latitudes has collaborated over the past decade: Lawrence Weiner (New York, 1942), Haegue Yang (Seoul, 1971), Ignasi Aballí (Barcelona, 1958) and Mariana Castillo Deball (Mexico City, 1975).



    With the summer art calendar in mind, the bags are made from natural durable cotton canvas with a reinforced base. They feature a press-stud closure, an internal pocket with a zip (never loose your biennale pass again!), an adjustable shoulder strap, as well as smaller handles for carrying like a briefcase. Versatility from vaporetto to vernissage

    Each bag have been hand silkscreened in Print Workers, Barcelona; this is an artisanal process and each printing results in slight variations.
     
    Place your order(s) from our website.

    Launch Price: 45 Euros + delivery. After 1 June 2015: 50 Euros + delivery.
    Edition: 35 + 5 A.P. (Haegue Yang's tote is ed. 20 + 10 AP)
    Measurements: 38 high × 40 width × 14 base (in cm)
    Fabric: 475 gsm natural chlorine-free cotton canvas
    Strap: Adjustable  

    Capacity: 15 litres
    Weight: 420 gr aprox.



    Related content:

    Latitudes' 4th anniversary (April 2009)
    Newsletter #22 – April 2010  
    It's our 10th anniversary! (22 May 2015)
    Latitudes' Limited Edition Totes


    This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
    All photos:
    Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
    Work is licensed under a
    Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

    It's our 10th anniversary!


    We find it hard to believe, but April 2015 marked our 10th anniversary!

    In October last year we started working on our new website so that it would be ready to mark the decade of our two-person self-organisation. We submerged ourselves in the exercise of looking back and consolidating our physical and digital archives. The last decade has certainly been marked by the transition towards the latter, and hence files and hard drives now hold the most voluminous evidence of our activity, with all manner of USB-sticks and obsolescent CDs (remember those?) having fallen by the wayside.

    We devised a plan for what we wanted to improve with a website conceived as a place for reportage as well as a publicly-accessible archive. This process included developing more extensive, and larger-format, photo galleries, cross-referencing to previously "buried" texts, making descriptions more concise, adding a related content section to cross-reference project information with blog posts, and consolidating locations as well as events. After six months of work, and some down-the-rabbit-hole endless weekends with the intricacies of CSS, we had re-edited ten years of our professional life online. Ta-da!



    But we also hold on to physical archives and printer matter and they continue to delight! They also bear witness to something of what has been lost. The decline of the post as a means for distributing video (VHS! DVDs!) with the rise of DropBox, or Vimeo, for example, has meant no more of those sweet hand-written notes that used to accompany artists' packages. Exhibition invitations are frankly a rarity now too, and these are filed alongside various postcards, discarded fragments of artists' work and other amusing ephemera. 

    Since we commissioned our mail-and-stamp graphic identity from More Associates back in April 2005, we have seeped more-and-more online to document and communicate: our first newsletter (November 2005), our first website, our early blog posts (starting in September 2006!), our Facebook page in early 2009 started with the presentation of Jan Dibbets' filming for Portscapes, our Flickr photo archive (also in 2009, now with nearly 4,000 photos online), followed by our first tweets in 2010, and sporadically YouTube, Issuu, Storify, Soundcloud followed.


     Presentation of 7 years of practice as part of the programme "La Sucursal" at Casa del Lago, Mexico City, September 2012. This invitation gave us the opportunity to begin the series 'Incidents of Travel' commissioning artists tours in Mexico and Hong Kong. Photo: Latitudes.

    This "ecstasy of communication" as Dieter Roelstraete has ironically put it, a day-to-day reality, has certainly defined our practice and how we have come to produce, document and disseminate our projects. We always stress this rapid digital transition when presenting our practice, as adapting to it has certainly been crucial as a two person spaceless self-organisation. Not running a regular programme of exhibitions or events has meant we have found the need to communicate the duration of what we are working on while being seemingly offline. Sometimes the standard drop-in question, "What are you working on?", is not so straightforward to answer. Back to Roelstraete – "getting organised" could often be the most suitable answer. "Getting organised" for the next project, reflecting on a recently concluded activity, anticipating the one after that, sorting out finances, seeing how we might put together the next research trip, finding it a challenge to find the time to read a book from beginning to end, watching life and work go by in 'likes' and 'retweets' and 'regrams'... Yet far than being nostalgic, this transition has itself given us great food for thought. For example, we dedicated over a year to discussing the consequences of online presence for art practice and curating with colleagues from Hong Kong to Minneapolis in the #OpenCurating interview series. 


     In 2010 we were awarded the inaugural Curatorial Prize given by the Catalan Gallery Association, recognising our "curatorial work and especially for their involvement in the local context and their efforts to disseminate national art in an international context." Photo: Latitudes.

    We are thankful to the many artists and other creative people who have supported us throughout this past decade. Some projects started with innocuous conversations that eventually led to ongoing collaborations and friendships, and we are also grateful to colleagues willing to offer critical feedback and words of encouragement in those moments in which we most needed to regain trust. A huge thanks too to the institutions and organisations for financing our projects

    Very soon more news on a commemorative project we've been cooking up...
     
    Related content:

    Latitudes' 4th anniversary (April 2009)
    Newsletter #22 – April 2010 


    This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
    All photos:
    Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
    Work is licensed under a
    Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

    Latitudes' re-designed website now online!


    Our website is finally up and running! Take a look at www.lttds.org

    After months of re-editing, digging floppy disks and analogue archives, we're proud (and relieved!) to launch our newly designed website, same address as always: http://www.lttds.org




    We have improved several things. Our home page now features a "cover story", a monthly focus on an artwork, artist, book, site or trip we've experienced in our recent past, accompanied by a short text. Our first cover story centers on Wilfredo Prieto's work "Grease, Soap, Banana" presented in 2007 in the group show "Extraordinary Rendition".
      
    Below this section we highlight three recent projects which are refreshed with each visit.

    Yes! Each page is more tablet and mobile-friendly, yet has an even wider format for your desktop.


    Each of our project pages includes a sliding photo gallery complementing our flickr sets, and has clearer access to our social media networks – such as our twitter or facebook.

    At the end of each project's text, we've added "Related Content": an expandable section linking to our blog posts.
    The sidebar includes details of the locations, publication (if applicable) and project supporters; a calendar of events and biography of the artist (for solo shows).

    Our project page now includes tags enabling you to dynamically filter our projects by 'year', 'exhibition', 'research', 'public realm', 'with publication', etc.
    From here you can also check our Index, our Publications or download the pdf 'Projects Dossier' detailing a selection of our projects.

    We have revised the 'About' page and placed an accordion listing our "Lectures", "Teaching", "Awards & Affiliations", "Juries", "Residencies", "Bibliography/Press" and "Research and Field Trips".

    And last, but certainly not least, we continue to report from our blog on the development of our projects as well as on our field trips, news, shows, or books worth discussing.





    This is the blog of the independent curatorial office Latitudes. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
    All photos:
    Latitudes | www.lttds.org (except when noted otherwise in the photo caption).
    Work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

    Longitudes cuts across Latitudes’s projects and research with news, updates, and reportage.

    Latitudes | www.LTTDS.org (except when otherwise noted).

    Latitudes 2006–2019

    Previous posts

    Nov 2019 (4)
    Oct 2019 (2)
    Sep 2019 (6)
    Aug 2019 (5)
    Jul 2019 (1)
    Jun 2019 (2)
    May 2019 (3)
    Apr 2019 (1)
    Mar 2019 (3)
    Feb 2019 (1)
    Jan 2019 (3)
    Dec 2018 (5)
    Nov 2018 (3)
    Oct 2018 (5)
    Sep 2018 (7)
    Aug 2018 (5)
    Jul 2018 (2)
    Jun 2018 (2)
    May 2018 (3)
    Apr 2018 (3)
    Mar 2018 (2)
    Feb 2018 (4)
    Jan 2018 (3)
    Dec 2017 (3)
    Nov 2017 (3)
    Oct 2017 (4)
    Sep 2017 (3)
    Aug 2017 (2)
    Jul 2017 (2)
    Jun 2017 (2)
    May 2017 (2)
    Apr 2017 (3)
    Mar 2017 (3)
    Feb 2017 (3)
    Jan 2017 (2)
    Dec 2016 (2)
    Nov 2016 (3)
    Oct 2016 (3)
    Sep 2016 (2)
    Aug 2016 (6)
    Jul 2016 (2)
    Jun 2016 (3)
    May 2016 (5)
    Apr 2016 (2)
    Mar 2016 (2)
    Feb 2016 (6)
    Jan 2016 (3)
    Dec 2015 (1)
    Nov 2015 (1)
    Oct 2015 (3)
    Sep 2015 (1)
    Aug 2015 (4)
    Jul 2015 (5)
    Jun 2015 (3)
    May 2015 (3)
    Apr 2015 (4)
    Mar 2015 (2)
    Feb 2015 (2)
    Jan 2015 (2)
    Dec 2014 (2)
    Nov 2014 (3)
    Oct 2014 (2)
    Sep 2014 (2)
    Aug 2014 (2)
    Jun 2014 (3)
    May 2014 (3)
    Apr 2014 (2)
    Mar 2014 (3)
    Feb 2014 (1)
    Jan 2014 (1)
    Dec 2013 (4)
    Nov 2013 (3)
    Oct 2013 (6)
    Sep 2013 (4)
    Aug 2013 (2)
    Jul 2013 (1)
    Jun 2013 (3)
    May 2013 (4)
    Apr 2013 (2)
    Mar 2013 (4)
    Feb 2013 (2)
    Jan 2013 (5)
    Dec 2012 (5)
    Nov 2012 (4)
    Oct 2012 (4)
    Sep 2012 (6)
    Aug 2012 (4)
    Jul 2012 (2)
    Jun 2012 (3)
    May 2012 (8)
    Apr 2012 (7)
    Mar 2012 (5)
    Feb 2012 (5)
    Jan 2012 (4)
    Dec 2011 (4)
    Nov 2011 (3)
    Oct 2011 (6)
    Sep 2011 (4)
    Aug 2011 (7)
    Jul 2011 (3)
    Jun 2011 (8)
    May 2011 (10)
    Apr 2011 (6)
    Mar 2011 (7)
    Feb 2011 (9)
    Jan 2011 (3)
    Dec 2010 (8)
    Nov 2010 (9)
    Oct 2010 (6)
    Sep 2010 (11)
    Aug 2010 (6)
    Jun 2010 (4)
    May 2010 (5)
    Apr 2010 (11)
    Mar 2010 (4)
    Feb 2010 (6)
    Jan 2010 (7)
    Dec 2009 (6)
    Nov 2009 (3)
    Oct 2009 (7)
    Sep 2009 (11)
    Aug 2009 (11)
    Jul 2009 (2)
    Jun 2009 (10)
    May 2009 (7)
    Apr 2009 (5)
    Mar 2009 (6)
    Feb 2009 (4)
    Jan 2009 (5)
    Dec 2008 (6)
    Nov 2008 (5)
    Oct 2008 (5)
    Sep 2008 (5)
    Aug 2008 (3)
    Jul 2008 (3)
    Jun 2008 (5)
    May 2008 (4)
    Apr 2008 (5)
    Mar 2008 (3)
    Feb 2008 (7)
    Jan 2008 (5)
    Dec 2007 (5)
    Nov 2007 (5)
    Oct 2007 (6)
    Sep 2007 (8)
    Aug 2007 (3)
    Jul 2007 (5)
    May 2007 (8)
    Apr 2007 (8)
    Mar 2007 (8)
    Feb 2007 (3)
    Jan 2007 (1)
    Dec 2006 (8)
    Nov 2006 (2)
    Oct 2006 (6)
    Sep 2006 (10)
    Aug 2006 (1)
    Founded in 2005 by Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna, Latitudes is a curatorial office based in Barcelona, Spain, that works internationally across contemporary art practices.

    More about us. Browse projects. Read Longitudes. Receive newsletters.

    Contact us. 
    All content
    Latitudes
    2005—2019